WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 121 · 1 year ago

#121​ Trey Campbell - ESPN 97.5 Board Operator & Producer - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Trey Campbell is a hard working young man who aspires to be a moderator by 2028, and in the meantime, he is honing his skills as a board operator and producer for ESPN 97.5, Houston.

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...welcome to why we work with your host, Brian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice, which will be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going and keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here's your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian V, and this is why we work today. I have the great pleasure speaking with Trey Campbell. Tray is a contributing author to ESPN, and he's a lover of NASCAR today. I want to find out from him where that love first came from. Also, why he thinks some racing fans 10 to hate NASCAR. Join me in my conversation with Trey Campbell. I'm Brian V. And this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure of speaking with Trey Campbell. Good day. Fine, sir. Good day to you, sir. How you doing? I'm doing well. Trey. Thank you for doing this on short notice. I've been wanting to get you on for a while now since our mutual friend Frankie, I should say I shouldn't say, friend. I don't know if Frankie would call me his friends, so I don't want to say that. He's I think he's your friend. But he's at me. He's at least my manager, right? That's what I I know a little bit. Frankie has a distinct way of talking to people. Yeah, he he does that sometimes. Like, hey, tree, it's Frankie will. Go on Brian v work show. All right, Frankie, I got you. But I was planning on coming on anyway. Is that my messenger is very strange. It filters out things, and I don't add some things. I don't see so understandable. Tray, will. You do? Well, thank you for coming on, but will you do me a favor and tell us what industry you're working in and a little bit a little bit about your what you're up to nowadays? Sure. Well, I work currently as a board operator slash radio producer for ESPN 97 5. It's very part time right now, but I'm in the beginning stages and I'm trying basically what my my, what I do is, um there's a big audio board and you turn the mics on, make sure the producers mics are on. You play music, beds, commercials, just all that kind of stuff, and it's very rewarding. Um, when you hear yourself on the radio and people come in and and talk about you know what, what, like bits they like and stuff, and I really enjoy it immensely. I also work. I've worked in construction for most of my life as well. Um, I've driven a dirt roller, but I don't do that as much anymore, but that that's also enjoyable, but not as enjoyable as the radio I can. Sometimes I find myself looking at at cranes and saying, or even dump trucks and, uh, cement trucks and people working building apartment buildings like Man, I wish I could do that. Just just stop what I'm doing and go do that right now. Yeah, and and it's very accessible. I mean, there's a lot of people that are just doing general labors and stuff, but I was basically born on a backhoe. My dad put me on tobacco like immediately after I was born. So speaking of that, my question was going to be Why don't you bring us back into what was your first job. What would have been the very first thing you did and maybe working on a backhoe. But what was the first thing you did as...

...a kid? Maybe that was exactly I would go with my dad, too. Like sites. I would work on tugboats. Um, I would work on apartment complexes. There's one. We were doing a clear lake. I would go to just all kinds of places. Wherever there was dirt, me and my dad were there. And when I was young, how young were you when you first started? I was, like, maybe six years old. I think like no one is as far as I can remember going back. But my dad would be all right, son. Go pick up like little pieces of rebar or go pick up some of the trash that they throw on the ground. So, little by little, I just kind of kept evolving. And, um, I had an end like a lot of people with my dad being such a big construction guy. But I did that. I I volunteered at a college for a little while when I was in college, because they had those things where you could work like a certain amount of hours and, like, do like office stuff. So I did that for, like, not very long, but but just those two I I've been in the family business for most of my life. And so as you got into high school, were you thinking you were going to continue, even though you volunteered to do something else in college? Were you thinking you wanted to go the route of construction or What were you thinking? Um, I was thinking that was gonna be kind of something I would do. Like as a side type of thing. My career was always to get into media. Um, I was inside. Was it side or you knew you could always fall back on it. That was Yeah. That's more or less. I knew I could fall back on it. And I can I can drive a dirt roller pretty well. I think I could probably figure out a way to get back on one, But But I always said, like, I'm not doing this forever. I mean, it's good. It's easy, easy money, but I'm not. My goal is not gonna be working on, uh and Clear Lake. I want to go into radio and I want to go into entertainment and journalism and all that. That was always my goal, and that was the way I I would try to get there. Did you find that watching your dad work in the industry turned you away from it? Or was the appeal to media just so strong that that's the direction you wanted to go? Well, I never really had anything against um, working construction. I think it's very honorable when a lot of these people work their way up like my dad worked his way up and I thought that was really cool and there's part of me that enjoyed going out there. But it was just so hot and I really loved media more than anything like we would be. We I would be going. I would be on the roller for about 8 to 9 hours a day and then I go to the station at night and I was like, completely miserable when I would go to the station because I was so tired. But I knew like when I got there, everything was, was better and like everything felt normal. so that that was when I knew I was like, You know, I can be here and and take my lumps kind of intern here for a while while I'm doing this. And maybe it'll work up to something, and I'll just keep driving the dirt roller for safe keeping, you know, And and that's how it kind of went. Um, overall, it was just my I just had more of profanity for working in media. Is there something? Is there something that you're gearing towards so out of high school, you're thinking media. Was there some attraction to something in particular? Yeah, I always like when I was young, I would watch the news and I would watch like SportsCenter a lot.

And I would think it was really cool how the presentation went. And it just it just grew as as much a lot more when I finally went to, in turn at the ESPN 97 5 year in Houston in 2017, and I was like, I really fell in love with it then, like I liked how you cut audio and did all the audio editing and there was all this stuff, and I really like how? Like there would be people coming in and out, and I thought it was really cool. But overall, um, yeah, I had always kind of had admiration Is to do that go into in the sports media or just media in general. So 2017, your first experience with media? Yeah, it was October 60th or no, October 29th. It was right before Halloween. Um, and, uh, that was my first day. I had known that the guys before, but I didn't. I didn't work for them, but, like, they knew me and they were they were excited to kinda have me working there because, like, I don't know, they just kind of took took a liking to me. So basically, I just kind of, uh yeah, that's pretty much all of it. Like I started in 2017. I started interning and working on the side, but but yeah, that was that was how it started. And what is it? What is your niche? What is it? So ESPN sports Is this what you want to stay in? Is this what you have to love for your whole life? Is more of a sports rather than an entertainment of, say, movies or something like that. Yeah, I think both would be really cool. Um, I would I i c I But sports is my first sort of my niche. I'm really in motorsports. More than anything, that would be my end goal is to cover motorsports NASCAR F one, um, anything, really with an engine. That race is I want to cover. But but yeah, I think sports, although I would love to be. I I always like in my head. I've done stand up routines in my head, so I would be cool to be a comedian. But you know, it's that the world is really kind of an oyster at this. At this point, I'm just trying to figure out which. But overall, my end goal is to cover NASCAR. Isn't it funny, though it's It's like I mentioned about construction, and I have to be careful when I say, like I look at that and I just want to go do it. Maybe the constructions guy might say You're not going to be able to do it in the same way with comedy, right? I'm like I would love I think more so I'd like to try stand up comedy than construction. But sometimes I still would like to do construction just to get your hands dirty. But to get up on stage and to deliver something. Have you seen some of those Netflix specials and some of those things on comedy? Is that kind of growing your love for comedy and the and the process that goes behind it for sure? Yeah, that, and knowing a couple of people that do it around here is really, really kind of thought. It was cool like, um but yeah, especially people that are big, like Bill Burr. Um, you know, Nathan Fielder's people like that really influenced me to want to create sort of a tangible type of entertainment product, like comedy or something like that for sports. You mentioned NASCAR, and I have this question because I read somewhere that you, you know, your NASCAR and I love NASCAR. But I I definitely don't have the knowledge you have, especially being in South Korea for so long, I have no idea. No, not at all. I mean, people drive as if they know about it, but maybe more formula F one racing. Where did that love for NASCAR? I love NASCAR. Just everything about it. I wish I could be in a place that I can go to an event, you know. I know in my...

...hometown of Halifax, Nova Scotia, out near the airport, we have this small track and it seems like they push on the pedal. They have to get into the turn. And I brought my son once and it's one of his favorite memories because they also had monster trucks there. What was what was your first introduction into NASCAR? Well, when I was young, my dad he raced at a local dirt track here in Baytown. He had this old, like Camaro that erased, and it he he did that for a while, and I guess he always was a big car guy. And it was just on. At some point, I think my dad liked watching it, but like it was on and when I was a baby, I just like it just It just clicked. And when I was younger, when I grew up a little bit more, I just started reading NASCAR Guide like Front to Back, like all day and writing stuff down and I was like, It just became my livelihood and I was like, Man, I don't I got to get into this some way and and and that's what I would say It came from my dad more than anything and the colors. I really like the colours, too. So you mentioned your love of engine so I can see how you would love NASCAR and F one. But I find there's a lot of people I'm saying this generalist, but a lot of people don't like NASCAR, and I can't understand it. Do you have any idea even why racing fans like F one racing fans or some other sort of motorsport just they don't get NASCAR? Some people? Oh, you're always turning laughter. You know you can't make a right turn or whatever it is, absolutely. But do you have any idea what it is? And what would you say to those people who are not quite sure and just don't get it? Well, there's a multitude of things I would think, um, number one being it's It's as simple as like, Oh, it's just 38 cars turning left when it's and people don't understand the nuances and how to set up a car and all that and the strategy that goes into it. But it's kind of hard to get into. I can understand that the the whole nuances and everything. Another thing is some of the fans are kind of a rough crowd. Um, you know, some some people may see some of the fans and be like, I don't know if I want to be around these people and which couldn't be further from the truth. NASCAR fans are pretty nice altogether, but But I think what it all comes down to is as simple as, Ah, it's just cars. They think it's just car is running around in circles when it's a whole lot more complex than that. And for some people, I think it's just really difficult to keep them occupied to watch the watch a race, I guess, and a lot of them are pretty long. So do you like, and I can't articulate it well, what they're doing, but how they've separated a race for particular points so that they're, you know, the first so many laps, they're getting their points and so they're racing to that, particularly the 100th lap. Or do you like how they've they've incorporated that into more, more strategical way of racing? Do you like how they've done that versus the older way? Yes and no. I mean, I think it incentivizes everybody to run up front, the whole race and not sandbag, and to an extent, I get why they did that. But it takes away sort of the the traditional appeal of NASCAR to me because I get it. You got Charlotte the Coke 600. It's 400 laps, 600 miles. When it's like lap to 25 there's not gonna be a lot to talk about, so I get why they did it. But overall, I'm so used to watching, like, a full race in its entirety. Yeah, it never bothered me, but I think I think overall I think it's kind of cool how they distribute...

...the points from each each stage. And, uh, I think that's kind of cool. But I would I would much rather see sort of what they were doing pre 2017, where they just had a whole whole races. And, uh, you know, it was a lot easier for me to kind of follow, but I get it 100% why they did it. So you mentioned your position now at 97.5, and you kind of talked about the process of it. What is something difficult you didn't anticipate? You're only a few years in. You're kind of doing a part time. But what is something difficult and what brings you the most satisfaction? You kind of mentioned hearing your voice on the on the radio or hearing yourself or people commenting. But what are some difficulties in some satisfaction as you get from your job? Well, the biggest difficulty for me is, you know, there's a lot of steps, and for me, I'm sort of I'm more of I don't really think too much in steps. I just try to get everything done. But there's a lot of steps, and there's a lot of little things you you do, and if you forget to do them, it messes up the whole thing. For instance, like we have a two computers, one plays like music and everything, and the other plays the commercials and on the button on that computer, you have to click mute satellites every so often or the commercials will start playing and you gotta go back and drag all the tabs and rebuild where the commercials have to be. And I forget to press that a lot, and sometimes it'll just start playing the commercials, but nobody will hear it. But it will be kind of a pain to go back and rebuild everything but the biggest. The best thing about doing what I do is when you go into a a show that's really tough to do, and there's a lot of things you've got to do, and you just do everything perfectly. And when you're done, you're like, Man, we did, I did that and you hear it back on on the podcast and you're like, Wow, that was really good. I really did a good job and that's the best thing. Like there's a show called The Blitz and there's a lot of things you gotta do. You gotta like, make audio, like, sort of, uh, you got to make, like, a rewind that summarizes the whole show. You gonna do that like, like, really quickly. You gotta play like certain commercials, and it's really tough. So when you do something like that perfectly, and you just nail it. It's the best feeling I'm like, man, I've always had trouble with this, and now I'm finally progressing to where I've done everything like perfectly and nothing happened bad. So I think those are the two things. But overall, it's really cool to have people reach out to you on the phone and stuff and say You're doing good and the feedback you get is another really good the best part of it. So for people getting into the industry or just for yourself, realizing it, what is a skill that you've had to develop or it's something that you know? You may be lacking, but you're working towards perfecting it. Yeah, I think the biggest skill that I've learned from this is sort of the responsibility of it, you know, like I had a lot of I didn't have as many responsibilities, and I was just driving a dirt roller. I just drove the roller. Some days I would sign tickets for dump trucks that are coming in, and it was very rudimentary stuff. But on this one, you have to get there early at the show prep. You have to pull audio. It showed me how to kind of, you know, do tasks and stuff. And it's It's been a big help on remembering things and, you know, just overall, like it's also showed me how to work with people...

...a lot more because I didn't work with a lot of people before, But like it, it showed me all that and the importance of, like, connecting. You're making connections with people and stuff and you know that that's what it's kind of. And it showed the skill, another skill, like if we're getting, we're talking just basic like skills. It showed me how to work with adobe audacity and how to write stuff. So just those are your basic things. But if you're talking more about, like, you know, you're sort of get personal, Yeah, interpersonal stuff. That's exactly what it's what It's really benefited in both ways. So since you're doing this part time, are you Are you doing construction as well? Are you doing some other job? Not at the moment. Right now. I'm It's been a tough couple of it's been Two months ago, my dad passed away of a covid 19. Yeah, it's I've I've kind of made peace with it a little bit, but I've been applying to places and, uh, but everybody's kind of just been saying, don't worry, just kind of focus on radio and all that, but But, like, that's pretty much occupied most of my time, you know, getting everything set up in the will and sort of doing tax stuff and all that. And how do you stay productive trade? Because that's what I'm leading to the question. Because my mom passed away a year ago as well. Not covid from cancer. And I saw some of your posts that your dad passed away and how great of a man he was. And I believe he is the one who did the action figure no for for Frankie. Um, no, no, no, I don't think so. My dad, I don't think I ever knew Frankie, actually, but I think the guy who did the action figure actually was in Ohio, in Ohio. I can understand, though, where you would get that mixed up because my dad was a sort of a handy person with tools and stuff. How do you stay productive with you know, you have a part time job. You have a difficulty just two months ago and you're still going through it. How how are you staying? Productive, motivated and kind of inspired to keep going? What is driving you? What is motivating you? Well, really and truly, Um, I've just been kind of trying to, like, do basic stuff. You know, like I've been trying. I just kind of apply to places. That's what My biggest motivator is that like, I'll get it. I'll kind of get another another job to kind of keep me productive and stuff. And I've had a couple of interviews, but that's really my biggest motivator to to, um, to be productive is just kind of like being able to do what I want to do and going to races and stuff and covering NASCAR. And you know that. I think that's probably what it is. And that and helping people around me like like I really like my friends will need help with stuff at their house, and I'll go like help them. But but staying for that's what that's what kept me productive more than anything to answer. Your first question is, is going and helping my friends. He's in the middle of a move. So that and you know, just trying to talk to as many people as possible. And because if you think about it, if you think about losing someone just a couple of months ago, that is hard. Having a part time job, not only a part time job but having a part time job that's not a full time job. Some people might be discouraged by that, but you're not saying that's how you are not saying that you're never discouraged, but you keep you keep going. You're putting 1 ft in front of the other, even though you've experienced this difficulty and you're not where you want to be professionally yet. So it's really good on you even though you're young, right, and to be...

...going through this sort of thing. I just want to let you know that I think it's really good that you are staying productive. Whatever your motivation is because you're still working at it and it and it's pretty good and it's an inspiration for other people who sometimes they go through some of these things and they give up right. They just let things go and they don't work. And they don't help out with whatever paperwork and all that stuff. Or they don't help with other friends, right? Some people will shut right off, but you're not doing that. So that's good on you. Yeah, I appreciate that. You know, I've always been taught from a young age, too. Anything that you want to do, you can You can do it as long as you set your mind to it and just be persistent. And you know, there's gonna be times where, like, you don't have any hours this week. You know, there's gonna be times where I'll get discouraged, but you know, usually have a lot of people to help me, and, um, it's been really good, so I just kinda I just kind of like, take a day by day more than anything, and I'm like, All right, well, today was kinda lame, but, you know, tomorrow we'll figure it figure something out, and that's like today it was kind of lame, but tomorrow figure I wish I thought like that often. Yeah, it's, um it's taken me forever. I mean, when I was when I was, like, really young, when I was like 16 17 and high school. I was like trying to figure out everything I could. I struggled academically, um, and stuff. And I was under like, I was like, I can't I keep I can't ever think about all this stuff and I get I got really scatterbrained and stuff, but like, people kind of told calm me down, and I found a way to get through it. And that's how it was when I was really young and I was really scatterbrained around, getting out of high school and going to college. I was like, Man, I can't keep up with all this stuff and I couldn't I would get stressed out. But ever since the dad passed away, I've been, you know, there's no reason to be stressed out. At some point, everything's gonna work out. Even if it doesn't work out at the radio station, it's okay. We can work somewhere else. I just I just try to remind myself that everything's gonna be all right and it's going to pass, regardless of what happens and I tried. I've tried to find a way to be all right, regardless, even if I was like homeless or something. I'd still trying to find a way to, like, see the best of it, I guess. But but But it's tough sometimes not to get discouraged. But overall, that's what's helped me through. Is is realizing that it's all gonna pass. It's all temporary tray, knowing that you started working at the age of six, helping your dad being a kind of a gofer. And other people start from there up until 12 or other people who change their career, change their job from one to another, maybe into something that leads to something. Do you have some advice for people, whether they're starting a job for the first time or they're changing their career? Absolutely. Um, the first thing I have to say is, um, I guess if you're going into like your first job and you're like a teenager or something, I wouldn't get too complacent and and rely too much on like I'd still do all the I'd still be a responsible worker show up early and everything, but, like I wouldn't I would try my best to to use that as like a springboard to what you really want to do. But when it comes to starting your career. The best thing I can say always be there. You know, even if like if you really love going somewhere, just just be there. You know, like even if you don't have to be, just go be there for a few minutes, you know, hang out with some...

...of the people, do some extra stuff like like like with me. I go and record a podcast up there once a week or I'll have Frankie on or I'll have and I have somebody else on. But that's my biggest school. If you really love something, just just be there as much as you can and make that sort of your biggest. Your biggest, like starting point is to just show up and and kinda and always be early, obviously. But just just be there as much as you can get to know everybody. That's probably my biggest. My biggest word of advice. I say this and thinking you have a good head of hair on you, but you also have a good head on your shoulders. So do you have some moral beacon that's kind of guiding you along something that you look to you mentioned how instrumental your dad was in your life. But what is it that kind of is the bedrock of your morals and values? Well, I think overall, when it comes to moral morality, I think the my biggest thing is just treat people kindly and just treat people the way you would want to be treated. I guess the golden rule, what they call it that and and just be just be decent to people you know. Don't go out of your way, too. Try and make have give people a hard time and I guess just make things better. I don't know if there's so much a higher power up there that I would really say I follow. But overall, I believe in the sort of the act of just being decent to people and and not and you know, not going out like when If somebody lives next door to you and unless they're not breaking the law or doing something really inherently bad, like beating their wife or anything, I just kind of leave people alone, you know, to their own devices. But I would say my biggest. The biggest bedrock. I guess that as you mentioned of my more morality. The foundation of it is to just be decent to people, you know, regardless of what they think regard like, you know, regardless, if there they fall on the left or the right, just just treat them like humans. I guess you know, like and under understand that that doesn't make what a person is. It's all. It's all about how that person treats other people, I guess, And if they don't treat somebody the best way you don't have, you just kind of don't really associate with them. But if they treat if they if they fall under the same sort of decency you do, that's the people. I guess I kind of want to be around, and that's really it. Really. Just just be good to people, I guess. Tray. As we get older, we learn different things. How is your view? Since you mentioned, you kind of struggled in high school with your education, and as we get older, our bodies start to break down. So what's your general view of education and exercise? Education in America has its faults. I'm not a big fan of standardized testing. I think it's not the proper way to sort of past get these kids through. And I think that there needs to be more options, I guess when it but like, but I don't think it's terrible. Um, we're certainly not where you guys All right, Imagine in South Korea education is a whole lot more more, I guess more pushed for it is there's a lot of tests. I was talking to someone grade nine yesterday and she said So many tests, so many tests, so many tests. Uh, and there's there's a lot of pressure to the point...

...where that pushes kids to suicide. So yeah, and that's not right. I don't think there should be that much pressure. Um, the thing is, a lot of high school kids here in America they're there because they have to be there. They're not there because they really want an education. But overall, um, you know, it's really difficult to pinpoint exactly what everybody should know. I mean, you have your bread and butter meat and potatoes type of things, like paying bills and balancing a check and all that. But really and truly, I guess what it all comes down to is do kids really need to know the Pythagorean theorem. You know, to be smart, I guess, you know, or do they need to to know? You know, all these sort of mathematical things, like I guess, and to an extent they do. But, like, you know, I think it's it's less. It's more about like trying to pass the standardized tests than it is like trying to prepare people for normal life, I guess. But overall, I don't think it's terrible. I think it's, I think it's all right. I don't really have any complaints with how I was taught. Now exercise I. I really enjoy doing, too. I sometimes go through phases where I don't do it as much as I should. But I really like walking, and I think that's really important. Um, it's a good way of clearing your mind and stuff, and in America it's very it's not as it's not as um talked about, I guess in education, Um, you have gym class, obviously. But you know, the education system in the United States, to me just kind of feels really corporate, and it's about trying to get the test prep places their money, and I just feel like it's kind of it's not gonna It's not really going to show you exactly what reality is, in my opinion, so that but in other places, I think it works. But I I don't know it school to me. I know I had a really hard time in school, but but I don't know, it was it's It's very touchy, I guess. But overall, I think it could be better. Well, I said, You have a good head on your shoulder. When I was younger, I thought walking was a joke, like walking, Is it exercise? And now, as I'm getting older, it's the only exercise I can do. And I find it most most valuable. Yeah, I think for a walk, I think I think walking is really, um it's pretty essential. I guess you gotta walk everywhere. Someone told me the other day is like and I interviewed him. He's Canadian basketball player and he said, Yeah, you're over in Asia, where Asians, Japanese and China, Chinese and Koreans in particular tend to walk. You don't see them working out so hard. Some do, but they just know that that's going to maintain your body as well, and they tend to take good care of themselves. Yeah, here in America, it's very different. Um, like in the South, in Texas, everything's so spread out. So everybody drives around. Nobody really walks places like in New York or again or all these. But, like everybody just kind of drives around. And, um, I've fallen victim to that anywhere I can drive to. I'd much rather drive to than walk, But walking is very much the the basic fundamentals, I guess. And, uh, you know, it's good that it's good. It's a good way to clear your mind to, you know, it's funny. We we get, we drive to a place and we want that parking spot right up front because the one a little bit where it's empty and there's no other cars, and it would probably be good for...

...your car anyway. And good for you, we tend not to sit around a few times. I've I've seen that a lot, and, uh, going to like Walmart and stuff. It's just it's like it's so crazy because like they'll be car wrecks and stuff. And it's just the one thing about parking lots, like what you were saying there that I really despise our people that leave their carts and they don't take them back to the car. Dark car dark. And I love that dude. He's doing the Lord's where that guy is doing the Lord's work because people who like they'll be sometimes where they'll park right next to the thing and they'll still leave them there. I'm like you can't walk like 5 ft. He had one on yesterday. A couple of days ago. It came up on my YouTube and and he freaked out. He kept at it. At some point, you gotta you gotta, like, say, is it We're getting pestered. Let me just put the card back. But these people, they stick to their guns know that they're really she was threatened to kill him. Yeah, it's just a car back. It's just so ridiculous to me. I mean, it's that goes back to human decency, like the least you can do is take a cart to the to the cart cart corral. It's just so it's so it really irritates me, and I go when I go to the store and I see carts around there. I'm tempted to take them back myself, But I'm like, No, I don't have time for that. But I'm like, Man, this is ridiculous. But yeah, it just kind of goes to show in America like it's very, uh, there's a lot of concern, sort of materialistic, type of type of behavior. I guess a lot of it happens here in Korea, too, and I, you know, we don't know someone's heart and the reason why they're thinking. But it's the and the lady said it, too. They pay someone to pick this up, right? So that's the idea. Some of the people's ideas, it's someone's paid to pick this up, so why should I? But he comes back. He's like, Yeah, but you don't urinate on a toilet on purpose or you don't wreck the entire hotel room just because someone's you don't do that on purpose. You don't Your kid doesn't trash your house just to say, you know you don't want your kid to trash the house and say, Hey, Mom, we're gonna is going to pick it up That that's pretty poor logic. Yeah, I I agree. I mean, like, just because someone's paid to do it doesn't mean you have to be like a jerk to him and and, you know, like and I get that way of thinking and there's certain there's obviously certain sort of, uh, there's certain excuses. There are certain circumstances that you could have, you know, like if you if, like somebody's hurt and you're trying to get or you're trying to get somewhere important, I get it. But like if you're just leaving your cart there just for, I mean, that could damage people's cars and it's just it's just I just think it's absolutely lazy. And it's another reason why I have this podcast, too, is I? I want to encourage people to work if they have Children, get their kids to work by having a list of jobs before you start your career, or even if you just have one, or you just happen to have you know, the basic human appreciation for others to say, You know what that job they do like. I remember working at a restaurant or my mom worked at a restaurant for a long time, so I have a tendency to have a appreciation towards people who have to bus tables, right, so I don't kind of leave my table a mess for this person who has 100 tables to clean up this day. Not to make mind the worst. So when people have those types of jobs. So if someone worked as a bag boy or bag girl...

...at a restaurant at a grocery store and happen to be a cart buggy person, then they're going to appreciate to like, Oh, I wish I had just one less car today. And if you're the person who has a cart and puts it back, that's actually helping them, not only not damaging a car. Yeah, absolutely. And that's That's, I think, the biggest genesis of like why I would do it because, you know, like you don't know. There could be somebody who has a harder time, and they need to get home or something. And if it's little if even if it's a little bit less work that they're going to do, I'm I'm happy to do it on my end. And I think, like you said, it just based empathy for people, you know, Like you said, You've been there at a restaurant, you know, it's just empathy, you know, like it's You got to have a job like that. It's not easy. I'm sure to be a bus boy. You have a lot of a lot of dishes to get, so it's if it makes people people's job a little bit easier. I think it comes back around full circle and people have. It just makes society a whole lot. You think society would be a lot better now? There's so many social warriors on the Internet, it seems like everyone's that would be the greatest. But you go out there and it's like, Yeah, and and to and to a degree like, um, there's a lot of people on Twitter that I think don't actually understand what's going on And and I think there's serious issues that they just only battle is on Twitter. You mean Yeah, like I think there's there's serious issues and instead of sort of understanding those issues and some of the nuances, a lot of them just see what people will react to or we'll get them sort of clout in a way they don't they don't want to. They don't actually care about the cause. They're just trying to sort of fit in, and I see that a lot with celebrities. There's a lot of virtue signaling, Um, and it's it's not its It's so it's so frustrating, you know? Like, I don't want to hear what Tim Allen has to say, or I don't want to hear what what Chrissy Teagan has to say about anything because, you know, they've had It's hard to empathize with those type of people, but I don't know. It just seems really ridiculous, Like on Twitter. You know, like and and a lot of people are just trying really hard to look cool instead of actually seeing what's wrong and how they can fix stuff, I guess. Yeah. Those are little weapons people use. I think they just kind of slice people like What is it 1000 cuts of death or what is that saying? Um, yeah, I'm not sure. I guess, um, you live by the sword. You die by the sword. I don't know. That could be one. Um, but, uh, you Trey, what is your What is your ultimate goal for media? What? What are you hoping to do? Have your own show. Be the director producer. What is what is your higher goal. My goal as a media personality is to try and be as center as possible. When it comes to issues. I want to try and talk to people and figure out what it is that they think the way they do. And, you know, I want to give people sort of unless they're like, what? Like Nazis or or whatever. I want to give everybody a chance to sort of say what they have to say and try to come to an understanding to why people think that and I want. I want other people to. I want to. I want to be seen as somebody who sort of sees both sides of stuff,...

...and that's my end goal is to put out a product or put out a sort of a show where people where we where things issues can be talked about and there isn't any like anger, malice, and I can understand sort of on both sides. Like I guess I guess I want to be a moderator more than anything like I want to be kind of like, um sort of a moderator. Two things, I guess, is what I'm going for and that's that's my angle. Is there anything for you to reach that goal? Is there anything that people may not understand about you that you would like them to understand so they can have a better appreciation for the work that you're bringing to the table? Yeah. I mean, I've always like when I was young, I got wrapped up in a lot of what I saw, and I still think some of its valid. But like when I was young, I was very, very sort of skewed to the left. I guess of things. And now I'm trying to be like, dead center. But, like, I don't want people to think that because of what I was when I was younger, I'm not gonna listen to what they have to say. Like, I want people to know that whatever they think, I'm trying my best to understand the view from their world, whether it be somebody who is trying to get their message across with police brutality or why police brutality doesn't exist either. One I want to hear sort of what both sides are and understand, So I can empathize a little bit better with what they think because I can't empathize with a lot of those people. I have to know and you know it's because I'll never experience some of those issues, as you know, but like, I want to at least try to understand how I can help with both sides and how we can make things better. I guess as a society, that's my ankle. Is there any adversity that you have faced that you can use to help encourage people in the adversity that they're facing in their work or in their life? This is a great question, because when I back when I was about six or seven years old, as in first grade, the biggest obstacle I ever had to face through all of this I was diagnosed with with Asperger's syndrome, which is now called Autism Spectrum Disorder, or whatever there's there's a different name for it every day. You know, they changed the names up on these things a lot, but I was diagnosed with that, and that's been the biggest turtle I've ever had to climb up. You can as you can tell, there's sort of queues. I have hard times like looking people in the eyes and sometimes when somebody's joking, I have a hard time recognizing that they're joking. It takes me a minute, but like that's probably been my biggest. Adversity is dealing with sort of the autism and stuff. And funny that you mentioned it. How Frankie and me kind of like how me and you kind of came about because of Frankie. I really looked at Frankie is some sort of a motivator with everything he's had to go through as well. I know he's also on. He also has autism spectrum disorder. I believe as well. And I thought that was really cool, how he put it, how he went out in front of all these people and did what he did, and everybody really liked it. So that was that was a big motivator. But yeah, that's probably been my biggest obstacle is dealing with the, uh, with Asperger's syndrome throughout my life and a few other things a d, h, d and all that. Just the normal stuff they give you so but that's probably been it. How would you use what you're experiencing as an encouragement for...

...other people in what they face? The best thing I would say to people is that I Listen, I did it, but I'm on a much different path than a lot of people. But the best thing you can do is just do do what you wanna do, You know, that's the best thing you can do. And everybody has limitations. And, um, But if you do what you you want to do, people will recognize that and they will be willing to accept you for whoever you are and whatever, whatever things you have to deal with, as long as you just do what you do and just treat people kindly, I guess, and have human decency. But that would be my biggest motivator. My biggest word of advice to people in my position is just keep doing it, you know? And don't worry too much about, like, clouds or anything. Just do what you love doing, and that's that's what's helped me through. You know? How can people get in touch with you, Trey? So I have Twitter. Um, my twitter is juggle o underscore tray 48. That's a nickname they gave me at the radio station. Um, that's pretty much primarily where I'm at the most is Twitter. it's a w underscore 48 on Twitter. It's a that's my Twitter username if you would like to follow me, but But yeah, like that's pretty much it. I don't I don't really go on. Instagram are all that. I try to limit my social media as much as possible. I'll go on Facebook and look at, like, old memories and stuff or post pictures. But pretty much Twitter is where I get a lot of the news and stuff, like in sports. So, um, that's what I try my best to be on. So if you'd like to find me, I'll be I'll be on Twitter. I have one final question for you. Is there anything that, besides this question? Is there anything that we haven't touched upon that you'd like to bring up anything else you would like to add? Well, like, I was sort of wondering how you got to South Korea. That was sort of like, uh, how what led you there. I guess there's this story when people ask me this that I know it as well. Um, I was sitting at a party at Katie University where I went to school, and there was this couple sitting there and they happened to just return from Japan? I was like, Oh, not knowing what I want to do with my future So I was like, Oh, that sounds great. How do I go there? What do I do? They go, Well, it's It's a great experience, but you probably at that time, which was probably 2000 and one. They said You might want to go to Korea because because it's a better economy or it was had a better economy at the time. And then during that time, my mom happened to be working in lower sackful in the Downs View Motel, which was owned by Koreans. And so I mentioned to them, Maybe I'm thinking about going to teach English in another country. They said, Well, if you do, we've got a place for you And within a couple of years I said, Yeah, I'm going to do it and I left in 2000 and five. That's really cool. What's it? That's like, got to be a big culture shock going from Canada and imagine to South Korea it was it was different. There's lots of things that I still you know, on and off. We were here and I married. My dear wife is Korean, so I'm married into it. Now I can't escape. But we went to Canada, Tried Canada, didn't really work out for us. So we came back here. So on and off. I've been here for 11 years, but with knowing that family in my hometown, that Korean family and they had their in laws living there too. So it wasn't that they gave me Korean food and taught me how to use chopsticks and all of that. And just growing up with in Canada, my hometown is a little bit more multicultural to an extent, Canada tends to be like that. So it wasn't It wasn't a shock. It was different. But I accepted it. Um, you know, the biggest thing I think was probably kimchi. The smell of kimchi when I got off the...

...plane is like, but I knew the smell in my hometown. I was like, Wow, there's lots of smells around here. But then after living here a couple months, then I smelled just like it, so yeah, yeah, you kind of go nose blind to things I'd imagine. You know, like like if somebody moved here to Baytown, they wouldn't be so used to the smell of oil refineries or smoke clouds. But after, like 25 years and just you just kind of become nose blind to step that kind of stuff. I'd imagine so. But, yeah, that's cool. I always wanted to go to South Korea. It's a nice place, Nice place to visit. It's not very touristy, like foreign touristy. It's more of South Korean. It's made for South Koreans and they kind of keep it that way. Yeah, you hear a lot about your neighbors up there in the North. What man? That's gotta be pretty interesting. It's well, I think he fired a couple of missiles there a couple days ago. I mean that it's kind of and that was quiet for a long period of time, and now it just kind of picked up again. So I don't know. Since I came here, I always thought there was going to be a war. I mean, that was with his father at that time before his father passed away. But now, with Kim Jong un, you never know what's going to happen. You never know what? And and that's probably part of the reason why you know, I'm a little bit okay. What are we going to do about our future? Where are we going to be? What do we want to do? You want to live? Because when I first arrived here and I was working in elementary schools, we would have sirens throughout the day that everything had to stop the lights stop. Cars stopped. I mean, the lights went red and all the cars stopped and we had to stop teaching, and then the siren would go for a few minutes. But that is I don't know why, but that has stopped in the last few years. But it was just a weird sort of thing coming from Canada and being here where any moment they could declare war because there's a nuclear war. It seems like it's a kind of a powder keg over there. I know. Uh, I remember I saw somebody at a hotel and he was, like, sleeping. And in the middle of the night, his TV turns on and it's like sirens and stuff. I was like, Wow, the TV just turned on. He didn't even touch it, but it's very I'd imagine. It's very that's sort of, um I guess, like sort of anxiety to that. It was I didn't ever experience a TV turning on, but just the sirens. I mean, nowadays, with Corona, I get enough notifications on my phone. Do you guys get notifications on your phone? I've got Okay, So in America, it's every it's every man for himself. Um, like, I think I've gotten one notification and I was in Colorado and I was like, There's somebody who has the virus. You've been exposed and all that I'm like, Okay, whatever. But yeah, I've already had it like, um and I survived. My dad didn't but but I survived. But like, um, I know it like you have to like, they have banking, information and stuff like it's all tied to that. And it's crazy, like I'm like, I don't even want to know what would go on. If they tried this stuff in America, people would probably revolt. And I'm just realizing this, too, especially their starting Q R codes. Like not starting QR QR codes are huge. Like every story you go into, you have to submit your QR code. So not only do they everyone knows where you are, but what you're spending. I even saw in the urine all the other day or a sign over the thing. It showed a really nice picture of a tree and a receipt kind of melted through it of sorts. So it's just kind of showing that receipts waste, waste trees. Therefore, we're...

...using QR codes. So everything you buy at the grocery store, everything that you every time you go into a Starbucks, if you wherever you go, you have to use this. And it's like we did our taxes this year and we did not have to do any paperwork. Wow. Yeah, that's and it doesn't take long. I mean one thing. It's good. It doesn't take long, but to they already know. Yeah, it's kind of scary. It's a little unnerving, you know, like it even a Korean man who was much older than me and not even a friend. But just he noticed, Um, and he said, Yeah, that's why a lot of Koreans high gold cash in their apartment, because this is it's even, he said, totally ridiculous is what's going on. Yeah, yeah, that's like I would never I want that. And I'm sure it happens here in America, but they're sort of a lot more secretive about it, but that's just blatant. Yeah. Yeah, like it feels sort of, uh, I guess, um dystopian A little better Black mirror. The you know, like you're showing up with your QR code. It seems a little bit too much like black Mirror for me, So I could I couldn't. But I mean, I guess it's It's Kurt. It's I don't really know what it's done with the with the covid infections. If it's if it's made it any better. But I don't I don't know. It just seems like it doesn't you know, But I don't. They found a new strand in India the other day. So, like, is it actually ever going to stop? I don't think so. I mean, it's gonna stop, but they're going to stop talking about it, I think. But Covid won't go away. I mean, at at some point people are just going to stop talking about it, and you know, the vaccines coming and there'll be more mutations that won't protect the vaccines, and it'll just it'll get weaker and weaker, and people just stop talking about it and I'll move on to sort of the next attack, wherever it came from, which we know where it came from and why ever it happened. We don't know exactly, but but they have a good I do. I want to see a weapon. They have a good weapon if they ever want to do it again, because it kind of cripples the world. So I'm sure it's just it's a new way of doing things. So unfortunately, yeah, and I'm hoping that, you know, people kind of like, well, kind of just It'll just be normal again. But I don't know what what normal is going to be. I mean, I really don't You know it we could We could go back to to, like, not wearing masks and full capacity stuff, because in Texas it's open 100%. You can do whatever you want. I saw your your Ted Cruz there. Yeah, he's really It's so funny. How like, yeah, it's Border told him. Yeah, it's so funny, Like, you know, Ted Cruz is not somebody I like at all. I think he's sort of an idiot but most politicians are. It's not just Ted Cruz. I don't like AOC or any of those people, but it's so funny, like they'll tell you. Okay, you've been vaccinated. You're good, You're immunized. Your but like, they'll still be like. But you still got to wear the mask. You still am. Like if you've got the vaccine, Isn't that the point? Like you're good, you're immunized and I don't have anything against masks if you haven't been. I mean, I don't know if it works, but I'll follow the rules. But like if you've gotten the vaccine, why do you need to wear it like or if you've already had it and you have the antibodies? I mean, what good does it do? I don't know. I was talking to a doctor here in Korea the other day and he said in his hospital, and I think he does well, he's not just...

...pushing garbage around, although there's nothing wrong with that. Is that 30% in his hospital took the vaccine. 70% rejected it. Wow, this is the hospital, and this is in Korea. So yeah, and then I was like, Well, that's good to know that 70% rejected it or it's interesting, but well, the exact numbers. You didn't want me to quote him, but he did say, and a lot of people are rejecting it. I won't. I don't know if I mean, if I get if I get the vaccine, I get it. You know, it doesn't really. I don't know what it will do. I don't know much about it. Um, if I have to do things that I want to do, I'll do it. But like, I don't really know, I don't know enough about all that to really say what's what. You know, I don't know enough about asymptomatic spread or any of that. I just I try my best to to like I really don't know what what would happen. I just am clueless when it comes to all that. I have no idea. I'm I'm more resistant until I have to. I'm like, Okay, it doesn't matter. Even masks. I'm like masks. I hate them. I really I But if I have bad breath or okay or someone else has bad breath or if I go on or something or whatever, they're not the worst thing in the world to have to do. Yeah, it's very minor. I always thought it was kind of funny, like you have all these people run into Kroger's or any other grocery store, and they'll be like yelling at these poor employees like I'm always like. Come on, man, It's like you got to wear a mask for 30 minutes. Is that the worst thing in your life? I get not liking them, but it's like you don't have to take it out on the store. Employees that are just trying to do their job. You know, I thought that was kind of lame. I think I'd rather wear like a motorbike helmet. Yeah, that would be, too. I'd rather walk around with one of them than a mask. I don't know. And I get why people don't like them, you know, like, but I just I just always found it like, hilarious, that these people are like It's like they're coming and taking their kids, you know, like like it's it's just a mask, honestly, and we'll be out of it soon. They've already like in Texas. If you don't wear a mask places, nobody really does anything. They don't kick you out of the store. It's very rare. There was a lady, wasn't it? Just the other day? I mean, I've got Yeah, I got the bank broken. Yeah, I think so. And and that's that's sort of an outlier from what I've seen. So any time I've gone to, um, sort of a an establishment. I've seen so many I've seen, like, always a few people not wearing them. And nobody really does anything they just kind of, but like you can't honestly like. You can't attack people for that. I mean, they're not like they're not hurting anybody. And if you have your mask on and they don't have their masks on, you should be good regardless. But I I don't get it. I'm so I'm so over the whole thing. You know, like at this point, if you want to wear one, I I have more power to you. If you don't, I understand. I just try to I don't It's such a It's such a weird debate to be having, you know, at this time there's they. There's like unemployment is like 7% and there's like seven and had 760,000 people without a job and like we're trying to figure out who should and shouldn't wear a mask, it seems sort of like a a deterrent of some sort. So I just hope that we get to the point where things are more civil amongst people, you know, and, uh, I don't know, we might not.

But at the end of the day, all you can do is just try your best, right? Yeah. To treat people with respect. Tray tries, tray. One last question. All right. Why do you work? Well, I work because it's a good way to occupy my time. It's a good way to get ahead. And But at the end of the day, when you're working and you're doing something you love, it's hard to call it work. Um, but working is a great it gives you meaning, You know, it gives you a gives you purpose, and, uh, it helps you better society and everybody. Everybody who does a job regardless of what it is. Whether you're pushing, whether you're a janitor at a hospital, like you said or you're the president of the United States, everybody who does their job is worthwhile. And as long as they keep doing that, I think will continue to to find where we are now. And there will be some sort of civility amongst people because everybody has a certain job and responsibility and everybody should really be recognized for that, you know, because it takes it really. It's really good to to better society, by doing whatever job it is you're doing, and that's why I work. I think just better make society better in any way. I think that's why I do it. Trade Campbell board operator at ESPN 97.5 I appreciate the time that you have given me. Yeah, this has been great. I appreciate the work that you do. Thank you. And I appreciate the I'm sure in Korea they push it a little bit harder to learn English and another language. And I think that's pretty cool that they that they are, uh, they do that and that. People in over there teaching English. I'm sure it's pretty rewarding to hear people speak. Uh huh. So yeah, that's really cool. If it wasn't rewarding, my dear wife would not be happy. Yeah, I would imagine, Um, because you know, like it's, um you could go out and do a job and and not and it not be rewarding. But at the end of the day, you just be miserable. So that's that's good that you're you're doing what you love up there or down there, wherever we are geographically. And that's thank you for doing what you do and teaching kids English. So that's really cool. Thank you, Trey. Maybe we'll see you soon. Moderating somewhere. Maybe. Maybe 2028. Maybe you'll see me. Um, you'll see me on the debate stage is with whoever against, uh, maybe Tucker Carlson or whatever will be up there with, um, Oprah or whatever politics looks like in 2028. So Well, thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you for having me. I'm really enjoying. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian Wien. Be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive yet joyful day in your work.

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