WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 116 · 9 months ago

#116​ Trent McClellen - This Hour Has 22 Minutes - Comedian - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Trent McClellan is a stand-up comedian, writer, podcaster, actor and cast member of This Hour Has 22 Minutes.

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linkedin.com/in/trent-mcclellan-a65b5048

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trentscomedy.com (Company Website)

Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/TrentsComedy/

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https://twitter.com/Trent_McClellan?r...

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SHOW LESS


...welcome to why we work with your hostBrian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as wetogether dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seeminglymissteps, hopes, warnings and advice, which will be an encouragement to usall to get up, get going and keep on working. Working is tough, but workingis good. Now here's your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian V, and this iswhy we work today of the great pleasure. Speaking with Trent McClellan, Trent isa stand up comedian, writer, podcaster, actor and cast member of this hour has22 minutes today. I want to find out from him his process, the process thathe goes through in being a stand up comedian. And being on this hour has 22minutes. I want to find out which one is more difficult for him to join metoday in my conversation with Trent McClellan. I'm Brian V. And this is whywe work today. Have the great pleasure. Speaking with Trent McClellan. Good day.Fine, sir. Good day, sir. How are you? I'm doing wonderfully well. And as soonas I heard your voice ready to A moment ago, I thought of all the friends Iwent to. I met when I went to a Katie University and the bestest of friendscame from Newfoundland. Really? That's cool. It's and it's nota lie. And it's not an exaggeration I've never met. And I'm from NovaScotia. So it's not like, Hey, I heard about those new Finland guys over there.I'm from those good. We're not a far stretch from one another, but I'venever met a new philander that I haven't like. I like that. I like hearing that. Ithink the thing about Newfoundland and I'm like, you know, there are peoplefrom all walks of life and people who, you know people cannot be nice in anyprovince that you're in, I'm sure, but I think in general and Newfoundlandpeople don't take themselves too seriously. You know, if there's not alot of pretentiousness, just the culture doesn't allow it. You justyou're like people would just cut you down to size quickly if you start toact or think that you're better than anybody else. So I think that keeps youhumble, which when you come in with a certain amount of humility. I thinkit's easier to kinda to kind of connect with people because you're not. You'renot separating yourself in any way. So it's absolutely true. And that's whatyou get to realize with just, I mean, in maritime ear's any country, whereveryou're going to find people that if they're they're humble about theirbeginnings, the humble about where they are, then they're a little bit easierto get along with. I mean, we all have our difficulties, no matter who trend,will you do us a favor and give people an idea of what industry you're in andwhat you're what you're up to nowadays? Um, well, I am a comedian, actor andpodcaster and writer. I guess, uh, I've been in this industry and entertainmentfor yes, 17 years now, which is insane to think about. And, uh, currently I'mat the end of comedian and also a cast member of this hours 22 Minutes withMinutes, which is a CBC show in Canada. Here. That's a political satire show.So it's jokes combined with sketch comedy as well. So I do that, plus somestand up and I also have my own podcast called the Generators Podcast. So Ijuggle those three balls in the air most of the year, or at least half theyear, and then, uh, yeah, that's what I That's what I do. So I feel very luckyto be able to do what I love for a living and be creative for a living. Iknow not everyone gets to follow their dreams, so to speak. But I feel like Itruly am doing what I was meant to do and what I'm supposed to do. So I I'mgrateful for that every day that I get to get up and do that. I was listeningto one of your most recent episodes in the one in March March 2nd, and I wentsomewhere recently and I saw I don't know if there's a 20 ft Christmas treeand this was just a couple of days ago and you were mentioned walking aroundthe streets of Halifax, noticing, noticing some people with the Christmasdecorations still up. And is there a debate to say some people have, Theyhave the they have a point to keep it up. Isthere any point to leave them up or okay, marches to It's a stretch. Two things I will say. Number one is. Ihave seen people just change the theme of the tree. So they go from itsChristmas treats. And now it's the same Patty's Day tree like legit in Easter.Suddenly it's got Easter bonnets on it and ribbons and stuff, so they keep itup year round. I have friends who do that, you know. But the second thing is,and I I thought about this after I think with the last 12 months thatwe've had, maybe it's a little harder to take the tree down, you know,because that's, you know, some semblance of of joy and connectednessand a good season and a good feeling.

And taking that down makes the housefeel empty and cold and all those things. And I think maybe after the 12months we've had, it's just harder for people to to go and God, you know, it'stoo much reality outside my door. I don't want to. I don't want to stepinto reality. I'd just rather stay in this festive time. So this year, morethan ever, I kind of understand it. To be honest, I understand people notwanting to take it down. And it was when I saw this one. It was actually inthe hospital we went to the other day, my father in law and I was like, What'sthe Christmas tree is still doing up. Then I thought, actually, it's prettybeautiful. And some people might need coming into this place in particular.Yeah, it might be just a little pick me up. I'll tell you what I'm big into now,and I kind of see it as a year round thing is lights, you know, like I loveputting Christmas lights up like indoors, like, kind of just like, youknow, uh, just these little white lights I'm like, man, I think thatshould be a year round. I'm sure people do have it as a year round thing, andI'm like, Yeah, we'll start bringing that into my life and just, you know,making a cozy area and making my little studio kind of that way. So I thinkthere may be some some some lines of lights coming in the near future mewith just like beads of lights just here as I separate them as I'm like aseventies sitcom or something, you know, So it will be all right. The other daywe went for a walk, and they have now this new thing where I am in Daegu,South Korea. I don't know. Maybe we're behind the times when you wait at acrosswalk, rather than waiting only for the little man to change color you haveright down at your feet, a pretty thick line. Whether it's time to go, it'sgreen. And when it's time to stop, it's red. It's just a big beam right acrosswhere your feet are. So people are looking down, not always looking up.That was a pretty good idea. More lights do us good. I think I thinkyou're right, especially in this era of cell phones, with people not looking upand are looking down at their family entire time, it's like, Yeah, I need toremind you that there is a car coming, so let's put this stuff right off thesides of your phone as you looked out. So probably a safety feature that iswell warned that I would imagine So will you do us a favor and bring usback what would have been your very first job. Maybe as a teenager, Preteenif it was selling lemonade or some legit job at 13 or 14. What was whatwas your very first gig? My first ever job was I was. I love soccer playing,playing soccer when I was a kid, and, uh, when I was about probably 12 yearsold, um, they needed coaches for kids that were like ages six and seven andyounger, and so kids my age could apply to be those coaches. So I applied toremember running my resume out on a piece of, like, loose leaf paper, youknow, And like, Okay, where do I What's our address? Okay, writing it down andhanding in this piece of loose leaf paper and and getting the job, and itwas a big deal. It was like the first time ever in my life that I had checkwith my name. You know that I earned this money. It wasn't just someonegiving it to me was me earning it. And it meant a lot to me at the time.Whatever I was making, probably like, you know, 25 bucks or something, orwhatever it would have been. Um, but it was It was a big deal at the time. AndI remember, you know, showing up on time, you know, trying to come prepared.Um, so I learned all that kind of early, but I loved that job. I love soccer. Sojust being around the pitch for me, it was just so much fun. So that was thefirst one I ever had. And you were no sloe gin soccer. You played, what,Under 16 under 17, you were the captain of money as well. Yeah, Yeah, I lovedit. I got so much out of it. I You know, I I think growing up soccer was ametaphor for, like, me taking control of certain things in my life. But mygrandparents raised me, and so my childhood wasn't a traditionalchildhood, but I remember, like just pouring myself into soccer, like justgoing on a soccer pitch or this dirt road next to my house and hammering thesoccer ball off the wall. And I was just like, If I can get this ball to dowhat I what I wanted to do, it's like That's me somehow controlling all thesemoving parts of my life, so I would just get lost in playing soccer forhours and hours and hours. And then I was lucky enough to make provincialteams and then playing university and be the captain of my university teams.So it was a great gateway for me. We didn't have a lot of money growing up,so my first time ever on a plane to go to the Atlantic championships was doingsoccer. You know, I'm getting on a plane. And how was this simple workedand what? Oh my God, like all this access I was granted because I, youknow, I was. I was piecing at soccer, so I owe a lot to that game. It was myfirst job, so that's four. Gave me a lot, for sure. As you been up throughmiddle school and high school, did you continue working with soccer inparticular, where there's some other jobs that year that are notable? No. Istayed with the soccer thing every summer. For the most part, I wouldcoach at some capacity, and then I got to probably my first or second year,first year university maybe came home for the summer, and then I was thetechnical director of one of the minor soccer associations in my city. So Iwas a big job, kind of coordinating other coaches and programs and stuff sothat that was a real big job for me at...

...the time. And I remember having a lotof responsibility with that and then also trying to juggle my own soccerplaying and training. And so I had a lot going on that summer. I do recall,but it was it was great because the great thing about coaching to as a jobis that you never stop evolving. You know, there's always new drills tolearn. The game changes. You see how other coaches prepare their team or howthey set up practice or how they manage a game. And so you can always take indata. And so, as a soccer junkie, I was just I was like a sponge, just takingin all this data all the time, so I always felt like there was more tolearn. I never got stale, you know. There was always more more drills tolearn, and and and, um, more ways to set up a team and more tactics to learn.So I was I was always enthralled with it from the get go. Being a graduate ofMemorial University, what were you thinking in high school? Why did youwant to go on to further education? What were you thinking about yourcareer at that time? It's so funny because I don't know whatit was like for you, but when I was in high school, it was pre Internet, man,your career options were pretty much what your guidance counselor couldoffer you, you know? And I didn't even go to my guidance counselor, so Ididn't look pretty glitter. You have that? We had, like, a guidancecounselor, and he was great, hilarious guy and fun. But it was like, you know,the options are you can work. In the middle of my hometown was a pulp andpaper mill. A lot of folks were hoping to get on there because it paid reallywell And I was like, Well, that's not me. Another option was like, you know,you go to, like, technical college and learn a trade or something, and I waslike, Well, I'm not very handy. And I don't really. And then it was like themilitary. Do you want to join the military of the guy I long just shot at?Um, so then it was like, Well, your marks are sufficient enough for you togo to university. What do you think I was like? Well, a bunch of my friendsare going, So, uh, I'll try that. And that was pretty much the amount ofthought I'd put into it. I know inkling of career or what I was gonna be. I waslike, I already felt like great 12 just kind of dropped me off, you know, likeI was in this bubble of living. Oh, man, Every day is great basketball, soccer,hanging with my friends. And suddenly it was like, Where is everybody? Iseverybody going? It's like you're the last guy at the party. You know, youfeel there's a push behind who's pushing me out of my house. What'sgoing on? I mean, where's everybody going? I thought we were part of what'scalled your that guy. So I was that guy. I kind of lost following the crowd alittle bit, and, uh, luckily, there was still soccer to play, so that kind ofkept me connected and self engaged to a certain degree. But that was my Thatwas my road to universe. What did you take in months? I did a double major.Yeah, I did a double major in history in English because I really did enjoyEnglish in, um, in high school. I liked I've enjoyed reading and I like, youknow, writing papers about that stuff and finding a team and a thesis andstuff. And then in history in the university, I started take a bunch ofhistory courses and I found that really, really interesting as well, so that Iwas like, Okay, well, these are the things that also they were they tendedto be my best marks. I was like, I think this is what I'm supposed to do.No idea of what I'm supposed to do with that degree or what you do with This isa major. People like you're going to be a teacher of my I don't I don't know.Maybe I coach kids my whole life and, uh, you know, and, um but that was it.That was kind of the That was kind of the road there. As you started to neargraduation, though, did things start to crystallize or were you still wanderingabout? And don't get me wrong. I'm still wandering about in my forties andI did that whole path and, like, I don't know, I still don't know what Iwant to do. Yeah, No, I was the same way, man. I was like, How do I What amI supposed to do? And I know if you felt this pressure, but a lot of myfriends knew what they wanted to do, So they were like, I'm going to be anengineer that went into the engineering program, Got a job placement straightout. I was like, Wow, I'm not that guy. So what am I supposed to do? So I feltreally lost for while And when I graduated from university also keep inmind as well as new flat at the time. Very, very high unemployment, like itwas just like people had master's degrees and they were applying for jobsat the mall, like for customer service jobs at the gap, because it was just sobad. And so I ended up um I got a job as a waiter for a year, was justserving tables, and I hated that. I was just like, I can't I don't see the joyand this at all. If you do a good job, that's what they expect. If the food iscold or the orders messed up, then you're the face of the restaurant, andthey want to take it out on a good point. If you do a good job, that'swhat they expect. So don't expect way to go. You brought the food we ordered.Well done. You're like, Okay, but if I don't bring it, you're angry, right? Umand then I got a job, uh, working at the Boys and Girls Club as a kind of arecreation director and boys and girls club. So with my coaching background,they were looking for someone to work with youth there. And I did that, and Iwas in that field for almost a decade. I worked the Boys and Girls Club for acouple of years that I worked at a...

...community center in Newfoundland for afew years. And then I moved to Calgary and I worked at boys and girls come inCalgary as well out of Newfoundland. So I was in that field for quite a whileand I really, really enjoyed it. But I still deep down knew I don't know ifthat's what I'm ultimately supposed to be doing with my life, but I did enjoyit and enjoy the kids that I worked with. And I enjoyed this crew that Iworked with. But, um, yeah, I just drifted into that field. So, knowingyour roles now, how did you step into comedy? Was that even a part of growingup as well? Or was it just off the whim? Yeah, comedy for me, I think, was adefense mechanism. In all honesty, it was like, You know, you're a black kidgrowing up in an all white town, for most intents, purposes, it was like Ididn't see anyone who looked like me. My grandparents were white, they raisedme, so I had. I always felt different on the outside, So a way for me to takecontrol of situations where I might be the focus of attention. The negativeway was to be funny, you know, it's just like you change the power dynamicin that moment. So I always had a pretty keen sense of humor, and I had alot of friends are like, Oh, you should do comedy. You should do stand up. Butin Newfoundland at that time in the eighties and nineties, there was nocomedy scene. There were no comedy clubs. It was just something on mytelevision, you know, like I didn't have access to talk to comedians. Um,and I got to go to one or two shows that came through the city, but I never,ever got to speak to a real comedian or learn about how to do it. But when Ifinally graduated from university and I had those jobs working with kids, Idecided to move to Calgary because the economy had dried up really badly inNewfoundland. And when I chose Calgary, I knew they had comedy clubs there, andI said if I moved there, I'm going to go to an amateur night and just try itwhen I go on stage and just see if I can make strange writing. Did you writeat all before this? Before this? Yeah. So when you when you went to a yuckyucks. I think it was in Calgary at the time was a yuck yucks. They had whatthey called amateur night, where you could go for an hour ahead of time andthey had a headline and comedian who would talk to you about the business.So there'll be a group of people, all newbies, and they would tell you aboutyou know, how to write a joke joke structure, how the business works. Someof them are really good at doing that. Others were kind of just grizzled guys,you're like most of you won't be here in a month. You know, you don't havewhat it takes, you don't you know, you're like so there's a bit of that.And I was just the same thing like as I was with soccer. I was just a sponge. Ijust took it all in. I could not get enough of it. I was reading books aboutstand up, but I was totally enthralled. And then I went on stage for the firsttime, and I swear to you, everything in that moment made sense. After I As soonas I got on stage, I was like this is what I'm supposed to do with the restof my life. Everything else now makes sense. Why other things didn't work out.Why I was wasn't completely fulfilled in other things, because I hadn't foundthis thing. And now I know why. And I knew how many minutes did you do yourfirst time? I think they let you let you do 5 to 7 minutes and I tell people,man that walk when you're in the wings at a comedy club in the dark andthey're about to announce you and the host goes all right, this next guy thefirst time ever on stage. I mean, your knees, my knees were literallyquivering, like for real quivering. And I remember thinking, can I make it tothe microphone like, will I be able to physically move my legs left, right,left, right, and get to this Mike. And, uh, I was fortunate enough to get tothe mic. Gotta laugh early. And then my confidence kind of grew a little bit.And I was like, Oh, wow. Okay, whatever. But the next one and I got a laugh andI was off to the races. I was just I was hooked. It was like it was likesomething. You're like a drug you can't get enough of or something. And I wasjust so addictive to get that kind of adulation and to connect with strangerslike that from out of the gates and off to the races. How long was it beforeyou got your first prize? Yeah, of some surprise of some sort of maybe a dollaror something. Like what? I'm getting something in return for this race. Yeah.So what I continue to do was I would work at Boys and Girls Club Monday toFriday, and then on the weekends, the Booker in Calgary would send me off onthe road to go open for bigger acts. After probably after a few months, thisstarted to happen. So I'd go to, like, small town Alberta or somewhere inSaskatchewan at a legion or a community center. And I'm like, I'm doing 20minutes and it would cost me more in gas money to get there than when I wasgetting paid. But I was like, I'm making money doing stand up, you know,and, uh, I come back on Sunday, I go back to my job again Monday at, uh, atthe Boys and Girls Club. And I remember the story. I was playing some smalltown and I was opening for somebody else in Alberta Saturday night. Andonce we got off stage because there's...

...such a small town, like as a comediancoming through it was a big deal for a lot of the folks that were in town,right? They didn't know who you were, but they just knew you were one of thecomedians. And you were funny and like, Oh, my God. So get off stage myself andtwo other comedians And so people come up and they want autographs, right? Idon't even know our names, Really? But they're just like, Hey, man, would yousign my So I'm my thing and sign this sort of. So we're signing stuff and I'mlike, My God, Wow, this is amazing. We're just on a cloud. We're drivingback to Calgary kids on Monday. Yeah, so Monday, Monday, I get into work andI'm feeling like I'm on a high. I'm like, man, maybe, you know, it's timefor me to start thinking about, you know, moving on and doing standup fulltime. And I get into work and one of my staff goes Trent, the boys toiletsclause you They just had me a plunger. I was like I was signing autographs onthe weekend. How? An autograph. I don't think that having a plunger I met I'vebeen walking into the boy's room like just like that was That was the firstcrack in the foundation of like All right, it's time to start considering.Uh, yeah, but no matter how famous you get, I even heard one of your skitstalking about, you know, whether it's the clog and the tub or that it doesn'tmatter and the toilet or not, What? One day? It doesn't matter how big you arebecause of female. You're going to have to unclog it, unclogged something. Well,that's life, isn't It was a metaphor for life, always unclogging something.So but that Yeah, I did it for about three years. I did that kind of cycleof work during the week gig on the weekend work during the weekend thatfor three years and then eventually, as their cabinet leap in to stand up fulltime after three years and so forth. It seems like a bit of a cliche what I'mgoing to ask, but I think you'll know what I mean. But I think as a comedianyou have all this work that you're putting into it that people don't see.But where was your big break? When did you break through? And and it's notlike it was done to it and it might have been. But all that work behindwhat people don't see like. But when did you break for you know, what wasyour big break? I think a big break for me and I don't know where this camefrom. It was more of a mindset. I would say in the mindset was This is a job.This is not a party. This is not a great way to meet girls. This is notThis is a job. And like all jobs, you have to work, put an effort and beprofessional. And I quickly learned the talent wasn't enough. Like there's lotsof folks who are funny and, you know, very, very talented, but didn't meanthey went on to have long, successful, healthy careers because they had otherthings whether it was drinking or gambling or drugs or whatever it was,they just didn't couldn't stay focused enough to just keep doing this thingand keep creating. And I learned that early somehow. I mean, I did my shareparty into, I'm sure when I first started, and I was enjoying myself, too.But I feel like I realized quickly, like if you want to have success inthis business, you're going to have to put in an effort and really, really digin, and I learned that early. The other thing I would say that really helped mewas I was able to work fairly clean. Material was so that allowed me to docorporate comedy, which was where companies would hire you for theirholiday party or whatever, and that put a lot of money in my pocket. So Itreated that almost like my new day job. I'll do corporate comedy where I kindof have to played by a stricter set of rules and be squeaky clean, but atleast I'm still doing stand up. At least it's forcing me to kind of writein a certain way, and then on the weekends when I'm doing other club gigs.I can say whatever I want, and I'm not censored. But those two things really,really help me because they allowed me to put enough money in my pocket tokind of keep funding the dream and funding the dream. So I think those twothings were really, really, really, really huge for me to be able to keepmy legs moving. It's I watched a Maybe you've seen it, too. But the Netflix ofJerry Seinfeld and one of his older times is showing. When he first startedand Orange Adams was in it as well. And what that movie changed my life. What Ididn't realize, like, I mean, he spread out all of his work from a certainamount of time on one of the roads or something. All the pieces of paper andeven or any Adams had a filing cabinet full of stuff, just material that hasbeen working on. How is that for you and that writing process and, you know,keep crafting your skills? Yeah, well, that movie I watched that documentaryabout, you know, Seinfeld and ornate and people writing their material. Iwatched that movie before I ever went on stage. So that gave me permission totry it. Because I was like, before that I thought anything professionalcomedian say on stage is like, Oh, they just have these brilliant thoughts andthey walk up on stage and say them where it comes out the top of theirhead. I didn't realize it took that much work and effort to craft and act,so I went well. I have ideas. So what do you guys do? Just go up and see ifit works. And maybe sometimes it doesn't like I can do that fromstarting now. I just have ideas. So that showed me the behind the curtainof what it took to be a stand up in the...

...process. So that was so crucial for me.And then I was like, Okay, well, I need to write every day. Then I need to,like, put work into this every single day, spend time. Either I would go to aStarbucks or coffee shop and I would sit there and just try and write a fewjokes every single day or go back and look at jokes that I was already doingand see if I could improve them or add to them. And, you know, I drive byStarbucks in Calgary. Now I can still go. Like I wrote my full my first actand that Starbucks, like over the course of a bunch of months, I wouldhave read my full act in there. You know, observing people overhearingconversations, you get inspired to write something, and and that's wherethe work ethic comes in. And it's funny you brought that up because in thatmovie, Jerry Seinfeld actually says it's about sitting your ass down in thechair and doing the work for a lot of comedians or getting getting on stage.And he said he remembers looking out the window and a bunch of constructionworkers dropping on the road, and they don't want to go back to work afterlunch. Uh, and he goes, I don't care if you're in the mood to write jokes, sitdown and write him and he goes, You know that. I think that work ethic wasinstilled in me just in watching that movie and then seeing other successfulcomedians and how they plied their trade and to work like you said, theyput in offstage in the dark like an athlete, right, like Sidney Crosby wonStanley Cups and gold medals. But what you don't see is training the dry landtraining and summer with a parachute tied to his back running up a sand dune.You just see him lifting the cop like and the greatest. It's like, Yeah, buthours and hours and hours of work and effort in the dark that nobody sees. SoI think anyone to be successful at a high level. I think it takes a lot ofthat that that what he said and what you're reiterating is very importantfor anyone in any industry, because I was thinking of it yesterday. I wasfeeling a little glum and I went for a walk and I saw I just looked at peoplelike that person does not necessarily want to be doing their job right now,but they're doing it right there. You know they have to put their feet on onthe floor and get up and get going, and a lot of people feel that way. But as Ithink it's an encouragement to see other people putting in the grind,putting in the time putting in the effort, refining going back and even ifyou don't want to getting up, whatever putting a parachute on your back. Allof those things are ways to encourage one another and show that this workthat we're doing is paying off. Whatever your goals and dreams, maybethey're valid in each individual's life. Well, there's no doubt about it. Yeah,it's very well put. And a motto that I've kind of adopted to is that youwill be measured at some point. You know, like I get athletes don't want totrain every day, and I get Comedians don't want to put working every day,but at some point you will be measured. You will be at a show. There will behigh stakes. It will be for a showcase or an audition, or you've got a bigaudience or you've got a tour you sold tickets to, and now there's 1000 peopleout there waiting to see you like you're about to be measured. And inthat moment you'll have to ask yourself, Have I done the preparation and thework or have I not? And there's nowhere to hide in that moment. That's thething about stand up. It's such a solitary endeavor. There is no one tolean off in that moment. You either have got the material or you do not andnobody cares. They paid their money and they're like go. And so I always thinkabout that, like the next tour, the next big show I have like, Will I beready for it? And it might not be for months, but it's like, Well, you canyou prepare now and there's always something you can do to get better, youknow? So that's kind of the way I approach it is to that When when I whenit's time to get measured, will I be ready? And hopefully I can answer yes,Well, how you mentioned that the waiter waitress bringing the food? Did you doyour job? Good. You're supposed to, And the grind or the difficulty in beingcomedian, I think, is up there with any of the top lip. I mean, any job hasdifficulty, and it brings stress and difficulties to each people based onwhat they can handle. But being a competing, I think, is at leastsomewhere pushing the top because you have to be funny. Yeah, it's not enough just to publicspeak. Yeah, it's not just enough to public speak, you know, it's like Okay,well, a lot of folks, folks and public speaker, it's like I need to actuallyget a physical reaction. A lot of these people, like I'm not there, just hopingthat they listen. I'm like, No, I need you to laugh at the end of what I'msaying. And again, it's a different. It's a different thing. I know itsounds silly. Once stated the truth. It's funny, right? I'm going to saysome things to you today, and at the end of it, I need to laugh. That's the whole goal.And it's funny because my days playing soccer and stuff helped me a lotbecause there's a lot of parallels I've found, like even in my own podcast.Talking to athletes and and uh, and other comedians is that when you're anathlete, game time is eight o'clock or whatever time it is. The oppositiondoesn't care if you slept well. They don't care if you have food poisoning,they don't care if you don't feel great, they don't care if you had a bad travelday. They're like they're going to beat the crap pretty when you show up andthe same thing with an audience, it's like if I haven't had a good day, Ihaven't slept well. Hotel. I couldn't...

...sleep by food. Nobody cares. Eighto'clock. It's like I paid my money. Make me laugh. So that's the mentality.Uh, yeah, exactly. It's like there. You have to show up and be professional anddo the job. I mean, there's been times I've got on stage or I did not feelgood. I was tired. I, you know, whatever a million different thingsthat happen to someone in a lifetime. But you have to be able to flip thatswitch at Showtime and deliver. And, um, you know, it's like we talked aboutearlier, easy to do things. When you're in the mood to do it, Can you do whenyou're not in the mood to do it? You know, um, I think that's what separatesin the comedy world anyway. Often, people say, that's what separates theamateurs from the pros. The pros will like. That's what it should do it anddeliver when they need to, and amateurs are like when I'm in the mood when I'mfeeling it, and when the crowds kind of into me and then it's like, Yeah,you're going downhill It's easy when you got to go uphill Not so easy. So,um, you learn that from doing lots of different gigs with lots of differentaudiences at various different times a day. And, uh, you know, crowds thathave not drank any alcohol crowds and drank too much alcohol, and you learnto just be able to deliver and figure out a way to connect with that audience.You know, not to say you don't have shows that don't work because of everycomedian will have those two. But you just you learn over time, more toolsand your belt to use, you know, with different scenarios. But it's notalways about motivation is like, Can you just have the discipline to be ableto deliver in this moment? So I learned a lot of that from sports. I thinkTrent, what was the transition like for you from being a stand up comedian intothis hour? Has 22 minutes, And how much different is that from just being onstage all on your own, with just your being responsible for yourself, right?Yeah. No, it's It's a big change. It's it's kind of 1 80 because we're part ofa part of a team. You know, when you're with 22 there's, you know, your fellowcastmates. There's a bunch of writers you have directors, executive producers,people who do set design, you know, wardrobe makeup like it's a full, afull team. And that kind of a collective wisdom to kind of see thisvision come to life. Stand up is very, you know, autocratic. It's like I getto say it the way I want to say it every single time I get to pick thetopics. And on 22 I guess we do. I do get to have input and get to writethings and stuff. But everyone there's so many more hands on it, right? And soit's gonna be okay with the network in terms of like, you know what languagewe can use and those are the things. So you're always kind of in a bit of aframework that you didn't necessarily create, whereas with stand up, it'scomplete freedom to say and do whatever you want long. But it's funny, you know,as long as you deem it to be funny. And if you get an audience to laugh, it'sall okay. So, um, it's a bit of an adjustment there mentally, for sure,because you're different. Different approach. Also, the great thing aboutstand up is that you can write something this happen to me. Just theother day, my girlfriend and I were joking around about a topic and I said,I'm going to go to the club tonight. I'm going to try that. And she's like,Okay, so I go to the club, she comes with me and I try it and it works. Soright away, I had an idea. At five o'clock three hours later, I'm on stagesaying that thing, and a bunch of strangers I've never met are nowlaughing at it like so the feedback is immediate. I know immediately what'sworking with TV. You make something last week it's not going to air. So thefollowing week, in between those two things, we've already made 100 things.We already moved on to make more sketches and write more jokes andwhatever. So you don't get to see the reaction of it per se, because peopleare home in their living room and watching it, you know, or you'll seeonline, maybe like if something is doing well or it's going viral orwhatever. But stand up to me is cool because it's just that immediate. Ihave a thought, this idea taking the stage and see if it works and theaudience will tell you right then and there in the moment. So So they're very,very different. The shore between stand up and and, uh, catch like that betweenthe two. Which one brings you the most difficulty and what are thosedifficulties and which brings you the most satisfaction? And what is that?Satisfaction? Yeah, I think both come with their challenges. Stand up againbecause it's I've said this to musicians that I've had on my podcast,you know, like people who have been in bands. Part of me wishes I had kind of been agroup like that. You know, whether it's a comedy group for music group orwhatever, because you have that camaraderie of traveling around. You'renot alone. Stand up. Comedians often are just traveling alone and hotelsalone eating alone. You do the show alone, you're alone again. It's a lotof isolation, you know. Um so that's a downside of stand up being alone. Butyou have to be funny to a bunch of people. Yeah, it's a great quote,actually, from Steve Martin's book Born Standing Up. I don't know if you'veread it or not, but he has a great quote about playing a football stadium,you know? And it was probably, I think, you know, 80,000 people. It's him juston a massive stage, wearing this white suit, and he's destroying and killing.The crowd is going crazy. The show ends. He gets in a limo. He goes to a hotel,sits at his hotel room by himself, and...

...he's just eating shrimp cocktail byhimself. And like the duality of those two things are like just. It was in thebiggest crowd, where I was the focal point of all this energy and love, andnow I'm sitting by myself with a remote control watching the evening news, andit's just me, you know, like there's those two things that are hard tobalance sometimes for comedians. I think some comedians struggle trying toget away to deal with that, but also creatively. Then you have 100% controlcreatively. You can do things the way you want to do it, and so there's nocompromise. So the great thing about 22 is you love being part of a team.People bringing new ideas. Playing with other actors is fantastic becauseyou're going to get to see where something's going to go and let it cometo life in the moment while you're doing a sketch together. Um, but also,sometimes when you have an idea and it doesn't make the show for whateverreason, sometimes that could be frustration because you've worked hardon it and you think it would work. But someone else will use it like we justcan't do it. We can't shoot it or we just don't think it would work. Soyou're always compromising in that regard. So that would be the challenge,I think, with the T V side. I was talking to Tommy Cheung and hementioned Steve Martin had quit stand up comedy because he could not handle making his set, delivering the set,performing going on stage and then having to write a new set again. Sothose peaks and valleys of getting back down in those trenches in those fiveminutes again you know, this joke here and trying How is that for you? Becausewhat? People may not understand that I obviously don't understand it fully.But you get your set, you got, you know, a good 2040 50 minutes. However muchyou have. And then when you're done playing that out to all the places yougo to, you got to start over again. Yeah, you gotta you gotta build rebuildit again. And and that's hard for some comedians to do it. It's not easy,because you you get a certain slow of this material. You feel like you cankeep adding on to that material. But the new standard now is like, yeah,have that for a year or two and then get rid of it and put a brand new ourmaterial out. And that's really hard to find an industry. Now people aretalking about Eddie Murphy coming back, you know, stand up. And he seemshesitant, right? He was on. He was on Jerry Spy us Seinfeld. And on that showcoffee with comedy comedians encourages encouraged coffee. He just He justseemed like he was very hesitant to that whole idea. Yeah, because he knowsthat because he's a comedian, he could have done it before, before you sawDelirious or raw. What you don't see is the years of going to comedy clubs andworking this material out. So he knows that if he has got to come back and ahas to try and meet the standard that people have already set for him intheir minds as to what he was and that legend and how good he was before hegot to try and meet that bar. And in order to get to that bird, you gottaget clubs. You gotta get stage time. You're gonna be on that stage prettymuch every night, doing multiple sets. Trying to work your material like thatis work that is a grind. And that's the danger of television Sometimes ormovies you get. It's such a it's an easier lifestyle. So it's easy to sitback and watch TV and have a good time, and then you want to set the next day.Do you want to do all that? But now, when you come home, you got to go do aset at the Comedy Cellar in New York and then go to another place. Afterthat, get home at two o'clock in the morning, go to sleep, wake up. You'reon set now, doing your film again like it's a grind. Its work to get thatpolished diamonds ready for public consumption for a Netflix special orwhatever, because you know what's going to go out in the world and it will livein infamy forever. So that's a lot of pressure on someone when even whenyou're ready, Murphy, because the standard is so high and you set thatstandard for yourself with your past work. So, um, I understand why you'd behesitant, because and you have that pressure trades work to do. You havethat pressure as well. And I heard you mentioned that you went to Comedy Covenot long ago. And how was that for you to get back at your credit? Eggs, youknow? Yeah, it was good, but it feels like, you know, you're riding a blankagain. For the first time, you know, it's just that muscle will atrophy ifyou don't use it. It's like you need to be on stage all the time. So now, asour 22 minutes season is winding down, I'll be doing more stand up and gettingup more and working on more new materials. So you eventually just haveto get back up and do it. There is no shortcut. That's the thing about it.Like, um, I mean, I think Eddie Murphy the genius for one so it may be easierfor him than anybody else, but end of the day, you still want to be sharp.You still want to deliver when people are paying real good money to come seeyou. And your name is on a poster and they bought tickets months ago like youreally, really want to deliver? Um, and so that takes repetition that takeswork and writing out stage. So, um yeah, but I enjoy that process. I was luckythat way to stand up, and I love the adrenaline of performing, but I alsoloved sitting down with a pen and paper and trying to figure out why a jokedoesn't work and trying to fix it and...

...then tweaking it and taking it back onstage like I love that part to the I love the solitary nous of that. So I'mlucky in that way. Is there a specific skill thinking back when you were inCalgary and you went up on stage for the first time? And even now, afterbeing on stage many times in front of the camera, is there something inparticular that helps a comedian be at his or her best? For your particular? That's a greatquestion. I think. I think a lack of self consciousness isa great thing to have. I think self consciousness really put the handcuffs on everybody,whether your public speaking, whether you're leader of a company, Um, can youjust be in the moment and deliver this thing and not have the radio going inyour head about all these other thoughts that could be negative anddraining you? Can you just be in the moment and focused? And the more youcan dial in like that, they think the better you are in the betterperformance you'll have. But it's when we start worrying about Will this work?Will it not work. What do they think? You know, you that well trainedconfidence and it takes away from performance, I think, at the end of day.So the great thing about doing stand up for a bunch of years is that selfconsciousness tends to go away more and more and more and more. I think you'llalways have a level of it, but it's really quiets down as you've been doingit for a long time. You just kind of go. Nothing is fatal. If this joke works,it doesn't work. It doesn't matter. I get up again tomorrow. You know what Imean? Like I wake up tomorrow in my own bed. Who cares like it's You don't haveas much pressure on yourself to to make sure everything's perfect from the getgo, You're like, No, I'm willing to try something different. Experiments. Putnew ideas out there, see what I can find, you know, So that lack of selfconsciousness, I think it is vital for a comedian. Do you ever bring noteswith you or some sort of cues to help you stay on track? Yeah, Sometimes whenI'm trying to brand new material, I'll just take, like, a little note pad upthere with me or a little notebook and I'll have just a set list written downa few bullet points, and I think I'm going to forget it. The great thing tofor me anyways, it becomes memory very quickly for me. So if I can do it oncelike that, or twice like that, then it will quickly be like, Okay, well, nowit's in there and I know it, and I can start adding onto it and putting layerson top of it and new angles and add new lines to it. But sometimes the firsttime you just because you're performing in front of a live audience. Sometimesstuff can just leave your mind in the moment. You can look down quickly andgo, okay, Have a reference point, you know. But once I'm in the groove and Iknow my hour or whatever, I I don't need any notes at all. I just justlocked in there and I can go. So trend, knowing how you said that when you wentto school, your university weren't sure what you were going to take. You didsome other helping out working in other places, but not until you stood up onthat stage. You kind of found that was what you wanted to do for your life.Knowing that people arrive at those points at various stages in their life.Do you have any advice for people who are starting their first job? Maybelike you, you know, you were a soccer coach at the age of 12 or changingtheir career after they're finding something different. Works for them. Doyou have advice for people like that? Yeah, it's funny. I talked to, um, abunch of student athletes at my former University of Memorial University. Ispoke to them two weeks ago on Zoom. One of the things I said to them was, You do not need to put pressure onyourself that this thing that you choose is now locked and loaded, andthat's what you got to do for the rest of your life. Like people changecareers, you know, 6789 times. But that's just the nature of the worldwe're in right now. But we put so much pressure on kids in particular to knowwhat they want to do at 17 18 years of age. Like to me, that's ridiculous. Youknow, you're not. You haven't even experienced the world yet. How are yougoing to know what you want to do with your life? Like so? I don't think it'srealistic for people to feel like they got to pick a lane and stay in thatlane. And so I think case as many things. You can try things and realizeyou can always turn the car around. You're not happy doing this thing. Youcan leave it and you can go do something else. But I think we startmuddying the waters when we start listening to parents in their opinion.And you go, Well, I spent all this money on my degree. So now I have tostay in this field because I spent all that money in education. Why? And soyou can be unhappy and just go well, I am going to fulfill this. It's like, dothe thing you love, and I think ultimately, and I don't know what yourthoughts are on it, but I feel like people deep down, if they're quiet, allthe noise, they know what they want to do But it's when we let all the othernoise in from the outside we start convincing ourselves and no well, no, Ican't do that thing or someone else thinks that's not a good idea, You know,like no one else's business, What you want to do with your life career. Ifyou quiet the noise and listen to yourself, you know what that is. It maytake a long time. I don't know what status you'll get to a level you get to,but if you follow that, I feel like the rest of it will come. You work wayharder because you love it. You will put the effort in because you want tobe doing that thing. And I think more...

...people need to listen to that and stoplistening to all the outside noise and industry trends. And here's who'shiring. It's like I get. People have to pay the bills, and I I respect anyonewho works for a living. I respect anyone who's willing to do any job anddoes it to the best of their ability. But do the thing you want to do, do thething you want to do and don't listen to any outside noise. Yeah, that's whatI find about doing this podcast of why we work and just finding people fromall sorts of walks doing these and many other things that they do and how theycame about doing it. And a lot of the people seem to It was just somethingthat they kind of knew. It was part of them their whole life, and it just tookthem a while to get there. And it's just I think what you're saying is thatnoise kind of gets in the way and other pressures. You know, you get married oryou have kids or, you know, this Johnny went to this school and you have to goto this or, you know, all of those things kind of mud. As you said, muddyup the waters of allowing us to think clearly. Yeah, I think you know fear isa chameleon, right? Fear will mask itself in different ways. We make upstories as to why we can't follow this certain career path. You know, we thinkour parents are going to get mad. We think our partner won't understand. Weare fearful that we don't know how to transition to this next thing. And atthe end of the day, the only way you'll ever know is if you try that thing andput your toe in the water, at least check the temperature of the water overthere. I wouldn't know if I could be a stand up or not. If I didn't find thelegs encouraged to go up on stage the first time the rest of the time, itwould just be wondering if I could ever do it. And what if they don't laugh andthinking about worst case scenarios? And so I feel like people need to startanother way. I've heard of terms, you know, People say, Follow your passion,follow your passion. And another way I've heard it phrased is think about itless as a passion. Think about it more as a curiosity. Follow your curiosityand that sometimes it's just a whisper. It's just a small thing. It's the thingyou love doing when you're not getting paid. When you you just had free time.This is the thing you would do. What is that thing, and can you find a way tomake a living doing that thing. And I think if more folks look to followtheir curiosity, I think there'd be a lot happier like that. The curiosity,Because when someone says, Follow your passion might I don't know if what I'mdoing is my passion, but I'd like to find out more about it and and seewhere that takes me. Is it a full blown passion? I'm not sure, if you thinkalso, if it is my full blown passion, why aren't I doing better with? I am askilled with this. What may be my passion is not going to pay me in. ButI heard Bill Burr, the great comedian American comedian. He said he wasgiving advice to someone who wanted to try stand up, and they're like they hada great six figure job and but they really, really wanted to try stand up.And that was his advice to them was, you know, just just go to an open likejust try it. Just go try it for a little bit on the side. Don't quit yourday job by any means, but just go try some open mics and see how you feel andyou'll know within that period of time after a period of months, like, Is thissomething you want to put more energy into? Is it what you thought it wasgoing to be like? You get all this data back from the experience, You know whatI mean? And then you can make a decision. Um, but it goes, You've gotto have that thing that drive that. Yeah. Like at all costs. I will find away to get this done because you have that curiosity just pulling you along.But if you don't have that, then that's probably not going to be your thing,you know? So I think you're right. I like that phrase. The terminology ofcuriosity. I think it it's passion to me. Seems too large and brand. And wetry And, you know, I'm changing the world with my passion, and I think alot of people like what are you talking about? Like I live in a small town, Uh,from the Passion fruit. Yeah, we don't even we don't have a bus system here.What are you talking about? So it's like, uh but I think when you saycuriosity, I think everyone can identify with the curiosity that theyhave that they could say. Yeah, I wouldn't mind. I've always wanted tolearn guitar, So, yeah, I think I'm gonna buy a guitar and maybe learn howto play like it's just a small little gradual increments, You know that Pullyou along. Is there a trend? I think Bill Burr is one of your favoritecomedians. And you mentioned your grandparents. Do you have a moralbeacon that's kind of guiding you along or something that you're trying toattain to A You know, a thing in the back of your mind that kind of pushesyou and encourages you. I really, um, been thinking about thisthe last the last couple of years. Actually started doing meditation thelast probably six years. I guess, uh, I try to incorporate into every day, somedays I don't get to do it, but I try and do it a bunch of times a week, atleast. Sort of. Excuse me. I like doing that. And I like just quieting my minda little bit. And part of that routine as well includes a gratitude practice. I'm just writing down three thingsevery day that I'm grateful for an interaction, a cup of coffee, whateverit may be that I can just meditate on and think about how great that was. AndI end each meditation normally with I want to be kind and I want to becreative. I want to be kind and I want...

...to be creative like that is the intentof every single day. Be kind, be creative. And if I do those things atthe end of the day, I feel happy and I feel authentic. So that's kind ofbecome my little moral compass is be kind to be creative. That's excellent.Do you have a view opinion on education in general,but also knowing your soccer player exercise so education and more so forthe listeners, but wondering what you do and how you keep fit, and with yourmind and your body, what are your views on those two, Um, with regards to exercise and tryand work out a couple times a week for sure. So it's, you know, weighttraining, um, treadmill stuff, um, you know, spin, spin, bikes and stuff. Itry to do that three or four times a week, and, uh, I love that because itjust real big believer that you can change your state of mind by changingyour body, and you can change your body by changing your state of mind. Youknow that adage, and I feel like you can. So when you're in a bit of a rut,mentally exercise for me will really jog things up for me and allow them tobe creative again or giving a new perspective a lot of problem or anobstacle. So I really, really I'm big on that, and I know it's also my story.Would you also say, because I missed exercise last couple days and I justfelt gloomy, right? And I think people don't realize, you know, it's easy tobe lazy. It's not even easy to be lazy. You kind of have to work at being lazyas well. But once you get in that group of a few days of not a week, a monthand you're not doing it like that's a big part of how you're feeling, becauseonce you get out and do one little bit of exercise like Oh, I know what I'mdoing and you feel totally different. Yeah, I agree. And I totally agree. Andit gets back to what we said earlier, like about, You know, writing jokes aredoing the job even when you don't want to do it. The trick of that is just sitdown and start. Give yourself five minutes. You know, like, if you'regonna do a Taft, you don't want to do it. Just say, look, I'm gonna I'm gonnaput five minutes into this, and I guarantee you, once you start, you'llput it more than five minutes. You just started doing it. But it's just thetransition from doing nothing to do something that we see as Mount Everestquite often. And the gym is the same thing. It's like just get dressed. Putyour clothes on and start moving your ass to the gym. And when people do that,you get there. Now you're there, you're going to put the work in. Now thatyou're there, it's just that transition of getting from a to B. So it's notabout We always wait for motivation and being in the mood. And it's like it'sjust not people can't live that way because you're not always going to bein the mood. But you just got to get into that discipline. Very mindset oflike, yeah, I'm going to look at the clock and go at six o'clock. I'm goingout that door at six o'clock. Doesn't matter from in the mood, I don't care.But feeling it, I never regret it. I go never come back. And I'm always glad Iwent hated beforehand. But never regret it afterwards, ever. You never do it.So you realize that. I know I can tell myself that to that. I know I'll feelbetter when I come back. Like I automatically know that. So that alsohelps me move that door. Um, education. And I feel is like, I really think people I I think readingin general to just the general educational thing is just fantastic. Ithink putting reading in every single day is great and and reading as much asyou can is a great thing. Excuse me. I think we're on our phones way too muchthese days, and, you know, social media and likes and whatever we should belike learning more and and and reading more and seeing combinations of wordstogether and making our minds think differently. I love reading books aboutcreativity and understanding, people's process of making anything, whetherit's music or movies or stand up comedy. I just love the most Honda scenes, uh,inner workings of process for people and what makes them how they go abouttheir work. I love that, Um, and for me, university was vital because I ittaught me how to critically think it taught me how to not just take thingsat face value but question them and dig inside and unlock them and go, Why isthat? Well, how come that thing happens? Well, maybe it's connected to this. AndI really feel like that helped me so much in my comedy career because that'swhat comedians do. We ask why we ask, How come that is that way? It'sperspective. Making an argument. Um, I learned all that in university. So whatis your overarching goal? Maybe with your stand up comedy routine, maybeinto acting, maybe with your podcast? What is your overarching goal for you? I think I want to just continue to becreative and see where that curiosity and takes me to be honest, I feel like,um I want the podcast to continue to grow and more people to hear it and tocontinue to have great conversations. Um, for me, that go with the podcast isjust I realized in my profession, I was getting to have fantastic conversationswith people from all different professions. This is the generators.Correct. The generator generator podcast. Yeah. So I've talked to, youknow, comedians, musicians, um, athletes, NHL, former NHL players,coaches, journalists and doctors like...

...and I I realized that I would like tostart capturing these conversations, you know, and sharing them with peoplebecause I always learned so much. I feel like it's selfish in a way becauseI would gain so much from the conversation to kind of plug into myown life. But I was like, when I start capturing these and putting them out inthe world So we're at, like, I think, 75 episodes now and stuff, So I justwant to continue to keep doing that and hopefully more people will find it. Um,stand up was I want to continue to push myself and grow and continue to createnew material all the time. try new things on stage, Uh, you know, and thenreally push myself that way. Performance was, and then, obviously,I'd like to just do some of my own projects as well, and I'd like to writea book at some point. So I I think that's going to be in my in my nearfuture. So it's like, yeah, continuing to be creative in any way. I thinkthat's when I'm happiest when I'm doing those things. I feel like that's whenI'm my authentic self. So I don't have any, um, real tangible goals in termsof like, Oh, I got to raise this are going to respect I feel like thosethings you don't control necessarily that the universe and industry and allthose things deciding. Whereas if my goals are internal and I focus on thethings that I can control, which is just my own effort, my own output, thenyou know, I think I will continue to be happy and content with what I'm doing.Is there anything people may not understand about you, or maybe evencomedy in particular, that if they understood this about you or comedy,they would have a better appreciation for you or the art of comedy. I think the big thing about comedy Ialways I feel like people don't understand is that it's such avulnerable thing to stand up on a stage and, you know, say, Hey, I'm going totry and entertain these people And, you know, like I said, you could be movinganywhere from 10 people one night, uh, 1500 people the next night, you know? Imean, it's such a vulnerable place to be. And so when people go to shows andthey like, yell stuff out or they're drunk and they're heckling, it's likeyou don't realize how vulnerable that person is on stage, and the only reasonthey're there is to just make you laugh. That's the only reason they've come.They're not there to go like, I hope these guys suck. And I'm just here toyell at them. They're like they just like to have a good time and laugh.That's the only reason there on the stage. So I feel like sometimes peoplefeel like, well, I'm going to pay my money and not so much at feeders andstuff but like at a comedy club you will have to get people who are justdrunk and disruptive sometimes and stuff. And I just think Just thinkabout what it's like to be that person up on stage in the cross hairs up there,you know? And I feel like for, especially for comedians starting out,that's their biggest fear. You know, I was like, Well, what if I get heckledand what if somebody else Something out? And it's like it's kind of, uh it'skind of sad that they still have that fear. That thing still exists, but italways will. I think, you know, to a certain degree, but it's like I thought,the committee up there doing just trying to give you a good night andhave a good time. So I think if more people just realize that in that momentand you know, maybe they're not the people sitting in the dark, I betteryell stuff out. It's like nobody is here to see you. Nobody is here to seeyou. Thank you, sir. Eat your chicken, eat your chicken wings, your nachos.That's what I like. I like when comedians I mean, I think it'sunfortunate to have to do this, but pointing out to some people, sir orma'am, do you not realize you're at it? A comedy show? You're you're You'rehere to laugh. So uncross your arms and just open up And I want to kind ofdissect and go through and hopefully hit a little funny bone in yousomewhere. Yeah. Yeah. Well, that's, you know, I tell new comedians. I usedto do workshops with new comedians, you know, And that was a lot of fear. Theywould have as well. What if I get heckled? And so I would try and rewiretheir mind a little bit Where I was like, no one's coming to this show hoping yousuck. No one got a babysitter tonight. No one found parking, went for dinnerahead of time and got dressed up in his coming here hoping you eat it. No one.Everyone's on your side already. You're already plus five because they're heresitting down, facing the front quiet. They're already on your side. So youjust don't be self conscious about all the other stuff. Just go and focus onyour material and do your stuff to the best of your ability and have fun andthey're already on your side. It's a very different mentality. Then what ifI suck? What is good? What if I get heckled now? You're minus five. Youknow, like you're already in a whole, like like let's start from a the pointof abundance and go from there And it tends to work for a lot of people, youknow, is to try and just think in a positive way, walking into thatsituation, that everyone is there for the right reason and they're all onyour side. So I think that works trend. I've only have only have a couple ofquestions for you. Is there any adversity that you have faced andwhether it may help or hinder your career and your comedy career? But youuse that as motivation, but you can also use your adversity to help otherpeople who are facing adversity in their work. It's a great question. Um, I thinkadversity wise something that I've...

...learned and especially entertainment. Um, and I know it applies to a lot ofthe people in their lives in general, is that quite often the results you'relooking for don't happen in your time in the timeline that you've set out foryourself as to when this thing should happen. I don't think the universecares about when you think it should happen, You know, Um, so we get veryfrustrated when we feel like we put in a certain amount of effort over acertain amount of time, and we've had equaling this goal at this time. Noone's promise you that, you know. So are you willing to wait longer toachieve this thing you want to achieve? And if you can learn to do that? Andthat's why it's important to love what you do, because it may take way longerfor you to get to the point where you think you're supposed to get to, um sothat ability to just focus on the everyday little winds of writing a newline for a joke, writing a new five minutes, getting on stage this week,all measurable things that I control. I'm not letting someone else controlthem. I'm not trying to obtain something for somebody else would bechosen by somebody else. I set the standards and I use my own metrics, andif you can do that It's amazing how you can just gradually keep moving alongand progressing because you're not squeezing so tight, hoping for theseoutside goals to be chosen by somebody else or selected. Or, you know it's aninternal metrics you're using for yourself, and you enjoy that processevery day. I think that really, really moves you along, and you also enjoy itway more because you're not living and dying on every success and everyfailure. You're just enjoying the thing that you make and do every single day.And I think if people can learn to do that, they end up a being way happierand be tend to actually get to where they actually want to go. But you'rewilling to keep moving your feet because you're you know, that timelineis unpredictable. You never know, and you can also in entertainment inparticular have a great stretch of a couple of years, and also the bottomfalls out of it. And then you go career wise. Things change. So can youmaintain a level of, of just continuity mentally to kind of continue to moveand continue to create and keep moving? Uh, and I think if people can learn todo that, they end up in a really good place. I'm sure it's been said before,but comedy has probably the most our overarching hands into other people'slives in that if we could look to the comedian on how they struggle, they youknow they triumph, the difficulties they go through and all of that andapply them to our own lives. It's not just and this is what I appreciateabout Joe Rogan's podcast, which I couldn't at first I was like, Man, whyyou always having comedians on there? But then I started to realize thatthese are some hard working individuals, that they don't demand respect, but wesurely should give it to them. And when we see the work that you guys, that youin particular go through because you you have a bunch of pots in the fire,right, you're a stand up comedian. You're a writer, you're an actor,you're on a show, right? You have a podcast and all these relate to oneanother. But it just shows the determination that the dedication thatis required to to do this and then other people who are in other types ofjobs can say, Listen, you know, I don't need to do that many things, but if Ican just take one nugget from what these comedians are doing on a dailybasis or what you know on a weekly basis or however long it looks, then Iwill be better off in my craft. Yeah, I totally agree. And I think you know,when you talk to comedians in general, a lot of times they've had stuff that'shappening there, lives that's been rather traumatic. And I'm sure you knowa lot of your listeners or viewers. You know, everyone's had stuff in theirlives that, you know, has brought them to their needs at some point, and Ifeel like for all of us, it's how you dance with that, you know, like that.That can't be an excuse test for you not to have the life you want to have.Everyone's got a backpack full of pain that they probably carry around withthem, but it's like, How do you how you carry that? How do you process that?And I think when people realize okay, that's what happened to you. That's thecards that were dealt to you. Um, you know, one of these adages I've heardpeople say, You know, when something bad happens, people say, Why me? Whywould this happen to me? And then the other pushback is Well, why not? Whynot? Bad things happen to people all the time. People are born in, You know,these war torn countries where there's civil war and they're running throughthe streets while there's bombs going off, that's their pain. They have todeal with, you know, So we all get something. So at the end of the day,it's like, How are you going to negotiate with it and still go on totry and have the life that you want to have? But it's not an excuse for well,that's why I didn't achieve these things. It's like, No, you had that.But now how you're going to deal with that and move forward? And I feel likewhen people, when people figure that out, I really believe this. People, Ithink, will be the process pain or they pass it out. Either process your painor you pass it on to somebody else, and...

I feel like the more people processthey're paying, the more they'll be able to just achieve the goals theywant to achieve, go inside themselves and know that is the things that youcontrol. That's what makes the difference, you know, and use that painpositively in their life. Yeah, as opposed to him. And we all know someonewho was, you know, going to be the next NHL star or the great athlete out ofyour hometown or the person who had all the raw talent to be anything and theyjust didn't do it. And they're full of excuses as to why it didn't happen orwhatever. It's like. Okay, like you think you're the only person who everhad to go through adversity to try and get through something. Everybody hasthat every single person. It's not a smooth road for anybody that I knowwho's ever achieved anything or any of their goals never wasn't a smooth roadfor anybody, so why wouldn't it be tough for you? It's tough for everybody,you know. So I think people accept that reality. I think it may be it's alittle bit easier to achieve trend to have one more question. Besides how canpeople reach you? Sure. Uh, you can reach me at my website trans comedy dotcom and you can find me on Instagram and Twitter. I think I'm even notlinked in. You can believe that. What am I looking for? A job not looking fora job? Hebei. I'm not looking for a job job. I'm good. I'm good. Just myprofile picture, Just their profile. They're like, they're for keynotes. And,uh um, yeah, I'm all those platforms and you can find me there. And thepodcast. The generators. Podcast with trim McClelland drops new episode everyTuesday so you can find that on all the podcast platforms. So, uh, yeah, I'mall over those places. LinkedIn is a great resource, but how do you explainit to your employer? Just looking around. I'm looking for another sketchcomedy show. No, I'm good. I'm good. I just feeling it out. I don't know. It'slike high five back in the day. I don't know. It's a fake account. It's notmine coming up, not mine. Pack your post. Sorry. I'll believe it. One final question trend. Why do youwork? I work because I feel it's my purpose. I feel it'slike making people laugh, having good conversations and sharing it withpeople. I feel like that's what I was meant to do. And I'm lucky that I getpaid to do this, um, and have this job, and I feel very, very privileged andhonored to do it. But I work because it makes me feel closer to my authenticself and helps me get in touch with who that person is and the authentic me inthere. So I I feel when I do those things, that's how I feel centered andgrounded. And when I'm not doing those things I noticed, I don't feel quitemyself. So that's why I'm always reminded that that this is the work I'msupposed to be doing. Trade McClelland stand up comedian, writer, podcaster,actor and cast member of this hour has 22 minutes. I appreciate your time, andI appreciate the work that you do. Thanks so much, Brian. Appreciate youhaving me all the best. Thank you for listening to this episode of why wework with Brian Wien. Be sure to subscribe, follow and share with othersso they too, can be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself aproductive yet joyful day in your work.

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