WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 112 · 9 months ago

#112 Will Njoku - Speaker & Mentor & Coach & Teacher - www.Will2Win.ca - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Will Njoku is a motivational speaker, mentor, coach, and teacher. Will has the heart to lead and the experience to win; hence, Will2Win.ca.

Contact Info

Will’s Profile
linkedin.com/in/will-njoku-650b333

Website
will2win.ca (Personal Website)

Phone
1.506.227.7881 (Mobile)

Email
will@will2win.ca

Twitter
WillNjoku

About

"Having stood close to 7 feet tall since age 18, Will has always had a unique perspective. Although his height helped him to be drafted into the NBA, it is his perspective on life’s journey to fulfillment that drives him to help others find and fuel their potential.
Will’s guiding mantra for personal growth: Set your feet. Aim high. Follow Through. Every day (S.A.F.E), invites an honest examination of the success awaiting us if we are truly willing to grow.
Will Njoku has over 20 years of experience engaging international audiences as a Motivational Speaker and Leadership Development Facilitator. He helps individuals uncover the roots of resilience, reach their full potential and fuel the will to win required to achieve goals in the game of life." (LinkedIn)

Welcome to why we work with your hostBrian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as wetogether dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seeminglymissteps, hopes, warnings and advice which will be an encouragement to usall to get up. Get going on, keep on working. Working is tough, but workingis good. Now here's your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian B. And this iswhy we work today. Have the great pleasure speaking with will, no joke.Who will is a motivational speaker, coach, mentor and teacher today I wantto find out from will how we turn adversity into motivation to pursue ourpassions, dreams and desires. Join me today in my conversation with Will thejoke Ooh, I'm Brian V and this is why we work today. Have the great pleasurespeaking with will. No joke. Ooh, Good day. Finds her Good evening here.Morning to you. Yeah. You know what? My first several episodes I would say topeople because it messes me up all the time. I'm in Korea. Something that'smorning. So Good morning. No, you're in the evening and I always mess it up. SoI just said good day, So it works. Thank you, Will, for coming on here andgiving me your time. Would you do me a favor and tell us what industry you'rein now and what you're up to nowadays? Wow. I'm in the leadership industry.I'm considered myself leader in the in the community for a very long time.Most recently, I just completed my bachelor of education degree. Soteachers are the front line relationship. Thank you. Because therewere talking to kids daily. Um, and motivational speaking. I do that withmy business. My work will to win. Um, and the concept behind will to win isthat winning means something different, all of us. But in order for us to besuccessful, we have to fuel our will, at least learned to fuel our will. AndAnd you do that by having experiences in life where you're stretched into,you know, out of your comfort zone. And that's where the growth growth happens.Um, and I do some basketball training. I'm I'm busy. Busy training youngathletes, um, to be better, become better people better, better basketballplayers, uh, in our community here. Monckton. So that's what keeps me busy.Well, can you bring us back? Bring us way back into what would have been yourvery first job. I read something about what? One thing that you're doing. So Idon't know if that was specifically your very first job, but even as apreteen, if it was selling lemonade or what have you? My very first job was as a newspaperboy. Yeah, yeah, and of course I know. I think it was a paper in the pubs andthe public housing in the West End there in Halifax Side a little bit.Papers for the Daily News and the Chronicle Herald E Yeah. Really? Yeah.Daily news. I got fired for throwing mine in the ditch. Yeah, I've heardabout heard about people. I e they were heavy. I was on sackful drive and I had,like, a big, huge bag and I didn't think at 12 or whatever I was, I didn'tthink people read those things. It's just and it's considering how heavy andthick and full those things were was like, no way people reading this wholething front the back. But they were I mean, it was It was the best When yougot right, you get halfway through that bag, and you just do Okay, Alright. Nolonger feel like a mule. I think I could manage the rest of my route.Right. And then you start moving a little bit quicker. But it's the first,like, 10, 15 minutes, or even like those 1st 10, 20 houses. When you'rejust loaded down with all those papers...

...and you try to figure out certain placeyou could drop some papers and come back to them. And you get that routinein place so you be more efficient. Why did you get that job? Why a 12? I thinkit was 12. I read that. You You got that? Yeah. What's going on in the door?Well, we, you know, my dad was super super hard worker, you know, educated adegree in commerce from ST Mary's. And my mom was always working and, uh, youknow, living in public housing. Our family could have used the extradollars, and so I don't know how I get into it. I'm sure my mom and dad,probably just like you're gonna deliver papers and make some money for thefamily on. Uh, I just did what I was told. So you actually gave some of yourmoney to Are all some of your money to the family? Oh, yeah. No, I do. No, Isaved my money because the first bicycle ever purchased, remember, itwas, uh I my memory. I think it was $180. That might be wrong, but Iremember it was one of those bicycles with the curved handle bars in front ofhis yellow. And I remember going to the store to Cleaves and Bears RoadShopping Center with my dad. I remember having a pocket full of cash and howproud I waas that I was able Thio to pay for half of the bike because I hadearned that money myself and that that stayed with me. That's a lot of papers.That's a lot of papers. I'm not sure how long it took me to get $90. Howlong did you How long did you deliver papers for? Uh, you know, for years Ithink I I probably deliver papers right up until I was in grade. I remember inhigh school, I was delivering delivering papers. E think so. In highschool, there's another guy interviewed. He did it from elementary school allthe way up to high school because he developed a relationship, a friendshipwith these people. And, you know, Christmas card time didn't hurt as well.But it just, you know, it was just one of those things. You know, You gottawake up, brush your teeth, you got to deliver the papers, and then you're offto do the rest of the day. Yeah, and that was the routine, you know, it isroutine. It just became part of what it was. I'm pretty sure when I got thehigh school, I don't can't remember if I did it in grade 10. Um um, but I knowthe most significant, uh, year me delivering papers was 1984 was duringthe Summer Olympics in L. A. Uh, those Olympics Olympics that really changed.My life was set. My life on the path was going to be an Olympian. I rememberwatching these amazing athletes are reading about them in the papers andseeing an athlete who finished in, like, 10 place celebrating on the cover ofthe paper and I didn't understand. Watched you so happy about you.Finished 10th until until the days when passed by. And I saw the excitementsurrounding the Olympics like I cut out. Uh, you know, there's always an extrapaper here. There. Right. So I kept a bunch of Yeah, you did. You did. I knowwhat? You know what you did with yours? I could I made a scrapbook, and I wishI had kept that. I have no idea where ended up, but I decided that I wantedto be a limping. I thought if anybody could finish in 10 place and be thathappy, then I want to go to this place. This magical Olympics and have thatexperience was Well, were you playing basketball at this time? I had no sport.I was playing House league fast, pitch in the pubs in my neighborhood, and s Iwas in great six, right? So, no, I was maybe playing soccer in the summertime,but nothing serious. Did you work another job in high school? As you gotinto great 11 in grade 12. Was there something in particular? Yeah, This thesecond job. I remember getting, uh Waas. Actually, no. Yeah, yeah. Uh, thinkstudent from my my father died. My older sister, Angela I We startedworking at the Chronicle Herald downtown. Uh, they had the the thepapers would come in, and at night...

...they'd be stuffed. You know, the flyersthat you and I would carry, whatever Flyer Day was like Monday or whatever.It was the worst day, Flyer day. It was the worst day because the papers weretwice thick. So we were the ones I became Now the person who was stuffingthe flyers. So we'd start work at 10 o'clock at night, and then we'd be onour feet till, like, five or six in the morning. So my sister and I did that inhigh school? Yeah, for some months. Yeah, we did that. I'm not sure I knowfor sure. I did that in high school, and that was just My dad had passed bythat time, and so that was just a supplement. Our family income. And somy older sister and I did, and I did that. And it's and I still have inHalifax. I still run to a couple run into a couple of people that I workedwith in the in that attack Harold overnight, we just kind of smile andlaugh. We have this special bond that's good on you and your sister. I mean,you're faced with adversity to do what you were doing, but to come together towork together for your family in high school. I mean, I was a punk, so maybeI would have done that if I was faced with similar adversity. But I justdon't see it. You know, I would have probably rebelled and went off in adifferent direction, but good on you and your sister for working together tohelp with your mom and your family. I appreciate that. But I take no creditfor that. My parents instill discipline into us, like way were very, very, verydisciplined. I mean, traditional African families. There's a lot ofdiscipline. There's a lot of respect, and, you know, we did what we were toldto do when we were asked to do. We didn't ask any questions and and thenwhen we saw the fruits of that because of how hard, when I saw the fruits ofhow hard my dad was working how my mom was working and that every we hadalways had food in the fridge. We never, ever went hungry. We may not alwayshave the clothes he wanted to wear were not always had shoes that fit quiteright all the time. But, you know, on Saturday, when the fridge was looking alittle shy, it was. It was full by Saturday afternoon, and we just learnedthe value of hard work from watching our parents sacrifice and sacrifice andwork and work. And it's a gift that I I need, you know, I wanna pay forward toto my to my Children and even as a teacher just didn't still that thatsense of pride that comes from a job well done and yeah, so we were We justknew it was what we needed to do for our family. And we have great examplesin our parents well, being a great example and, as you know, growing uppeople that we meet that do not have those family members that air thatexample. So it's good for you and I other people to be that example forthose kids that they don't have those influences in their lives. And if wecan be that example, then that that will bring them some motivation, someencouragement to, as you said, pay it forward for other people as well.Absolutely. It's essential. I mean, I can only control what I can control. Imean, I'm gonna do my best to be the best I could be. I'm flawed in manyways. Um, e think because im e because Because we're flawed. I mean, I thinkthat the knowing that that I'm flawed it and not being so hard, I'm actuallysuper hard on myself. I've learned Thio to take it a lot easier on myself, andand I feel like that's just allowed me to let my light shine a little bit alittle bit brighter. How would you How would you be hard on yourself? In whatway? With that manifest, because for myself, I get hard on myself thinkingI'm unable. But there's other people who, because you had a growing up wherediscipline was important, that you feel that you're falling short, so you needto doom. Or how did that manifest for you for being hard on yourself? Uh, Ithink it is just you know there's extremes. Um, there's, you know, youyou know, there's there's there's always balance, right? You wanna have abalance between discipline and focusing...

...on outcomes And that sort of that that,um that that tenderness, that inspiration, that sort of, um um, senseof self worth and that not to take life too seriously. I think you know,there's there's, you know, you end up sometimes if you're in the middle ofthose two, then you're pretty valid. But if your were on one side, so whenyou're on that side for so long, you you just have the you vibrate at such ahigh level that you just your expectations of yourself or so are sohigh because you had to maybe grew up a little. You know, we had to grow up alittle bit faster than we would have liked to being an immigrant family andjust traumas that come with transition from, you know, from West Africa toCanada in December, right on, just growing up in trying toe fit in in thenight in the early 1919 seventies and in the Halifax, um, and parents wereconstantly working just to help the family. It was, you know, it fracturedour family in a lot of ways. And so although we had great examples of howto work hard, we all we always didn't have that, that nurturing that, thatthat that sense off, you know, self love and self Karen's and building ourself esteem. And so when that's lost, you kind of you thank yourself a littlebit more in the discipline because its's predictable, right? You know, ifI do it this way, I'm gonna get this result, and it's always going to besomething good for me. But in the end, it always catches up to you becausethere's not enough balance. S so that's where you working that with your kids?I do that too. I I grew up with more of ah, not a strict household, but ahousehold that was either inconsistent so you could do what you want or sortof regimented where you had a walk on eggshells because you're not sure whatmight happen. So I sometimes fall to that because like, hey, it worked forme. You know, something something worked so I could use that. But then Iwant Oh, But I don't want that. I want to be more loving and carrying kind andunderstanding and compassionate. How do you kind of push yourself away fromthat? Excuse me. That other extreme? Well, first, I think less of myself andmore of my kids. They don't know anything about my past unless I tellthem they don't anything about my past unless I show them. So all they know ofme is was what I show them. The face that I reflect the image that reflectthe the energy that I give to them tells them about them. If it's negativeenergy, they're probably gonna feel negative. And so I chose Thio. Alwaysbe, Ah, beacon of light and energy and positivity. It's a supposed to you knowwhat I what I experienced. There are times when you know sort of that hardline. Those hard line tactics are necessary, but there's love is love andcompassion and kindness, and those were really easy to work with ifyou know how to. And so they answer your question more specifically, I'vealways talked to my kids about self love and, uh, not, you know, lovingyourself, caring about yourself I would for years before my kids. I still do itsometimes. Now, before my goods could go to bed. We go to sleep like four orfive years and formative years between the ages. Sort of three when they couldunderstand until about seven. Every night. I asked them a series ofquestions like, You know, Do you love yourself? Do you believe in yourself?Are you handsome? Are you smart? Are you strong? Are you black? Is black.Beautiful. Is anybody you got anybody, punk? You off like Do you love Grandma?You love God love. I would ask them these questions to that with themselvesand and I would sometimes we just I just, you know, whispered into the ears.Actually it for a long time. I just It was individual, but it's whispered intotheir ears. And then it was a group thing. And now I can see the fruits ofthat. You know, I don't ask my kids when they my kid brings home. You justhad a birthday yesterday, and and, uh, something happened to school. He wasreally excited. And I don't say all I'm...

...proud of you. I never said that. Iwould say, Are you proud of yourself? So I always want them to think of termsin terms of ways that they're fueling their self esteem. They're pulling infrom their life, experience into themselves. So I'm not always don't youknow, being the one to build them up? And then I would follow that with allyour proud. I'm proud of you, too. So they're proud of themselves first andand so ultimately, I don't wanna I don't wanna bring in my past. I knowwhat parts worked. I know what parts didn't and so there's a little bit ofthe discipline that's required to, so they just be normal. Kids need tough.They need to hear. No, they need tough love. That's our job when I'm supposedto be their friends with their parents. E think I'm so much fun when you'reable to combine the two and I I'm really lucky. I have really specialamazing my three sons. My my 11 year old just turned 11 yesterday and mytwin boys or nine and I could not be a happier father. I think my dad would besuper proud of me. I know my mom is shepherding our Children's hearts. Iwas reading something and there's there's a book called that and It Zwhat you're doing. You know their hearts, right? It's not them. There isa reflection off of what you're doing, but you're bringing them back tothemselves and how they relate to the world. Well, what about you inbasketball? And maybe you'd like to highlight some some areas of your lifeand how you got into basketball and where it brought you. But also as youtransitioned out of basketball, what were some key lessons that you learnedin your profession is being a professional basketball player? Well,this question is, you know, to get into basketball. Um, was was really, uh, youknow, you know, going to junior high and, uh, playing on the junior highteam. And then we had high school coach. Our coaches were high school studentswho saw me, recognized me, and then they started to talk to some otherpeople in the next thing. You know, I'm I'm having some other opportunities toplay in a for, you know, favorite Clinton Park or the sackful storm orthose local martyrs community Y M. C. I started playing in that in thatorganization with favorite clicking Parkman of Basketball Association. ThenI just had what everyone else. What are we all need? I had great coaching thatcommitted dedicated coaches who saw this, you know, 13 year old, 6 ft tooskinny African kid and thought okay. And I did exactly what they wanted. Idid exactly what they asked me to do. And where did that come from? Myparents. So the value of discipline, um, was bore fruit for me quickly, uh, insport. Um, and I maintain that mentality until four years later, I wascaptain the junior national team and and playing for Team Canada. Um, Ithink on the flip side of all of that, um, you know, playing professionalbasketball, I think that's where I think I know. That's where, um, some ofmy, uh, sort of, uh, like my emotional, um, weakness just started toe sort ofreveal themselves. Uh, excuse me, and you know it, Z getting drafted was apretty incredible experience. But remember the day after that I gotdrafted. I was almost, like, apologetic for getting drafted. Like who getsdrafted and shows up to practice the next morning with, you know, Steve Nashand Rick Fox and Martin Keene and and and feels apologetic, I mean, thatperson would have toe have some. Cem. There's something going on there, andin hindsight and reflection, like not believing in myself, not trustingmyself. I think my environment, when I was younger, was was so unpredictable.I think I just didn't trust myself. E didn't know understand my sense of mysense of worth. And but my discipline always save me. Actually, my disciplinegot me drafted because when I went to...

...my first kind of official MBAexperience wasn't once was in Phoenix with sons and, you know, flying downthere, meeting the brass and going into the workout room into the into thepractice court toe. Get rid of my workout. I do a routine that I that Idid always and still do to warm up and and after that routine, I called 100truck warm up. Um, then I do a little running warm up. Or actually, therunning warm up starts and there's 100 shot warm up that just takes him aroundthe world shots. I was feeling good I was shooting really well, and then Idid the the the the session with the group and three key to that sessionreally was having traveled 13 hours from Halifax to Phoenix, Arizona. Youknow, I haven't been to the hotel for maybe just less than an hour beforethey call me to the arena, been awake for 15 hours of settling on thebasketball court, and I'm tired, all right, travel, three time zones. Andthen they're asking me to be at my best. I remember saying to myself, Have aconversation that William just just do your best, like, just But I have beenso discipline at that point that my best was actually pretty good. And thatday it was good enough for the Phoenix Suns and not knowing that they hadrecorded that session, apparently from the moment I walked into the gymnasiumto the moment I walked out. So, um, that video that workout wasn't wasn'tjust good enough for the Phoenix Suns, but when I went back to Halifax acouple of days later, my agent called me and there is the Phoenix, the Sixers,Celtics, the Nets, the Nuggets, All these teams were asking to see mebecause they've seen my tape. Apparently they had videotaped thewhole thing. And so that one day, um, where were the discipline that you know,I was brought up on. And there's a natural, gifted, gifted skills that Ihad were on display for the sons. But it'll be on display for half the MBA,to the point where the Indiana Pacers, who had never seen me, never contactedme. They never seen me play live. They saw my tape, and that was enough forthem to draft me 41st in the NBA. It's it's discipline goes far away, butas you. But even as you're saying that's that's still not not enough. No,it's no, it's it's And that's the thing is is when When I think back or what Ido now with my work is is as a teacher as eso. Well, how did you transitionout of you know you played on the World Basketball Championship? Canada'snational team is well, how did you transition out of out of basketball andthen get into what you're doing now? Good question. I was really organic. Iwas coaching some kids in the Hammonds Plains Road out of school on bond weekafter week, Monday after Monday, and parents were really enjoying how wasworking with the kids. One of the parents was a teacher. She pulled measide and said, I love how you talk to the kids and you think you would liketo come in and talk to my students, your irony of it being a teacher Andhere I am all these years later, Um and I said Sure. So I went in and she lovedthe work that I did. And I realized, Well, if I'm solving a problem forsomeone, maybe there's a business in that. And then I already had this ideaof will. To win is a program like I coined that up 10 years before that andwhen I was in college at ST Mary's, and and then I just started to kind ofreach Put the feelers out there and, you know, the foundation of what I didwas my life. Philosophy has set my feet aim high, fall through every day. I setmy feet in the foundation of education. I am high, but having a vision of adream and a goal I could achieve as long as I believe in myself. E fallthrough about having the courage and perseverance and determinations, uh, toachieve my goal and experience failure and learn from it. And then every day,I do something to build my mind, my body, my spirit so I can achieve mygoals. And so that ended up spelling safe s a f e, which is my safe actionplan. And, uh, so based on that on on...

...safe, um, I started Thio just to dopresentations about my life experience and and, Yeah, a lot of people enjoyedthem and still do. I was the manager of the Katya Axeman basketball team withCoach Dave Nut Brown. I can just just with the big guys underneath, like setyour feet s. So I'm sure you heard a lot of this, you know, in yourbasketball career. What? What is the process? Are you working full time aswell as a teacher? Now, is that something that you're looking intodoing now that you have your bachelor of education? Yeah. So what? I want tobe, uh, in order to do my motivational speaking and some of the things Ireally like the fact that I can go from school to school, community communityand do a presentation for kindergarten to high school. And then I stay and Ido basketball clinic for everyone. And I really get toe to subversive myselfin the community, and the students and the community get to know me. And Ithink it's important for people, um, to thio get to know, You know, I tell Itell the kids, You know, if you look around and all your friends look likeyou, then you really need to spread your wings and try to find some peoplethat don't look like you is. You can learn more about them and and yourselfso you can grow. And I feel like whenever entered into these communities,um, I have an opportunity to for them to see someone who who looks like me,talks like me and, uh, and receive a message for me not just from the wordsI say, but in my character, in my presence and the things that areimportant. Um, so that's what I want to do so and s o I to commit myself fulltime to a classroom will be difficult, but I supply teach, which I love. Uh,actually, only ever at one school, right on. And just that familiarity ofthe students and staff is fantastic Air month. And, um and that's what'ssustaining the Yeah, So you're working as a teacher, and then you're alsodoing your motivational speaking wherever, wherever that takes you. Whatis what is the process that you go through either as a supply teacher?Because it's a great profession or as a motivational speaker? What is theprocess that you go through for people interested in being a teacher or peopleinterested in being a coach, a mentor and motivational speaker? What isapproach process you go through, say, a week or two weeks? Um, can you be the mark? So, what doyou How do you prepare? Like, what is it you actually do what? Scheduling allof the actual the the nuts and bolts of what you do as in your profession. Okay,So for example, last week I had a few presentations online that I was doingand juggling that around. So you're available for online as well now,especially yeah. Yeah. Do online presentations uh, right now, um and, uhand so just making sure I'm prepared for that and being, you know, beingrelevant talking about, you know, current issues and cove it and howthat's affecting students. Um And then it's the same role is the supplyteacher I'm very fully aware of what's going on. What's this, Teacher Dio?I've been in education for a while. I don't even know what a supply teacherdoes. Maybe should know this Well, you know, you know, when we're in schooland we're sitting there and the teacher hadn't showed up, we're like, Where'smrs so and so suddenly this stranger walks in were like, Oh, yeah, it's away would say substitute right, usually substitute. And so I'm not guy. So youcome in And if you're feeling so ideally Azaz a teacher, I would leave alesson plan and is in a some some sort of resource resources for the supplyteachers substitute teacher to come in and take over my day. No matter whatI'm teaching, I'm having, you know,...

...from teaching art phys ed, socialstudies science. I have to have a lesson. Plans ready for that individualto come in and so supply teacher would come into the room. Uh, having beingtrained as a teacher knows how to manage the classroom, gained theattention of students and then, you know, get them set up and then justfollow the routine based on what's left for them by the by the host teacher.And I love that. Sometimes you get a sticky note. You know, sometimes theteacher is sick at the end of the day and just scratches a few things down.Newspapers do this or there's an emergency lesson plan filed, like goover there and pull the lessons out. Or sometimes, you know, I've had somereally detailed lesson plans. Minor really detailed. If I had a supplyteacher, um, what you're teaching and you mentioned kind of the subject. Butwhat you mentioned art and what other subjects are you able to teach? Well,the teacher you're supposed you're you're capable of teaching because theteaching teaching is a process, Um, and which is and there's ah, there's a waythere's, you know, you always you teach with the end in mind. So what's theoutcome? What's the end goal? How are you going to assess the students on Ben.You work backwards and you build a lesson. Um, then you want to make it isentertaining and and because energetic on fund for the students as possible.So it has to be student centered, Um, and, uh and so that's what And then forme, being creative person, I always get wrapped up. And I always have thesegreat ideas. How much fun or interesting I could make it for thestudents. And that's what that's what makes teaching part of what makesteaching from for me. Um, what makes teaching really enjoyable for me is Iwalk in that door a quarter to eight, and I'm at 100% battery full, and Iwalk out at court at four. I'm at 100%. I feel phenomenal. It's where I meantto be. I know when I'm speaking at schools, I feel the same way. Andsupply teaching is just a way for me to get a more personal engaging with thestudents. Whereas when I'm speaking in front of 1000 or 2000 students or even30 I'm talking to kindergarten kids. Um, that's a kind of it's a small period oftime, and then then I Then I move on. But when you have a whole day to reallysee and sometimes you supplied teach for 23 days or even a weaker had a twomonth term in one classroom. A couple years ago, when I was a teacher for twomonths in this particular classroom, I thought everything from I thoughteverything but drama, music and math. I thought everything, um you name it and,uh, it was try to the drama. Oh, yeah, I would try anything. Um,again, It's its's. The teachers is a is a formula, and it's really theindividual teacher. They're still, you know, we had teachers that were like,Oh, man, Mr So and so again, I miss So you were like, Oh, we got we gotphysics. Next, we've got chemistry with Mr So and so you know, just it's a makeor break, right? Depending on the teacher for the subject. And they know,like, if you you know, if you want to be a teacher, you gotta love kids. Um,you gotta love all the things that they bring to the table And you gotta be X.I mean patient. You gotta be mega, mega mega patient And it can't be about you.You don't get into teaching to glorify yourself, right? You don't. You getinto teaching cause you really care about kids and you want to change theirlives. I mean the lesson. The lessons are important. The grading is necessary.But the relationships that you build, the example you set first for for thestudents who see you as sometimes, you know, you're you're the you're the mostinfluential, uh, adult in their life. That's a big responsibility. I don'tthink that very lately do you, Whether we're speaking aboutyour motivational speaking career or teaching, it's their kind of the samewhere you're delivering a message and you're in front of these people andyou're hoping to impact them. What are some advantages or challenges andsatisfactory moments that you get out of doing either or Oh, wow. It's amoment where a speaker, when you're...

...when you're speaking to a crowd,especially when students I've seen kids literally like I can see the light bulbgo off in their eyes when I say something or they realize somethingabout themselves, and I can see them just in their in their body there oreverything just changes and they get it. And I'm thinking, great. I reach oneand things bigger. You just want to reach one. If one could make it, I talkto kids. If I could just reach one of you in this audience today, I've donemy job, and it turns out I always end up reaching all of them and even staffin many different ways. Um, a teacher. It za process, Um, the victories, Um because of because ofthe fact that you're teaching lessons over time, I think my biggest rewardand most recently, is seeing students who aren't confident I'm really good atbuilding. Bringing the confidence out of out of it was just funny. I was nota confident person. I was younger, but because of that, you know, I don't wantthe appetite having anybody else. So one student, particular Chloe, is sheShe was her spelling was just not where it could be. And, you know, I said, youknow, just give me five extra minutes in the morning working on your spelling.Just give me five and we'll see what happens and she did it. And then when Iwhen I corrected her paper and get back to I wrote her a nice note likeCongratulations, you know, you stretch yourself a little bit and this is whathappens when you're willing to be a little bit uncomfortable. Now expect toSeymour and those were the victories when when Olivia has been assignmentthat I didn't think she's going to do. And she's done mawr than I expected.And she's She's kind of like whatever Mr Will right? And I'm like, Okay, but,you know, three weeks ago, you wouldn't even thought about that and that z whatI get, that's that's what gives me. I get charged up when I see them makethat transition, and it's not necessarily the work is what they getthe Greg's. I need that. But it's it's how they feel about themselves, liketoe, watch them, transform and move into direction and grow in a way that Iknow is going to be beneficial for them in so many parts of their lives. Man,that's better than hitting the game winner for sure. So for challenges.What about as a teacher? What is some challenges that you face, Uh, you know,it's a teacher. You're your biggest enemy. Really? If you're not prepared,uh, if you don't get enough rest, uh, if you if you aren't, um, willing to beflexible, Um, And if you if you if you e I know For me, uh, it's important welook at all of our students as from a kind of a trauma based perspectivewhere not that they've been traumatized. But there's potential in some ways ofevery student is coming to school with a bag of uncertainties. I know I didthat. You said you had no idea what I was doing with that home because Iwould come to school Hi, Mrs here. And I was just so happy to be in school.But underneath that that that was just on the surface. But underneath that wasreally sad and struggling. So it's important that as teachers, you know,that would be. The challenge is to make sure that those students who who aren'tnecessarily media expectations or some behaviors that you're struggling to tomanage in tandem with the resource team and the psychologist at the school totry to find a way Thio have that student kind of, you know, unlock theirpotential. That's the That's the challenge. And you don't always reachthem all, whether in on a stage or in the school, you mentioned not havingthe confidence as a youth. What is the skill that you had to develop in theroles that you're in now? Ah, skill had to develop. Um, I think just for me is just just notbeing hard on myself, E. I asked this a while going. Was it a tough transitiongetting out of basketball into being a...

...teacher into a motivational speaker?The transition of I'm not the professional athlete that I am now, butI'm, you know, the there's not much of a difference, right? I don't thinkyou're a worker either way, right when you're a worker as a professionalathlete, your worker as a teacher. But was there was that a tough transition,and then the skills that you needed thio work on rather than the morephysical and there's a mental aspect to sports as well. But was there one inparticular that kind of Well, I didn't have this at all. I never had to usethis or I had a little bit of it, and I just need to work on it. Authenticity. If you're authentic, if it's who youreally are, um, if you're standing there and if you if you you know, ifyour story is I went to base camp and Mount Everest and didn't make it, andthen you want to come back and that's you wanna base your motivationalpresentation on that it's not authentic. I mean, so people will see through it.Um, my story is about It's about my life, I tell the students. Oh, are the,you know, the adult audiences. I speak to that. Everything I'm telling youhere is the truth and that authenticity, um, comes out in your vulnerability. Ithink that's one thing I realized that it was okay to be vulnerable in frontoff audiences and because that's where that emotional connection happens andwhen you're when they see you being vulnerable, when when you know a great12 kids sees you up there being sincere and authentic, they can relax and they,you know, we all have these little guards we put up. They put their downtheir guards and doesn't always take might not take, you know, a day or aweek, but over time that authenticity eyes liberating in a lot of ways foryourself. Um, be yourself. That's the key. Just be you and it Z. I think thatwas one of the biggest challenges I had was just knowing and loving myselfenough to be like, You know what? I'm pretty special guy. I mean, you know,accomplish a lot And I have a lot of good people in my life and, you know,and you know, it's for me. The person that that was in the mirror, Uh, Ididn't always see what other people saw. I saw what I saw. Another people sawsomething greater. Um, and I think it's when I when I finally was able to seeme for who I am and who I can be, who are willing to be, um, thatauthenticity makes being a teacher and being a speaker easier because it'sjust it's just natural with being authentic. You may have a similaradvice for people thinking of you when you were 12 delivering newspapers orwhen you finished with basketball as a basketball player, switching to acareer a different career. Do you have advice for people who are just startingwork one way or the other? Just starting at, you know, a teenager orthey're switching a career? Do you have some advice? Yeah. I mean, there'sthere's this thing about, you know, follow your passion. Follow yourpassion. It there's, You know, uh, I really like the rewards I get frombeing a speaker and being a teacher, you know my rewards from being ateacher. I told you already, it's It's the fact that I get to go home everyday with a full emotional tank. That's that's the best thing. Um, as a speaker,you know, I get paid to do my work. And with that, I get Thio have a life thatI wanna I wanna I wanna enjoy that I enjoy. Um I mean, the advice really isto if if wherever your interests lie. Research, research, uh, whatever thatis. Um, ask questions, seek out mentors, ask as many questions as you possiblycan. Um, there are no dumb questions or bad questions were Just ask thequestions and and then just whatever comes from those questions trusted. Um,if it's taking you on a path that you you're like, Whoa. I didn't think I gothis way. Well, then trust it and see...

...where it leads you. Um, I mean, Ididn't three years ago. I no clue I'd be a teacher, but I want to see my kidsperforming and skipping performance out of school ended up talking to theprincipal was a buddy of mine. I said, Who are all these extra adults? Theysaid these are educational assistance. What do they do? They do this. I coulddo that. And from that, um, and being in schools and seeing teachers teachingbeing around students, I realized that wow, I could teach. I could I could dothis. This is with wouldn't be work for me. And so then I started askingquestions and and seeing what? You know what the opportunities were. And then Ifound out that yeah, I wanna be I wanna be teacher and I became a teacher. So,um e think's yeah, sometimes in in the stillness of of you know, I have this. Um Thanks, man. Try live by is I don'tcomplain about what I permit. Oh, special. I don't complain about what?What I permit. So in seeking, you know, in transitioning from school to work orwork toe work. Um, there are boundaries that one can create s so that you cango home every day and feel good about yourself that you're making decisionsthat you know are good for you. Because if you're not, you really can'tcomplain anybody. So I can't complain about getting fat if I'm eatingMcDonald's chocolate and potato chips. I'm sorry. I'm not to me. I won't hearyou. That's true. The potato chips understand McDonald's. I don't I don'tknow anything. But people do complain about the things they permit. Yeah, andyou know, it's it's liberating. For me, that was one of the, you know, in inand buying into that whole hearted wholeheartedly saying, Don't complainabout what you permit it was it would allow me to establish healthierfriendships, healthier relationships, healthier partnerships and ultimatelyyou stop. It allowed me to establish the most important leadership was whichwas with myself because I defended myself with teeth and nails because ifsomething was going the way, I didn't want it to go, and I let it happen. This is the guy I had to deal with. Andand I refuse to go home or in my day, feeling that I hadn't voice my opinionor made a choice that wasn't right for me. Um, you know, in terms of what'simportant without taking advantage of anybody else. Um uh, but I if you know,if if if I want to get in shape and I'm on, I need to find a way. I taughtmyself how to swim, right? Or shut up. If you don't, if you don't want to runthe streets and bang your knees and 40 years old and you want to get in shapewill go swim. But if you don't do it and you're still feeling the way youfeel, which at that time wasn't great things don't complain. And at that andthat little bit. And is that someone who's disciplined and an athlete anddriven and has gone through so many things to stretch my body? I couldn'tsit idle like that. Yeah, I think I'm I'm getting at that point where I needto transition from running to swimming. It's the knees. You're getting bangedup. Hey, listen, I like six o'clock this morning I was in the pool at the YM c a hair Monckton banging out a kilometer on. And I know until I dieuntil I can't stop. I can't swim anymore from injury or whatever.Swimming is my fountain of youth. That's changed my body. I wish I'd doneit on my kids. Uh, just the room here next to me. My sons. I have talkedabout a lot of swim, and I'm gonna make sure that they do. A lot of that isfantastic exercise. I'm not a I'm not a good swimmer, so I don't like what youknow. What was it called? Breaststroke? No, no front crawl. And so turning myhead. I just don't like I would be happy with just swimming, but I have tobreathe. I saw last year they had I saw...

...someone. They had a mask. You know, thesnorkel usually goes up up the side. It comes right up the front of the the topof the head. I'm like, I want to get one of those that would make swimmingmore interesting to me. I think that's exactly how we planned this morning.Yeah, like just like I could just go right? That's what I want to do. I wantto go. But until then, I'm beating up my knees. Will you mentionedrelationships? How do you keep your work life balance in check in, turningoff work and setting time for yourself as you mentioned in your family or yourother pursuits, especially coming up. And you said in a family where it'spretty disciplined. So it's probably work came first, so that might mean ahigher majority of the time was spent with work and maybe less. With the Mawrdeveloping relationship. I had to teach myself how to relax, you know, to stopand play video games with the boys or throwing a movie or or, you know, nothave my you know, this compulsion to clean, organized or whatever. And I wasa stay at home dad with my three sons for years, so I just have that paternalinstinct. Always make sure things air neat and tidy. Eso I have to kind ofturn that turn that down. But it's easier for me to balance. Um, whathappens when I'm not at work knowing that I'm really satisfied by my work.Um, that it's not draining me in any way. Because at the end of the day andmy number one team is my family and our families, our number one teams, and wewant to make sure you come home with our energy to give to them. And thatgoes that falls into the hole. Don't complain about what you permit. Ifyou're working yourself to the point where you have nothing, left it end ofthe day for you. Number one team. Uh, something needs to change on dso I I'myou know, the combination of exercise is great for my mental health. Um, youknow, engaging in things that my that my my kids enjoy doing on gettingsatisfaction and watching them have fun, those are some of the sacrifices I makenow is apparent that I love. And it helps that I've traveled around theworld and seen a lot of done a lot. And I feel like, Okay, I've had had enoughof that. Yeah, yeah, it's it's good you mentioned, um,exercise. Where do you value exercise for other people and also educationknowing that you you know, you're only young, but you just received yourbachelors of education as well. So how do you portray that to other people?The value of exercise and education? Yeah. I mean, you know, I think I thinkyou know, getting a diploma or degree or certificate. That doesn't mean theend of learning. It's just you're still you're still learning. We're alwayslearning this opportunities to learn. We learn through pushing our our bodiesmentally, which is going to school and being an adult learner. Being a studentagain at my late forties was interesting. Um, but our bodies are thesame. So our bodies are still grow as well. If we're willing, Thio make thatmake that sacrifice. And, um, exercise is important as we move in all aspectsof our life because, um, way don't realize Aziz kids, that's all we did.We played, we played, we played, we played, we played. And we never stopbecause that's all we did in our Our bodies were trained to play and just befree and loose and limber. And then, as we move into, you know, high school inadult hood and we get into our these these careers, we start to slow thatplay down on our bodies. Slow down to I remember when I first started workingas athletic director of Criminal University. I went from playing a lotof basketball in Toronto on being great shape to sitting at a desk for months,and it just destroyed my body for a...

...while. Um, and then again, you can'tcomplain about you permit So ideo myself out of that desk and andexercise, and it's really just about finding the time. I mean, peoplecomplain I don't have time. We all have the same amount of time in a week, sameamount of time in the day. It's really about planning and being in a routine,Um, because once you get into a routine is like being like you and I deliveringpapers. You know, at seven o'clock in the morning, you're on that beat andyou're and you're doing your papers at seven o'clock in the morning, you couldbe doing some Pilates. You've been doing some free weights and exerciseband. You'd be doing a strength condition class at your local gym orswimming lanes like me or shooting hoops in the evening with your withyour homeboys in your own girls. I mean, you know, it's just making a plan toacknowledge that our bodies are growing and learning always. And if we make ita habit, um, of being of exercising, you know, the endorphins that thatreleases it trickles into the rest of our lives. And especially for me, if Idon't exercise, I know it's my mental health will deteriorate quitesignificantly. Um, and so I think in general, we're just It just makes sense,Um, to be as active as you possibly can walking is huge. Admire I c e. I loveit. I love you. Want to see people walking and, you know, in in, in in, uh,Korea and South in China, Places walking is big. I'm the only foolrunning around Most people, they're walking. I'm like, yeah, yeah, right.You're sprinting by them. But yeah, it za mentality that I think, uh, majoritythe world adopts on you. See how healthy people are your part of theworld right now in Southeast Asia. Um, and the challenges are in ourcommunities. Um, but I love the fact that I that I you know, even the 10 11,12 year old kids like coach now and they're like I said, You know, I don'tknow why I've been still in shape. Like why I said, I do it for you. E want toset a good example for you? So you know that when you're my age, you can havemuscles like these and you can feel good about yourself. And you can haveall this energy and you're just like Coach will your nuts, right? But itthat to be viable, to be vibrant, uh, is important. It's It's funny becausewe usually attempted to choose the path of least resistance. But with Cove itI've found or I'm finding, you know, one. We can be tempted to sit down andwatch movies all day or Netflix whatever someone's thorn is, or we canuse this time in education and exercise. Thio. Learn something, Thio exerciseand take better care of ourselves, and it's it's one or the other with somepeople, and hopefully we're leaning more towards the better rather than theworst. Do you have? Ah, moral beacon will. Is there something that's leadingyou and guiding? You have your parents as role models as well, but is theresomething else that lead you and guide you to make the decisions you make foryour family in your career. Yeah, I just know when I was young, youknow, I I you know, on the surface, Like I said, I was super happy. GoLucky kid underneath. I was really struggling. I was always struggling. Iwas always struggling and no one would have known that. Because I I put onthis facade and I've seen other, uh, spoken to other adults. I've spoken tostudents, athletes who kind of went through similar things. Um, and I know that a lot of that comes because justbecause we haven't tuned are you know, if we think of our brain in terms of aradio, we just don't always get the signal clear. We're not able to tuneinto the frequency to get that signal clear. And when we get that signalclearer, we're able to make better decisions. I know, you know, havingbattled, you know, depression. And...

...since I was six years old, you know,having that fog lifted when I was 29 when I finally was diagnosed, was waswas a big part in realizing everyone. It was like this, um, and thenforgiving myself for, you know, some of the mistakes that I made and some ofthe decisions I made because I just didn't know any better. Eso I'm verysensitive to what I don't see when I meet people. Um, I'm very aware that,um we're all eso fragile in so many ways. Especially having lost my mybrother when I was when he was 19, my dad when I was 15. So I haven'texperienced lost in my life. I appreciate so much and having to do thehaven't earned the position on the national team and and having traveledaround the world and seen, you know, uh, just some amazing things and then somesome really discouraging and sad and things Thio to have been dressed inNike from head to toe on the way toe to play a basketball game in Argentina onevery day we drive by this this'll community where there was just peopleliving in ramshackle, the home with with no running water and electricity.Was it just It gave me a lot of perspective. Um, you know, living inturkey and seeing some of the oldest places in the world and then living inone of the most modern cities in China and and then just connecting withpeople on being open minded. It really taught me what it's important. Andwhat's important is really just a relationship that we have each witheach other, always believe the most important person, this person who arenext to right. At this moment. Um, the moment is the moment we take, we alwaystake the moment for granted for granted. And I always my friends, you know, Ialways told my friends, my kids, I'm like there's a reason why mo mentum isimportant but you can't create momentum unless you you're in the moment onappreciating the moment. Appreciated appreciating the person as a gift. Um,when you haven't had a life that where you felt really great aboutyourself. Um, you know, always where you're always kind of unsure insecure,um, yet yet heralded as this amazing athlete in this person. But underneaththe surface, you didn't kind of feel that way. When you come out from that,when you surface from that and the fog has lifted and you see yourself for whoyou are, you don't want anyone else to feel that way. Mhm and I really and andcombined with my life experience, I just really know what matters. And themost important thing is just being kind and loving yourself and loving otherpeople and and just knowing that things can change so quickly that I want tomake sure that anyone I interact with has a really good vibe from me. Um, andI think in the past I was I'd have toe play that part because it was almost adefensive shield. It was almost like, um, armor that I had to wear just tonavigate through life. But now I don't have to have that shield is off. I'mactually just letting my own light shine and it feels great. And it's it'sdrawn a lot of amazing people into my life. And and as long as my kids arecontinue to progress the way they were progressing, I think I'm doing theright thing. Well, as you shine, what is your overarching goal? Maybe forwill to win or you're teaching career? What is your overarching goal? Um, Ithink I just like to be settlers. A resource to just help people navigatethrough some of the challenging parts of their lives. Um, that's what I find,you know, I'm getting emails and messages and from adults and studentswho are just trying to overcome something. Um, And so I think theauthenticity of my life experience and knowing that I'm flawed on being vocalabout that and, you know, dealing with mental health issues and overcomingthat. And yet, you know, being a...

...teacher, being a motivation speaker,being a dad, I it's it's ah, I would love you know, I'm working towards inin the near future, you know, doing a masters in counseling, Bond. I wouldlove to work with student athletes and help them, Um, make that mo mentalshift, um, to get them to the next level. Um, if there's something perhapsholding them back, um, in the way they're wired. If they're struggling toget that that signal clear, uh, in that radio, their mind if they're battlingwhatever giants that exist in the battlefield of our minds, I want to bethat guy that they can, uh, anyone can come to. And just from what I hear fromwhat my friends tell me. They just feel they feel comfortable. They feel safe,they make them feel good. So, um, um, e wanted to be remembered by for how Imade people feel it's nice, Thio, you know, toe have, you know, experiencesand whatnot. But I know that no one's gonna remember that, but I know they'regonna remember the way I made them feel. What about you mentioned a few timesthe adversity that you have faced in your life, especially a younger adult?What adversity have you face that kind of motivate you Maybe sometimes hindersyou, even still today. But you use that adversity to encourage other people inthe adversity that they face in their word. Yeah. Only the only thing that'sconstant is change. And you know what? I'm doing? My when I'm swimming in thepool and that water I'm fighting against the water. I'm trying to be asrelaxed as I possibly keep telling us. Just relax. Are you? Relax yourbreathing property, are you? Relax. Just relax and then go through thewater. The water isn't gonna change. It's still wet. It's not that warm. Um,and but I still have to navigate through it. And that's what our life islike. Way have to know that there is going to be resistance. But we're goingto meet it. And we're going to relax in that resistance and know that we'regonna come out of it. And when we come out of it, if we put a flag in thatspot and say, Hey, remember that. Remember that experience I had? I gotthrough that. And if I could get through that well, I see that challengeup there. I know I can get to that point. And you can't do that unlessyou're willing to go through some different times. But your story willnever change. Your story will never change your from willing to stretch alittle bit on Have life stretch you Andi challenge you because that's howwe grow. That's how we grow on Ben. Reflect on that and say Okay, well, whoam I now? And I always hoped the answer that with Well, I am better, you know? Well, I only have one more question. Isthere anything that we haven't touched upon? That you'd like to add somethoughts about the work that you're doing that some people may findinteresting or the official? Yeah, my kids. You know, we're the politicalclimate. Just such social injustices. Ideo talk a lot about social justiceand I'm passionate about it. My kids, um they know who they are. They knowthat the black they know the black is beautiful. They know that there thereare obstacles and out there and they understand they're starting to learnUnderstand? Because you know you can't always experience is often the bestteachers. Sometimes way don't want it to be the best teacher, but I'mpreparing them for that. I just think I find it interesting. Um, you know, you know, hip hop culture andblack. I see, you know, black culture reflected in so many aspects of societywhere music or fashion entertainment, um, in, uh, in music, in even the foodthat we eat. Um, you know, radio jingle...

...radio jingles have this hip hop flavor.It's just the idea that as a black man, so much of my culture and the thingsthat we made popular are are in the mainstream. Yet we're not popular inthe mainstream, and it's so confusing. I don't understand. I don't understandif the things about us that, uh, that mainstream loves the love the most. Ifwe're so ingrained in the mainstream and were and what we are our culturesthat embedded in that welcome, why aren't we as individuals? It'sheartbreaking. Um, I try to remind my sons that, you know we're not part ofThere's not zone. I think it's easy to thio be divisive and say, well, themand us no, we're all part of the human race and I want my kids understand that,you know, without seeking the truth of who that you are annoying your valueand your worth and then understanding where you fit in life and then and thengrowing that tolerance that you need, um, Thio manage in situations where youknow, in life and in business and education. Um, in all the differentarenas, competitive and non competitive arenas of life, we have to be tolerant.And when we learn to be more tolerant than then, that's where social justicereally comes in. When we're all open minded enough to accept the other eachother as as we are, I feel like there's so much intellectual capital that'sthat's not tapped into because, you know, we don't all have the sameopportunity to contribute. You just imagine how much more, further ahead wecould be a za society if we all have equal opportunity to have input. Eso isdisappointing, but the same time it's I'm hopeful, because the work I'm doingis I'm trying to set an example. Um, you know, there's a reason why I go toschool every day and I wear a collar and slacks because I want the kids tosee a black man. You know, that speaks and looks and dresses like me and thatbe the representation of blackness as opposed to something else on bats.Important. And I can change. I'm not gonna I can only set an example for mykids and for the people I'm interacting with, Um um, but I really hope thatthere's, ah, that there is a a mindfulness. There's an awakening ofconsciousness, of the role that we all play and how much more what's happened,what we've seen with George Floyd's murder, how much that makes us realizejust how vulnerable we are. We all our now fragile we are, we all are and thatwe see that there are. There are people in society who are more fragile thanthey need to be, and it's important we do something. Um, do something aboutthat The coronavirus has really revealed. Um, you know, the underbelly of our societyand who's who's affected by, um, by the coronavirus and whose lives are beinglost in this is disappointing, but at the same time it's encouraging and toknow that there is a movement and there I'm seeing commercials. Now I'm seeingI can't believe it. I'm seeing Mawr black people in commercials of likekids. You notice how many black people are commercials or just things likethat that, you know, when we grew up in Halifax, we would not have seen that Iwould not have seen anyone in the walls that looked like me. Um, so I would notbe able to see a doctor or or someone that was doing something that I thoughtWait a minute, I could be that person. But now we've had there are those timesare fading and we have some. There's some change, so I'm always of the halfglass full kind of thing, and I always know I want to contribute to thesolution and not necessarily dwell in the problem. Um, whatever way, I can,um, help bring awareness. Um, to how...

...connected we are again travel the world.I learned how small the world is and how we all want to be safe and happyand be able to just live freely. Um e I think it's important that all of ushave that opportunity and we're all humans. First. We're humans first. Andrespecting each other's humanities is tantamount is paramount. It's Yeah,we're the same human race, and our differences should not separate us. Butthey should bring us together absolutely well. How can people reachyou? How can they can contact with you to be a speaker? Maybe even nowadayszoom calls, whatever, whatever is easiest. But you also have you comevisit them. Yeah. My website will to win dot c A w i l l number two dutchwin dot c A. I'm on Facebook on instagram. Um and, uh, yeah, they couldreach me through those through those means Semi private message. Yeah, thisis what I do. Um, super busy at it. But, you know, when I spoke in China a fewyears ago, I went to Bermuda. I'm I'm really really I just see this. You know,this. I'd like to travel the world and just sort of give this, uh, thismessage of hope and, uh, and healing for many, many people, and again set myfeet aim high fall for everyday safe. Who are you willing to be? Where you'rewilling to go? What are you willing to accept and what you're willing to doabout it today? I always ask myself those four questions when I havechoices to make. And I wanna hope that everyone, if anyone's interested, couldseek me out. And so you can share it. Experience will. One final question. Why do you work? Oh, I love it. I work because, you know,you want to know I work. I work because my goal is to have four day weekendevery month where I just get on a plane on a Thursday night and I travel and Icome back on a Monday night and I know that if if I work well and horror, um,because of who I am and what I'm willing to accept in my life, I will beenjoying that. And if I do enjoy that the fruits of my labor labor wereallowed me to have this really fun for day weekend goal that I have for myself.I worked for the pleasure of the work and of the pleasure of the rewards. Imean, why? Why? Why else would work? Not enjoying enjoying it. Well NjokuMotivational speaker, coach, mentor and teacher Check them out on will to windot com Thank you. I appreciate the time that you've given me and Iappreciate the work that you dio Oh, thank you. It's will to win dot ch justyou permit right, Will to win dot c A. Yeah. Thanks. Listen. Thank you. I'm soit's so great Thio to make this connection on the other side of theworld. Um, good luck with everything you're doing there with your family. UmGod bless you. And thank you so much for having me on your show. Thank youfor listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe,follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. EI hope that you have yourself a productive yet joyful day in your work.

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