WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 62 · 1 year ago

#62 Tomoko Togawa - Bilingual MC and VO Artist - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Tomoko Togawa is a Bilingual MC and VO artist who also models and does narration and coaching. Furthermore, she is a hard working mother who keeps her character in front of her career, which explain how she is able to stay humble and productive.

Contact Info

Tomoko’s Profile
linkedin.com/in/tomoko-togawa-118363159

Email
stylenglish@gmail.com

About
"I’m a professionally trained Japanese voiceover artist.
I am here to bring your vision and story to life and would absolutely love to serve any your voice over needs.

Conversational, versatile, relatable, warm, friendly, clear, natural, trustworthy, approachable, and empathetic are how clients describe my voice.
Voiceovers in both Japanese and English can be recorded.
I am dependable, easily directed, deadline driven, well prepared, responsive to serve you. I offer high quality voice tracks and translation services as well." (LinkedIn, 2020)

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...welcome to why we work with your host Brian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which will be an encouragement to us all to get up. Get going on, keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here is your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian V, and this is why we work today. I have the great pleasure of speaking with Tomoka Togawa. She is a Japanese bilingual voiceover artist, and I want to find out how difficult that is, how difficult it is to even speak other languages and do your work in them. But also I want to find out what the connection is between the voice, the career and the character inside. Join me today in my conversation with Tomoko Togawa. I'm Brian V and this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure speaking with Tomoko Togawa. Good morning, young lady. Good morning. Thank you for having me. I was just saying that YouTube The two of us are on the same time zone so I really? Most times I mess it up. So if I said so, good evening and it was really their morning or morning and the evening. But I know you and I are on the same time zone because we're not far from one another. We're just across across the water. You're in Japan and I am in South Korea. I thank you for coming on here, and I did a brief introduction to you, but could you fill us in a little bit about who you are and what you're doing now? Okay. So I'm versatile person. So I dio bilingual EMC for corporate event and also, um, some international events and also a wedding party. And I also besides that idea innovation for international markets. And then sometimes I do coaching for students or clients and, um e think hardly. I do modeling right now, but in the past, E did model link. Um what else? My mom thio, 12 years old son. I have right now. Um, yeah, that's all about it. No, that's great. I mean, you sound like you are busy, especially being a mom like that's a full time job in itself. Would you would you be able to bring us back? What was your very first job? Even as a teenager, Even if it had nothing to do with voiceover work, What was the very first thing that and and I know being in Korea, Um, Mawr. Asian cultures tend not to have that many jobs as a younger. Maybe wait until after. Not sure if that's the same with Japan as well. But what was your very first thing that you got you out of the house to? Maybe venture off and do something on your own? Ah, PSA. Part time job. Eso I did teaching a little bit English to your kids. How? How old were you at the time? Um, that was around 19 or 20 years old. So you fight long, right? No. Well, that z e I get a lot. I mean, in North America. You have some people, um, selling lemonade, right? Working for parents store or something around 14. 15, 16. So I understand. So when did you begin to study English For you to be able to teach it at 19. I think that I was around maybe, um, 17 years old. I was very serious to studying English...

...because I really want to go to overseas to study eso mainly psychology. You wanted to study psychology? Yeah. Yeah, because I think I was really into some people's minds around the time. Maybe I was a teenager. So my father's jaw s. So we have to move to many places and then So I had a lot of difficulties to, you know, like facing Thio teenager kids. Yeah, I probably meeting new kids all the time. Yeah, difficulty. So maybe I didn't have any, like confidence to, you know, confront with the people because I was pretty shy. So that's kind of forced you into studying more. Mhm. Okay, so when you started teaching, did you work for a company or is it just private? How todo private a It's still, I mean at 19. And that 17, you're thinking about psychology and, you know, moving overseas. A lot of other teenagers are not thinking that far ahead. Eso after your initial job, your first job teaching. So this is around high school or 19th college beginning that was said around the college. But I didn't go to college in Japan because I really want to go thio overseas to study. As I mentioned eso, I went to a crime school. You know what I went after graduating from the high school s o the keys. I guess maybe Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. And for entering the college or university students becoming the college students. And so I e apply for two really good universities in Tokyo And then I couldn't getting so that's the beginning off. Seriously, Really Wanted to go thio u S or u K to study psychology Eso I waas studying at cram school specifically for entering into university. But I didn't really enjoy it. It's cramming, so I don't know how much you can really enjoy going to it. Oh, I didn't, but I'm the only child. So my dad is That's kind of trying to convince me to stay in Japan. Of course. Right, of course. Eso and I was trying thio just, um e think for one year maybe he will give up. He would let you go e o thinking. But so he was really e think kind of conservative, you know, I think in the agent, dad or father is usually very conservative too. Especially two daughters. Well, my daughters 12, 2 days and I will I'm not going to let her go. S e o Where did you Where did you end up going or what did you end up doing? Oh, you mean, uh, after graduating from high school s o nto problem school eso One year I studied and then So I told my dad I said, I really want to go Thio, you know, just abroad to study. And he's oh, again, you know, just you can study in, you know, Japan's, you know, universities. And I said, I really want to just study overseas for a few years of these. And then So I think we had a really big...

...argument. E I was just thinking I wonder if it it became a problem. So how is so looking back on Lee a few years ago? How how did you look at that argument between your dad wanting to keep his daughter right with you Know what little I know of your dad? The best intentions, right? He just wanted to keep you. But you are like a bird flying out of the nest, and you just You just wanted to go and spread your wings. Where? Where was the issue? Was it? Maybe your attitude about what he was trying to hold you back from? Or was it his like inability or unwillingness to let you go? Looking back, do you think that well, maybe e mean it worked out? Think he just wants Thio monitor what I'm doing every single day? Yeah, that's yeah. Every single day. That's about it. Yeah, e no. You know, he loves me right? Off course, a za father. But I think you know, when I got to, like, 19 or teenager, I just wanted to be independent or just I really don't wanna be controlled by my father because my mom is kind of like me. So, you know, just you say, Oh, do whatever you want, You know, that's your life. But my dad said, you know, your life is kind of depending on my Did you join something like that? So eso battle. How did it end? How did how did the battle go? I see. Okay, that's a really good question. So in the end, So he gave up. So he said, OK, eso that check two years. Do you know if he always knew that you would go. But he just wanted to show you how much he loved you by, you know, holding on as long as possible. Like because every, like, even I say my daughter will never go anywhere, and I'll never let her go. But I know in the back of my head I gotta let her go. So I like your dad, although conservative and loving and caring and stubborn and controlling every part of every day of your life in the back of his head. He knew the day that he held you as a baby. One day, he's gonna have to let you go. Did he ever acknowledge that and and say I think so. But he had never say that. Yeah, but when you see, talk about yeah. Mm. I never asked him because hey, just I think just gave up Thio. You know, trying Thio, you know, just convinced me to stay in Japan on my mom. I think it's kind of she's in the middle of us, right? So I think she trying thio just, you know, say let all right, go, because that's a very international problem. You know. Okay, Papa. Papa is letting go of their daughters. Right? Or even the mother is not wanting to let go, Usually of the sons. Right? You know, you have a son, too. So when your son's like I'm going, mama, you'll be like, No, not my baby. Maybe. Right. Where did you Where the Oh, well, in the middle of the life, it's like, Okay, you can go. But when he was about to walk out the door, you might you might Yeah. Yeah, I might. Well, hopefully some my son will be, you know, independent meaning, Like, you know, I always just think about him as individual meaning. So even though he's...

...my son, But, you know, one day it's just, you know, become independent. Eso Where did you go? Where did you end up going? Oh, this is thank you for asking. So I went to offers. Um, Connecticut. I think you might know or not re sport kind of industrial part off the city, and then it's not really safe. Area. I event that I didn't know 21 22. You went to the United States all by yourself? Yeah. So 2020. Yeah. Yeah, around. So almost before 21 did your dad did your dad shed a tear? I don't know. E r us. I know. So he never cried, so Yeah, stiff upper lip. I'm sure he did. I'm sure he did, Really? I mean, if he fought, if he fought you for 22 years trying to hold you back, then when he finally faced defeat, I'm sure it broke his heart a little bit. You never know. So how was your experience in the United States and studying and being a free bird? Oh, so I didn't have any conversational skills. Okay yet. So I think, you know, maybe in Korea, South Korea in Japan is have the same kind off educational system. So the electorate study really hard. Good on the grammar. Bad on the conversation. Exactly. So I think I just had really, really difficult time to just listening to what they're saying. Teachers saying or other, you know, students from I guess so. The area I went is maybe 30% off Our students are from South Korea. Okay. And then Japan, maybe almost maybe 30%. And then Russia. Okay. Yeah. So it's kind of really interesting part. I went something, something that I experienced when I was in Canada, in a job that I had, and being here is you have to be commended. I mean, your dad may not have appreciated it at the time, but it's a It's a very brave and courageous adventure to endeavor on when, when, when you are saying I'm not saying this about you, but you started studying English at 17 by 20 you're in another country studying a program in a second language that takes a lot of gusto that, Ah, lot of guts to do, like to attempt it and to come out on the other side. And I met a lot of like when in Canada a lot of Koreans, Japanese, Chinese students and other Middle Eastern countries that come over and there essentially leaving your language or pushing it off to the side and immersing yourself into another country and studying a different program. It's a new pro. It's hard enough to study, like even if you were taking psychology or whatever in Japan, that would have been difficult. But you're going to go to another country and study a program in English so It's commendable. No matter how insignificant you felt. It's a really good thing that you did in in trying Teoh, you know, be independent on your own. Yeah, I think so. So when I realized that e guess so I went to a...

Bridgeport about, I think, three months or four months or so and then And then I decided to go to San Diego is more a tropical part in California. So that was about maybe, like, eight months or so and there s Oh, that's cool hat many students from, like Switzerland and then Brazil. So that was totally different. Atmosphere and environment I had and, you know, had a lot off communication with. And then so I guess maybe Brazilian or, you know, Swiss. You know, students tend to have mawr conversational skills higher than you know, Japanese students and probably maybe Korean e think you know, um, Korean students have more tendencies. Teoh, you know, speak. It's well, Yeah, I'm not sure about a lot of Korean kids air studying English, at least great four. They're starting it. They're a little bit familiar with it. All the signs, English and stuff. Yeah. So I think in classes. So Garma school on, but also maybe reading classes that I had waas kind off like Easy because I studied. But in a conversational classes are pretty hard for me and maybe other Japanese students. You were you required to do some sort of English program before you jumped into your degree or Oh, yeah. I didn't say sorry. Sorry. So I went to an English school in bridge boards and in San Diego. Yeah. Yeah, that's common. Yeah. Yeah. So I think I really see I don't think I didn't have that much skill off speaking skills yet around that time. And then I guess so. I went to a university after that in New York. So that was where I started. Thio. Really? E could imagine you're glad with a map of America. Okay, She's in credit that get San Diego now in New York. Oh, my daughter just e I didn't tell him after e told my mom. Of course. Right way have very sick regular. Don't tell that. Yeah, exactly. I told my mom What were you going to take in New York? So s so. I was telling psychology from the university in New York City and then eso off course, just the university. So their curriculum that programs was not Onley psychology off course. So you have to study like English and math. And then, like other courses? Yeah, eso, I guess. Oh, I think history classes are pretty hard. So how long did it take you to finish, or did you finish that degree in New York? Okay, so to be honest with you, so eso I had financial issues, so I dropped out at the I think senior for Yeah, I hear you. Yeah. I recall having financial issues in my university to e international problems. E think eventually I can go back to us and maybe I can, you know, just can finish maybe one more semester. Hopefully. So think after my sons or be going to college or something. But e, we were gonna work really hard. So how...

...long did you stay in the States before returning back to Japan? I think I almost 10 years really So yeah. Yeah. So the reason why? Because I was dating with, you know, my ex boyfriend s. So I was kind of like helping him his work. What type of What type of work were they doing? So so he was the i ts company to providing management services to university or educational institutions. So basically, what I did was, like, translation off course, like I can do it for, you know, Japanese in the market. So when you came back to Japan, what was what was your plan? Where you were you? Well, you're disheartened where you saddened where you encouraged to come back home. Uh, that's a really good question. So my, um, like, honestly, my so ex boyfriend became my husband, so we separated right now, but eso he said Okay, so let's go to Japan and then to do something like three new things, because he you know, he I think maybe he was thinking about having a new business or something. I really don't know. But anyway, so we came back and then, you know, um, it could be three years or so, so we just, you know, separated straight up. So, during this time, when are you starting to think about your own career in doing something for yourself? Um, off course, you know, as a single mom. So I was really seriously about So how should I, You know, bringing up my kid. And so when I got to over 30 in Japan, um, usually the companies or corporation asking you to have our certain certifications. So, for example, um, up anything but like, oik or they can do, you know, taken for English tests like quick clarification E u s. So I didn't have any off course. Yeah, but anyway, so, um, first thing I waas thinking about Okay, so I loved, like, clothes. And then maybe I can work at some. You know, um, no clothing shops, a pair of shops. And so I apply sums. And then So I got offered. And so I start working like loco Stay. Is that correct? Pronunciation sounds about right way on, like other French shops. A clothing shop. But anyway, so I didn't love it because I didn't really have that question for that, You know, work. Even though I like clothing, but not anymore. But anyway, it's a different. It's a whole different side of things, getting into merchandise and dealing with customers and all those. Yeah, it's different. Exactly. So I think during the time. So one off my, um, friend waas applying to Miss Universe contest in Japan. So because I was smuggling to, as you like as I mentioned before. And then So my agents, um, CEO said, can you do a translation or interpretation for Miss international sponsors on? I said okay. And then so that that's where I started. Thio doing...

...interpretation, Taking it more seriously. Yes. Yeah. And then So I felt okay, Maybe so I can use my skill a little bit and then So I was like, OK, so what can I dio? But that area I live, It's kind off small city and I think it's not really easy to find a variety of jobs. Eso Tokyo has more off course, but in my area, it's not that quite, you know, lacking opportunity. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. So, um, I was like, Okay, so maybe I can teach English first. And then I was like, looking up some cooperation. And it's a one off the big corporations. So I apply. And then they send me back the reply, And as I went Thio interviews and, you know, taking a test off course. And so so I pass. And then So I started teaching for two years Students. How how did you I mean, you started doing that when you were 19. So how did you like it as a full time job teaching English? Actually, it's quite fun. Yeah. What level were you teaching? You know, usually for native speakers. So they can they study usually for upper level. So, like, you know, as a Japanese. So I do teach from the beginner Thio Intermediate. Okay, so for adults too I teach So Tomoko I don't want toe take you through a journey that you may not want to go through completely. But what is it you do now that zits kind of keeps you busy and keeps you active whether it's completely into what you want to be doing? Or maybe you're doing something else on the side too. S o I think I mentioned before about the interpretation that's I started Thio doing interpretation for the speakers from overseas Eso I was really into the speaker so very outstanding speakers from overseas from a battlefield on de So I waas okay, I can do interpretation for the gas overseas when they come here. So live speaking events you would be beside them Yeah. Yeah. And also like the private sessions that you know participants. The big events. You know, a lot of participants comes and off course, guest speakers, you know, speaking on the stage. But besides that, so they go to a private session so each participant or attendees can ask, you know, their concerns or you know, something. So maybe their businesses to, you know, professional speakers. So nowadays, with covert, I don't speaking engagements. Kind of dropped off a lot of I'm not sure about in Japan. What is it you do each day nowadays to keep yourself busy? Oh, so this year s o almost biting EMC Joe was off course way. Can't do do it. So, um, I was doing almost like online, um, coaching to clients and in students this year and generation in narration. Yeah. Restoration. Yeah. Your voice over. Yeah. Are you doing English and Japanese voiceover work? What does that look like? What kind of materials are you doing the voiceover for? Oh, okay. So...

...last so recently, I did waas for, um Big curse company automobile companies for e learning on my narration resolver And then sometimes I do for characters like four girls because I think my voice was kind of like a high pitch sound. So yeah. So this is relatively new for you. This e mean, you've been speaking your whole life, but doing it as a profession profession, How long has it taken you and especially for listeners listening to get into voiceover work? How long has it taken you to develop your voice and to know exactly what you're good for or what? You're not good for what you're qualified for? Or maybe what is too much for you? How long does that take? I think I need more than one year because I've, you know, cutting many kinds off offers. And I'm just thio, you know, challenge him by myself because you know which one. I can be good at it or and I'm not good at it. Off course. Like as you said Eso I think. Probably, Um the corporate learning, Um oration waas. Quite fun or, like commercial too. I want from you guys like fits. E I wonder the because you can hear people who have these soothing voices or, you know, they they use their voice in such a way that you can see they're very artistic or creative. Could you comment on what is the connection between? Say, your voice. So I know for you you describe yours is warm and friendly and trust yes, as some of the things that I've read about you. So how true is that to your nature? Versus is it's just a complete act not saying that you're not trust not warm or not. But how close is that? And does that make you you know better? Or is that just make you more creative or more of an actor? What is the connection between your character and your your voice over voice? I don't think, um I separated from my voice because I believe in my authentic voice has in a friendless and like trustworthiness and they weren't Yes, So I'm very honest with my own skin. So I was good. Like I mean, when I say, like, you know, I can act or something. That's what you would hear. Yeah, Yeah. Could you know some voiceovers, you know, friends. So they can act like, you know, even though they dio I guess they do, really. You know, actress. So our actors, so they can do that. But like for me is I don't think I can eso I just can't deliver what I have, But you probably could You probably could, but you would prefer to keep it true to your character. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. But, um, I think so. I can, you know, brush up my skills more off course. But, you know, because a zoo, you know, So I'm just like doing my process to improve myself or my voice, you know, every day. What? Yeah. No Ideo. What is difficult about doing that in that process? What is difficult for you and your voice over work, even even getting work in other fields such as you? Uh wow. So I I think my voice has, ah, high pitch. And then So last time I had...

...on offer for English voiceover for the corporate commercial eso they asking me to have more lower voice, and then I tried to practice a lot to over my voice because I think like, as you know, so probably in U. S. Or in Canada, because most women have, like, you know, have more powerful woman meaning that politician or more entrepreneurs, women ladies. So they do have more lure like the voice. Hmm. So which I don't my natural voice. I have, you know, higher pitch. So that was quite hard, even though I just trying thio door, you know my boss as much as I can, but it's pretty hard. Well, when I think of, say, and I don't think of the same, but I did there's some similarities between Japanese and Korean culture in that when you go to an airport, right or you, you know, here's some commercials of some female there is that that is a very high pitch, almost character. Do you know the sort of voice? And it's There's a lot of that characterization of voices. So there I would think there would be a temptation for you or even males getting into voiceover work to to be like that character that's presented a lot. So the temptation or the difficulty might be of carving out your own voice versus something that seems to work in every other occupation. So that is that a hard thing for you to is? You hear those high pitch voices in a lot of the commercials are on, and then you're like Oh, I could do that. And then they're like, No, we don't want that. We want something different. Mm. So I think you know, as you said, I think you're right. Um, lots off, like commercials. Or maybe for animations, right? Eso you listen, Thio high pitch voices in a voice overs, people e think, you know, maybe Japan like the way it iss. Hmm? Yeah. So it's a challenge. I mean, it's a challenge to find. I mean, there's not always going to you're not going to be given every role because the companies want a specific. Obviously, they want particular about that. And so So, like a Sfar, as I know, because I started to doing voice over and then, um, they I would just say maybe 70% off voice overs. So they went to specific, you know, voice over school in Japan. So they are pretty good at it. Very good. I like me, but like I was just doing my voice over for, you know, international market. So I really don't have to do it always high pitch like a characters. So that's good. Really opportunity to learn every kind of field. Have you gotten into narrating books, like, just not yet. Your books? Not yet. Is that so? Most of them are commercial. Okay? Yeah, but sure. Yeah. I wanna try all your book that I think probably commercial. Its's more lucrative. There's there's better money than sitting sitting down and reading,...

...reading a big, long book and not and not knowing the benefits of it. What is it? What is this a satisfaction? You get in your work now, thinking of all that you've been through and being able to, you know, help support your son. And you know, I didn't say this at the beginning or when you mentioned it. But one year brave for going to another country and studying another program. But like my mom, who was a single mom, it is not easy. Well, and I commend you for your willingness and attempt to take care of your son. And it gives a better I under another standing of why you said I want my son to be independent. I want right because you don't want to depend on the on the whole time. You gotta tough love from mom, right? Like Okay, you're 18, you're 19 out. That's what? My mom even earlier. But I commend you for doing that because relationships are not easy and all of that other stuff. But toe have a mother that's willing to look after her son and to help raise him to be the man that you think that he should be. Thank you for doing that. And he might not appreciate it fully yet when he's older, when he's older, he'll look back and say, My mom was the one that was there and my mom is the one heart, so that that is a really, really good thing that you're doing it. Thank you. So what is it you would like people to understand about Kemoko? What would you like people to understand about you in in what you're trying to do? Maybe is raising your son or, you know, in modeling or in your voice over work so that they can have a better appreciation of you know, what you bring to the table and what what value you could bring into work when you work with other people? Um, I think I'm very, you know, honest meaning. Um, I just say whatever the idea comes to mind, and then also, I like to trust in people around me, always. So that means that I want them to trust me too. So always I wanted thio them to, you know, be comfortable with me. So through work here. So I'm always, like, friendly, and I commit myself my work. So, um, you know, they appreciate what I do, but eh, So I do a vast little like, you know, I have a variety off works, so that makes me live. Or, um, I think I just like to be always active. And then I like to entertain people. So I think, you know, doing biting EMC is kind off, you know, accommodating gas off course. But, you know, simultaneously. You know, I just entertained a Z. You say that I'm thinking of, like, an interpreter off to the side. That is this very stressful and hard job, I would think, because you need to be on the ball quick. You need to say exactly what this other person is saying and and not be seen, right? Not you can't. You can't stand out. Sometimes you're beside the person. But you're just there to say whatever is said and It's not like, Hey, everyone, look at me. Look how good a job. But but you're so vital for those people who need to understand what this person is saying. So that's a high city job. Yeah, I think so. Off course. So I pick when I what I can or what I can do. Meaning?...

Like, I just don't want to do every single interpretation. So, for example, for the speakers from the bosses. So they have. I mean, of course, you Brian job. So, you know, everyone has, you know, unique backgrounds and then their stories that I love to know about them. That's it. Yeah. It probably gives you a better, um, a deeper understanding of what they're trying to say. You can come at it from a better angle than just getting words or translating words. How you mentioned about staying busy. But how do you stay productive? I mean, you're bilingual EMC urine narration. You're doing coaching modeling in your mom. How do you stay productive? How? What gets you up in the morning? Mm. I just just open the windows and then just feel the fresh air. That's where I start. Eso Next thing So I will wake up my son. How? Why? Why are you getting up? Why do you open the window? Why do you get your son up? You know, encourage him well in school. What's keeping you productive and keeping the wheels rolling? Hmm? A really good question. How are you pregnant? Uh, I mean, I could say superficially or down low Aiken se Teoh to support my family. Right? That that's keeping me going. A drive to do something more interesting. A drive to do something better. You know, if it's with people Thio to meet more people toe learn mawr information those things productive. You know, money is helpful like that. That's not too why I work. But what you know today I have some tasks. You know, I have an interview with you today. Those things having goals set before me, right? Things to do that. I know that I need to do Experience gives us that thing. If if we don't do them, no one's going to do them for us. You know, unless parents but our parents pass away and die, and they're not always there to take care of us. So those are the things that keep me productive, you know, just having, you know, you think of the proverbial the horse holding a carrot before its mouth, like on a stick, and you're just trying to strive to get through the day each day. And, you know, having variety, I think, is one thing, and that's what you have, right having a variety. And it's not the Onley thing that you do right. It's not on Lee looking after your son because, you know, as a mom, that's hard on Lee looking after your son. But you also have coaching. You also have voice over work. You're also, you know, experimenting with your voice. Your you know, those things help you stay productive because you have a few things going. Yeah, um, I think the main things I can think of is just I really wanna, you know, be happy by myself. Because if I can take care off myself, So you you know you can't take care of others. So that's, I think, the main key I tried to be, you know, healthy. I try to be always positive. I always to be energetic. So my son want to, you know, people I love. Is there something that you use that keeps you efficient, like a tool that you use? Maybe it's a microphone for voice over work or thinking. Is there something that you use that helps you stay on track and and ah, tool for your work? Yeah, I think so. So, you know,...

...many kinds off jobs, As I said so, too right now Is the voice over or, you know, talking to my clients? Yeah. That makes me, you know, really? You know, delighted or, you know, pleased. So, in the tool that you use, what is it that you use in your work that helps you? You mean like your tongue and speaking or a microphone? Or some people say, a laptop. Some people say so. Right. Something that that helps you a lot. What is what essential to keep you keep going. Some people might do. Say, coffee, maybe t probably chocolate chocolate is essential tool. And that's that's a good and yeah, that's my favorite e Eat every day. Chocolate every day. Mhm. I love it. You're doing well. What is it? How do you balance between all of the work that you have and in free time or rest time. How do you keep your work Life choices in check So that you're not working yourself too much or, you know, worrying as you probably do about your son's future too much. How do you keep How do you keep those things in check So that you can have be happy and enjoy some free time? Um, so you know, of course. You know, financial, you know, things that you know, one off the important factors. But I really don't look at the main things was, you know, always, you know, money or anything. So, um, to be honest with you, So, um, let's see. I'm not really two months ago, so my dad passed away. So this year, I'm I'm sorry to hear that. And that would explain why you weren't sure about if your dad had a tear and my mom passed away this year, too. Really? Yeah. And I could probably speak for you for a moment just because I know it's hard. It's even yesterday I was thinking of my mom, and then you have these little moments that come out of nowhere to remind yourself of, you know, the parent that we've we've had that's no longer here, Many of the things and, you know, I'll give you some time to think about this is the reason I started This podcast was because of my mom. Because my mom was such a hard worker and I never really understood why I never I have some like an England. I haven't idea as toe why she did what she did. But right until the very day that she died, she wanted toe work. And so I have this this this thing of asking people why you work, Why you do the things that you dio I'm sorry, Thio, here you're in two months is not that long ago. So I'm sure the wound is still fresh and hopefully it stays fresh to remember. Right Thio continue to remember. And as I said to my dear wife who lost her sister this year and her grandma this year is never know but never feel bad for feelings that never feel bad for feeling sad of the loss of someone. Try not to let it overtake your life right to affect your work and your other responsibilities. But never forget those most important memories that you have of these people in this case, Your dad. So again, I'm sorry to hear that. Your dad I know, I know. But as you regain your closure, um, no, that if you could be there for...

...your mom, right? Those sort of things. And and and talk to your son about your father and how loving and caring he waas, right? Thio, hold on to you As long as it's a great story, I would have known before that he passed away and then you told me the story. Then I I probably would have been more heartbroken, but now it's a wonderful story that your dad just wanted to hold onto you, Aziz, long as he could loved you so dearly. So you were saying eso you were saying about keeping your Oh yes, voices in in check eso so But any measure this year's my you know that that passed away, right to feel it months ago So that was, you know, after and before So my mom and I are really busy Thio take care of off him off course, But anyways, thanks Year. You know, everyone has very difficult, you know hard time, you know, during this in a pandemic situation. So I was really thinking about you know, what is the most important things in life? I think you know, you know, people say, Okay, this one in that way. But for me, this year is like the moment I can have. Yeah, you are the people I love. So that Z just kiss me going? Meaning Okay. So just I can do something for him or to my son or, you know, Thio everyone we care about. So also, with the question of work life choices, it kind of it pushes you away from the need and desire of money and pushing or towards family and care and concern and knowing when to turn off work and turn off your non family. Yeah, so you know, off course. You know, every day I work, but, you know, if necessary, meaning next urgent things or I think my priority has completely changed this year. So you know, next year, probably I would change, maybe work. It will be a top priority or, you know, you never know. But this year, just I wanna have spent a lot of time with my family because I'm trying to do right now, and I'm I'm sure there's a Chinese Japanese proverb or saying about seasons, because I I saw a picture of Japan the other day and it looked like Alice in Wonderland, like the big, colorful fish on top of some in the white pond. And there's pink trees in Japan. If they're not, there's some very beautiful it might have been. It might have been a really beautiful picture and someone like this. The the scenery in Japan looks like the Alice in Wonderland like the like, almost like it's not even of this world. But it reminds me of seasons. And so what you're saying is, maybe next year I'll think of money, but we go through these seasons, right? And it's not the world summer winter fall in spring. But life seasons of of transitioning from, you know, are changing our priorities, and it's not bad. It's not bad to work for money, right, but of getting a foundation of what's what's really important and what matters most. We still gotta work, but unfortunate thing, Uh, Tomoko, thinking of my listeners and the people who hear this is there a tip. Some advice you would have for people who are thinking, maybe of yourself when you were 19 and you started to teach English for the first time, or changing careers or balancing careers. Is there any work advice that you have for people getting into work? Hmm? I think you know the age doesn't...

...matter. So if you want to do something, I think you should try it because otherwise you never know. So you need to taste it and then So if you don't like it so you can change one. Move onto others. So that's always, you know, saying to my son, even though his time so he has a quick probably. But so that's what I you know, you know, did it like many times. So if we didn't like it, so I change it and then so if it works out so I can just keeps on going, well, it's you say your son made. Not yet, No, but you keep saying that's important, though, right? I mean, just keep, you know, the little whisper, right? Go straight like what are you talking about? There's a term just in life. Go straight. You know be honest, be kind and just keep reminding them of those little those character traits those concerns that they will undoubtably, um, see in the future. And that's doing this to for you to say that right to try things that you otherwise wouldn't have. I mean, I'm it's sad to hear that your father has passed away and the difficulty that you had. But you went to the United States, right? You did something that really want to dio. And without doing that, you wouldn't have your son. Mhm. Right, Right, right, Absolutely it Regardless of how difficult our Children are, most of us, most of us wouldn't trade them for anything. Sometimes you would trade them for anything. But most times we wouldn't trade them for anything. So you're right. You actually live that of doing something that you wanted to do. And it wasn't like I want to go kill people or do something bad. It was. I need to explore this for myself and try it out and and experiences and reminding our kids, our Children, our listeners like that's very important, right? Don't be afraid to try something because going in your family has done it right. One of those things, especially for work, I think is is important. Temuco, is there anything? It's kind of hard for people to say, but is there anything that you wish you would have known that you could tell other people? Or even I think the question something that a mistake that you might have made that you don't have to divulge the mistake. But just something you you learn from, you wish you would. It's the S O. I was thinking about one person in my family. So my grandmother, sister. So she got married with American, and then So So they lived in San Diego. But anyway, so their daughter's husband So he was really sweet to me when I was in San San Diego, and then so shouldn't probably six years ago, seven years ago. So I got a message from his wife because I think she was trying to do each meal yourself for some reason. And so we were talking, and then I just knew. So he passed away on and then oh, yeah, And that thing Waas So I thought maybe so He waas like, you know, he passed away because off some diseases or something, but he commits suicide. And then so everyone loved him so much, even though I'm saying I love him Thio. But so I was just thinking. So he was such a lovely friendly and they consider it just heartwarming in a person and they So I just like thinking...

...if the time goes back, I just want to say more, you know, Thank you. Or, you know, appreciation or gratitude to him. So that's I always think so. If you think or feel something, you just say it the moment right now, especially when it's regards to people who you never know it will be. We don't know if we will be here tomorrow. So right, holding on to things that are unsaid or, you know, appreciation for someone being so kind. And sometimes that can encourage them, especially in a suicidal situation that maybe those are the things they we all need to hear. You know, you're doing a great job. Thank you very much, or I love you. And I miss you. Those types of things in those phone calls I think you would all be better, Thio. Do them more often. Mm hmm. So that's I always thinking right now and then Also be Klein. Teoh. You know the people you just reto encounter? Yeah. Tomoko, you kind of mentioned this with how your voice, um, is connected to your character. Do you know of the temptation? And how do you How do you combat it with putting your character before or after your career? So if you're a title of the model or the voiceover actor, or even the mom, how do you rank or prioritize your character? So when you when you go into it, is your character first or is that I'm mom or I'm a model or I'm a voiceover actor, and then you will do anything you can to So you think of people who want to be president or they wanna be a politician or they, you know they want to be an actor, and they'll do whatever they can to get that career going while leaving their character behind or a good personality traits. How do you fight that temptation of trying Thio Get your career going versus bringing your character through everything you do? Mm, because I think depending on the days that I do different work, so each day is totally different. So if I have to do coaching so I'm a coach or on the weekend on Sunday. So my son is off course it day off, so we spend some time. So I'm the mom s. Yeah, it's every single day is totally different role I have. So I really don't say Okay, so this one is a priority number one more 2nd and 3rd. Yeah. So do you see that having a solid character is more E would say, I think maybe I probably like bilingual communicate that I would say because I use English and Japanese, right through people. Yes. Yes, I think also, though you as you said when you're staying true and honest to your voice, that is the best voice that you bring forward. So similarly by being a bilingual translator, coach or model By bringing by being honest and consider it, uh, warm and kind. That is the best way to pursue any care any career, right? That that's the best way to move forward in work is by bringing your character upfront. Not by your title. Yeah, exactly. All right. Thank you for a description Yeah. Tomoko, I know that you mentioned about wanting to continue your education. How for listeners. How do you place the importance of...

...education even if it's not a formal, like a four year degree or something? But you're doing voiceover work where you're you're learning on the job, right? A lot of that is not necessarily certificates or degrees, but is education. How do you, um, define the importance of educated workers? Um, I think in Japan kiss for education, the forest to study. But when you become adults, so I think education is just forever things just if you want Thio, improve your life so you need to educate yourself Always. That's life, life, life, long learning. Yes. Yeah, it's very important, especially as we get we get older and we have Children and they were remember, like I don't know that sort of thing. Tomoko, Is there anything else you would like to add or suggest, or some words of encouragement for people who, you know, maybe lost someone. It's been a tough year or change changing their career or looking at education and may be discouraged in something they have to do if they have a passion for something in something that they would like to work in. Do you have any words of encouragement? Because I think probably, you know, life is not that long, but in terms off the length off the ages. So I think you can live longer in general. So I think just always keep positive, mhm, be positive and then just do everything you can. Yeah, it's important to weigh always if there's a problem, right, we tend to focus so much on that problem versus all of the other things that were going well. And nine, if we ever wrote lists to lists of the bad things and the good things, the good things in our in our lives. Mhm most always that way, the few things that are going wrong eso itt's, you know, and that's thinking positive about these things, right? Or even changing a bad into something that's good, right? You know, by as my example of the passing of my mom, you know, as hard as you can never replace Apparent. I've learned a lot of things about myself. It makes me reflect on all of the things she tried to do for me and I appreciate her and miss her more. And it's unfortunate. As you said about your relative who passed sometimes the pain and these experiences they're necessary. Thio allow us to realize these things a little bit more. But then we can pass this knowledge on to our Children. So you I'm sure it's the same with your the passing of your dad. You could reflect on your dad and just think you know how loving and caring he waas even though it seems so strict and, you know, on hard at the time. But you wouldn't give it up for anything else. Temuco, how can people reach you? How can they get in contact with you? Um, just like looking up from Google. So just hit by Lingle EMC and then also English narration in Fukuoka. So you can find me because there are blog's so right now. So I'm working on my website right now. So I've been...

...difficult a few times for getting yeah, way used to go there to get our visas. So But we took the speedboat across. I forget what it's called. Yeah, it was very quick and a nice on. And Japan is such a lovely place. My my dear wife loves it. She has an uncle who lives there. Eso there. And she loves going there visiting, Very organized and very clean. Very much love to Moco. Last question that I have for you. Why do you work? Why do I work? Um, that's a really good question. Um, I guess through work, you can experience ah lot off things through people because always interacting with people. So I think you can learn something really important. Listen, always and off course right now is you can brush up your skills Well, Tomoko Togawa, I appreciate you and your work. All the things that you bring to the table in your bilingual services. You're modeling your coaching and being a good mom. I appreciate you and all that you're doing. Thank you kindly for coming on today. Thank you for having me. I really appreciate it. Thank you, Brian. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive be a joyful day in your work.

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