WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 101 · 10 months ago

#101 Tony Verkinnes - On-Air Personality - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Tony Verkinnes is a retired on-air personality who worked over four decades in the communications industry. Over the last decade Tony could have been heard along side Todd Friel on Talk the Walk, Way of the Master, and Wretched Radio. Tony will continue to lend his voice to various works, especially for his grandchildren.

This is True, Really News (Podcast)

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgclaC-qp3UwMB1mzVTlRog


Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/LutheranBoy

Wretched Radio
https://wretched.org/

Way of the Master
https://www.livingwaters.com/outreach/way-of-the-master/

...welcome to why we work with your hostBrian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as wetogether dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seeminglymissteps, hopes, warnings and advice which would be an encouragement to usall to get up, get going on and keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here is yourhost to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian V. And this is why we work today. Ofthe great pleasure speaking with Tony Verkin is Tony was an on airpersonality producer editor and you could have heard him through a burningbush communications way of the master and wretched radio. Today I want tofind out from Tony what is vocation and what does vocation mean to him and whatit should mean to us. Join me today in my conversation with Tony Verkin ISS. I'm Brian V and this is why we worktoday. Have the great pleasure speaking with Tony Verkin ISS Good day, Find,sir. Dude, I'm so proud of you. Thank you for being here. I've heard my namepronounced several dozen ways and well, this is the third. I think they got itright, Brian V. Because my last name is vast terrorists and very few Kendrickgot it. All right. So you could be Tony v two. I was actually one radio stationearly on. Yeah, maybe I'll change. Now. I'll, uh, close to Bobby Vee for me. Icouldn't do it. I'll consider that in the, uh Oh, yeah. Good point, Tony. I appreciate you coming on here.Would you be able to tell me one thing? Industry just for for the way thispodcast works, The industry that you've been in and what it is you're doingnowadays, Um, I have been in radio most of my adult life. I think I did the numbers. I was playedradio some way or another for 43 years of accounts. Um, work we did in highschool at the Explorer thing. Uh, yeah, it took two years off for factory work,but that happens in radio because if you're not fired from a few jobs inradio, you're not doing it right. That's what they always told me. Didn'tenjoy being fired, even though they told me that Mhm. Yeah. Been in a ton of radio stationsplayed most every kind of music possible. Couple of talk radio stints,um, everything from polkas and mazurkas to rock and roll to Christian talk. Andnow mostly I sit around the house andannoying my wife when she's home. She's still working. And, yeah, I watch a lot of Netflix. I'm binging Everything you and I werejust talking about waken get sucked in very easily, and I know and all of asudden it's four in the morning. It's like E, but then I don't have to goanywhere. But technically, I'm retired by studio. One of these kind of things.We just started with a friend of mine who's He's basically my twin, exceptthat he was born in Kansas and I was born in ST Cloud. Other than that werethe same Well, he's eight hours older. Um, he's tall. I have hair, that sortof thing. So we do a thing way started way back. When did you? I'm sorry. No,it's good. And I've always liked I mean, I've never met you personally, but I'vebeen listening to the show that you were on for a while. Wretched radio.And you're just the voice that you have the sound of reason. As I said when Ifirst to start at this a moment ago to said, You make it sound of reason andit z and we were talking a moment ago to about work and the appreciation foryou have we can have for people who do the things they do. And I appreciatethe work that you did for 43 years. But, Tony, would you be able to bring usback into what would have been your very first job, even as a teenager,even if it had nothing to do with radio? Oh, that's easy. My first job was I wasthesis wont per for my dad's bar. What is this swapper? He's the guy thatcomes in at six in the morning before school and sweeps up. Make sure all theashtrays are empty and clean. Floors were clean. Rugs have been shaken out.Um, spills and icky things have been cleaned up, and on Sunday you do thethorough mopping clean. How old were you? Uh 15. 16. It was my dad's bar,though In all honesty on Sunday, it was a family thing. We go to church, comeback and everybody there would be clean. The bar, which was not as much funny tothink, is my mom was picky. Wow. German lady was very picky. People wantto clean bear, I guess. And by that time, she didn't. Shewasn't working anymore. So I was like,...

Mom, go home. So as you were getting into high school,where did your desire or could you start finding a talent for radio? Well,I never had talent because it's radio. I, um, actually was second grade. Really? What? What turnedthat on? All right. My dad had this weird little golf tournament kind ofthing. Basically a one day excuse to go play golf, drink beer and have fun withyour friends. Yeah, And by the time I got to gulf in it, when I was wow, Ithink 16 or 17 they finally invited me there like 150 guys, and they took overa golf course for a day. One of the people that golf was thesports director of the radio station, and he took me to a few games that yearthat he did, and I was like, Mm he gets paid fortalking about sports. What a great job Then, by the time I was in high school,figure out there was no way and being a sports guy in the radio because thathas worked. You know, there's nothing like doing your show leaving for Duluthduring the game, coming back and doing your show and then heading over theHardee's to do the coaches show What? What made you realize that? Did youjust paying attention to some broadcast? Yeah, In high school, we had a newexplorer post that was a radio explorer post. Um, hi, Mike Diamond. You're outthere. Um, my mentor. He was sleeping up behind me. Hire me twice. I don'tunderstand it. Um, when I just watched the workings therejust on the outside of what went on in real life, part of the radio station. You're looking at that. No, man,there's not enough money to do this. Now if you're Troy Aikman and Joe Buck,you get a lot of money, and it's a lot different when you're at that smallmarket or media market level. You do all the schlepping of the equipment,all the set up all the interviews, all the pre game post game, and you get todo all your other stuff, too. Mhm. So that's everything. And I thought that'sway too much work for the money they pay because radio is not that glamorous.And it's not that big a payer when you're down in the lower levels. Sowhen you realize this, what were you starting to think for after high schoolcollege? Or after that? I think I'm still doing radio. He get paid Thiotalk and drink coffee. And how bad could this be? So I figured I'd be arock and roll disc jockey and be very cool and make lots of money. And I don'tknow. That's about all the farther that went, um, ended up in a couple of whatwe used to call M O R. Stations, which were basically lots of talk. A fewsongs every hour, lots of commercials to get through, and you have to be asentertaining as you can so you don't lose the people. When what was yourfirst experience on air first paying gig was part time at UIC C 12 60 Emory,Wisconsin, while I was finishing up school. The two years of college didnot like that, you know? Do you know the first two years they expect you totake? See? That's it? I don't know. They don't let you take any of the funstuff. It's like, Okay, here's your sociology window. One your psychologyone No. One. Your Oh, my gosh, I'm bored to tears. One or two. Uh huh. You don't get I mean, you gotta Yougotta get through two whole years before I even get a sniff of the stuffyou want, because for a while I entertained going into the news side ofit, you know? So I went to Brown Institute, maker of great radio peopleworldwide Don't even know if they're still in business. Eso a part time atthe end of my term there I was, working part time at UIC. See, First job was inMarshall, Minnesota at K M. H. L lasted there about a year and a half.Were you nervous? Your first time up there? Care to death? Yep. Scared todeath in slow? Because besides doing your show and getting ready for that,um, there was production things to be done. And those are the You want thoseto be perfect cause they're gonna be recorded and played over and over. And I was very slow in very particular.So there was some mornings that would get off the air at midnight, and I would be going home just beforethe morning guys came in because I wanted to write. Did you feelthat you you had what it took, Which is why you were following this besidessome unknown desire. You felt you had the voice for it. You felt No. I'mwriting skills or anything like that. No, I was a lousy writer. I found outpretty early, though, that I could take other people's writing and speak itlike I was saying it for Riel instead of reading it. Apparently, that's a skill. Um, way youknow how it is when you can do something. It's like so I can cold read.Copy a Skoda's like my pastor. We have...

...contest sometimes in our little bookthing. Um, and all the other. How'd you do that thing when you read for aliving? Dude, you also don't make much money. Neitherprofession. I just want to know you got to know this. No, I didn't think therewas any great talent. I just thought it would be a great way toe to make aliving. And I had, Like I said, I had goals tobe a major market guy. Make big bucks. So there was martial. There was STCloud from ST Cloud. I followed my dime again over two K M o m. A startup from K M o M. I ended up in KSTP AM,which was a talk station in the Twin Cities. My first stop from there, I got fired my first time Iwent to Princeton, which is where we still live. Because my wife Why did youget fired? Change of management. Actually, the GMand the sales manager and a whole bunch of people got canned. Um, they wanted they redid a wholebunch of the show of the shows they had a lot of them went away on, became, youknow, the syndicated stuff they do nationally. And then they move theafternoon guide in the mornings and tried something new in the afternoons.And we were out the nice part about radios. You get fired because it'sTuesday. You know, they just here's what theykeep you till Friday because that way it's easier for the shift over. Andsecurity is around in the Yeah, it's tasted the new people in thebusiness. So thinking about being fired were you being your first experience inthe radio business getting fired? Were you discouraged, man? No. Yes. Maybe itwas. You know that there's a crushing moment? Um, it took a while. It took a week or twobefore everything started to settle in. Did you question your career path atall? Or just I'm just gonna go get another radio job at that point. I know I didn't. I was Iknow there's another job out there. Found one in Princeton, which was kindof nice, because the program director in Princeton had been a major marketguy elsewhere, so he hired me again. I don't know whatthese people are thinking, and I made 4.5 years working in Princeton, whichis the longest I've worked anywhere, with the exception of wretched, whichwas all told, Richard was 18 years and in two years before that cake M s,which is unheard of. That's like, you know, being dead in dog years. Uh huh.But no, I at that point, I didn't. There were other times you would likewhen I was working in the factory at Crystal cabinets. I was thinking these radio what I need to do, Or do Ineed to be looking at something else? Because I ain't doing this for verylong, so yeah. How maney positions did you take outside of radio throughthrough your career? Um, or were there a number of them? No,there weren't many. Um, I worked at crystal cabinets for a while on onestint, and I worked at Were you manufacture cabinets? At thatpoint? Was I ever sanding on a line? I was awful. Um, but I knew if you're the people therebecause it's Princeton, it's not a big town. Yeah, it was okay. And I was gladthey took the chance on me. I also have worked at Federal, which is thatmunitions manufacturer? Were they extra income? Was it between jobs between? Yeah, I would do every once in a while, they'd be like,you know, if you wanted to deejay some gig for somebody they pay you somemoney, but I wasn't really into that at all. I want to be a club deejay andactually make money. Um, again, It looks so easy, right? You work sixhours and you make a lot of money. It's not. You've gotta get the playlist setup. You gotta look the way you do. You gotta make sure everything's readyaround you. They all have. They all come with extras. And I just didn't.Wasn't ready to put that kind of thing or travel right. Live in ST Cloud. Andthere's a gig in I don't know, Eden Prairie. There's a 50 minute drive to and from you have to bring the equipment,usually all the music. Usually it's just thatnever interested me a lot of bartending for a while, but Ithought that was way too cliche to be a bar owner's son and then go tobartending way. We were talking earlier about themic that you have. Yeah, how has how has it changed from the ability to justmove around and to bring your equipment with you? And how easy is that? How,how easy it has it become? Well, in the old days, when I was a boy,we had to lug our equipment in the snow...

...uphill both ways. And no, I'm not kidding. Some of thestuff was just gargantuan. You know, the boards would be this huge. We had aScott and I had a gig in, um, Minneapolis for a nap. A wedding dance.Scott knew these people really well. It was, like over a legion or something ofthe FW. So we're cutting the speakers, this huge honking board and all thestuff up this large flight of stairs on the outside of the building because,you know, you don't want that on the inside. Uh huh. So then you get that all set upquickly, towel off and put on a dry shirt. And now it's 4.5 hours of musicstuff. And then when that's all done at 1 30 it's tear it all down and look atall the other way. He was very fun. And now you can just take. And now you know,it's like little anybody. Red box does. All the things that my and the board I used to have was verysmall compared to everything you used to see first, Actually, the first boardat at Wretched. Well, was it wretched, then? Yes. First board. When we whentalk the walk became wretched, um, was slightly smaller version of oneof the first boards I ever work done. Wow. They still make these, and they'relike tanks. Unless you you know, drop a hand grenade in them and then hold thetop down. They just don't break. Then you've got all now you everything'sslide pots and solid, solid state. Wow, that dates me.But you know, there's no to be stuff anymore. Unless you're you know, elitewanted to amp for your mike. So, yeah, it's gotten lighter, easier, much moremobile. So as you moved along in your career, I guess seeing that with talkthe walk that was your longest stint up until wretched radio. How did you getinto that position? Um, I had worked with the program director there at W lO L back in the day. My one claim to fame in the big leagues. Um, and they had needed somebody, and I'vegot a little Christian radio station in ST Cloud, which was okay, but the people I knewthere that I came to work for. We're leaving. And I thought, You know what?I don't want the responsibility of being their job because I just didn't.So I called David. We interviewed, and I became the production director, whichwas the first time I wasn't exclusively on air talent. Um, so I voiced commercials and then putother commercials together. All the stuff you do that you hear it, you know.And one day they said, Oh, yeah, by the way, part of your job is going to be boredhopping for this guy on his show talk. The walk reallyhappened. And I remember Todd's entire firstwords to David were, Yeah, just make sure he knows to runthe board. And he didn't have to say anything. Way evolved from that overthe years. But yeah, it was no, like any otherbusiness connections helped, you know, people, you know and have worked withyou. It's like being in any trenches kind of thing. Um, you know what? Ifyou can count on him or not And David thought Okay, well, given the flyer,and from then on, it's been mostly behind the scenes stuff with thesidekick E thing with Todd. You know, you guys work together forquite a while and you just retired. I did Just within the last few few months,Lee, for just August, Somewhere in there. So you're August somewhere. Ithink the end of July, I think, was the the end of the run, which was reallyodd. You know what? What does that feel like? What does that? You know, 43years and something. You know, you do have Netflix to keep doing with Netflixprime, and they feel Max so I can watch all of my d c cartoons. So e you wantlive If you want live action superhero stuff, you go with Marvel if you wantcartoon superhero stuff that's done really well, D c. However, not all ofit is for kids. Hmm. My son loves those. My son loves it. We watch them together,but he loves your hoot. So how are you settling in in your retirement? How isthat? I'm still working on it. Are usually the voiceover work as well andyou're having it. You have another podcast, but we do the podcast thing. Ie no, that was something I never enjoyed,although it paid well. But the flight of voice over stuff was just notsomething I like doing. Um, is there something just eventhinking of listeners who might think...

...of voice over work? Is there somethingthat you you just didn't like sitting and reading a script that you're notconnected? No, it's what was I have no logical reason for this because Iactually production in a radio setting was my favorite thing. Hmm. It just andthe older I got, I can hear the slip in pronunciation inenunciation, that sort of thing in my in my voice and the way words came outMm. And I thought, you know, because I'm gonna debris reading the same thingnine dozen times. And it's never gonna be different because I'm gonna havethat little list here that little dragged there because that's the wayit's maturing out. Mhm. Did you do your show with, say, with Todd from home thewhole time? No. No. First we're When we moved from cake mess. We went evenfarther south so that my drive would be 25 minutes longer, which I'm alwaysgrateful for, and I swear It took me 4.5 hours. Onesnowy day They let me out early. Took me 4.5 hours to get home to get home. Ilove the Twin Cities. He said sarcastically. Um, yeah, we had We hada sweet up in the I can't remember the name ofthe building now And we had to studios. Todd, Studio Mine. Joe. We had a studiothere for production stuff. Um, eventually we brought in hip hop andbrainiac. I should probably remember their names. I remember now is David, Sharon andRick. I'm sorry, Rick. I don't remember your last name. He was always brainiac.He's one of my Facebook friends. I'm in deep trouble. Um, we were there. Eventually. Somebody sawthat I forget who it was, but somebody in Atlanta saw the show and heard theshow. I don't know if Todd would come to Atlanta to do the show and do TV, and we thought, well, people could doTV here. Know that quickly became feasibly monetarily wrong. So basicallyeverybody but a few of us went down there, and slowly but surely, we decided toknow what this office really isn't needed Julie and I think what we diofrom home so slowly but surely the officers were gone and we were senthome to do our stuff here. That was a little odd to get used to. How manyyears were you home doing it? Five, maybe six. Okay, Shows a while.So it's pretty. You have yourself a treated room. And how did that work? No,that's pretty much it. It's a little square room. My father inlaw actually built way back. When when we redid the basement, um, put up different lighting, easy toe just for reading purposes. Wedidn't care about cameras in because I still have a great face for radio board. Was you know, we bought an oldcountertop and use that as the place to put all the equipment off We went knowing that you're you're now retiredand I think you have a good as I said, aresounding voice, a sound, the voice of reason, which you would say you don't,but the word vocation comes up being theLutheran that you are the were vocation. What does vocation mean to you and whatshould it mean to other people? Location is, Yeah, it's what you do. And I mean that more than just a job.Um, the people who amaze me with vocations, our nurses, um, mhm, good pastors. Those people are amazing to me becausethey do what they do, and it's there's no glamour in it, a lot of criticismand people not in their best form always. So. Location for me is justit's what you're You got skills and talents, and it's what you do with them.So I was hoping, you know, through the years that maybe somebody would have alittle better time getting off to work, coming home from work or something. And if I got that accomplished once ortwice every day, that was a good day. I don't know if I did, because nofeedback, but that was the plan anyway. What was the process that you had to gothrough, especially from your home studio, to prepare into deliver? Uh, generally, I would get down here,Um, when we moved home, we decided doing it every day was a little weird. And actually, I think even before thatwe had started recording two or three of the shows in one dayand then two or three of the shows on another day. So there were tworecording days on those days. I would be down here early, make sure all thestuff I wanted or thought I needed would be around. And then we recorded I did the news. So that was alwayssomething I had toe put together. Find...

...the stories and present him and get himto Joey. Um, did a lot of the production work Same story, short ofverse, so the day would usually start nine ish. It was much shorter day when I actuallygot to move home because I didn't have three hours of driving, which was nice.So I'd get down here about 99 30 and I'd be done 34 What kind of nice? If you didn't hearit? It just sounded like you guys were together. That's the funny thing theyhave. You guys had that relationship inability to things that always amazedme. I'm sorry. Let me talk all over you. But there are two things that amaze me.One that people listen because, you know, there's so many places to gofor stuff. And why would you listen to us, but they did, and to so many peoplethought were in the same studio. I thought, Wow, that's great technology.But I have been blessed four times with people who have worked with who just we talked earlier, right aboutchemistry and TV shows how they make the whole show click. There've beenfour guys in 40 some years that I would work with any time anywhere, noquestions asked, just because I trust him that much and we work together Well,that that much, I guess I would be a missive. How Howwas your career with Todd Todd Friel? Because he's still going There ischange and what they're doing and and, uh, but you guys seem to have a goodrelationship. He seems like, you know, he's louder, I would say right, And hehe has his views, which are, you know, great. And you guys have somewhatopposing views at times. But you guys, you guys, you guys worked well together,and you made it like a marriage. Yeah, that pretty much describes itright there. There are good days and bad days. Um, I realized pretty early on because the Lutheran conversionactually came after I'd been working with Todd Really? So a little bitdifferent. And I decided pretty early on that. If I'm gonna, you know, hit him. With every difference we havein theology, this show is gonna grind to a screeching halt. And let me guessone of us will be gone. Yeah, and I wasn't actually that pragmatic. It'sjust you know what? It's Todd Show. Why would I want to mess with him like that?Um, so every once while we get into it, but usually no, um, it was I likeworking with them. It was always fun. Usually unexpected. I can't remember days very often.Alright. In the old days, we used to do theology Thursday. Those weren't funnyat all. But other than that, most days would have, you know, a laugh or two orthree of them. So I enjoyed it. I like Todd and hisfamily. I still like giving his daughter's a hard time when I get ahold of them on the screen, Um although honestly dish it back as well as theygive it out. I love that people. And a little bit hard. When it was over.After 18 years. Not as bad as a marriage dissolving, but, you know,took a minute. That's why I was wondering aboutvocation and talking about how you work together. And I'd like to know what youthink about theologically speaking where people become either legal istsor and to know me in is, um or anti No means the idea of what You can't dothis, or you can do whatever you want in between and for vocation. And youand I were talking before this about our appreciation for sports andentertainment and all these things and the people that people, the things thatpeople do and comedians. And I'd like you to just comment on because I findthere's there is that more legalistic view of what you can you can't do foryour vocation. Yeah, it depends on what side? Your own,of course. Um, we tend a How do I phrase this politely? We tend to look a through a very smallprism. Our perspective is very limited. Even us old books, because, you know,60 years matters what, almost nothing. In the grand scheme of things, Um, soour perspective is entirely what we digest what we take in and how weprocess it and how we spit it back out. Which is part of the reason ended upbeing Lutheran. It seemed the most, even if nothing else of the bunch. Um yep. There are. There are Lutherans whoare very critical of what has to be done, how I want and where. And thereare others that hit. We call them the L C A. But don't tellanyone. Um,...

...invocation is hard because depending onhow you were raised, that will alter where you're gonna go with yourvocation. If in your head and heart and soul you're thinking I can't do this orthis or this, you will stay far away from this or this or this may limit you, but you will. Otherwise everything'sopen. And you know, we have some of the stranger ministries we'verun across over the years when it more to the anti Nomi insights Did thatanswer anything you asked? Yeah, I did. And I was just thinking I know a guywho was telling his whoever it waas I don't wanna call themout, but it's like he couldn't work. He couldn't be a pilot. You're not allowed to be a pilotbecause they serve alcohol on plane. You can't work in a grocery storebecause they sell alcohol or you know that one off? Yeah. It was a KieferSutherland, like, 10 7 degrees to separate. Like you couldn't do anything.You know, there's always and that is tough, right? And I'm like, Well, whywould you be a bag boy, but only like at a store that sold no meat or alcohol? Really? All right, First of all, I'dcareer choice. Um, I've never quite understood those. Doyou remember? I've seen a pretty wide range of of Christendom. I was raisedRoman, um, spent a few years doing absolutely nothing. Spent a few years pretty reformed,which kind of eased its way into kind of a charismatic feel to it and thenLutheran. So I've seen a bunch, and they all have certain flavors thatNo, you can't do that because it's just wrong life. I'm not killing anyone on purpose.Yeah, and really, it gets to the point where if we if we get such a narrowview, we can't do anything we can't buy from anyone we can't sell to anyonetalking to immediate family probably would be okay, can get very narrow. And that the ideaof vocation, I think in done think that I know what I'm talking about. But fromLuther himself, about realizing that you conglomerate fi God, if you're thebutcher, the baker in what you do and what you dio you reach out to othersthat's your vocation is what you bring to others like a mom's vocation. Even aworking mom has to vocations, which is gonna sad because But that's a wholeother story. But a mom taking care of her baby is a vocation. Taking care ofher family is a vocation. Um, you know, I'm not sure being a soccer mom or asoccer dad is a vocation, but it it falls into it because you know what?You want to raise your kids to be happy, healthy, smart team players get alongwith people. Yeah, so I'll put it in there. Um, but vocation. Yeah, that'sit. Vocation is what you bring to others, I think which is a big Lutherthing. And I just think it can relax some people to realize that there's aand almost an infant amount of jobs out there that you can consider and thatthey're you know, if they're providing a good product, a good service, and whynot consider doing them because they're obviously needed. If they weren'tneeded, then they wouldn't exist. I haven't found one that I would go. Youabsolutely cannot legal. Yeah, I'll put that caveat. Being a mobster for theGambone e family would not be right. But anything you say those thosemobsters come home and say, Wow, it was a rough day. What a day I had at theoffice. Had to whack Jimmy Small and, um but yeah, I can't trying to think ofone. Can a Christian be a bartender and serve alcohol? You could really You could start afight there. You can start to fight, but I never thought of the question,but thinking And don't get me wrong, anyone but whowould you rather have? I mean, someone who's gonna be there and and there'sthe bartender is the one that's like, Okay, he's had enough, exactly. Found areason. Yeah, and they are hoping that they would care more about at least amuch if not more about their customers and whatever vocation they have, Whichwas the weird part about radio. You had several people you have to take care of.You take care of your bosses because they paid the checks, the listeners andthe folks who bought ad time. So you had kind of three bosses to keep trackof and oddly, is you get into it, they become e No. If you become you know,Buddy, buddy, Huggy, huggy friends. But that's your vocation. You try to doyour best to do what they need you to do, knowing the freedom that we hear.Like I'm thinking Robert Schuller on one of his last interviews. Oh, thefreedom in Christ we have is he was...

...talking That's a great line. But nowI've got Robert Schuller saying it in my head, but he was talking about, you know, andall religions lead to Christ so very critical. The freedom is there, butokay, look at the Soviet Union. How many people, after after the SovietUnion dismantled how Maney wanted that regime back because there was an order to what theyunderstood and knew and could work with him. Freedom is a nice thing, buteverybody's gonna have their different limits. And when it comes toe religion,we kind of find our own limits and congregate there. Billy Graham andRobert Schuller Way like in Billy these days ago. See? Universalist Way? Don'tknow. Sorry. I guess that's what that that was that clip. It was like, Oh,but but the freedom in your occupation, the freedom in your vocation is whatI'm pointing out. And I think that's just wonderful. That and you can havethat freedom Thio work in whatever you want and thinking of that Tony of workand knowing that you are a swamp, er new word today, people who are gettinginto work or, as you have tried a couple of other jobs besides the radioindustry, Do you have some advice for people as they're getting into work oneway or the other? Um, no, I really don't. I I don't buyinto the, you know, we all have this one purpose in working. There's onlyone job out there for you. No, I don't think so. But you're gonna findsomething that you're good at that you may not like Sometimes circumstanceswill force it so you do your best where you are and who knows if you havecertain talents, use those. I mean, you know, we talked a littlebit about football. And if you're Patrick Mahomes, you bet play football. That's what youdio and how it affects other, you know? No, I don't have any. Really? Sure. Otherwise, I'm gonna wander off fordays on this. There isn't. I think if you find a job,you, like, do that. Um, but you will know it's of okay. No matter whatyou're trying to do, it should become your vocation. And I guess also is wondering advicefor people who you know, Should they work, Should theyget a swamping job, right? You know, at what age should you start working and,you know, if you're in between jobs, you know, you were in between yourcareer. You took a job as a carpenter. We had some people don't do that. Wehad a really easy way of it. It was like, OK, bringing something is betterthan bringing nothing in. Yeah, he's kind of philosophy at our house. Um, mywife told me it was I just i e you know, my dad. She wrote it over the doorPosts exactly. Tattooed on the inside of my eyelids. Um, my mom and dadworked really hard when I was a kid to start the bar up. They had just boughtit when I was What? A kindergartner. And I won't say that I'm a hard worker because basically, I'm sort of slot Lee.I can nap with the best of them. Uh, but that's, you know, I just couldn'tsee if there's a job and they'll hire me. Okay. Would I rather do that orwhatever other? Collect unemployment? No. I did collect some unemployment inone or two times. Didn't like it much, but it was astopgap. If you have your choice, I think you'd rather be doing something.At least I would. Speaking of doing something inretirement, did you one have ah, goal for your career? And now that you're atthe end, you you felt that you have reached that. And do you have a goal inyour retirement? Some things that you might want to dio Oh, wow. In the career. No, I think, actually, Cove in. Stop me.Mm hmm. Um, before covert, where you think. Did youhave? Ah, little plan? Maybe a few more years? Uh, maybe mhm. And you know what? Iprobably would have hung out at wretched for as long as they wanted,except I didn't wanna move to Atlanta. It's hot, and they have the Falcons,and I just can't do that. Um, e might have I would have probably hungaround, right? I don't think I was moving jobs again with the Kobane thing,though with the timing of it all, it's like, Okay, where is ah, fat asthmaticguy who is 62 going to find a job? It's not gonna, you know, make things worse. And I thought, man, so we crunchednumbers on the side of this Might be a good time. Just toe. Settle back. Um,Scott called a few weeks ago with the...

...idea to do the podcast thing. Is that What is this? A podcastwith pictures. Okay. I thought they could only be audio. I didn't know. No,I do both just people see it, but it does go to a podcast host. So we'vedone a few of those. We record once or twice every week, which is kind of funkeeps, you know, keeps me caught up with him and his family. Um, other thanthat, I've got granddaughters. I wanna watch a brandnew grandson this June that I want to keep track of on. Do you have to bevery careful about that? Because those girls like that little baby, so you have to rest him away prettyquick. Um, I'm gonna do more family stuff. I'm gonna do more. I've gotreading things we dio with my pastor and with the church. Imean, little stuff like that. No. Do I haveany grand goals? No. With your voice. I mean, I say this, I don't have thevoice, but I think it would be nice if you don't know. Did some audioChildren's audio books. And, you know, my wife has my wife talked to you? It'sno, not at all. But I think that would be I mean, you have such a iconic voice,whether someone has heard it or not, but it's just it's a soothing. It'sjust, you know, there's people have it, some people have it and some peopledon't. And I think you know whether you saidyou're slurring a word or drops amending. So I on everything I say. AndI'm just 43. Yeah, you're a pop. Have habits older than you. Um, but actually,I've thought about it a little. I haven't really thought about itseriously, but you're the third person now. That's said I should do something big. It's a big into I mean, you knowit better than I do. But there's a big industry, especially with technologynowadays wanting anymore voice recognition and all of that. If youhave to see the trouble I have is I'm a lousy self promoter. I'm just not very good at it. But youhave. You have the name. You already have it. You don't. You're You're kindof like a sidekick to some degree, but I think you have more appreciation thanyou really recognize out there. Okay. D c count the d. C movies, right? Whenyou look at the credits on some of them, actually, some of the best of them youwill notice no names that you recognize, because they are all voiceover talent.All they do is they do commercials. They do cartoons. They do characters.Um, there are tons of, um And then the actors in Hollywood found out theycould do this. She got them. I don't know. I There might be a way todo that. I haven't really looked at it much now. I may have to snoop a little.Every time you close your eyes and the sun is shining, the light is shining inyour eyes. You see that tattoo that you have? It might make you thinkdifferently, like Okay, give me the microphone. She also said, We might. Ishould just go for the either the middle school or the elementary school,um, where they have people come in and read to the kids. That might be kind offun, but I fall in love with kids, and then I, you know, take them home and bearrested. My granddaughters would say, Who's He'sour new grandson. Shut up and then the parents would call and say, Can we havea kid back? And actually, my own kids do that. Speaking of that, Tony, isthere anything that people may not understand about you? And you had 43years in the industry and I'm sure people know a lot about you, but isthere anything? People don't understand you that by knowing this, they wouldhave a better appreciation of the work that you continue to bring to the table. I have a strange sense of humor. I get along with most people. Know, um, I married a crazy woman. Mhmserious. She's been with me for be 40 years of this fall. That's why she'scrazy. She can't be that bright if she's still hanging out with me. I mean,she looks so much smarter when I married her. Um, I'm in trouble forthat one. No, I'm you know, I'm pretty much oneof those. What you see is what you get kind of guys. I'm not very complicated. Is there any adversity that you havefaced in your life that either positively or negatively affected yourwork while at the same time thinking how that could encourage other peoplewho face adversity in their work? There have been some tough moments. Um, physically, actually, the first thing I can thinkof is when I couldn't work for a whilebecause of some health trouble, my son had back when he was 12, 10, 10 and it was I'm a part time radio guy inthe cities and these guys were sending over T shirts and hats and stuff for myson. And it's like most of them have...

...never haven't even met me to this point.It was amazing. They'd stop over, They talk with Eric and these guys were theguys he would know is being, you know, radio guys, Um, the compassion in this business, Ithink it is surprising to me which reminds me when someone else needs tohelp, you know, an ear, a shoulder I lift up. Maybe it might not be a badidea toe hand that out to him because somebody was there for me all the time.Whether I missed time because of laryngitis or or getting knocked silly in a roomballgame and then trying to goto work that was good. Wouldn't suggest that.And people make sure that everything happened around me without me evenknowing it. So in that part of it, it was like,Yeah, you know what? It's kind of nice when you know people in your businessthink enough of you to take care of you when you need it. So that was didn't answer a question again today?Well, no, that's your adversity now. The idea of encouraging others who findit difficult to get up to get going and working because they had similar things.That's Anderson. I realized it's hard ideo when I first moved home to record withwretched and then the first few weeks after the run was over. Um, yeah,things were a little weird. You know, I can now bend shows until four or fivein the morning and who cares? And then I don't get anything done therest of the day and suddenly my wife cares. And actually, I do, too, becausethere are things that I do around here that don't get done that. Because ifyou do certain things in the house that you know four in the morning, peoplelook at you funny like turn the vacuum off. Why is hewalking with a rake? What? What's it? Is he hitting golf balls in thebackyard? It's dark. A couple for that would or is he comingto get us? It's one of those. Does he have a mask? If he has a mask, we'rerunning. No. Yeah, it just takes a minute to getinto a routine. But yeah, Other than that, it's been kind of Ah, a weirdride. Really. Radio pushing, pushing through. Pushing through, I think isthe idea. And sooner or later, you find a rhythm in whatever you're doing,whether you're still working whether you're retired. Um, whether you'reabout at school, I have any If you see my three granddaughters who are themost beautiful granddaughters in the history of the world, Um and I'm notbiased. They are genetically superior. Um, you can see the difference in thethree of them and how one really needs routine aroundher and how one will bring her own routineanywhere she goes. And the other is kind of ah mix. And that's pretty much wow, we justwent from legal ist Dante. No, me in. And it's like that. Whatever routineyou're gonna get into. Yeah, I think you've and you bring agood perspective in that just retiring and looking back on how we rush thingsand and are hurried, and we're worried, and we're concerned about a lot ofthese things that just kind of pan themselves off. If you just give itsome time and practice some of the patients. When you first got ahold ofme, I thought about I thought, Look at this for the first. How many years of my life in theprofessional business? Year and a half to 20 months. Was it? I wanted to be mynext step up the ladder. Um, and it all those like a bad weather showed up. I'dbe out of the house no matter what time it was. Because you want to be at thestation to get the weather alerts and help somebody who's on the air and doall this and that and that. And of course, my family was still sitting athome. Sure, they were pretty impressed. And it's like, I look back and I go, No,you know what I remember? I remember the people. I remember some of the fun things wehad some of the hard stuff you go through. Um, and if there's one regret, it's like,Wow, I did not spend enough time with my family. Mhm. And I'm in radio. Idon't spend that much time at work. That's kind of sad, but I'll fix thatnow. Unfortunately, my granddaughters and grandsons will have to pay thatprice. But I'm worth it. Yeah, we can. In our jobs,I think regardless of the position, we can easily get sucked in there for theaccolades that come to it and like, Oh, no, honey, I got to do this. If I don'tdo this, either nobody will do it or it'll getdone wrong or they'll think I don't care. And, yeah, I know there's somehigh pressure gigs that that's true,...

...but for the most time, most parts. If I had it to do over again, I'd takea deep breath and relax a little through it, only thinking of beingretired, thinking of vocation in this podcast of why we work. Is thereanything else you would like Toa ad suggest or say to listeners, Enjoy it. I mean, we've all got things that haveto get done, So whether you're whether you're retired, whether you're working,enjoy it. It's a when you look back at it, it'snot gonna be near his dark as it looks, or near his bright as it looks.Sometimes it would be somewhere pretty much in the middle, so enjoy it whileyou're there. Mhm be in the moment. Oh, I tried so hardnot to say that, but those little cliche things sometimes actually reasonthat reason. They're cliches. Yeah. Don't get too far ahead of yourself.You know, if you keep looking over your shoulder, you're gonna run into a wall.Not that I know this personally, but I've hit a few walls in my daylooking over that shoulder, wondering if something is catching up to me. Um, yeah. Enjoy it. Sit back, rest a minuteand enjoy it. Are you big on social media? How canpeople get in contact with you if they want to encourage you to get into audioReading Audio book? I'm a hermit. Um, I have a Facebook thing. Um, Facebook thing. That's about it. Ifyou go to the net radio net radio dot network or two. This istrue really on on YouTube. And that's an important aspect. You want to go toYouTube to do that? Because otherwise you're gonna get weird things. Um, you know, you can leave messages andthings there that I will get a hold of, or if I don't, Scott will pass them onto me, So yeah, one final question. Tony. Onefinal question. Vikings Twins. Wild. Who's going to win the Super Bowl?That's not my question, but yeah, I'm afraid Kansas City will. But partof me would really like to see the bucks do it. And okay, address all yourangry cards and letters to me just because Tom Brady toe win one there SoI could all go neener neener neener to Belichick, but that, you know, that'sjust my personal thing. One rial final question. Okay, why doyou work? Um, to use the talents God's given me. It's how hopefully I shall Christ to others in some way or another in vague terms. I know, but that's the only reason that you woulddo it. But I like the money. Tony Burke, tennis retired, but soon to come out ofretirement. Like many of those athletes to on air personality, soon to be audiobook reader. We're talking audio books. Yeah, I have been an honor to be here. Iappreciate the time that you have given me and the work that you continue todio. Thank you. It's been fun being here. Thank you for listening to thisepisode of why we work with Brian V, be sure to subscribe, follow and sharewith others so they to be encouraged in their work. I hope that you haveyourself a productive be a joyful day in your work.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (123)