WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 101 · 1 year ago

#101 Tony Verkinnes - On-Air Personality - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Tony Verkinnes is a retired on-air personality who worked over four decades in the communications industry. Over the last decade Tony could have been heard along side Todd Friel on Talk the Walk, Way of the Master, and Wretched Radio. Tony will continue to lend his voice to various works, especially for his grandchildren.

This is True, Really News (Podcast)

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgclaC-qp3UwMB1mzVTlRog


Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/LutheranBoy

Wretched Radio
https://wretched.org/

Way of the Master
https://www.livingwaters.com/outreach/way-of-the-master/

...welcome to why we work with your host Brian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which would be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going on and keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here is your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian V. And this is why we work today. Of the great pleasure speaking with Tony Verkin is Tony was an on air personality producer editor and you could have heard him through a burning bush communications way of the master and wretched radio. Today I want to find out from Tony what is vocation and what does vocation mean to him and what it should mean to us. Join me today in my conversation with Tony Verkin ISS. I'm Brian V and this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure speaking with Tony Verkin ISS Good day, Find, sir. Dude, I'm so proud of you. Thank you for being here. I've heard my name pronounced several dozen ways and well, this is the third. I think they got it right, Brian V. Because my last name is vast terrorists and very few Kendrick got it. All right. So you could be Tony v two. I was actually one radio station early on. Yeah, maybe I'll change. Now. I'll, uh, close to Bobby Vee for me. I couldn't do it. I'll consider that in the, uh Oh, yeah. Good point, Tony. I appreciate you coming on here. Would you be able to tell me one thing? Industry just for for the way this podcast works, The industry that you've been in and what it is you're doing nowadays, Um, I have been in radio most of my adult life. I think I did the numbers. I was played radio some way or another for 43 years of accounts. Um, work we did in high school at the Explorer thing. Uh, yeah, it took two years off for factory work, but that happens in radio because if you're not fired from a few jobs in radio, you're not doing it right. That's what they always told me. Didn't enjoy being fired, even though they told me that Mhm. Yeah. Been in a ton of radio stations played most every kind of music possible. Couple of talk radio stints, um, everything from polkas and mazurkas to rock and roll to Christian talk. And now mostly I sit around the house and annoying my wife when she's home. She's still working. And, yeah, I watch a lot of Netflix. I'm binging Everything you and I were just talking about waken get sucked in very easily, and I know and all of a sudden it's four in the morning. It's like E, but then I don't have to go anywhere. But technically, I'm retired by studio. One of these kind of things. We just started with a friend of mine who's He's basically my twin, except that he was born in Kansas and I was born in ST Cloud. Other than that were the same Well, he's eight hours older. Um, he's tall. I have hair, that sort of thing. So we do a thing way started way back. When did you? I'm sorry. No, it's good. And I've always liked I mean, I've never met you personally, but I've been listening to the show that you were on for a while. Wretched radio. And you're just the voice that you have the sound of reason. As I said when I first to start at this a moment ago to said, You make it sound of reason and it z and we were talking a moment ago to about work and the appreciation for you have we can have for people who do the things they do. And I appreciate the work that you did for 43 years. But, Tony, would you be able to bring us back into what would have been your very first job, even as a teenager, even if it had nothing to do with radio? Oh, that's easy. My first job was I was thesis wont per for my dad's bar. What is this swapper? He's the guy that comes in at six in the morning before school and sweeps up. Make sure all the ashtrays are empty and clean. Floors were clean. Rugs have been shaken out. Um, spills and icky things have been cleaned up, and on Sunday you do the thorough mopping clean. How old were you? Uh 15. 16. It was my dad's bar, though In all honesty on Sunday, it was a family thing. We go to church, come back and everybody there would be clean. The bar, which was not as much funny to think, is my mom was picky. Wow. German lady was very picky. People want to clean bear, I guess. And by that time, she didn't. She wasn't working anymore. So I was like,...

Mom, go home. So as you were getting into high school, where did your desire or could you start finding a talent for radio? Well, I never had talent because it's radio. I, um, actually was second grade. Really? What? What turned that on? All right. My dad had this weird little golf tournament kind of thing. Basically a one day excuse to go play golf, drink beer and have fun with your friends. Yeah, And by the time I got to gulf in it, when I was wow, I think 16 or 17 they finally invited me there like 150 guys, and they took over a golf course for a day. One of the people that golf was the sports director of the radio station, and he took me to a few games that year that he did, and I was like, Mm he gets paid for talking about sports. What a great job Then, by the time I was in high school, figure out there was no way and being a sports guy in the radio because that has worked. You know, there's nothing like doing your show leaving for Duluth during the game, coming back and doing your show and then heading over the Hardee's to do the coaches show What? What made you realize that? Did you just paying attention to some broadcast? Yeah, In high school, we had a new explorer post that was a radio explorer post. Um, hi, Mike Diamond. You're out there. Um, my mentor. He was sleeping up behind me. Hire me twice. I don't understand it. Um, when I just watched the workings there just on the outside of what went on in real life, part of the radio station. You're looking at that. No, man, there's not enough money to do this. Now if you're Troy Aikman and Joe Buck, you get a lot of money, and it's a lot different when you're at that small market or media market level. You do all the schlepping of the equipment, all the set up all the interviews, all the pre game post game, and you get to do all your other stuff, too. Mhm. So that's everything. And I thought that's way too much work for the money they pay because radio is not that glamorous. And it's not that big a payer when you're down in the lower levels. So when you realize this, what were you starting to think for after high school college? Or after that? I think I'm still doing radio. He get paid Thio talk and drink coffee. And how bad could this be? So I figured I'd be a rock and roll disc jockey and be very cool and make lots of money. And I don't know. That's about all the farther that went, um, ended up in a couple of what we used to call M O R. Stations, which were basically lots of talk. A few songs every hour, lots of commercials to get through, and you have to be as entertaining as you can so you don't lose the people. When what was your first experience on air first paying gig was part time at UIC C 12 60 Emory, Wisconsin, while I was finishing up school. The two years of college did not like that, you know? Do you know the first two years they expect you to take? See? That's it? I don't know. They don't let you take any of the fun stuff. It's like, Okay, here's your sociology window. One your psychology one No. One. Your Oh, my gosh, I'm bored to tears. One or two. Uh huh. You don't get I mean, you gotta You gotta get through two whole years before I even get a sniff of the stuff you want, because for a while I entertained going into the news side of it, you know? So I went to Brown Institute, maker of great radio people worldwide Don't even know if they're still in business. Eso a part time at the end of my term there I was, working part time at UIC. See, First job was in Marshall, Minnesota at K M. H. L lasted there about a year and a half. Were you nervous? Your first time up there? Care to death? Yep. Scared to death in slow? Because besides doing your show and getting ready for that, um, there was production things to be done. And those are the You want those to be perfect cause they're gonna be recorded and played over and over. And I was very slow in very particular. So there was some mornings that would get off the air at midnight, and I would be going home just before the morning guys came in because I wanted to write. Did you feel that you you had what it took, Which is why you were following this besides some unknown desire. You felt you had the voice for it. You felt No. I'm writing skills or anything like that. No, I was a lousy writer. I found out pretty early, though, that I could take other people's writing and speak it like I was saying it for Riel instead of reading it. Apparently, that's a skill. Um, way you know how it is when you can do something. It's like so I can cold read. Copy a Skoda's like my pastor. We have...

...contest sometimes in our little book thing. Um, and all the other. How'd you do that thing when you read for a living? Dude, you also don't make much money. Neither profession. I just want to know you got to know this. No, I didn't think there was any great talent. I just thought it would be a great way toe to make a living. And I had, Like I said, I had goals to be a major market guy. Make big bucks. So there was martial. There was ST Cloud from ST Cloud. I followed my dime again over two K M o m. A startup from K M o M. I ended up in KSTP AM, which was a talk station in the Twin Cities. My first stop from there, I got fired my first time I went to Princeton, which is where we still live. Because my wife Why did you get fired? Change of management. Actually, the GM and the sales manager and a whole bunch of people got canned. Um, they wanted they redid a whole bunch of the show of the shows they had a lot of them went away on, became, you know, the syndicated stuff they do nationally. And then they move the afternoon guide in the mornings and tried something new in the afternoons. And we were out the nice part about radios. You get fired because it's Tuesday. You know, they just here's what they keep you till Friday because that way it's easier for the shift over. And security is around in the Yeah, it's tasted the new people in the business. So thinking about being fired were you being your first experience in the radio business getting fired? Were you discouraged, man? No. Yes. Maybe it was. You know that there's a crushing moment? Um, it took a while. It took a week or two before everything started to settle in. Did you question your career path at all? Or just I'm just gonna go get another radio job at that point. I know I didn't. I was I know there's another job out there. Found one in Princeton, which was kind of nice, because the program director in Princeton had been a major market guy elsewhere, so he hired me again. I don't know what these people are thinking, and I made 4.5 years working in Princeton, which is the longest I've worked anywhere, with the exception of wretched, which was all told, Richard was 18 years and in two years before that cake M s, which is unheard of. That's like, you know, being dead in dog years. Uh huh. But no, I at that point, I didn't. There were other times you would like when I was working in the factory at Crystal cabinets. I was thinking these radio what I need to do, Or do I need to be looking at something else? Because I ain't doing this for very long, so yeah. How maney positions did you take outside of radio through through your career? Um, or were there a number of them? No, there weren't many. Um, I worked at crystal cabinets for a while on one stint, and I worked at Were you manufacture cabinets? At that point? Was I ever sanding on a line? I was awful. Um, but I knew if you're the people there because it's Princeton, it's not a big town. Yeah, it was okay. And I was glad they took the chance on me. I also have worked at Federal, which is that munitions manufacturer? Were they extra income? Was it between jobs between? Yeah, I would do every once in a while, they'd be like, you know, if you wanted to deejay some gig for somebody they pay you some money, but I wasn't really into that at all. I want to be a club deejay and actually make money. Um, again, It looks so easy, right? You work six hours and you make a lot of money. It's not. You've gotta get the playlist set up. You gotta look the way you do. You gotta make sure everything's ready around you. They all have. They all come with extras. And I just didn't. Wasn't ready to put that kind of thing or travel right. Live in ST Cloud. And there's a gig in I don't know, Eden Prairie. There's a 50 minute drive to and from you have to bring the equipment, usually all the music. Usually it's just that never interested me a lot of bartending for a while, but I thought that was way too cliche to be a bar owner's son and then go to bartending way. We were talking earlier about the mic that you have. Yeah, how has how has it changed from the ability to just move around and to bring your equipment with you? And how easy is that? How, how easy it has it become? Well, in the old days, when I was a boy, we had to lug our equipment in the snow...

...uphill both ways. And no, I'm not kidding. Some of the stuff was just gargantuan. You know, the boards would be this huge. We had a Scott and I had a gig in, um, Minneapolis for a nap. A wedding dance. Scott knew these people really well. It was, like over a legion or something of the FW. So we're cutting the speakers, this huge honking board and all the stuff up this large flight of stairs on the outside of the building because, you know, you don't want that on the inside. Uh huh. So then you get that all set up quickly, towel off and put on a dry shirt. And now it's 4.5 hours of music stuff. And then when that's all done at 1 30 it's tear it all down and look at all the other way. He was very fun. And now you can just take. And now you know, it's like little anybody. Red box does. All the things that my and the board I used to have was very small compared to everything you used to see first, Actually, the first board at at Wretched. Well, was it wretched, then? Yes. First board. When we when talk the walk became wretched, um, was slightly smaller version of one of the first boards I ever work done. Wow. They still make these, and they're like tanks. Unless you you know, drop a hand grenade in them and then hold the top down. They just don't break. Then you've got all now you everything's slide pots and solid, solid state. Wow, that dates me. But you know, there's no to be stuff anymore. Unless you're you know, elite wanted to amp for your mike. So, yeah, it's gotten lighter, easier, much more mobile. So as you moved along in your career, I guess seeing that with talk the walk that was your longest stint up until wretched radio. How did you get into that position? Um, I had worked with the program director there at W l O L back in the day. My one claim to fame in the big leagues. Um, and they had needed somebody, and I've got a little Christian radio station in ST Cloud, which was okay, but the people I knew there that I came to work for. We're leaving. And I thought, You know what? I don't want the responsibility of being their job because I just didn't. So I called David. We interviewed, and I became the production director, which was the first time I wasn't exclusively on air talent. Um, so I voiced commercials and then put other commercials together. All the stuff you do that you hear it, you know. And one day they said, Oh, yeah, by the way, part of your job is going to be bored hopping for this guy on his show talk. The walk really happened. And I remember Todd's entire first words to David were, Yeah, just make sure he knows to run the board. And he didn't have to say anything. Way evolved from that over the years. But yeah, it was no, like any other business connections helped, you know, people, you know and have worked with you. It's like being in any trenches kind of thing. Um, you know what? If you can count on him or not And David thought Okay, well, given the flyer, and from then on, it's been mostly behind the scenes stuff with the sidekick E thing with Todd. You know, you guys work together for quite a while and you just retired. I did Just within the last few few months, Lee, for just August, Somewhere in there. So you're August somewhere. I think the end of July, I think, was the the end of the run, which was really odd. You know what? What does that feel like? What does that? You know, 43 years and something. You know, you do have Netflix to keep doing with Netflix prime, and they feel Max so I can watch all of my d c cartoons. So e you want live If you want live action superhero stuff, you go with Marvel if you want cartoon superhero stuff that's done really well, D c. However, not all of it is for kids. Hmm. My son loves those. My son loves it. We watch them together, but he loves your hoot. So how are you settling in in your retirement? How is that? I'm still working on it. Are usually the voiceover work as well and you're having it. You have another podcast, but we do the podcast thing. I e no, that was something I never enjoyed, although it paid well. But the flight of voice over stuff was just not something I like doing. Um, is there something just even thinking of listeners who might think...

...of voice over work? Is there something that you you just didn't like sitting and reading a script that you're not connected? No, it's what was I have no logical reason for this because I actually production in a radio setting was my favorite thing. Hmm. It just and the older I got, I can hear the slip in pronunciation in enunciation, that sort of thing in my in my voice and the way words came out Mm. And I thought, you know, because I'm gonna debris reading the same thing nine dozen times. And it's never gonna be different because I'm gonna have that little list here that little dragged there because that's the way it's maturing out. Mhm. Did you do your show with, say, with Todd from home the whole time? No. No. First we're When we moved from cake mess. We went even farther south so that my drive would be 25 minutes longer, which I'm always grateful for, and I swear It took me 4.5 hours. One snowy day They let me out early. Took me 4.5 hours to get home to get home. I love the Twin Cities. He said sarcastically. Um, yeah, we had We had a sweet up in the I can't remember the name of the building now And we had to studios. Todd, Studio Mine. Joe. We had a studio there for production stuff. Um, eventually we brought in hip hop and brainiac. I should probably remember their names. I remember now is David, Sharon and Rick. I'm sorry, Rick. I don't remember your last name. He was always brainiac. He's one of my Facebook friends. I'm in deep trouble. Um, we were there. Eventually. Somebody saw that I forget who it was, but somebody in Atlanta saw the show and heard the show. I don't know if Todd would come to Atlanta to do the show and do TV, and we thought, well, people could do TV here. Know that quickly became feasibly monetarily wrong. So basically everybody but a few of us went down there, and slowly but surely, we decided to know what this office really isn't needed Julie and I think what we dio from home so slowly but surely the officers were gone and we were sent home to do our stuff here. That was a little odd to get used to. How many years were you home doing it? Five, maybe six. Okay, Shows a while. So it's pretty. You have yourself a treated room. And how did that work? No, that's pretty much it. It's a little square room. My father in law actually built way back. When when we redid the basement, um, put up different lighting, easy toe just for reading purposes. We didn't care about cameras in because I still have a great face for radio board. Was you know, we bought an old countertop and use that as the place to put all the equipment off We went knowing that you're you're now retired and I think you have a good as I said, a resounding voice, a sound, the voice of reason, which you would say you don't, but the word vocation comes up being the Lutheran that you are the were vocation. What does vocation mean to you and what should it mean to other people? Location is, Yeah, it's what you do. And I mean that more than just a job. Um, the people who amaze me with vocations, our nurses, um, mhm, good pastors. Those people are amazing to me because they do what they do, and it's there's no glamour in it, a lot of criticism and people not in their best form always. So. Location for me is just it's what you're You got skills and talents, and it's what you do with them. So I was hoping, you know, through the years that maybe somebody would have a little better time getting off to work, coming home from work or something. And if I got that accomplished once or twice every day, that was a good day. I don't know if I did, because no feedback, but that was the plan anyway. What was the process that you had to go through, especially from your home studio, to prepare into deliver? Uh, generally, I would get down here, Um, when we moved home, we decided doing it every day was a little weird. And actually, I think even before that we had started recording two or three of the shows in one day and then two or three of the shows on another day. So there were two recording days on those days. I would be down here early, make sure all the stuff I wanted or thought I needed would be around. And then we recorded I did the news. So that was always something I had toe put together. Find...

...the stories and present him and get him to Joey. Um, did a lot of the production work Same story, short of verse, so the day would usually start nine ish. It was much shorter day when I actually got to move home because I didn't have three hours of driving, which was nice. So I'd get down here about 99 30 and I'd be done 34 What kind of nice? If you didn't hear it? It just sounded like you guys were together. That's the funny thing they have. You guys had that relationship inability to things that always amazed me. I'm sorry. Let me talk all over you. But there are two things that amaze me. One that people listen because, you know, there's so many places to go for stuff. And why would you listen to us, but they did, and to so many people thought were in the same studio. I thought, Wow, that's great technology. But I have been blessed four times with people who have worked with who just we talked earlier, right about chemistry and TV shows how they make the whole show click. There've been four guys in 40 some years that I would work with any time anywhere, no questions asked, just because I trust him that much and we work together Well, that that much, I guess I would be a missive. How How was your career with Todd Todd Friel? Because he's still going There is change and what they're doing and and, uh, but you guys seem to have a good relationship. He seems like, you know, he's louder, I would say right, And he he has his views, which are, you know, great. And you guys have somewhat opposing views at times. But you guys, you guys, you guys worked well together, and you made it like a marriage. Yeah, that pretty much describes it right there. There are good days and bad days. Um, I realized pretty early on because the Lutheran conversion actually came after I'd been working with Todd Really? So a little bit different. And I decided pretty early on that. If I'm gonna, you know, hit him. With every difference we have in theology, this show is gonna grind to a screeching halt. And let me guess one of us will be gone. Yeah, and I wasn't actually that pragmatic. It's just you know what? It's Todd Show. Why would I want to mess with him like that? Um, so every once while we get into it, but usually no, um, it was I like working with them. It was always fun. Usually unexpected. I can't remember days very often. Alright. In the old days, we used to do theology Thursday. Those weren't funny at all. But other than that, most days would have, you know, a laugh or two or three of them. So I enjoyed it. I like Todd and his family. I still like giving his daughter's a hard time when I get a hold of them on the screen, Um although honestly dish it back as well as they give it out. I love that people. And a little bit hard. When it was over. After 18 years. Not as bad as a marriage dissolving, but, you know, took a minute. That's why I was wondering about vocation and talking about how you work together. And I'd like to know what you think about theologically speaking where people become either legal ists or and to know me in is, um or anti No means the idea of what You can't do this, or you can do whatever you want in between and for vocation. And you and I were talking before this about our appreciation for sports and entertainment and all these things and the people that people, the things that people do and comedians. And I'd like you to just comment on because I find there's there is that more legalistic view of what you can you can't do for your vocation. Yeah, it depends on what side? Your own, of course. Um, we tend a How do I phrase this politely? We tend to look a through a very small prism. Our perspective is very limited. Even us old books, because, you know, 60 years matters what, almost nothing. In the grand scheme of things, Um, so our perspective is entirely what we digest what we take in and how we process it and how we spit it back out. Which is part of the reason ended up being Lutheran. It seemed the most, even if nothing else of the bunch. Um yep. There are. There are Lutherans who are very critical of what has to be done, how I want and where. And there are others that hit. We call them the L C A. But don't tell anyone. Um,...

...invocation is hard because depending on how you were raised, that will alter where you're gonna go with your vocation. If in your head and heart and soul you're thinking I can't do this or this or this, you will stay far away from this or this or this may limit you, but you will. Otherwise everything's open. And you know, we have some of the stranger ministries we've run across over the years when it more to the anti Nomi insights Did that answer anything you asked? Yeah, I did. And I was just thinking I know a guy who was telling his whoever it waas I don't wanna call them out, but it's like he couldn't work. He couldn't be a pilot. You're not allowed to be a pilot because they serve alcohol on plane. You can't work in a grocery store because they sell alcohol or you know that one off? Yeah. It was a Kiefer Sutherland, like, 10 7 degrees to separate. Like you couldn't do anything. You know, there's always and that is tough, right? And I'm like, Well, why would you be a bag boy, but only like at a store that sold no meat or alcohol? Really? All right, First of all, I'd career choice. Um, I've never quite understood those. Do you remember? I've seen a pretty wide range of of Christendom. I was raised Roman, um, spent a few years doing absolutely nothing. Spent a few years pretty reformed, which kind of eased its way into kind of a charismatic feel to it and then Lutheran. So I've seen a bunch, and they all have certain flavors that No, you can't do that because it's just wrong life. I'm not killing anyone on purpose. Yeah, and really, it gets to the point where if we if we get such a narrow view, we can't do anything we can't buy from anyone we can't sell to anyone talking to immediate family probably would be okay, can get very narrow. And that the idea of vocation, I think in done think that I know what I'm talking about. But from Luther himself, about realizing that you conglomerate fi God, if you're the butcher, the baker in what you do and what you dio you reach out to others that's your vocation is what you bring to others like a mom's vocation. Even a working mom has to vocations, which is gonna sad because But that's a whole other story. But a mom taking care of her baby is a vocation. Taking care of her family is a vocation. Um, you know, I'm not sure being a soccer mom or a soccer dad is a vocation, but it it falls into it because you know what? You want to raise your kids to be happy, healthy, smart team players get along with people. Yeah, so I'll put it in there. Um, but vocation. Yeah, that's it. Vocation is what you bring to others, I think which is a big Luther thing. And I just think it can relax some people to realize that there's a and almost an infant amount of jobs out there that you can consider and that they're you know, if they're providing a good product, a good service, and why not consider doing them because they're obviously needed. If they weren't needed, then they wouldn't exist. I haven't found one that I would go. You absolutely cannot legal. Yeah, I'll put that caveat. Being a mobster for the Gambone e family would not be right. But anything you say those those mobsters come home and say, Wow, it was a rough day. What a day I had at the office. Had to whack Jimmy Small and, um but yeah, I can't trying to think of one. Can a Christian be a bartender and serve alcohol? You could really You could start a fight there. You can start to fight, but I never thought of the question, but thinking And don't get me wrong, anyone but who would you rather have? I mean, someone who's gonna be there and and there's the bartender is the one that's like, Okay, he's had enough, exactly. Found a reason. Yeah, and they are hoping that they would care more about at least a much if not more about their customers and whatever vocation they have, Which was the weird part about radio. You had several people you have to take care of. You take care of your bosses because they paid the checks, the listeners and the folks who bought ad time. So you had kind of three bosses to keep track of and oddly, is you get into it, they become e No. If you become you know, Buddy, buddy, Huggy, huggy friends. But that's your vocation. You try to do your best to do what they need you to do, knowing the freedom that we hear. Like I'm thinking Robert Schuller on one of his last interviews. Oh, the freedom in Christ we have is he was...

...talking That's a great line. But now I've got Robert Schuller saying it in my head, but he was talking about, you know, and all religions lead to Christ so very critical. The freedom is there, but okay, look at the Soviet Union. How many people, after after the Soviet Union dismantled how Maney wanted that regime back because there was an order to what they understood and knew and could work with him. Freedom is a nice thing, but everybody's gonna have their different limits. And when it comes toe religion, we kind of find our own limits and congregate there. Billy Graham and Robert Schuller Way like in Billy these days ago. See? Universalist Way? Don't know. Sorry. I guess that's what that that was that clip. It was like, Oh, but but the freedom in your occupation, the freedom in your vocation is what I'm pointing out. And I think that's just wonderful. That and you can have that freedom Thio work in whatever you want and thinking of that Tony of work and knowing that you are a swamp, er new word today, people who are getting into work or, as you have tried a couple of other jobs besides the radio industry, Do you have some advice for people as they're getting into work one way or the other? Um, no, I really don't. I I don't buy into the, you know, we all have this one purpose in working. There's only one job out there for you. No, I don't think so. But you're gonna find something that you're good at that you may not like Sometimes circumstances will force it so you do your best where you are and who knows if you have certain talents, use those. I mean, you know, we talked a little bit about football. And if you're Patrick Mahomes, you bet play football. That's what you dio and how it affects other, you know? No, I don't have any. Really? Sure. Otherwise, I'm gonna wander off for days on this. There isn't. I think if you find a job, you, like, do that. Um, but you will know it's of okay. No matter what you're trying to do, it should become your vocation. And I guess also is wondering advice for people who you know, Should they work, Should they get a swamping job, right? You know, at what age should you start working and, you know, if you're in between jobs, you know, you were in between your career. You took a job as a carpenter. We had some people don't do that. We had a really easy way of it. It was like, OK, bringing something is better than bringing nothing in. Yeah, he's kind of philosophy at our house. Um, my wife told me it was I just i e you know, my dad. She wrote it over the door Posts exactly. Tattooed on the inside of my eyelids. Um, my mom and dad worked really hard when I was a kid to start the bar up. They had just bought it when I was What? A kindergartner. And I won't say that I'm a hard worker because basically, I'm sort of slot Lee. I can nap with the best of them. Uh, but that's, you know, I just couldn't see if there's a job and they'll hire me. Okay. Would I rather do that or whatever other? Collect unemployment? No. I did collect some unemployment in one or two times. Didn't like it much, but it was a stopgap. If you have your choice, I think you'd rather be doing something. At least I would. Speaking of doing something in retirement, did you one have ah, goal for your career? And now that you're at the end, you you felt that you have reached that. And do you have a goal in your retirement? Some things that you might want to dio Oh, wow. In the career. No, I think, actually, Cove in. Stop me. Mm hmm. Um, before covert, where you think. Did you have? Ah, little plan? Maybe a few more years? Uh, maybe mhm. And you know what? I probably would have hung out at wretched for as long as they wanted, except I didn't wanna move to Atlanta. It's hot, and they have the Falcons, and I just can't do that. Um, e might have I would have probably hung around, right? I don't think I was moving jobs again with the Kobane thing, though with the timing of it all, it's like, Okay, where is ah, fat asthmatic guy who is 62 going to find a job? It's not gonna, you know, make things worse. And I thought, man, so we crunched numbers on the side of this Might be a good time. Just toe. Settle back. Um, Scott called a few weeks ago with the...

...idea to do the podcast thing. Is that What is this? A podcast with pictures. Okay. I thought they could only be audio. I didn't know. No, I do both just people see it, but it does go to a podcast host. So we've done a few of those. We record once or twice every week, which is kind of fun keeps, you know, keeps me caught up with him and his family. Um, other than that, I've got granddaughters. I wanna watch a brand new grandson this June that I want to keep track of on. Do you have to be very careful about that? Because those girls like that little baby, so you have to rest him away pretty quick. Um, I'm gonna do more family stuff. I'm gonna do more. I've got reading things we dio with my pastor and with the church. I mean, little stuff like that. No. Do I have any grand goals? No. With your voice. I mean, I say this, I don't have the voice, but I think it would be nice if you don't know. Did some audio Children's audio books. And, you know, my wife has my wife talked to you? It's no, not at all. But I think that would be I mean, you have such a iconic voice, whether someone has heard it or not, but it's just it's a soothing. It's just, you know, there's people have it, some people have it and some people don't. And I think you know whether you said you're slurring a word or drops amending. So I on everything I say. And I'm just 43. Yeah, you're a pop. Have habits older than you. Um, but actually, I've thought about it a little. I haven't really thought about it seriously, but you're the third person now. That's said I should do something big. It's a big into I mean, you know it better than I do. But there's a big industry, especially with technology nowadays wanting anymore voice recognition and all of that. If you have to see the trouble I have is I'm a lousy self promoter. I'm just not very good at it. But you have. You have the name. You already have it. You don't. You're You're kind of like a sidekick to some degree, but I think you have more appreciation than you really recognize out there. Okay. D c count the d. C movies, right? When you look at the credits on some of them, actually, some of the best of them you will notice no names that you recognize, because they are all voiceover talent. All they do is they do commercials. They do cartoons. They do characters. Um, there are tons of, um And then the actors in Hollywood found out they could do this. She got them. I don't know. I There might be a way to do that. I haven't really looked at it much now. I may have to snoop a little. Every time you close your eyes and the sun is shining, the light is shining in your eyes. You see that tattoo that you have? It might make you think differently, like Okay, give me the microphone. She also said, We might. I should just go for the either the middle school or the elementary school, um, where they have people come in and read to the kids. That might be kind of fun, but I fall in love with kids, and then I, you know, take them home and be arrested. My granddaughters would say, Who's He's our new grandson. Shut up and then the parents would call and say, Can we have a kid back? And actually, my own kids do that. Speaking of that, Tony, is there anything that people may not understand about you? And you had 43 years in the industry and I'm sure people know a lot about you, but is there anything? People don't understand you that by knowing this, they would have a better appreciation of the work that you continue to bring to the table. I have a strange sense of humor. I get along with most people. Know, um, I married a crazy woman. Mhm serious. She's been with me for be 40 years of this fall. That's why she's crazy. She can't be that bright if she's still hanging out with me. I mean, she looks so much smarter when I married her. Um, I'm in trouble for that one. No, I'm you know, I'm pretty much one of those. What you see is what you get kind of guys. I'm not very complicated. Is there any adversity that you have faced in your life that either positively or negatively affected your work while at the same time thinking how that could encourage other people who face adversity in their work? There have been some tough moments. Um, physically, actually, the first thing I can think of is when I couldn't work for a while because of some health trouble, my son had back when he was 12, 10, 10 and it was I'm a part time radio guy in the cities and these guys were sending over T shirts and hats and stuff for my son. And it's like most of them have...

...never haven't even met me to this point. It was amazing. They'd stop over, They talk with Eric and these guys were the guys he would know is being, you know, radio guys, Um, the compassion in this business, I think it is surprising to me which reminds me when someone else needs to help, you know, an ear, a shoulder I lift up. Maybe it might not be a bad idea toe hand that out to him because somebody was there for me all the time. Whether I missed time because of laryngitis or or getting knocked silly in a room ballgame and then trying to goto work that was good. Wouldn't suggest that. And people make sure that everything happened around me without me even knowing it. So in that part of it, it was like, Yeah, you know what? It's kind of nice when you know people in your business think enough of you to take care of you when you need it. So that was didn't answer a question again today? Well, no, that's your adversity now. The idea of encouraging others who find it difficult to get up to get going and working because they had similar things. That's Anderson. I realized it's hard ideo when I first moved home to record with wretched and then the first few weeks after the run was over. Um, yeah, things were a little weird. You know, I can now bend shows until four or five in the morning and who cares? And then I don't get anything done the rest of the day and suddenly my wife cares. And actually, I do, too, because there are things that I do around here that don't get done that. Because if you do certain things in the house that you know four in the morning, people look at you funny like turn the vacuum off. Why is he walking with a rake? What? What's it? Is he hitting golf balls in the backyard? It's dark. A couple for that would or is he coming to get us? It's one of those. Does he have a mask? If he has a mask, we're running. No. Yeah, it just takes a minute to get into a routine. But yeah, Other than that, it's been kind of Ah, a weird ride. Really. Radio pushing, pushing through. Pushing through, I think is the idea. And sooner or later, you find a rhythm in whatever you're doing, whether you're still working whether you're retired. Um, whether you're about at school, I have any If you see my three granddaughters who are the most beautiful granddaughters in the history of the world, Um and I'm not biased. They are genetically superior. Um, you can see the difference in the three of them and how one really needs routine around her and how one will bring her own routine anywhere she goes. And the other is kind of ah mix. And that's pretty much wow, we just went from legal ist Dante. No, me in. And it's like that. Whatever routine you're gonna get into. Yeah, I think you've and you bring a good perspective in that just retiring and looking back on how we rush things and and are hurried, and we're worried, and we're concerned about a lot of these things that just kind of pan themselves off. If you just give it some time and practice some of the patients. When you first got ahold of me, I thought about I thought, Look at this for the first. How many years of my life in the professional business? Year and a half to 20 months. Was it? I wanted to be my next step up the ladder. Um, and it all those like a bad weather showed up. I'd be out of the house no matter what time it was. Because you want to be at the station to get the weather alerts and help somebody who's on the air and do all this and that and that. And of course, my family was still sitting at home. Sure, they were pretty impressed. And it's like, I look back and I go, No, you know what I remember? I remember the people. I remember some of the fun things we had some of the hard stuff you go through. Um, and if there's one regret, it's like, Wow, I did not spend enough time with my family. Mhm. And I'm in radio. I don't spend that much time at work. That's kind of sad, but I'll fix that now. Unfortunately, my granddaughters and grandsons will have to pay that price. But I'm worth it. Yeah, we can. In our jobs, I think regardless of the position, we can easily get sucked in there for the accolades that come to it and like, Oh, no, honey, I got to do this. If I don't do this, either nobody will do it or it'll get done wrong or they'll think I don't care. And, yeah, I know there's some high pressure gigs that that's true,...

...but for the most time, most parts. If I had it to do over again, I'd take a deep breath and relax a little through it, only thinking of being retired, thinking of vocation in this podcast of why we work. Is there anything else you would like Toa ad suggest or say to listeners, Enjoy it. I mean, we've all got things that have to get done, So whether you're whether you're retired, whether you're working, enjoy it. It's a when you look back at it, it's not gonna be near his dark as it looks, or near his bright as it looks. Sometimes it would be somewhere pretty much in the middle, so enjoy it while you're there. Mhm be in the moment. Oh, I tried so hard not to say that, but those little cliche things sometimes actually reason that reason. They're cliches. Yeah. Don't get too far ahead of yourself. You know, if you keep looking over your shoulder, you're gonna run into a wall. Not that I know this personally, but I've hit a few walls in my day looking over that shoulder, wondering if something is catching up to me. Um, yeah. Enjoy it. Sit back, rest a minute and enjoy it. Are you big on social media? How can people get in contact with you if they want to encourage you to get into audio Reading Audio book? I'm a hermit. Um, I have a Facebook thing. Um, Facebook thing. That's about it. If you go to the net radio net radio dot network or two. This is true really on on YouTube. And that's an important aspect. You want to go to YouTube to do that? Because otherwise you're gonna get weird things. Um, you know, you can leave messages and things there that I will get a hold of, or if I don't, Scott will pass them on to me, So yeah, one final question. Tony. One final question. Vikings Twins. Wild. Who's going to win the Super Bowl? That's not my question, but yeah, I'm afraid Kansas City will. But part of me would really like to see the bucks do it. And okay, address all your angry cards and letters to me just because Tom Brady toe win one there So I could all go neener neener neener to Belichick, but that, you know, that's just my personal thing. One rial final question. Okay, why do you work? Um, to use the talents God's given me. It's how hopefully I shall Christ to others in some way or another in vague terms. I know, but that's the only reason that you would do it. But I like the money. Tony Burke, tennis retired, but soon to come out of retirement. Like many of those athletes to on air personality, soon to be audio book reader. We're talking audio books. Yeah, I have been an honor to be here. I appreciate the time that you have given me and the work that you continue to dio. Thank you. It's been fun being here. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V, be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they to be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive be a joyful day in your work.

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