WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 115 · 1 year ago

#115 Tosh McKenzie - PCB Icy Paradise - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Tosh McKenzie is a beach vending business owner who sells ice cream up and down the coast of Panama City Beach, Florida. The sun is hot, his product is cold, and Tosh has a warm heart to serve his customers faithfully throughout the season.

Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/tosh.mckenzie

PCB Icy Paradise
https://www.facebook.com/getyourfeetwet77

...welcome to why we work with your host, Brian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which will be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going and keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now, here's your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian V. And this is why we work today of the great pleasure of speaking with Tosh Mackenzie. Tosh is a beach vending business owner on the beaches of Florida. Today, I want to find out some of this top selling ice creams. And if some personality traits lean more towards different flavors, join me in this delicious conversation with Tosh Mackenzie. I'm Brian V. And this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure speaking with Tosh Mackenzie. Good day. Fine, sir. Good evening. How are you? I'm doing wonderfully well, Tosh, Thank you for coming on here. Thank you for your time. I mean, I know your gracious we know one another anyway, but I know your gracious because I made a mistake thinking Today was the day, and it wasn't today. It was tomorrow, but you were willing to come on anyway. So I I really appreciate you coming on here. Tosh, will you tell us the industry that you're in and what you're up to nowadays in terms of work? Well, I'll tell you, at this point here, Yeah, we're definitely winging it, Brian. And, uh, look, you know, it's really my pleasure. And I think what you do is fantastic. You got a beautiful family. I see your posts on Facebook and everything. And, uh, it's such a pleasure to know somebody. I think that it's as wonderful as you. Um, the industry specific. Basically, it's when you live in a beach town of beach Town, is it's a different lifestyle because everything is focused around tourism and the people that want to come down and enjoy where you live. Like you live here, you make a living. But the people that come here, they only come here to visit, you know, So they're going to behave different than they do in their hometown and everything. Maybe some will cut loose. Maybe, you know, whatever they want to do, right. But The tourism industry here is very large. It's a lot of fun and it's fantastic. And a lot of people, if you do something well for them, they really appreciate it. And and really, the best thing about it is if you get to meet all the wonderful people that come here to enjoy, actually where you live, So you have your own vending business, which primarily is ice cream, and I'd like to get into that a little bit in a moment or in a little bit. But, Tosh, what would have been? And we both come from lower sackful, you might say Millwood, Nova Scotia, Canada. But at times I would like to know what was your very first job, maybe as a preteen doing something to make a dollar, maybe something official when you were 13. 14. But what was your very first job and very first job? Oh, well, I was 11. Uh, well, of course. You know, my father always kept me working around the house, you know, shoveling the snow, clearing the side while clearing the decks. Of course. And we've all experienced that growing up, but no, at 11, um, there was a gentleman. He was down by Tucker Road on Beaver Bank, and he used to cut wood, and he would supply cords of wood for people that want to use their wood burning stoves, furnaces in the wintertime and everything. And he used to deliver us our wood. So I asked him. I said, Geez, do you have Do you need some help if you need some help doing something in that and, uh, me and my cousin was up visiting at the time, we had some family and everything. And now he took us down for 23 days. And that's all we did all day was stack the wood. That's all we did. And that was at 11. And when we got paid, we were very happy kids, because we could buy all the candy bars, all the bubble gum and comic books that you know, and in hockey cards and anything that you wanted. What what middle school did you go to? I went to Harold T. Barrett. I lived out there even further out. Ah, what was the William Nelson Road, which was named after my aunt? I believe, um, and also excellent. Uh, there was another one, was it Tucker did? Tucker Lake was a Tucker Road that is out now. All houses is the wood.

Is that place gone? You know, I have not been home in over 20 years. It's been a long time. It's been a very long time, more than half my life. And of course, they still have family up there. And they just described that Lower Sackville and the Beaver Bank area is extremely well developed. And it's not the humble back in the woods, really rural area from Halifax that, you know, we grew up in that it's, you know, it's very well developed and talk a road. My understanding is that you know, it did it used to end in a called sack. Of course we turn around, but it's it's way more developed at this time here. How long did you work for them stacking wood from the age of 11? Oh, it was only just a few days And that, uh, you know, people were we grew up with, you know, they're very humble and everything, and so it's not like he was enterprising, but I think you know, he just appreciates, you know, a kid especially somebody that was our age and everything that wants to enter the real world and working is absolutely part of the real world. And you must do it and even me myself. Uh, you know, if a kid was to approach me, especially an entrepreneur, somebody you know, I support that I I think that's fantastic. And I think everybody should do that. Was this you wanting to get the candy wanting? This was your own motivation to make money? Or was it your dad saying, You know, this is a good opportunity for you to start spreading your wings? What was that initial motivation? Well, that's a good That's a good question. It was my initial motivation. Actually, you know, it's a I wouldn't even I call it instinctive where, you know, you just got to get out there And you know, if you want something, you have to go earn it, and you have to do it the way that everybody else does. And, you know, it wasn't necessarily advice or something like that. Yeah, it was absolutely personal where it's like, you know what? I just want to be independent and, you know, I just have an entrepreneurial spirit where I go out and I do it on my own as you got older and into high school. Was there any jobs that you did in particular that maybe were long lasting or had an impact on you? Well, I'll tell you, I, uh, in high school during the season off, um, I used to do landscaping, and funny, a really great friend of mine. Excellent. Excellent person. You know, I just I even sent him a message on Facebook and everything. I've seen some of his pictures as named Scott McGrath and I ended up putting in a word for him, and he ended up getting the job that summer. Uh, you know, maybe you could ask him sometimes you ever get them on the podcast? What happened? But I won't get in the back more than welcome. I went to school. I used to hang out with Scott as well. Yeah, yeah. And great sense of humor. Jeezy. Every funny he's really He's really, really fun. Good, good. Great person. Um, so the year after, no, I just got into landscaping and, uh, you know, so that was during the off season, but I gotta be honest. I tried to find work, in fact, fill, you know, going in and filling out applications. And no, there was really There was no success with that. So it was It was seasonal with me. So as you were in high school, what were you thinking? And I and I asked this question, but I caveat it with I was an idiot. I am an idiot. I didn't have a direct plan. I didn't know what I was doing. But I have met some people who had a clear idea of what they wanted to do. They knew that they wanted to go on to college. They knew that they want to start this business where they wanted to try this. What were you thinking? As you start to get into closer to your twenties. And what were you thinking about your future at that time? Yeah, well, um, of course, I I believe in education. I think education is very important. And, um, I believe that schooling and continue where your schooling and doing well in school is it's an all around huge benefit to help you in your thought process. Help you understand people and help you understand and know the world around you, so you know how it works. So education was always important to me, and I took that opportunity and move forward with that. But in the meantime, I always felt that, you know, being independent and having an entrepreneurial spirit. It's just it's...

...not just an instinct, it's ingrained. It's ingrained being independent and earning on my own, you know, doing it myself. I that's just my drive. What you mentioned. You move forward forward with education. What did you pursue or what were you thinking you wanted to do? Well, I went into hospitality, which is the hotel and restaurant industry. Um, and I work that as a teenager. And what did you do in particular? What do I when I got into Took a course on it, But I also moved out west. I got into housekeeping and laundry services and all sorts of things. What did you get into with with tourism and hospitality? Oh, boy, I'll tell you right now, the housekeeping department, that is that's a busy department right there. There's a lot of responsibility right there, and and there's a lot of hard work and it's It's a repetition routine and everything, and I think people that do that professionally as a living, I think they're actually really special people, and I think they really should be appreciated because there's a lot of people out there that, um they can't handle that kind of structure and routine in a job and doing what they do. I think they are extremely important. For example, it's kind of like being a dishwasher and which I've done before, and it's My attitude is as well. You can treat me as bad as what you want, but the reality of it is is that you can't serve your food if you don't have clean dishes. So you're out, you're out of it. Don't matter what you are, a server, you're the cook. It doesn't matter. You don't have clean dishes, you're out. You're out of business, right? So the hospitality was the hotel industry hotel industry did bartending and serving in a place called the Party Dance Club in Lower Sackville and down to your ball, which those names are a definite blast from the past and then of course, went into hotel and that was a family oriented thing. So as you were stepping out of that and knowing that even now you're in the tourism industry, were you thinking this is somewhere you want to stay even with the entrepreneurial spirit that you have? What were you thinking about? Your next step? Ah, to definitely be involved with people mhm to meeting new people and new personalities that are They have completely different dynamics about them and just that whole social thing. And carrying on what is all the time I find, you know, a fun kind of banter. You get to experience people's sense of humor in the situation. You know how their, uh, feeling and thinking at the time and and just engaging with people itself all the time is definitely something I love to do. And tourism will facilitate that. Because people come from all over the place and all over the world. And that's a fabulous opportunity, and at most times of privilege just to meet these new, fabulous people all the time. How did you make this step from Canada to the United States? And I'm not sure if it was always Florida. But how did you make that transition? What was what brought you down south? Well, um, where I was working at the gentleman who owned the bar was actually a friend of my parents. Danny Daou, Danny and Pauline. Do they own coaches? Sports pub and the party dance club down to, um, all and God bless them. They are absolutely two of the most hardest working people I've ever met in my entire life. They were totally dedicated to their business, and they're earning their living. Uh, they never took a day off, and so they actually went on vacation, which was a real surprise to everybody, because they are there every day. Danny even used to sleep in the place because he would have to wake up to work it. So they came to Daytona on vacation. They come back with a brochure about a hotel for sale, and he wanted to talk to my father and my mother about possibly, uh, investigated or being partners. Well, my parents took a look at it, and after a conversation and a few weeks going by, um, it didn't really happen with Danny and Pauline, But my parents really took it serious. They completely took it serious. They liquidated well, the home...

...of the everything furnishings. Look, if they were going, they were going What? Eggs? That's exactly how it that's That's a huge step of faith or something, right? Like that takes some gumption. Well, I'll tell you, my father, he's he's a very He's a very intelligent, business savvy man, even though he's my father. Um, you know, just talking to him and you know, not not being involved in, you know, talking to your dad. But you know who he is as a person and everything. I mean, I just I love him. I love him so much and he's such a pleasure. Enjoy. I can always bounce something off him. And whatever he says, I really, really take to heart. Well, actually, it's the two of them. I was gonna say Mom too. And mom too. Oh, yes. Now those two they can take on the world together, those two right there, God bless them. And they are old school. They've been together almost 40 years, and they have taken on the world, and they've done such a great job and them doing that was a blessing for me to, uh, further into hospitality by them purchasing a hotel in Daytona Beach. And then, of course, being, you know, in Florida, which is tourism mecca. So you had the you had the job. I don't know if you had an interview for it, but how was it your that that big step? That that first step to get down to Florida? And this is a change of scenery, and I have experienced I went to Korea. Some people move to different coasts in their country. You and I were talking about this different cultural shocks, those sorts of things prior to recording. And how was that for you stepping into something completely different while similar in being in the hotel industry and in tourism industry? How was that for you? The difference that going down there presented. Oh, it was Everything is everything is done different. Everything's done different, I would say. When I first arrived, the only thing that I could recognize from home was they have Burger King and McDonald's, right? But you know what Burger King doesn't have down here? They don't have the poutine, which I'm blown away. I'm like, why didn't you ever put poutine on the menu? That is so good. Right? So, um, you know, the It's really it's a different part of the world. It really is the vegetation, uh, the animals, the wall life. It's all different. It's completely different. And I got to say it took me about, of course, in the environment itself, because it's very hot here. It's very hot. It's very human, and it's sunny all the time. So it took me about, uh, my body. Personally, it took about 4 to 5 years to even adjust to the climate. And I would say at the same time to really start to figure out, um, some of the great, um, things about how people live down here and get to experience them and get involved, right? I found that getting involved. No matter if it's, you know, different churches, different religions, um, different sports, uh, different hobbies, you know, just just just get involved in the community. If somebody you know comes and says, you know, Hey, I like doing this and you've never experienced that before where we grew up in everything you know, you go do it because then you're not just learn about that person there and a part of them, Um, everybody else that goes, there is also a part of it. So you really start to understand your community and and being evolved in a community is the way to really understand where you're at. And it's just it's completely, um, new experience, like being reborn. So as you were reborn going to Florida and many people dream of it, and as people retire from Canada just would love the ability to go six months. They don't want to lose their insurance of the year, but you get to live there. So what were you doing initially and what are some of the steps that lead you to what you're doing today? Well, initially, of course, basically, you could you just You spoke about, you know, did I have to go through the interview to get the job? But no, because it was complete nepotism, right? I own it. I own it, right. It was basically it was it was inherited, given kind of thing. But trust me when you're working 80 hours a week at a hotel. And of course, we also...

...lived on site. So you eat and you breathe. The hotel business called being a hotelier and it really had its ups and downs. And it's a difficult. It really, really is a difficult challenge. Um, so with that aside, you know Florida is it? It's always a challenge. It's always a challenge. It really is. It's not. People come here to vacation and they leave and that's it. You know, living here, it's it's a total different world and experience. So for what were you doing initially you were working 80 hours a week. You were. What specifically were you doing? And how did you seemingly I'm not sure myself is. How did you get out of that? Or what happened for you to get out and into having a vending business of your own? Now, well, I'll tell you, I didn't want to get into it, But actually, I just remembered that Halifax had an experience in itself. Is this part of the world you experience what is called hurricanes and Florida Hurricanes? Yes, and they are People might want to say, Hey, I'd love to experience it. I would you know, people down here that haven't just moved here, they've never experienced one. They throw their hurricane parties and they're all excited about it. But these are dangerous, life threatening and life changing, Um, phenomenons weather phenomenons that just happen annually. And they're not fun right there. Absolutely not fun. So in 2000 and four, Florida had four hurricanes hit the state and the first one which we ever experienced, completely ripped the entire roof off of the hotel three layers. Some people, if they listen to this, they'll know three layers of commercial bitumen roofing rolled up like a piece of tin fall and 50 across the parking lot and lands on the property next door. So that completely wiped out the business. Because the building is now destroyed, which two weeks after there was another hurricane that came in, it was just a big rainstorm, and so it ended up drenching everything. So at that point there our little condo and everything in the hotel, the complete roof was collapsed. All of our belongings were completely destroyed. You have no power. You have no water. It's I mean, you're you gotta fend for your own right. So to us, that's what ended up changing initially everything and put my life and actually our family's life on a different course that particular year. So moving up to what I've do now, I've always had the independent entrepreneurial spirit. I've had my failures and I've had my failures. Failure is a part of it. It's the best learning experience you could ever go through is to fail because those lessons you learn will make you succeed. And so, after going through these natural kind of disasters and you've got to make changes in life, you have big disruptions. You have your family going on. It's like you know, everything is destroyed. You got to keep moving on and keep building. And that's what pretty much got me to the point here because you need to be resilient, You need to be strong, you need to be resilient and you have to persevere. And it's not like it's, uh, you know, you have people or certain things. It's just the natural mother nature that creates these disruptions that you need to accept and need to work through in 2000 and four, when you experience this knowing that you learned from the process. But during that time did you want to kind of put your tail between your legs and go back home to Nova Scotia. Was that part of your thinking process? This is too much. I can't handle this. What were you thinking? No, no, I am. I was never backing down. I was never given up. Of course, I have thought I have thought about moving to a more safer part of the country. But, you know, I have to say my my heart is here, and I think what I have to offer is best here. So you know as much. It wasn't. It was never discouraging. It just it created.

It's just an option that you need to overcome. So what? What got you into the vending business then? Because it's completely different. While similar, it's completely different. And this is what you're doing full time. So how did that first come about? Well, I'll tell you, I was a chemistry major at U and F and I moved to Jacksonville to pursue the degree. And what was this all about? This is completely different from tourism. What were you thinking? Absolutely Well, I'll tell you, we ended up moving. You had what was called the real estate collapse, of course, which Canada itself, and actually the whole world felt that one right? And we were Was this 2000 and 82 1008 or before 2000 and 7, 2000 and eight, The real estate collapse happened here in the United States. And of course, you know, the ripples in the pond, you know, one over time. And so we were living in Daytona Beach at the time, and my folks, they retired. They stole their property and everything, and they ended up visiting this place called Destin, and they invited us up for Thanksgiving. So I came to the area. I've never been in the Panhandle of Florida ever. And from the first day I got here, I love the place it is. It is a whole different world in itself. And the people, they are just amazing the people and culture. It I was like, You know what? This is where I want to be. So we ended up making a move up here, and, uh, things were really tough in the country at the time. And I said, You know, I said, I'm going to go. Of course, you get educated in something else because tourism, it's, you know, everybody was feeling the hurt. Tourism was not very good. There was an enormous amount of layoffs, unemployment, traveling down here from other people. It just wasn't happening. So I decided it was just too unstable because of hurricanes and because of the economic issues, you know, tourism is, um, finicky. You can call it something small can happen, and it just affects It disrupts excellent word. So ended up moving here. And so I said, you know, I'm going to go back to college. This is and I'm thinking, is this is this is good on you because you're talking 10, 30 all 13 years ago or something. And you're in your thirties, right? So that's good on you to whatever wherever it led you is, you weren't afraid to go back to school or to try something different to pivot. So that's good on you for doing that. And it could be an encouragement to other people listening that even if you're not sure or whatever may have happened in your twenties or your teens, it's not too late. And I know people know of other people who are older, 40 50 60. I hope there's hope for us because I'm 40 now and wondering about future as well. But I think it should be noted that you and your thirties decided, Hey, I'm going to do something different. Well, I'll tell you, I think your podcast podcast is absolutely fantastic, you know? And that's just an example Where, um, you know, I noticed a lot of young people. They, you know, they will be in college and they will go with a nursing degree. They will go into some sort of field, but one of their main motivations is just money. Where to me personally, you know, you need to really find what you really love and enjoy doing it. It's like your passion in life. There's a lot of people that just go to work and they're miserable what they do. They're just not happy. And I mean, that affects your entire life. So I mean, at that age there, I mean, it is always a challenge. But of course, I say to myself that I know there's something else out there that I would really enjoy doing really enjoy being a part of, and, you know, I'll be happy and can move on and chemistry was one of them. I just think it's just absolutely fantastic Science. It really is. Absolutely. Love it. What are you hoping to get out of that degree? Oh, that particular degree there, um, would definitely help. Just kind of have my own lab right where you understand the science and you can practice the science. But, you know, there's a lot of avenues to that, because chemistry is a real everything surrounding you is made of atoms and understanding that science and how everything works, you can help out and be a part of a lot of industries. Um, I I mean, really, you can pretty much go anywhere because if you understand the basics like that, you know, you can...

...speak people's language very easy in what they do, right? So, you know, a lot of people they might not particularly like that science, but to me, No, I found my passion right there. I really, really did. So how did that lead you into ice cream? Uh, well, so I'm at you and F in Jacksonville and university is very expensive. It's very, very expensive. And I gotta be honest, being a student, you are not only the lowest rung on the ladder. You are lower than the unemployed. Okay, nobody appreciates and respects you going to school and getting an education. It's an extremely, um, tasking process, right being a student and, you know, living in that particular life. It's It's very difficult and challenging. There's no doubt about it. Along with just happening, to focus on your school work, which is a lot of work in itself. You need to be able to take care of everything else small. So so at the end of it, I could not afford to complete the degree. It's a very expensive degrees. I even contacted the Education Department in the government and explain to them that you know these stem degrees. They need to be in a different category rather than your your arts degrees. Right, because you have a lab associated with it that anyway, So the lab in itself, that tax on Oh my goodness, that is an extra anywhere from 700 to $1000 right on the course. Were you getting or did you change your citizenship status? Or were you getting international fees as well? Oh, no, no, no. That's That's a story in itself right there. Holy. That is a process in itself right there, Brian. I'll look, I'll tell you, I can really get into that. That's that's really interesting there. But to get into the vending is at the end of it. I said, you know, I said to me, I said, I'm moving back home. I'm going to move back to Panama City Beach. And so I did. And of course, you've got to find work right away. Jesus found work in less than 24 hours after I got here. And your parents are retired at this time. Oh, yes, they're retired, and they torn North America kind of thing. And so I had the idea. I even thought about it years before I said, Geez, I said, Why don't they have ice cream on the beach, which actually legally correct? They're called frozen desserts and confections. Okay, so I was looking into it and I said, Gee, I said, you know, that would really, really, really go over well here. And so I did it exactly what I did. Were you thinking knowing us from Nova Scotia? And I don't know how far reaches but Dickie Dee? Yes. The the Dickey di bike with the bells on the on the handlebars. And the what is the three wheels? Two on the front. One of the back? Yeah. Big refrigerator. Big cooler. Yeah. Yeah. They had a big cooler on that bike and everything. I remember them. Yeah, What a blast from your from your first initial idea. How long did it take you to start walking the beach or whatever your first source of business was? Our income was to get that going. Um well, um, it took me about a year to figure it out, basically, you know, of course I overthink things, but, you know, I just had the science background, so I'm trying to figure out how I can make it work. And it took me about a year to find the equipment. And so I ended up finding the pieces that I needed to say, You know what? I think this is gonna work. This is going to be the best solution, because, um, here's an example. In Daytona Beach, you have extremely hard packed sand like people drive on the beach. You can drive your car on the beach Now. Here in the Panhandle on the Gulf Coast. It's not like that at all. It's It's what's what's called sugar sand. And it's snow white. It never sticks to you is very fine. And you can get stuck in it. You know, if you were in something heavy. Uh, no problem. You know, in just a couple of seconds, you can just sink in the sand. So that in itself was a...

...challenge to not ideal to be dragging along a £250 refrigerator on wheels. Pretty much that's exactly it. That's exactly it. So, you know, you need to find something like, like I said, to, uh, to handle the terrain. Basically. So So it took about a year. You know, investigating equipment looking at was what was for sale and it actually took me. I probably didn't find the site till about seven months later. That actually had the equipment that I used today, and it's actually it's manufactured in Brazil. So how long have you been doing it? So is this from 2010 or so? Up until now, or seven years? Seven. This year will be seven years, seven years on the beach Yeah. Yeah. We, uh I opened. Um, July 4th, 2000 and 15. That was the first day. So from 2015 onward, has it been consistent? Have you been able to maintain it as your sole source of income, or has it been up and down where you or even I mean, it seems like a seasonal thing. So maybe, you know, in the wintertime that slows down a bit where you might have to do other jobs. Is that the case, or are you able to solely rely on the ice cream business? Um, well, I It all depends on what you want to do. You do have the option to, um, work your season and do what you want in the off season. But personally, I don't recommend not working in the off season. Um, not working is an extremely unhealthy habit and pattern in life personally, And I think if everybody is working and they get their mind occupied, uh, it's a healthier, healthier life. Right? So you're able, you continue working. And do you continue with your vending, or do you do something else? Do something else on the side. What? We describe it down here for people like us is we put a Band Aid on the bleed, right, Because you only have your season. So and then you have your off time, and you don't want that, um, draining away at the business earnings and everything because that's what happens, you know, in the off season, Uh, so that's what we call we put a Band Aid on the bleed, but personally, myself, Um, yeah. No, no, I definitely do. Just just gig works. I know how that works. You know, You just do. Your gig works. You maybe go job to job to job or whatever it is. I prefer blue collar work. What type of stuff? What what what type of stuff do you tend to do? I think this is great part of the conversation of, and I find that a lot with speaking with people who are following their passions and doing things that they love, like doing a podcast. I met lots of people, but they have other jobs. I met a guy. He works in a paint shop. He's a pretty famous rapper, and in the daytime he's selling paint right? And so what is it some of the jobs you tended over the last 67 years have you been leaning towards? And how long is your off season off season here? Um, we opened up March 1st, which will be this Monday, and that's at the store to March break. And then we have to be off the beach by November 1st, which at this point here, I'm actually, I talked to quite a few business owners in the area to attempt to approach the city and the county to extend our season by another 30 days. I think it's very important because October is absolutely, I think, personally, the best month here in Panama City Beach. The weather and the water is the best it can be all year round. But you know the weather doesn't drop off the cliff at the end of October. It's beautiful into November also. And then, of course, you have. What is the automobile enthusiast enthusiast event? You have Thanksgiving, but then, of course, you have your weekends where, you know, people own, uh, their condos down here, which here's an interesting point when you bring up hospitality, their structure here in Panama City Beach, it's completely different. Uh, there. There's now big hotel change that litter the beach like Marriott Hilton Hamptons. Uh, there's none of them there, all condo buildings, and they're all privately owned. So when you come to Panama City Beach, you're actually renting a private owners condo. That's how it works here. So that way you have your owners and then you have them that rent them in the summertime. So that keeps the flow of people coming in, especially the kids and the families all year round. And I found that really...

...interesting here. How that's how they structure the beach here, the season where it's not. It's not corporate corporate is here, but there are small percentage. It's all privately owned, and it's very, very successful. It's a very successful business model. What's the reasoning for them wanting to stop November 1st? Uh, you know what? I know I never asked that question. It is a good question. It really is. And I'm on the hunt for the answer because I spent somebody who said they would rather have November than March because march is cool here. You know, we're not a massive tropical climate here all year around. We experience. Um, cold weather in the wintertime, we have her drops. Where? I mean, Nova Scotia was actually warmer than us this year at one time or another, you know, we had cooler temps to Nova Scotia, right? But, you know, in the off season, I prefer a blue collar and, um, you know, I really found this great line of work just doing installing granite countertops. Uh, you know, it was pretty good because, you know, it's the people. It's not necessarily the job. It's the people that I work with. You know, I like to participate in a team environment. I I think that's very important. That's that's the best. The best way for things to work is a team environment. And, uh, you know, forming a team and getting a job done. And especially after Hurricane Michael, that was just a big thing, because you were helping people get their life back to normal like they never had a home. Their kitchens gone to get a kitchen counter. They are. It's It's like a whole brand new life to them. You know, things. Things are getting pieced back together in that right, but that not look, you know, operating heavy equipment. Just gig work, right? You know, you just kind of off and on, you know, but you get to meet a lot of you get to meet a lot of different people, and you get to meet a lot of people that actually really, really good, really good at what they do. As a matter of fact, that's what I like about doing this. Finding people with those skills and talents and doing what they do. It makes me appreciate them and just realize how many skills I don't have specifically about being in the middle. But you're a great host. I mean, I'm having such a great time, and I I never knew what to expect. Um, you know, in the beginning and that, you know, I thought about a couple of things, but, you know, I'm just robbing. Personally, I'm really, really amazing. I I think your excellent absolutely excellent. Fantastic. I'll give you my address and you can write my dear wife and let her know how good I am specifically about the ice cream that you're doing. What is what is some satisfaction? You get out of it. But what are some difficulties that you have as well. So to paint the picture for people that don't know you're physically or I mean, you could paint the picture what you do each day. What was the process that you go through specifically in your vending business? Oh, well, of course. Um, you know, you gotta wake up in the morning, right? What time? What time do you got to get up on in the nice hot summer days in Florida? Well, my youngest is five, and he goes to daycare, so he has to be there by 7. 30. So, of course you know, you're up at six o'clock, right? But, you know, after that, you've got to go in. And you gotta, of course, like any kind of, um, food vending and that you've got to make sure that your stock is being rotated right. You got to make sure your equipment is ready. Uh, you get your uniform ready, you get your supplies. Which water is a very important thing here in Florida, right. You need your water, and you need your gatorade and you need your sun screen. And you know, you gotta do your what some people might know your account, right? You got to know what you got. What, You don't know how much you have of it, right? And, you know, you just basically for me, I'm just preparing the card and preparing myself, right? And then one of the things is I used to float my equipment to the beach. I got a trailer in that, you know, when I never live, I live across the street from the beach. Now, Uh, God bless me there. Um, I was gonna say, Tosh, you live in a rough life. It has its difficulties, but a lot of people like, okay, he lives across across the street from the beach down in Florida. Gets to walk the beaches nine months of the year. No, I'm telling you, you can think that, but I'm telling you, it's very, very difficult. It's very hard, and it's very busy. It's busy, you know? You know, it's not. The thing is I'm not a permanent vacation. Er right. You know, I have to, um I have to do what I do for the people that come visit us in our community, right? And that in...

...itself, it's a lot of hard work. But now, after floating the equipment to the beach, what do you mean, floating the equipment? I would load it up on a trailer and, you know, I got the trailer on the back, and then I would drive it down and unloaded. But one of the things was is that when you get to when you start at one end of the beach and you get to the other end of the beach, what are you gonna walk all the way back to put the card back on the trailer, right? So that I understand this. Are you in a day? Are you working? So you can explain this so I can understand? It is you're walking the beach once. Is there that much beach or you're walking back and forth and stocking up. And how does that work? Well, I'll tell you, uh, starting off, I used to go down the beach one way, turn around and then come back on the sand all in one day. Uh, you know, as simple as it sounds I have to say is, you know, I've actually learned how to do things better every year. Mhm, right? Every year. So at this point here. The location where I'm at everything I just walked. I don't have to drive anywhere. I walk, but I do anywhere from 10 to 12 miles a day. I walk so that that is physically challenging, right? You know, I'm not. I'm not old, but I'm not young anymore either. But you know, when you ask, it's like, Well, hold on. What are some of the good things? And then what are some of the It's not necessarily bad things, but, you know, the what challenges and what actually could be, You know, unpleasantries. Really? And look, when I ring that when I land on the beach and I ring that bell, all them kids and the parents and the families, they're just ready and waiting. And they're so happy. It reminds me of Eddie. Eddie Murphy. The ice cream man is coming. Yeah, that's it. That's it right there. And trust me, I've heard I've heard that before. That's right. Yeah, honestly, God heard that before. And so when you land there, there's not much for the kids on the beach here. That was one of the main things that that I recognized, is you can have your jet skis. You have your paddle boards. You have your pair sailing. You know, you have your dolphin tours with that sand with that sand, Can they make a snow capped as sandcastle? They're able to Okay, Yeah, I'm just wondering if it's that not sticky that they couldn't. But with some water, they can. Oh, yeah. No, no, I'll tell you. I'll tell you about a great seasonal thing that happens here at a local beach club. But so I said to my son, Jesus, I said, Well, you know, there really isn't much for the kids to do. You can't strap a kid in a Paris sale. I mean, you put a kid on a jet ski or banana boat, but there might be terrified for their life, right? They never really never been a so that's exactly it. That's exactly it, Brian. So you know, when they get there SpongeBob face so they get their Spiderman or, you know, they get their rainbow pop or they get their, uh, chocolate chip cookie sandwich. I mean, they are the happiest people in the world. They are so happy. They're just so happy. Did you learn these flavors by trial and error. What? Sell what sold what didn't sell. And this is how you picked your whatever is on your menu or whatever is on your list. I did. Yeah. It was trial and error. And there was, um I'm not sure some people might know it, but I had one particular item. Um, I had 10 items, but like a menu with 10 different servings that you can get or 10 different items you can get. And one of them that I started out with was the It was called Strawberry shortcake. And I mean, this is you know what? The nuts Is that the nuts on it? No, no, it doesn't have the nuts. It's It's almost like a crumble if you have ever apple pie. Delicious, aren't they? I taught her fantastic. Very cool. Yeah, I ate them all the time. Yeah, I mean, Brian, it's cheesecake on a stick. It's bumpy. When I said nuts, I meant Bumpy, right? It's not. It's not a swampy, bumpy, crumbly, crumbly and you know what? It was the most expensive item to purchase, and the way I structure it is is that I just have a flat price. Like like now. It's like for four bucks, you can pick out whatever you want between the 10 items. Right. So it was the worst seller. The strawberry shortcake was the worst...

...seller. They don't get it. I know, right? I know, I know. So I said, Well, look, I I gotta figure I gotta pick a different item. I got to get something else different on there, right? And, uh, through actually the past few years, my whole, which is good humor and Popsicle. They've actually stopped making some items that were just the great Everybody loves him. And I was confused. It's like all of a sudden you stopped production. You stop making this particular item. I'm like, you know why? It absolutely makes no sense to me. But, you know, I guess these guys, they don't come to the beach and get something off me. They don't come to the beach where we're at all the time, right? There must be in an office on their just making some kind of a dummy corporate call before you get in To throw that out there before you get into the advantages. I know there's always people making sub decisions will never understand before you get into the advantages or disadvantages of your likes and dislikes. Is there two questions about ice cream? Is there one that is your your best seller? Which one is that? And also, do you find that there's some personal characteristics of people that kind of lean towards certain ice cream, like that person will eat this, this type of person? Is it that or is it people have a variety of taste buds? Well, I'll tell you what. The biggest and best seller on the menu is. SpongeBob. You pull them out and it's got SpongeBob's face. And he has gumball eyes, and SpongeBob is the best seller. Now when you get into, there's one particular item, which is actually exclusive, where I negotiated with my wholesaler to keep them coming in just for me, and I will purchase them. Don't don't stop selling them. Just get them for me, which is called the King Cone, a k a Nutty Buddy, a k a. The drumstick. And it's the good humor. And who really loves them is like our parents. Our parents love them because that is a classic. It's such a classic to them is the drumstick. So I keep that particular item on there specifically for the parents and the grandparents because they gravitate towards that item. They love it, and actually, it's fantastic. I eat them myself. Uh, the second, the first best is SpongeBob. The second best is to King Kong. Uh, the chocolate chip cookie sandwich. I call it not sandwich sandwich. I don't know. Maybe it's a New Orleans Southern thing, but that's a great seller there. There are particular people that actually you can kind of look at them and say, Okay, look, I know what they're gonna buy and there are certain people that, like certain flavors that purchase certain items and everything, but when it comes to the kids there SpongeBob all the way, they are just SpongeBob fanatics. I don't know people not liking the strawberry shortcake, but my favorite, which is not on a stick of sorts from Nova Scotia, is moon mist ice cream. And I think if you could get moon mist ice cream in a package with at least the older people, that that would I think do well. I think kids would like that as Well, were you ever a fan of Moon Mist? Came out of farmers. Farmers? Oh, my goodness. Now there is. Look, I know they got their good orange juice and they got their milk moon. Miss Moon Mist Ice cream. Delicious. That's really bringing in the bell right now. And, uh, jeez, I'd really, really have to think back. You know, my, uh my mother was not a big, a sweet buyer, you know, we never had our, you know, Frosted Flakes. Um, you know, Cocoa Puffs or Pebbles Cereal, Right. She bought corn flakes. You're like Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, whose father never allowed him to have chocolate so that he opened a chocolate factory. Look, you know what? Maybe that is the hidden motivation right there. It must have been born from the childhood, but And you still have nice teeth. You still have? Not just like he did. Oh, my God. Well, there. Thank you very much. And, well, that's a lot of work in itself. Um, but remember the, uh what what were the chocolate things called? Jo Jo pies. What? What were they? Korea wagon wagon wheels. Oh, I remember the wagon wheels they hit the marshmallow. Are you Are you talking about the ice cream ones? Yes. Yes. No, no, no, not the ice cream ones. Brian, They had the white really sweet filling in the middle. Marsh marshmallow filling. Now it wasn't the marshmallow. It was more like what you would have in a Twinkie. They're not called sloppy Joes. What were they called you in here?...

They call the moon pies. Joe Louis. Joe Louis. That's it. Yes, Joe Louis's. Yeah. I like the caramels. Joe Louis, The caramels. The 22 little caramels that came in the package is a sponge wrapped in chocolate with the caramel on top. I love those things. Yeah, I know. They're so good. You can get the network rating Beaver Bank. Not Beaver Bank, but just upper Sackville rate Ben's Bakery. You could get a handshake. Yeah. Yeah. There was another blast from the past there. Oh, my God. This is such this is really nostalgic. So what? What do you like? You like the smiles, the pleasure that it brings. What is it you like? And what are some of the challenges that you have? Well, you know, I really like that the kids are happy. It just has. It's all around benefits Number one. The kids are happy, right? And so that means if your kids are happy and you're on vacation on the beach, that means you're going to be happy. Nobody wants an unhappy kid, right? You know, when you're on vacation, that just causes major problems. But another thing is it also gives the parents a break because you have the kids in the water and what they do is they'll come in and they'll they'll get what they want at the cart. And then they will go and they will sit in the shade and they'll sit under the tent and everything and my personal experience as a parent and especially after my first born, I was a helicopter parent. I mean, my eyes would never, ever leave. Stop, Stop it! That's it. It's It's just constant, right? I mean, you're always focusing, so I mean, it even gives them a break, right, because now you know the kids are safe. The parents could take a quick breather and and also I mean, they're just having a lot of fun with it. The pictures they got all the different dye colors all over their face. It's all over their hands. They're loving it, talking about how good it is. And if you've got a group of kids, they're all talking about what they got and this and that, you know, it's It's like a little social event, right? You know, you're going to have the pictures on Instagram. You're going to have the pictures on Facebook. You're going to have those memories and it's just pure happiness. But, you know, personally, on a personal note, the most difficulty is the sun. Mm hmm. That's what creates for me is the big problem. It's the sun. In what way? In the heat. I mean, it could be obvious, but yeah, yeah, yeah. No, no. The sun here is, um it's very hot. It's very strong. And when you're out in it all day, your body is always constantly working to just regulate itself. And then another thing I noticed is that you know, you have to plaster yourself in sunscreen every day, all day and on a personal note, I don't think those chemicals are meant to be applied to your skin every day, so you know it just for me. It's all about physiology and the physical strain. Other than that, I absolutely love it. And quite frankly, I'll do it till the day I die with exercise. Is that is that Is it hard on your body? Are you wearing shoes or is it just barefooted? Are you toughening and out? How does that work for you? And how hard is that? Well, I mean, you definitely got the bare feet, right? And I always say, I got the softest feet in Bay County. Right? Because you're always basically it's like a natural pomace stone walking in the sand all the time, right? But, you know, I mean, here's an example is, uh you know, the attendants in your whole ankle area and your toes and everything like that. You know, I've noticed a change physically that they've actually changed over the years to acclimated to the the physicality of the job and everything. And it was always a difficult thing for the first three years, you know, my body was always constantly trying to acclimated to the climate and the physical strain of doing it. But now I mean, it's it's absolutely, absolutely more. It's a lot easier now, right? You know, it's it's kind of funny. It's like evolution back to the process that you you do. So you were saying how you used to go up and down. So what is it that you're doing now, is it? And then when do you restock? How does that work? Oh, well, before I used to move extremely fast. This is like the first year and...

...everything. I used to move very, very quickly up so I could turn around and come back in a decent amount of time. How long is the beach that you're at? What time do you start? Oh, um, you land on the beach at 10. 30. 10. 30 is the best time to land on the beach. What time do you finish? Uh, you finished between 6. 30 and seven o'clock. And so doing the two strips coming down one way, turning around and coming on the beach the other way. Um, for the first couple of years that I was doing it that way there. But you know what ends up happening? I don't know if some people might have experienced, but you have suggestions from people, right? people want to be a part of what you're doing there. Obviously, they like it. They're very interested in it. And they keep suggestions. So it wasn't the first time I heard. Well, I think I'm moving too fast. So, uh, you know, at this point here, Sure. Lots of people have suggestions. Okay. Oh, my God. The balloon tires. Why don't you have the Van Halen song on? Why don't you have the ice cream song on? Why don't you? You can get a motor on this thing. People laying down at the beach just have nothing else to do but to give suggestions. Well, so I think you should Yeah. So true, Brian. Absolutely. That's exactly how it happens. And so So, you know, if I could just fast forward from year 1 to 2 to year seven, Um, now I found which is Basically it's like changing the route. I call it the route, which is proper. Where you entered the beach in a specific location. Um, you do a specific part, and then you roll on through, but you really take your time, which gives people more time to decide, right? You know, instead of going through the drive thru right. It's like walking into the restaurant and you're sitting down and you have time to look over the menu. You know, people that are on the beach, they're not in a hurry, which I was right, because I wanted to get everybody that I could done twice. So now, at this point, you know I don't do two strips on the sand. I only need to do one. However, you still need to come back to your starting point. You have to give the kid time to recognize it. Go to Mom or Dad, Bug, Mom and Dad enough so that they finally say yes. Then the mom has to figure out money. Who's going to give it? Who's going to pay it? She has to get in. And if you are already gone, then she was like, Oh, look, he's gone. I can't do it. But if he said you're just going stroll, Mom, he's right, he's mom. We can still get it. I'll run to get him so you have to You have to figure that out, and that is a big part of the process. If you're gone, they're like, uh, he'll come back. Right, Brian? You nailed it. You nailed it. That is that is absolutely 50% of the people, right? You know, there's the only other 50% they know that I'm there, right? They know it and their their return people. But people that haven't been here before, that is the process. And I'll tell you, I'll tell you, who is the most successful at it is the daughter and the father, which is the daughter getting the father. Uh huh. Daddy, please. Yeah, Daddy. No problem. Get the money from your mom. Yeah. Yeah, that's it. Right there. Oh, my God. Yeah, It's It's really, really funny at times to see the interaction right between the kids and the parents. And, uh, yeah, it's Yeah, it makes it all worth it. It really does. So now that you've you've kind of perfected it, I think you're probably still learning. But what is the skill that you had over the last 567 years? You had to, which wasn't part of your work ethics or your work experience prior to this. What's a skill that you had to develop dealing with the people dealing with the people And actually, it shouldn't be dealing with the people socializing, socializing with the people because they're here on vacation. They're here with their kids. And here's just an example is, um you know, you have say, say, there's a brother and sister. Uh, let's just put it out. Just say they're both twins and they never went to the store before. And Bob Bubble Gummer. They never went there and got a bag of chips like they haven't done a transaction before in their life, right? But now you have the ice cream man there on the beach and the parents give them their money to go get an ice cream. Well, you need to make that the best experience it could ever be for them.

It has to be the best you can make it. It's It's to me. It's It's the most important transaction on the beach. Is having the kids come up and experiencing that that experience? I think that is the most important. So, um, making that the best it can be? I mean, before I got into doing this, I didn't know how to do that. So that's just an example of something that I had to learn and recognize and make it the best it can be. You know, imagine those you send the parents. I don't know if this was a commercial show, but the parent given the kid. Okay, You've got to get a loaf of bread, a gallon of milk and a stick of butter. The kids walking down the street China, remember, get a loaf of bread, a gallon of milk, stick of butter, okay, and get in there and then giving, giving, giving the money to you. And I can picture some kids like, here's the money and running off and not waiting for change because they're just so happy. But to to take that moment and to allow them to recognize this is something in this helps build confidence. This helps build the idea of everyday life. Yeah, and you really? Look, you know the experience yourself there are there are kids. They just give that they get there, get there SpongeBob or, you know, they're rainbow pop or whatever it is. And then they're booking, right? They don't They don't know anything about the change. So here's an example. Is that, uh, just a point that you brought up before is it's, like, you know, recognizing something right and happening to, um, make a plan or, um, just taking care of the situation. Basically, where is, you know, there's certain ages that come up and you just know that that might be an example of what's going to happen. So after they do that, I say, Now, hold on there, Hold on there, young man or young lady or whatever it is, Now, don't go anywhere. I got to get to your change, right? So they don't do that when they're gone, and then you not even necessarily have to chase after them. But the parents are like, Well, where's my change and all this kind of stuff? So, you know, for me, it's I just see it coming a mile away, and you know, when you're doing the transaction, it's just like, Hold on there. Now I got to get you some change, so don't go anywhere, okay? And then they sit there patiently and they're waiting and everything, and they're just waiting to rip the thing at the rapper and, you know, go out of town, right and run up and, you know, and enjoy their ice cream and everything. So yeah, just as you say, that's that's exactly what happens. A lot of the time, we just had a brief intermission. You can see that Tosh had to change clothing so we can advertise something. Actually, had a class had to do, and he was very gracious. And let me do that. Uh, yeah. You were saying that the food around there in Florida, You just happen to be telling me this? Yeah, Yeah. No. Well, actually, I think you're taking the time out to do your class and everything. Brian is, uh, just really, uh it's amazing, You know, you're just so dedicated. And obviously education is very important to you. And so absolutely, you know, you can take many intermissions as you want. And you did leave your mic on, and it sounded really fun, really exciting, and everybody would have wanted to be a part of it. I am quite sure that I kind of forgot. I was like, if I turn off the mic, then I might stop the recording, So I didn't I didn't do that. What? I wanted to ask you next week or before. Um, I I interrupted the show, which I think the conversation was and still will go. Well, what's your favorite tool that you use as your on the beach going about? I mean, you mentioned the sunscreen. I've seen a picture of you with a big hat, but there's maybe something that you just need that's essential in the work that you do. I'll tell you, what's essential is, um, the bell. Mm. Bell is my favorite tool. Um, what the bell does is it Lets everybody know that I'm there. There was a I read a story about you and did you not have an instance? Instance where someone took your cart and this was a sentimental bell that you originally had. And did you ever get that back? What happened there? Oh, well, uh, long story short. Yeah. No, I had my, uh, equipment rifle and the bell itself. It was, you know, the the symbol of you know, this is what's here. You know, it's it's like a sounds like a song. It's something that you...

...know, if you hear it, you know what's coming kind of thing. And the funny thing is, is I may be delusional, but you know what it just It has its tone, and it it actually it ages like anything else, right? The tone ages. But yeah, despite that negative experience and everything like that, the bell is very important. And it's the most essential. Um, some people would say, Well, why don't you have the ice cream music playing or why don't you? You know this and that. It's like, Well, I say them now. I said, Well, would you want to listen to that all day? But I thought it was a great idea, and it's really simple and really effective. But the bell is very important. That tone, the tone of the bell is what everybody, uh, knows now Is this something you hand held or is it connected to your cart and for people that don't know what? What does your I mentioned? £250 Only because I read it. What is your actual cart fridge look like? And how does that How do you maneuver with that? Well, what it is that you've got two wheels, rubber wheels on the back, or you can get them with hard rubber and then you have a basically like a sharp in car wheel on the front. So what it was meant to do is it's it's meant to ride on, um, payment, you know, solid land. But however, uh, as I mentioned before, you know, it took a while to find the correct equipment. So it had the right axel with everything. And so, you know, I I just figured that it would work. But it's £185 empty. And then when you stock it, yeah, it's 200 I got one is called Old Yeller, which was in that particular article. And it's yellow. It is banana yellow. And then I got Big Blue and Big Blue was purchased because of what happened. And big blues even more heavier. Big blues like 2. 75 when it hits speech. Did you get Old Yeller back? I did. Okay. You did. I did get Old Yeller back with with the bell with the bell. Thank goodness. Yeah, because it just it's brass, and it ages over time. And it's only something that I would notice. Does it? If you ring that physically, or is it ring just by the movement? It rings physically I have the I'm not. I guess you could call the call the emblem, you know, And it's tied to a cord, and it comes across a handlebar and you pull it and the ambulance hits the bell. And that's what sends out the chime in the tone and the sound. How many ice creams are you selling on a hot summer day in Florida? Well, you know, uh, look, I'll tell you right now is, um I get asked that all the time, and, uh, I I avoid the question. Is it okay? And I knew it. Even asking is a tough question. Are you looking at hundreds like 100? Well, the thing is, you know, I got all kinds of people that want to talk shop and everything, and I even met a couple that even approached me after seeing what I was doing, and they attempted to do it, um, down a further stretch of the sand down the coast and, you know, they didn't allow it kind of thing. And so when it comes to talk and shop and all that kind of stuff, you know, numbers of Well, how much does it hold? How much Do you know? Whatever goes all this kind of stuff? Um, you know, I just prefer to keep that personal. Yeah, totally, totally understandable. But it's it's enough to keep you wanting to do it and keep you going out for more is thinking, Go ahead. The volume is in the motivation. The motivation is what it does for people. That's that's what's most important. It's almost like a nurse. The nurse wants to get into the profession because they actually want to care for somebody and there really good at it. May you know they want to go to work and do that. And, you know, it's enjoyable to them kind of thing. So I mean, the motivation for me is what I do in my community and who I do it for. Um although, oh, you know, if it didn't, you can't You can't live, um, under...

...your means kind of thing, right? You know, which has. And I mean, you can't do something that doesn't It doesn't pay the bills kind of thing, right? You know? So, you know, I mean, if we were to go that angle there, Well, no, no, no. It it does what it's supposed to do. But, you know, I earned it that way there. But that's not the motivation. That's that's all I'm trying to say, You know, it's it's not the motivation at all. You know what's most important is what it does. I think earlier we're going down that line of floating. What is it that you do by floating it up and down along the ocean? I guess it is so that you don't have to carry it. What is it that you do there? Oh, floating was just, uh you know, it's It's a construction term where you would put the piece of equipment on a trailer. Okay, you know, so you don't have to carry it or whatever it is, you know, down to the destination where it has to go, right? But you know when you're on the beach No, it's on the sand and and that's it. You have to, uh, you got to move it now, thinking of you starting at 11, stacking wood, piling wood, doing some other sorts of jobs even when you were younger. But also switching careers a couple of times in getting where you are, where you said. You will do this until you can't do it anymore. Do you have any advice for people who are getting into work, whether it's their first job or switching careers? Um, well, if it's your first job, Um, here's an example. Is my oldest son is he's 16. Sorry, 17. And at the age of 15, I would say to him, Aiden, you got to get the job. You gotta go to work and I mean you as a parent yourself. You can understand this and all parents. This is that you need to tell your Children. I mean, you could just just check off 1500 times and then, you know, start doing the four lines with the line across, right of, you know, before it sinks in kind of thing, right? And so he's, you know, he's doing great in school and he has a job at Publix now. I don't know if that's what he wants to do. What is Publix? What is Publix? Public is a grocery store. It's almost like so be okay. Okay. It's like getting a job with So bees. Yes. So, um, you know, that's good, though, because here in Korea, while we understand it culturally speaking, as you and I were talking before, we start recording culturally, the different values and where people put things is a lot. The majority of people in maybe Asian countries, but in Korea in particular, they parents don't want their kids getting a job until they're finished school. So their first job after university is their first experience with getting out in the real world, which is shocking to me. I understand it. It's not something I'm going to apply to my kids. I'm telling them now, especially with the podcast, why we work. You're going to experience getting a job because it's good for you. That's right. That's right. That's right. It's very, very healthy. And, uh, well, I mean, there you go. And I would love to visit Korea. I would love to experience that, You know, I would even take it as a vacation. Oh, no, absolutely. I would definitely love to visit, and and so, you know, right. Having them experience the real world and everything, it's probably not what he's going to do for the rest of his life, right. But, uh, you know, my personal experience is that you know, education and everything. They don't be scared to. Ah, make a change. You know, if something is not working out, you know, you have to trudge through. You know, if you have a family and kids and everything, it makes it more difficult, and it can put a strain and everything. But, I mean, if younger and you don't have those kind of responsibilities, Uh, absolutely, You know, roll through and find out what you like to me. What's, uh my suggestion to my son will be is just that you find something that you will be happy with when you wake up in the morning. You're going to be happy doing what you do. And then when you come home, you know you're not going to be unhappy because you have to go do something that you're unhappy doing. It's a vicious cycle kind of thing. But, you know, just just don't...

...be scared. And, you know, the They say the forties is the new thirties and everything like that. But, uh, you know, in your twenties and everything, you know, have some fun, you know, explore your options and all this kind of stuff, but you know what's most important is is, I think is you don't do it for the money. You do it because you want to do it. And and and that has a big wave effect on the people that you're going to interact with in your life. If you're unhappy, they don't people who want to be around unhappy people. You know, Tosh, we've been talking about your work for a little bit in the idea of the things that you've tried. Is there any mistakes that you made that you take with you? And you learn from that mistake or something that other people can learn from in terms of work? Oh, in terms of work, absolutely is, um, you be a team player. You know, there's some places that you know if you're a team player, that's that's the environment, and you are, that's the environment. You want to be any kind of thing. But you can be with people that aren't team players or don't you know they don't want that, you know, it's a pecking order kind of thing. You just you've got to just just feel out where you're at kind of thing, right? You know, So that's That's just basically how I how I see that. Thank you for talking about the mistakes. And what people should do is learn about teamwork. I think that is essential. Tosh. I agree. I agree, Brian. A teamwork is where it's at. Absolutely. You have a pretty good work ethic, especially starting at 11. And not many people started at 11 that I've spoken with people in 13, but 11 is pretty, pretty young. Do you have a moral beacon? What's guiding you and what's leading you in the choices and in the work that you do Well, I mean, why we work? I think your podcast title is I mean, it says it all. Um, you know, it's life's not perfect for me and, you know, everything has its ups and downs and all this kind of stuff. But, you know, I always found that working and staying busy is just the most healthy for me. You know, Uh, it really doesn't even have to do with, um you know what? What it brings afterwards, although, you know, my family, my Children or my guiding light and they're my motivation and all this kind of stuff. But you know, if you're not on your own and you know all this kind of stuff anyway, working and staying busy to me is it's what I need to survive. It's the most healthiest choice that I can make for me. If I had to make a decision for me, it's working and staying busy. Do you have what isn't like radius health? What do you have? A goal? Is your vending machine Do you have a name? A particular name for it? It's called PCB IC Paradise. What? What? I gave you that name. And what is PCB mean? PCB is Panama City Beach. And of course what? What it is that I, um, provide is something icy, right? And to a lot of people, you're in paradise. PCB I see paradise. That's correct. Yeah. Do you have a goal? Do you have an overarching goal for PCB? My overarching goal is to expand to franchise it out. No, just to expand. How What would that look like? Um, basically, it'll be that particular service. Um, instead of doing three miles of beach, it will do six miles of beach and then we'll do nine miles of beach and then it will continue on. And everybody that comes to this particular area right here has that service for their family and their kids, especially the kids. You know, it's if you franchised it, I would be the first applicant. I think it's ideal. I mean, I love the beach and I know you said the heat is tough and all of that, but it's one of those things where you know you can do your job and I appreciate that. And then you can interact with people as well, and at the end of the day you can finish with it. And so if you franchise or at least are hiring, uh, show me where to get the application and I mean, I'll tell you right now. Actually, I think you would...

...be perfect. I think you would be perfect and you have a lot of fun with it, absolutely, especially being a teacher and everything. You have all those attributes that you know when you encounter the situation and the people, the families and everything like that, you would handle it 100%. Absolutely. I got a £275 card here if you want to come up for a couple of months. Check it out. Absolutely. Okay. Be careful what you say. I might be on the next next flight. Is there anything Tosh that people may not understand about you or your business? Whichever you choose that if they understand this about you or your business, they would have a better appreciation about what you're doing in your work. Um, a misunderstanding about it. Uh, it's it's not easy. And and actually, it's not, uh, the word, Um, what's the word I'm looking for? It's not fruitful. It's, uh, you know, people think that you earn a great living, right, And, you know, I don't. I earn a good living, but I don't earn a great living. People are under some kind of guys that, you know, it's this a gold mine kind of thing. But it's really not, you know it all into. You know why it is. I do what I do. I don't do it. My motivation is not monetary. My motivation is what it does for everybody else, right? And you know so So that's a misunderstanding right there, you know, from people. And if they understand that Well, you know, then they would probably say, you know Oh, okay. You know, I mean, I get that and maybe some people would be like, Oh, well, that's not for me. And others might be like, Oh, well, that's fantastic. You know, I'd really like to be a part of that on another side of that, too, I could think, because I do this with things and I try to guess what people make or how good of how lucrative. Maybe that's the word you're looking for. How, Luke? It's the word. Yes, it's not lucrative at all. Right? And then some people on the beach might be like That guy is making a killing, and I'm not going to buy ice cream from him because of it. But if they understood, it's not that lucrative, and it isn't that easy. And then, by supporting your local people, always say local your local businesses and all the support your local guy walking on the beach selling ice cream because it's a little bit to you. But it's a lot. It's a little bit to the person on the beach, but it's a lot. It means a lot to you. uh, well, look, I'll tell you what Brian is, uh, you know, if that's if that was a situation I really don't care about meaning. You know what person? What? The person thinks. Yeah. Yeah. I don't need pity or anything like that, and I can tell by people's suggestions and everything, and and once again, I don't go into, um, you know, the whole real business aspect of it, the whole accounting. And I mean the administrative side of it and really, you know, everything internal about it, but, uh, you know, I I don't need people's pity or anything like that. Uh, you know, as much as as difficult as it is, I just I'm lucky I love what I do. Um, blessed. And by the way, I don't know how many people want your podcast, but keep that a secret. It's a good point, but that's that's right. Whether people have pity or not, it's It's not as lucrative as one might think, which I think, in turn, would give people people they would. It would give people a better appreciation of what you're doing because you're not doing it for the money. You're doing it for the many enjoyments that it brings. Um, and it's hard work. So just like many, many other jobs that are like that not lucrative. But you're using the skills the talent you learned developed you you've incorporated into your life over a lifetime. And this is a niche that you found that works for you and that appreciation not pity, because you don't want pity. But you want just appreciation and you don't you don't desire. I read someone, say, uh, something on the Internet. I don't know if Elon musk or something. Someone said maybe it wasn't him. But I lost all respect for you because of something that you did. And he's like, Well, if I ever went to the Internet to find the respect from people who I don't know, then to some paraphrases like that would be useless to me to seek that. And it would be useless for you, too, but to at least acknowledge that the job that you're providing is a good service, and you're doing it day...

...in and day out, and it takes hard work, and it takes dedication for you to get up right to to do this for your family. But yeah, well, I mean, that's not even just supporting a family. It's, um you know, if you were to experience it and everything it would. I mean, it just has such a positive, joyful, great energy effect on you because it's been involved with pure happiness. That's what it is. It's. And so all the things I mean, the questions you asked me about, the hardships and the difficulties and all this kind of stuff, it's it makes it all worth it. Speaking of hardships, absolutely 100% worth it. Is there any adversity that you have faced, whether in your professional life or personal life, that either affects you positively or negatively, that you use to drive you or it may hinder you in your work. But you also understand it. But you can use that adversity to encourage other people who are facing similar troubles. Okay, I did. You know, that's that's a really interesting topic to bring up because, um, you know, if I was to rewind the conversation before I brought up about living in a beach town, um, it's it's a whole different lifestyle, and it's a whole different government, so my main adversity was my government. Mm. My local government was a major adversity to it. So, uh, you know, I went okay. Why is to the governor of the state, right? And, you know, I I researched everything that I was doing, you know, to overcome that because, quite frankly, I'm just completely 100% focused. And I know what I'm doing is a great thing. And well, now it's proven, you know. So my advice to you is is that, you know, don't don't let people I mean, you might have a lot of roadblocks and all this kind of stuff, but don't let people put that stops on in front of you, and then you look at it and you say, Okay, there it is, right? You need to keep trudging along. Basically, here's Here's a word. You hear a lot in the news even here today is you need to fight. People call it fighting. And all this kind of stuff I call it Don't give up. You don't give up and you don't You don't let exterior influences change what you really believe. If you believe it's right, then do it. I can just picture you and I think people it would do people well. And if and we all face roadblocks in our work and in life. And if they can picture you on the sandy beaches of Florida dragging £250 down, the with your bell going, if they can picture that not stopping from end to end lap the lab day by day, going through and not letting anything it's a simple picture in that you can pick your beautiful ocean. You can pick your beautiful sand sandy beaches and one man walking down the road, walking down the beach, selling and delivering a service and not letting the regulations stop you. I mean, not to doing things illegally, but to to work through the system so you can do what you want. And if people can picture that and not be stopped in whatever presents itself to them, I think it's a good picture to keep in our minds that you have a Tosh Mackenzie working hard. Going down the beach is not being stopped, and things shouldn't stop us as well. That's correct. And and the thing is, is sometimes, uh, you know what it is that you know, I've seen it as is you have what's called change, which we all know, and, you know, you got to look back that well. I mean changes from the fifties to let's say there's well, here it is. There's computers today and there's no computers in the fifties, right? So all that changed from the fifties, which you have now still in our generation and everything, and now they have computers, and it's like our parents are like, Well, I don't want an iPhone. I don't You know, I don't want to go on the Internet and I don't You...

...know this. I don't understand this kind of thing, right? It's, you know, it's progress, you know, and it's changed and people are resistant to change. You could be complacent, which we all get, you know, And it's kind of like in our workplace if we get a new boss, we get a supervisor. The staff changes or something like that, right? You know, change is a delicate thing, and people are affected by it. And so in my particular situation is I just took a hardcore stance on change, and I believe, and what I was doing And while it's I believe it today and it worked out that way and everybody sees it now kind of thing. So you know, it's he's, uh, Tiffany's. And, uh, it's not even a change of regulation or anything like that. It's just change. Tosh is there. I only have another question for you. And I do know it's and I appreciate your resilience as well. Is there anything else that we haven't touched upon? I have another question for you as well, but is there anything that you like to add? Uh, anything that we you might want to add to the mix? Absolutely. That we have a flood of Canadians here every year. They come here from Ontario, Alberta, Calgary Uh, quarterback. I mean, they all come here to Panama City Beach. So there's any Canadians listening, or even anybody else from all over the world. Just come here and check us out. You're gonna have a great time. You got great food, great entertainment. I mean, there's all kinds of attractions. There are, um, sites, things that you've never done before, that you're going to have a blast. And especially we are family oriented. So if you have your kids with you, especially. You guys are going to have a memorable moment and a wonderful time. There is no doubt about us. We do it right. We know how to do it. Everybody here, in this community, that is their life is to do that for you. And it's here. It's waiting for you. It seems like a great community to be a part of. How can people get in contact with you? Tosh, is there? Is there a way for your business or social media wise? Well, I'll tell you I am. I tried to get a Facebook page up. Uh, what? What I want to do is get the Facebook page out and and hand out like a little card or something like that. If you take your picture, please post it on the site and it will be there for life. Uh, you know, it's almost like a mortality issue. Of course, that's a Facebook is going to be there. Um, you know, But I haven't, You know, I'm not big on the marketing kind of thing, you know, It's not that basically the whole Facebook page is for the families you know, to do that and have a little bit of fun and everything. So, I mean, if you want to Google PCB ic paradise on Facebook, Uh, you can find me there and you can find just what's posted there. And this particular year, though, I'm going to definitely make it a point to do it. But the thing is, is it takes time and everything, and I do everything on my own. So you know, it's just another thing to monitor and put the time and all this kind of stuff, but it's absolutely worth it. I'm gonna come through. It's going to be very, very successful. And please look up the site if you want and put your pictures on there, that when you're here, because everybody wants to see it. Yeah, I was thinking, as you're saying is like Maybe I don't know if you're allowed, but putting a sticker on your on the packaging of each ice cream, with maybe a QR code or something along those lines that leads to something, something, something. Then that's extra labor. Putting a sticker on Brian. That is a great suggestion. It really, really is. Actually, that's a wonderful idea. Um, and, you know, if it was at all possible, it's very labor intensive. It's very labor intensive and very time consuming. But that's a fantastic idea, especially to work around that. That's a really good idea, Tosh one. But it might be just as easy to have cards right on your thing. In one sale.

Here's a card. Uh, one final question for you, sir. And that is why do you work? You kind of mentioned it along the way. But why do you work? I do what I do because it brings so much happiness and joy. And to me, that's I think that's the best. Living that personally, just myself. But I can make and do. But working to me is it's a healthy thing, working and being a part of something. Yeah, to me, that's what makes my life whole is the purpose as much as my family and everything is the motivation. Um, I just know that if I'm not working and I'm not participating in my community, my country, my state, I don't feel good at all. It's a great point, Josh, because part of it got to be a part of it. You know, I agree wholeheartedly. Uh, work hard. Work hard? Absolutely. Yeah. You yourself. Everybody knows after a hard day's work, you feel good. You're like, Yeah, that's right. I work hard today. It's a good feeling. That's why you work personally. Tosh Mackenzie, the owner of PCB IC Paradise. I truly appreciate the time you've given me, and I appreciate the work that you do. This was a lot of fun. Thank you very much. Now you have to come and experience it now, Brian. All right. You have the invitation to the beach. It's not like you're coming here. And it's, you know, you don't know anybody you actually do, and you are welcomed. Absolutely welcome. It will be my pleasure to take you out, show you and your family around and everything and see what we have to offer. I know you have a great time. You would love it. I think the funny thing is, you would offer that in a good way, that invitation to anyone who is listening as well. Because I think you're that type of guy. Absolutely, but particularly you. So I'm so grateful. I'm so grateful for what you do and everything you do. You're a fantastic and wonderful person and your family is beautiful. You're a hard worker. And you know what? Your podcast. It It brings a lot of goodness to everybody that wants to listen to it. Check out Tosh Mackenzie. Go to Florida. PCB ic paradise. Thank you, kind sir. Thank you very much. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe, Follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive yet joyful day in your work.

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