WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 114 · 9 months ago

#114 Tommy Chong - Comedian - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Tommy Chong is an actor, writer, director, musician, and comedian.

Website
https://tommychong.com/

Twitter
https://twitter.com/tommychong?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

Instagram
https://www.instagram.com/heytommychong/?hl=en

Welcome to why we work with your hostBrian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as wetogether dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seeminglymissteps, hopes, warnings and advice which will be an encouragement to usall to get up. Get going on, keep on working. Working is tough, but workingis good. Now here is your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian V. And thisis why we work today. Have the great pleasure. Speaking with Tommy Chong,Tommy is an actor, writer, director and comedian today. I wanna find out fromhim knowing that he knows the secret to comedy is timing and the pause. How can timing and the pause do us wellin other areas of work and in our relationships? Join me today in myconversation with Tommy Chung. I'm Brian V, and this is why we work today.Have the great pleasure of speaking with Tommy Chong. Good day. Fine, sir. Thank you. And, uh, sunny Californiasunny and I'm your sunny South Korea. I think it was 20. You're from Canada. Soit was like 25 here in the last couple of days, which is not bad. It could beCanadian weather, and that would be a lot worse. Fine. Sir, Would you do me afavor and tell me what industry that you're in nowadays and what it is thatyou're doing? Oh, the cannabis industry. Whatever. Whatever you're up to mostmost often well, you know Yeah, it's cannabis. I I got Chung's, uh, TommyChong Cannabis, Tommy Chong's Canibus and I got tummy tones uh, T shirts onTommy John. Uh, pipes Familiar? Yes, you're you anything to do with that? Ecan put my name on it. Yeah, yeah, yeah. ISAT a wife thing. That Is that whyyou're in Korea? My my dear wife is Korean. I met her here my second yearteaching, and I've been unable to escape ever since. Way left a couple oftimes suru uh, Korean speaking Korean. No, I I jokingly say I just know whatI'm in trouble. That's all that Z That's quite often so I probably knowmore than I'm letting on. Yeah, I bet you dio I lived in Paris for almostfour years and, uh, the only thing I really learned was Papa e Yeah, alittle bit. No, I just know. Just pop, pop Pop. Would you do me o Only Just weprobably on anglais. No Spanish All your times in l. A. You know, I gottaI'm Canadian. So I got a thing against all languages. Uh, when I was growingup, we had English. Our principal try to teach us French, and and he couldn'tspeak French, So I think that I'll blame it on him. Well, that's whatsomeone once said to me is like, I speak two languages. My second languageis English, but I haven't declared my first language yet. Yeah, Yeah, I'mfluent in English and and English, uh, English, American and Canadian. Bothboth different ones. Learning how to spell color and things like that. Mhm. Would you be Oh, favorite, MrChung? Sure. Would you bring us back? Bring us back. And in this podcast Iknow you're busy, man, and you've been on many podcasts. But this one is whywe work in understanding why people do what they do. And what I like to do isis go back to people's very first job. Even if it's out of the industry,they're in now and learn the motivations of the first job and workour way through up into what you're doing now. And what keeps you going? Sowhat would have been your very first job? Even as a teenager Preteen sellingcards or bringing milk bottles, places, whatever it may have been. Well, my first job where I got paid wasprobably mowing lawns on Baby said no.

My first job was baby sitting. E was ababy sitter. And the thing was, I was a kid, and everybody wanted to go out, sothey would say, Okay, you're staying home to watch the kids, and then whenthey got back, give me a few bucks, you know? So that was my first job. How Howold were you then? Oh, probably 89? Yeah. Younger, maybe younger, you know?Well, we lived in the country, you know, we lived in the country. And so whenyou're in the country when you're eight, you're you're growing adults. Farasperm. Work goes, you know, you're carrying everything. Uh, then I got in.Then I got is interesting. Then I made friends. We moved into the city, and then, uh is this cowboy, huh?Calgary, you said, moved into the city of Calgary, Calgary were lived on theoutskirts of Calgary. And that's when uh, no one had a job. E mean, there wasno lines to ball because it was fields. And, uh then we moved into the citywith plumbing and electricity, and then I would have a friend that he would begme to help him with. His paper wrote, You know, Please, Please. You know, Igot to collect Will be 30 below, and, you know, you gotta collect door todoor, collect your 35 cents. 75 cents, you know, for the paper. And so I wouldhelp him collect, and then he would give me a few bucks for that. You know,you give me Yeah, a couple of bucks for doing that for freezing out in the cold.But, you know, what I learned is that when you grew up in the country, youdon't ask how much you're going to get paid. Your very grateful if you getpaid anything. But what you're what you're asked is to help somebody andeso you just help. And that's really it was the paper helped me collect. Andthen when he went away, he said, Will you take over my paper route? And so mysecond job really was delivering papers on a bicycle. It's a good perspectivetoe have. It's a good perspective toe Have, you know, just grateful for thejob. Not well. How much is this? And calculate this and trying to figure outif it's worth your time. I never did that. And I still don't. It's myweakness. I still have a problem. Uh huh. Asking for money. I don't know. Ifit was, I found that if you do a good job, then they usually pay you morethan than what you would expect. Then I started playing. Yeah, OK, esohole. And then then another friend. He had a job delivery meat and he wasleaving or going away or didn't want the job anymore. Asked me if I wantedit. I said yes before I knew what it waas eso I because we grew up poor uh, you know, I mean, if it wasn't forthe $15 a month Children's allow it, there would been no income coming intothe house into the house, you know, and my dad, You know, it was hey, worked.But he was like a truck driver. It was Chinese waiter that any but more thananything, he gambled, and so he would pay the necessities. But he wanted tokeep the money in his pocket. Eso there was no and there was no planning. Itwas just like gamblers, you know, they just gambled, and they need their money,you know, Um, yes, I I've had a lot of jobs over the years. Did you recognizethat? Did you recognize that about your dad when you were young, and then Didthat motivate you at all? Or did that maybe attract you to that lifestyle?Just when you were a younger kid? No. My mother raised us basically. And likeI found out that I'm native 8%. She was quarter. She was. And she was verynative, like, in her ways. And she was the one that had the be real aboutpaying bills and paying rent, and they would put on the layaway plan if theyneeded something. And it was always necessities. There was never anythingfrivolous. No, I remember moving into our house and looking around a littlebungalow. It was big when I was a kid, you know? But it was It was like my momand dad finally together because my mom...

...had spent time. He was in the army fora while that my mother was in the sanitarium for TV, and I was in thehospital and the kids were in the home and eso we Then we finally got our ourlittle cottage with no electricity and no wood stove heat. That was their home. And I remember the walls were bare and we used to getthe Star Weekly. Remember that at the starry up, the Star Weekly and thecenterfold was was, uh, usually a picture of, ah, landscape or something.So I remember taking the center pulled out of the Star Weekly and Scotch,taping it to the wall so we would have a picture on the wall. You're talkingabout having no electricity, wood stove and I have some family in Texas, andthey were a little upset over a couple of days without heat. You lived itevery Canadian winter. We were warned, You know, my dad made sure, you know,we had had firewood, but it wasn't. You know that You buy, you know, thefirewood we got way would find or pop mhm. There'll be a native going arounddropping trees off that property. And then you had a buck, saw it, cut it tolength and split it and pilot and and that's that's the kind of what we got.Or we went to construction sites and picked up to scrap would bring thathome. And, uh, no, it was firewood was always, you know, way needed it, butcook to cook with and the Thio war in the house, it was the only one we had.Yeah, I remember waking up in the morning and the fire gone out and thefour with floor was actually frozen, but we're cuddled in our bed, so my dadwould have to get up on that here. Crunch, crunch, crunch across the floorand they even start the fire. And he got to get a fire going really fastdone. And then the then the fireplace, the fire, the wood fire stove wouldwarm up the whole house. And I remember spending countless evenings, you know,sitting by the fire carving, you know, But in the wood pile. You know, killingwhat be carving knives or toys? Way couldn't afford toys. There was no toystore in our life. And so we played cops and cowboys and Indians. I wouldcarve, carve a gun, You know, a six shooter or or no, sometimes we got thatfor Christmas. We got a captain for Christmas on a BB gun. We have BB guns,too. And I was telling this other he was asking me about my indigenous, uhuh, inside E. Remember my brother and I when we got older, you know, 10, 11, uh, are one thing to do with throwknives into the shed into the side of the shed, throwing knife, knifethrowing. I got pretty good. I got pretty good to the point. And then thenmy mother, actually, one Christmas, I got up really nice. Swiss nice. And Igot pretty good at My brother was deadly. He was. He was marksman onetime. There's a lot of mice in the fields when we're walking one time withit. And we had a nice we used to go on our own little camping trips, day daytrips, you know, we're walking down this road. Most run across the road. Mymy brother nailed it with a Bowie knife. Like, cut it in half. Yeah, he was. Hewas pretty awesome. He looked me. He really looked native. He's gone. No,but he looked really, really native. And we used to climb trees. You know,that was our That was our fun thing. But as far as jobs go, then when wemoved into the city, I got a job mowing lawns lady across the road. Needed a and, uh yeah, and I looked. Yeah, I went to the dentist one time back in the day when you had, uh, thedental trouble with teeth. It was It was aking. The only dinner work we ever got.

They pulled it out. Eso that's all. Iremember being at the dentist one time and because way ran around Good. The,you know, the neighborhood? No, just pants. No. No shoes, no shirts.And and so I was really brown. And Iremember being a dentist one time and he says I look Mexican, I guess. Hey,would you like a job? Would you like your job? Garden? You know, I'd neverturned down the job. Yeah. Okay. So he gave me his address and I had to find away to get to the bus, you know, to get go there. And then I was I was agardener, but it was too much for me. I was too, too small, you know? S so Iworked there until I got sunstroke. And then I had to quit. So So that was ajob. And then, uh then I start playing musicwith a fiddle player across the field, and we'd play dances in that. And thenI got to learn the play the guitar pretty good. How old were you when youstarted playing music? Because that's that's a kind of a big part of yourcareer is. Well, I was eight when I first started playing with the fiddleplayer. 89 10 11. Yeah. All those years played by the fiddle player, I guess.11. 12? Yeah. Yeah. Because then it went toArmy could at 13. That's when I met another native and he was a singer. Hewas Elvis in person. He became an Elvis impersonator. And so we we played inthe barracks Way would play Ah, and I played accordion a little bit. I tookit to camp with me, but I never played. It was too shy. Uh huh. Since you're awriter, did you did you begin writing in high school or even earlier as well?Or is that something that came later in your career? Later, Way? Later. Waylater. What were you thinking? What were you thinking in terms of yourcareer in high school? Or were you just kind of wandering around trying tofigure yourself out? Well, high school, I had big hopes in the beginning, Youknow, uh, matriculation. You know, the old matriculation where you, you know,got into university eso when I went to high school that I took the hard course,but I I couldn't do it. I And then I discovered party and and girls, and, uh,that's so much girls. But then I was playing music all through that, butwith my part, not all the time. But, you know, I was I was a guy that worked,you know? I was going to tell you one time when I guess I was about 13. 14.Something that I got hired at the Lone Pine Supper Club. And they wanted me.The guy had a private party, and he hired me as a guitar player. And I said, Okay, at 14 at 14. And so Igot my guitar. I think my dad, my dad drove me because he was pretty excited,you know, because he loved the music part of my life. And so when I got there, the guy had mebe the bartender. 14? Yeah. It was his way of getting, ah, bartender withouthaving Thio do the age thing. You know, eso So you play the guitar, but firstyour drinks and I didn't know anything about it. So I got everybody so drunkbecause I had no idea proportions or anything. And so everybody was drug ontheir ass on my dad picked me up. Wow. What happened? You were bargaining yourbargaining because I never drink E right. But, you know, And then then westarted. Yeah, that was my job. Always had a job. That was one thing aboutCanada. When you grow up, you know there's no except scene. There wasalways a job to do a job that we had people always needed. Somebody you know,So I always work, but I never There is only one time, you know? Well, when Iquit Oh, first time I smoked pot Next year I went to quit school because andthen I decided I wanted to be a musician when your guitar player. Butbefore I could get into my guitar playing career, I worked as a Rufer. I was on a roof for a while until itwas winter. And then you can't do that job anymore. I was gonna quit it. Iwould work with my brother making each...

...trough with tin snips. Then I worked.Then I got a job in the telephone company because I thought maybe thatwould be a good job toe, have you know? So we ended up digging ditches or and Ihad a band at the time. Oh, and before that, I got a job in a cookie factory. Uh, seeing candidate goes onunemployment office and they would send you two different jobs. And so I wentto the unemployment. They sent me to the cook. They needed guys in thecookie fact. And so I learned, uh, cooking, you know, just a great workAlthough I made icing with a big cement mixer, big bags of sugar, they had medoing that. And then, uh oh. And then I finally gota job with the telephone company, had my name in there, and they called me.And by that time, well, then I got everybody in the band working at thecookie factory, and that was the riot. I want to do a movie, but it's likeLucille and A s. So we're doing the cookies, the whole band. I had the sameboth singers. Yeah, because the band were always unemployed and we had black.The light of the band, Bernie and and Tommy were black, and Dick was Indian,And so So, uh, wasn't with Dick, but was Tommy and Bernie and myself. We gota job digging ditches in the middle of winter. Were you digging the telephonepoles themselves? No. No, we were laying cable, okay. And we're what youhad to do because you couldn't lay it in the summer time because it was small,but like water, you know, sleuths, they call them, And so we wait till thefrozen and then you chop through the frozen ice in the frozen ground, andthen you lay the pipe or the cable. So I had that job until and we had todrive out of town for its. We had to ride in a panel truck and long drivegoing toe work, getting ready. Thio. It was like a chain gang, you know, theprison game. That's what it was like in the Foreman. He was kind of proud. Hehad a black crew. He felt like a Southerner thing. The only thing he wasmissing was the horse, you know. And so but New Year's come and we're stillplaying music at the time on the weekends. And he said, The thepharmacist, you know, New Year's Eve E don't know Wednesday or something. Ifyou guys aren't here, uh, Friday or something, He's Anyway, he's. If you'renot here Friday, then you're gonna be fired. But he told us aweek ahead of time. Eso way do We weren't gonna be there so way. Nevergot a whole lot of work done in the meantime, between time to be firedanyway. Yeah, and then we got I had a team fair or a team club. I started ateam club in Calgary and we started, were then we start making, you know,pretty nice money, whatever money we made. A fact, No. I was paying the band,uh, 10 2020 bucks apiece for the night, and then the breast went into the teamcup was legit. I could have kept it. And when we broke up, they said, Youknow, what should we do with the money? And they spend it? Why keep it? Butyeah, I was. And then we got kicked out of Calgaryand went to Vancouver, and that's when I became a full time musician. I hadone job in Calgary. I tried. Oh, when I got married, I got married. And then Itried to get a straight job. I went to the unemployment office and they gaveme a job in a bakery, given out pre samples. He was trying to build up thecrew, and I and I, if I had stayed, I would have probably end up being in thebakery, you know, baking bed or something. That but we'll And thenbefore I went left Calgary, I wanted a white collar job, and so I got a I hada girlfriend in the band E. I was a connection C In Calgary, everybodyworks. I don't care who you are. You work. If you work, you're eitherworking or you're you're in jail because you can't steal without gettingcaught. So anyway, Dick, uh, people at the sax player he got, he was reallyanswered. Part black, tall, beautiful,...

...handsome, beautiful artist, everything.He had this job as an insurance inspector. Do you know about insuranceinspectors? They're like, this is ah, company called Super Homes. And whatthey did, they would work for car insurance companies. And when someonebut car insurance, they would come to Hooper homes for report on the guy. Andwe were the inspectors had to go out to the guy's house, talk to the neighbors,find out what kind of guy was or a girl and and then right filled out a report.So I got that job and it was a white collar job, and I loved it. I loved ita lot of fun. It was like a detective, you know, he got to dress nice, youknow, keep playing. No digging ditches, knocking on doors. Hi. How are youdoing? Say, Listen, I'm thinking of moving in this neighborhood and justwant to ask you a few questions that your neighbor is he the guy that ownsthat car? Uh, you know, whatever it is. Oh, yeah. Now he's single, isn't he? Oh,he's married. Oh. Oh, he's married and, yeah, Is he a cool guy? You know, uh,and neighbors would you find a way and you get the neighbors talk abouteverybody if you said if you do it the right way. And so I got that that job.I loved that job. Until being in the music business. Tommy Mountain, thesinger would, uh uh, Yeah, he was very ambitious. And so we way we wanted ourown own venue, our own club, And he found driving around. He found this, uh,empty theater movie theater that had been converted into a dance. Salt Anawas in count in Vancouver, at the end of Ninth Avenue in the West End. Alma,Alma Street at one time was called the Alma theater. And, uh and so we, uh, went to the tothe guy that old it, you know, told we wanted to rent it easy dad. Okay, Noproblem. Uh, do you want to dance? Is you need a license? So we had to go tothe city to get a license and to get a license, we had to show parking, and we had to have plans, and it was adirt parking lot. And so I drew up plans by hand with a pencil paper. Kindof just the things put a put, put the things. And Calgary being a small town,the inspectors. Oh, yeah. Okay, that that'll do it. Okay, here's yourlicense. So and so I'm still working for Hooper homes time and eso. I'mdoing that. And then we're getting ready. And so we wanted to have a bigact open our club with and And Tommy Milton, the singer he was He was, like,could have been a football star. So he had that that upper echelon, as farasthinking goes, and he says, Well, let's let's get a Let's get a name, act uphere. So we found around we went down to Seattle.The agents that handled everybody in the agent was very happy to get intoCanada, you know? And so our first act was I continued Turner in the review, I continue to turn areally good first act. Yeah, And that was Ike and Tina. The cats, These girls,uh, and a band for $750 for one night. That's a lot for them. Yeah, but that'sthe whole band. Everything? Yeah. And so So we we advertised the way wealways did. And you know, my little stickers and posters in that we packedthat little theater tacked it, had the great night made tons of money.In fact, I was that Hooper Homes office counting my share because we just Wejust made the money that the rent was cheap. You know? Everything was paidfor. I continue was taken care of. They got the first money, and then we made Ithink we made about a couple of $1000 each. Um, first thing I did was quitHooper Homes, a Z. You're counting the money, By the way. I quit. Exactly.Just changed. Everybody changes everything. Eso then we were we thought were on a roll, youknow, bringing a container. And then...

...the cops know Then we because the wholeidea was to kick up and then put our own band in there and we played beforeI continue. And so then Okay, so I continue Cape opened the club. Then theweekend we had our band in there. Now we're back in a bit, you know, wealready started, and we were good enough, you know, good rhythm and blues.Bad trouble is Oh, it was on a residential area and we brought, like,our all our dances that we brought the crazies and the drunks and the peopleand looking for excitement. You know, that kind of thing s so we So theneighborhood the next day, after we played neighborhoods littered with beerbottles of whiskey bottles. Oh, it was a mess. But we get called into that.The city hall, cops, everybody, they're they're having a hearing. You're goingto revoke our license. And so rather than the rebooked license, Okay, we'llleave. We'll get another. We found another venue, bond. Then we foundanother club or empty restaurant in Chinatown. Big mistake, because wefound out as long as you're in the West End, you could make a lot of money. Butthe minute you go to the east and That's when everybody is afraid to godown there and the people down there. They're the reason that people areafraid to go down there. They're not gonna spend a lot of money becausewe're too busy trying to just make a living themselves on DSO. Then then thedynamics, the change. We just got a black crowd, and, uh, it was a toughcrowd. Room wasn't big enough. And so eventually way we had a close. We wentbroke. And then we went on the road and we booked her own own gay our own, uh,tour around Canada. And we drove around way take a bull horning go throughthrough the town a the shades of playing that it was a little that knowthat the shades were playing at the No little Daddy the bachelors daddy andbachelors they're playing at at this at the the hall, the Legion hall Come ondown and see is one night only. And and then and we limped around. And then wehit Kelowna. Uh, British Columbia and the regatta. We get the week. Found thehall outside of Kelowna. 25 bucks, uh, for the week. Yeah. No, it's 2025 bucks a night? Yeah. Packed it every night for a week,Packed solid. So again, Tommy and I we were the, you know, we paid the bandate the home split the rest. So we had a nice little chunk of change, and thenwe then we opened, uh, the teas that didn't go. And then and then I guess Tommy and I broke up. You know, we ran out of games right outagainst Oh, no. Then we got given a club. Yeah, given the elegant car Vancouverthe other get further bank. That was that, Davy. It was turned into a gayclub. But it was Davey and Brard. Is that the same place you started? Yourstand up comedian? Your comedy had a different club. That was a differentclub. We're giving the Shanghai the elegant partner that ran for five years.We got That's where we got discovered with Motown. Then the band went toMotown. Then we broke up. Then we came back, and by that time we were givenanother club by these, uh, you know, clubs were in the Chinatown area andthis one we turned into a topless nightclub and that's where I learned.Then when I got fired from Motown, I came back and started working in thatclub, the Strip club, of course, working the lights. And then that'swhen I come up with the idea of improvisational nightclub with with thegirls as actresses and they still danced, you know, when they're twonumbers the night. But we would dio improvisational comedy, and that'swhere I met change. And then we got fired from that gig because when it wasa strictly topless, we made a ton of money. But when I turned it into aimprovisational nightclub, we lost money. So from this time on your you'retalking about the early 19 seventies...

...yesterday, maybe even the late sixtieseso into the sixties seventies and e mean this is in when you started totake off were there times in which, even with teach or into the eightiesand nineties, where you had thio go back to some of these jobs you'retalking about besides being a writer director comedian, is there any timeswhere times were tough and you had to get air? Everything was staying on thatone track? No. When I had the clubs in in the topless club, in the in thetheater, the club, my wife or girlfriend at the time shall be. Shewas a waitress and and she made all the money, and so we kind of lived off hermoney. And then I was married, Still married, and s Oh, my wife wassupporting my first family, you know, the first family on and I was kind of,you know, she was kind of helping us, especially when teach night came to L.A. Then teach them with me and my first wife and had shall be stayed inVancouver. And then she came out, and, uh, it was pretty pretty rough going in.Then I then my first wife kicked me out. I ended up Shelby and I ended up livingin the the beach and she couldn't get a job. And so that that's when Maxine,but give me the little boost Little money here and there, you know, just tofeed just to eat. But, you know, I had a Honda 90 scooter and teacher livingat home. Hey, went back to his house. He's lived at home. And so for a whilethere we were almost while we were destitute. You know, we're broke untilwe kept hammering away at the open mic nights, you know, then we got to be aregular at the Troubadour. And that's when, uh, that's when we got discoveredby the big record. Companies have started to get a great appreciation forcomedians. Can you go through the process, especially at during that time?And you were just a couple of years before that. Just stand doing somestand up for the first time. So how did you get into into writing into stand up?What did that look like for you? Because I have seen some comedians.It's getting a joke, trying the joke, getting to jokes, trying those you'reworking out some some time. How is that for you? That process to you became acomedian. We were teaching when we got discovered. You know, we were like, uh,improper were comedy duel. Uh, and so we played off each other and we would,uh, work out. Actually, we wouldn't work at anything else. We would gorecord Way had album after album. Um, and then when she she broke up and Ibecame a solo act E started doing solo work with Cheech E. Started doing alittle mike time. I got the book, but it wasn't until I saw Dennis Millerworking live. And then that Then then I realized, Hey, you know, it was one ofthose. He's having so much fun I want to join in. And so when I started doingmy solo career, I had to start from the bottom, and being a musician reallyhelped me. Because one thing about being a musician, every time you gotta learn the new tune,you've got to start from the bottom, you know? And so when you change youract, you got to start from the bottom, you know your horn and act till the sogood and then, boom, you've got to start from the bottom. In fact, one ofthe reasons Steve Martin quit to stand up game was that he got tired of doinga new act. See, every time, every year he would. Steve would write a wholebrand new act, and he kind of just brand out of, you know, he was tryingeverything and doing everything you know is that tough for you? Was thatthe idea of starting at the bottom of e mean, that could be kind of depressing,but okay, it's like going up a mountain down a mountain. All here's anothermountain. I have to go up again. How was that knowing even some of the workthat you've done hard labor work? Did you look at it as you know, I've done alot of work in my lifetime. I conduce this again Or was it discouraging toyou Any time you work as a roof for and Calgary in the wintertime? There's notanother job that even comes close to being as hellish as that. I mean, hey,listen, one time...

I played a gig with Oh, this is CalgaryStampede time. We ended up with a plot bed truck. I don't know how we did itdowntown. We walked around on and then we had friends of the band walk around,collect money and, uh, Tommy and I in the rest of band. But mostly Tommy andI were the leaders we had. I had a big, fat all the money in my pocket. I'mwalking home now. We just play the game we put around midnight. I guess alsothis guy comes out of the shadows and he says, Uh, sir, can you help me? AndI thought, indeed, so many or so I was sure what he needs. He says, I got thisjob, but I need someone to help me and again on And I said, Okay, okay, I'llhelp you. So at my guitar E, I had a pocketful of money and so he said, It'sdone in the railroad, you know, we're the gig was really next to the railroadtracks and so we didn't have to walk far. We work done. The next thing Iknow, we're in front of, Ah, railroad car. And he said, Isis is you know? Sowhat's happening? He goes, I got paid Thio clean up this railroadcar full of cold. It was like remnants after they had taken the thing remnantsand everything had to be done by hand. Eso my Canadian kicked in. Okay, let'sdo it. Let's get it. I worked all night to six in the morning and we did it and then the guy tells meI haven't got paid. E can't pay you right now. In the meantime, I had apart.You are all right. You had some money, eh? So I told him. I said, Well, OK,he's But give me your address. And when I get paid, I'll bring it up to you.That's okay. So I give him the address, went home and my mother, you know, she was such adear. She looked at me. I'm covered black. What happened to you? It's along story. I gotta go have a bath. I went out about and about a month laterthe guy shows up. I was there, but he gave up. Gave my mother my mother tothe money. But you know that that taught me mhm. It's called. It's a work ethic. Youfind that in farms especially, you know, in the country you got to do you know,Hey, you gotta cut Hage's brain about sunshine. You know, that kind of thingand someone else asked you to do something. You don't question, you doit, and then if they give you a tip or something else, and it's like, Oh, okay,that's cool. You know, that's way how we felt about music to you got paid forhaving so much. But that's a bonus. Go back in the day when we used to playmusic, we used to spend it all in Chinatown. We goto change and have anice meal, a feast. And then, you know, so as you're you're facing that theupward battle of writing another skit again for comedy you look back to thetimes being a roof for or, you know, digging coal out of Ah, come on, comeon. Entertaining a room full of people,especially with my my background. You know, I what? Stand up comedians get,they get a you know, we're going to third. That's really what we're doing.The audience is the therapist. Now we're going to therapy. And if theylaughed or they don't laugh or whatever, you know, never had a problem with audiences because we I came out. I comeout of the the shoot. No, you know, I'm a known quantity, you know? So just saymy name. Boom. We had a thing. And then I got my wife involved in comedy and sowe became a dual, you know, she's she would open for me, and then I wouldcome in and do my act, you know, help her with her act, and and then, uh, andthen teaching. I got back together again, and part of the deal with thatshall be stays in the show. And, uh, and she stayed in the show, andeventually we went to Australia and and the guy goes, Okay, okay, We're gonnahave an intermission after Shelby, because before that, she was alwayspart of my show, you know, part, you know, kind of hovering there. And soshe goes the on and she loved it. Then...

...she became a bonafide comedian on herown intermission. She did hers start middle finish, Thank you very much. Andthere'll be a short intermission. And she loved it. I was nervous, but sheshe loved it. She would have you warming up for her. Yeah, instead ofyeah, instead of the other way around. And then, uh, And as you go with special in comedy,you know, you you're always looking always looking enlisted and and And thepaper, you know, the news E. I mean, the thing is, if you look at everythingin a comedic way, you'll never be unhappy no matter what it is. You know,just like in the Holocaust. You know, when when they were in the in the camps,I met a couple of guys, you know, that survived them, you know, and and therewas a lot of humor. A lot of humor went by because that's what you had to do,you know you had. Yeah, that's exactly yet. Exactly. Yeah, I have a questionabout comedy, and I know I heard you say I think it's well known especiallyfor comics is timing. And the pause is most important. Can you speak upon? Ithink, because you just said if you look at everything through the comediclens, it will help you how in life, maybe with relationships and othertypes of work, could the pause and timing help you in that, you know,relationships with the wife I could learn to shut up, you know, even as aninterview, just z hard. It's that that could be very hard being keeping yourMoshe. I'm still working on it. It's very tough. It's very tough. The pause.Yeah, you know what? Like I'm taking tangle, You know, I've been trying tolearn tango all my life, and finally I got YouTube and they got the best tango.Well, entangles the ponds comes with the musical Use the violins. I neverknew this before. I just learned it yesterday, the piano breaking shirts.So you're walking fast, you're doing the walk, and then you come into, uh oh,the vocalist or the horns or whatever. And then there's another. You change,you change with the music. But when the violence come in and get very zoo, thenyou that's your paws, that you're you're signed the pause. And so so withchange. What's all music with comedy, It's It's rhythm. It's rhythm, you know.And that's why a lot of comedians, the good comedians, they set you up withthe rhythm. And then they break the rhythm, you see, and they it's like thebanana peel. See the banana peel trip as you're walking along and said, Lookunexpectedly What? So you got a rhythm boom? Then you break the rhythm andthat you don't want to break the rhythm when you're playing for dance music.But when you're doing comedy, you break the rhythm and then eso you're leadingpeople a certain way and then boom, you break the rhythm and then you getanother answer, you know, and it's unexpected. And, uh uh, yeah, there'sthere's there's tricks, like juggling. You know, there's tricks to do it, youknow, you gotta be. You gotta be very steady with it. And more than anything,with comedy, you gotta know where you're going or if you're not going anywhere, yougotta make people. I think that, you know, we're going and and really, itcomes down to listening. Listen, if you're listening, a lot of people you know, especially ifthey're not in the business, they don't listen. They don't they don't listen.Yeah, they don't listen, and they're not aware. You know, there's a lot oftimes if you're not in the business, uh, if you're you know, the average guy, alot of times you're sitting there mulling about the past or worryingabout the future. You're very sound. Um, there, You know,that's the way a lot of parents, you know, the kids finding out that Aziz,your father, my father never was really there like my dad. You know, my dad, hejust took everything for granted, and...

...he would come home and and were thereuntil I started playing music. And then then I was the object of other people'son admiration. And then my dad, that's when he came run, started noticing, youknow, and really appreciating me because, hey, I mean, that's my son.That's what he said, S. O. S. Oh, really? It's being aware. Yeah, it's being in themoment where Yeah, well, it's like hunting. You know, when you go hunting,whatever you got to become that you couldn't know, how did that prey thinks?You know, you got to know how they think and that's what comedians, youknow, they're very sharp. They know, you know. I know I do it all the time.Now I try to guess what people do for a living, you know, just by listening toeand I try Thio. I can guess if, if people are married or single, uh, youknow their status. I can I can tell because I've been studying people and Istudy and and and that's why everybody is so interesting to me. You know? Idon't care who it is. I'll listen. Everybody's got a story. Everybody'sgot a story, and sometimes it's blow your mind. The guy that we're partnerswith, um uh JP John Paul. His story. All my God. Now I met John Paul becausehe's deaf in both years, and he was so many, uh, hearing aids. And there was,ah, system where you get drilled through the year. You don't have tohave stepped hanging around. Anyway, it didn't work, but I got to know him onat first is just a guy death guy. Then I got Then he told me a story. Oh, myGod. What a story he was in orphan. No, he was a love child. Check this out forFrance. His mother and his biological motherand father were lovers, but they were due to be married and she got pregnant.Ah, year before they were supposed to get married. And so they were from avery wealthy, decent family. They could not have this baby. It would blow.Their Catholics would blow everything. So she's went away. Had the baby very privately discreetly gave it to the orphanage to adopt. Andnow the organ age. They wanted to make sure this baby is special. So theywanted to make this baby have a nice home. So this Jewish family from L. Aor looking for. They wanted a Jewish baby from, Ah, the war torn country.They wanted to do their part. Instead, they have this little Catholic baby,John Paul. And now John Paul and and during wartime, they didn't go throughany of the paperwork. What? What? Cohen, The doctor. Father. He flew to Paris tothe orbit, Picked up the child. John Paul the baby. No idea of, uh,background. You know, they know he was the baby because they had anotherJewish baby and it died, died on him, and so they didn't want to give up themoney. So they so, baby. Yeah, it was a basic switch. It isn't that a greatstory. It's incredible. So John Paul gets raised in this Jewish family, andhe knows Soon as he gets older, he's being treated differently than the restof the family. He is. First of all, he didn't have to go toe do synagoguebecause they were respecting that he was a Catholic. Even though they didn'ttell John Paul No thistles. So crazy. And so then jump. All didn't know. Buthe you know, he got along with his brothers and sisters. You knoweverything is fine, you know. They're both bikes and he's down in BeverlyHills. You got to know Dean Martin's and all the kids and riding bikes andeverything else. Then 18, he turns the and he's doing really good school. Theother brothers doing the colon family. They're not doing that great. But Johnis just he's a he's a brain and he's got this energy, you know, like a goodJewish boy doing well. Aziz, 18th...

...birthday. And he gets a letter fromFrance demanding that he appears in front of the draft board in Francebecause he was born in France. He's a French citizen, and so they tracked himdown and send him a drop. Noticed. Then his father finally told him the truththat he was adopted, but he had to go back to France. So he goes back toFrance on and then it was just formality. He just wanted to see himthere. Okay, you can go coming back to America. They won't let him across theborder. They won't let him into America becausehe doesn't have a passport. Remember, he got smuggled in from from France? No.So the only way he could stay here is that he has to join the armed forcesnow none of his brothers or Jewish brothers, and none of them. So John J.P. And JP's happy as hell because he wanted to be a pilot. So he became apilot and he gets shot down over in Vietnam, takes a bullet in the chest.He saw combat and he's driving This cargo plane takes a bullet in the chest, the medicine that struck the mice andtakes off both. His hearing takes out. Now he's got no hearing. Yes, and he'sa war hero. And he's, uh, S o. He comes back, uses his G I. Bill puts himselfthrough DePaul University, gets a degree in finance, and that becomes thepresident of of Wells Fargo Branch. You know, in Japan, in Japan. Oh, great,great story. And then we meet. And now he's our He's our financial. He retiredfrom the bank in the industry, but But he genius fund, I hope you mean I'vebeen in contact with him. He's very nice. He's very kind. Yeah, certainlyis. That leads me thio your your writing career in the idea of thesestories that you come across, and I know that you just say, write what youknow. Is there Is there still do you stillhave some things you want to write yourself? Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Yes, Idio I figured I'm gonna write because I've been watching TV, and they gotthese sections of people's lights and and they go in for the detail. Eso Yeah,there's sections of my life I definitely wanna put on the screenbecause they're there. So, uh, so incredible. You know, e I mean, Ihad choices, but I was always guided. I've got a guide. Uh, I've been guidedall my life because being alone and in the country and the only entertainmentwe had was Sunday school. And so I went to Sunday school, and I was at that agewere really resonated, you know? And one time the Sunday school teacher said,You know, God's everywhere. God's everywhere, you know. And so I'mwalking home and at night, crisp night, you know, uh, no, no street lights inthe country. And so I said, Doing so. God, if you're everywhere, where areyou? I'm going to see you and I felt something kind of just raised myhead up. Looked up in the sky and there's the heavens so bright The Milkyway so bright I could see comments, I could see everything And I looked up.It was like, You want to see God? Yeah, there's God. And, uh, And then Istarted years later. I started, uh, the jazz musicians turned me on to, um TLobsang. Grandpa was the first book I read the third eye. It was about, uh,reincarnated Englishman. That was a Tibet. He was a Tibetan monk, and hebecame a writer. He wrote the third eye, and because he was English, he gotright English, a version of his life in Tibet, as in any revealed the secretsof our of our beach, You know, the silver cord and in the over south. Andthen I got into and then another I could tell you because you asked. Idon't tell us until they asked. Uh, I...

...was in New York going to the gym. Thewere mid city Jim on 42nd Street. Walker all said, I swear to God on set, I feltsomething. Grab my body and turned me and it point me toward the store. And I looked up Harper Collinspublishing. You know, I always taken through thedoor into the store, basically. And then then I'm over, you know, I'm lead right over toa counter book. There's books there. And then I felt something pushed myhand down and grabbed this book. And it was the autobiography of JoelGoldsmith, Joel s Goldsmith. Check him out. He never wrote a thingin his life, but he was recorded. Hey, would give talks. Andi was aspiritualist. Jewish raised, you know, secular or whether you raised going toeChristmas haven't signed a clause and all that stuff. And he was in the shredder business fora minute, and then he became a healer. And then he joined that Christianscience reading room and and then he, his father was was actually dying amoment. He the Christian scientists, said you could heal them, and he heldhealed him this way back in the twenties. And he the father he went tosee, went to pick up his body instead of his father's waving at the dog. Hey,I'm here, you know? Yeah. He healed his father, And then he became a like aworld renowned healer and and the speaker. And he told me about EmmettFox. And that's another healer. Uh, that I that I'm reading now e got theEmmett Fox books here now and what it is, it's one of those ask and you shallreceive and eso When I went on that journey, you know, when I said I wantto learn more and that's what it really waas And there was a visualization.Catherine Ponder is her name. She wrote about visualizing And I told my sonjust recently I was laying on the beach in Venicesomewhere. Did I have the scooter? I don't think Ieven have the scooter. Oh, I know I did. I did. I had the scooter. Our daughterwith my wife now shall be precious was a year old and she was playing in thepark in the swings and down in Venice. I'm laying on the on the on a towel inthe sand and I'm looking up over visualizing It will but look like amountain. But it was the Pacific Palisades, and I visualized me driving.Now I have to scooter. I'm visualizing me driving a new car and having a housewith the pool. And I'm visualizing that one day I willbe beside that pool. And then the other day, I was laying beside the pool and Ihad a flash of me visualizing it. And you talk about time travel? Uh, thatthat happened 20. I don't know how many, 30 years ago, 37 years ago, and here Iam. And it was like, It's the same guy. I'm the same guy. No change, no change.And this is because the world we live in, it's ours. It was promised to usall the riches within. You know, the all the glories is ours. If you havefaith, and if you can visualize, visualize it. And that's how you becomecomedian. I remember when I first started doing comedy, I would leave thehotel room to do my set, and I would visualize myself coming back to thehotel room after the sets over, and the set was so successful and I'm comingback in, and then later that night I'd be coming back and I would rememberthat time putting the key, the door and I said, Oh, here I am and finish theset. And I use that quite often. You know? Now I'm almost in a euphoricstate of being...

...because I guess I guess there's something even moregreater things that that air coming down the pike. You know something?Something greater. You know, the next step. Whatever it is, there's somethingreally, really Well, something really good. Well, maybe Mr Maybe Mr Chong,I'm thinking as you're talking and I've had a few experiences in my life andOnley because, as you said as because you mentioned it, I'm only mentioningit. Otherwise, I usually don't on my podcast, but I'm a Christian. So what?What do you do with with Jesus, or what do you do with Christ? What do you like?Because in that sense, if you talk about believing by faith and all theriches, all of that is more heavenly and and I don't I don't dismissanything that you said because I believe it's probably true for you. Notonly that, the rial experiences, I believe that they can happen and thatthey're true. But in the end, what do we do with, like, our guilt our sin andin Christ who, where the Bible says came and paid for it all. And I don'tmean to admonish you or anything like that. I don't. But you were sayingsomething greater or something. Next, I'm just a really sincere like aheartfelt What? What do you do with Christ? Well, easy. First of all, realize thatChrist is not in his name. No, you're right. That's Messiah. And it is.Christ is his title Correct the Christ and and the Christ really means theHoly Spirit. That's what Christ really means. It's the Holy Spirit. Uh, that'swhy he could say, Listen, you know my father in heaven, many mansions, youknow, because in the spirit world there is nothing but love. And that's what hewas waiting to go. He was being tortured and everything else. And hesaid, You know, why have you forsaken me? You know, I've got enough because Iknow that that up there in just when he said, I can return in three days, Ewell, but But that's all of us. That's not just Christ. That's not just Jesus,that's all of us. And and a Z Humans and not only humans, but that's all ofus living beings. Because there are. There's two of everything, you know.For every action, there's a reaction for every up you can't you can't haveup without. Down. You can have right without left eso in the physical worldthat we're living there. Our dramas, conflicts, fights, uh, all sorts ofphysical things that are happening. We have to keep breathing in order to stayin the physical world. You know, we have. We have toe work at staying inthe physical world and we're in the physical world. Toelearn. We're learning everything we do. We're learning the homeless guy. He'slearning the rich guy. Woody Allen, the pedophile. He's learning. He's goteverything, and all of a sudden he's got that burden. He's learning. We'reall learning, and and so the sins what? Their sins are forgiven. They're notreally sins or experiences. And in the experiences after you've had theexperience, uh, be it good or bad, they disappear because they're only here.We're only here in the moment. Each moment we're here, that's when we'rehere. We're not here a moment ago. You know, we're here now, and we're not infront. So the idea and what happens with with With With the ChristianChurch with a monetized it? And that's why Jesus was really pissed off. Theonly time he's ever pissed off was the money changers at the temple, becausehe realized that that they're charging people to go to do what is free. Whatis just in your mind, your mind. But yet and that's what organized religions,too. And they're here for a reason to Absolutely, you know, don't give.Everything that is done is in the physical world has done for experiencebecause in the in the spiritual world, there's no want, need or desire. Therejust is, and the spiritual world is filled with love. And that's why these500,000 people that have died you don't be sad for yourself, but you don't behappy for them. That's why the slaves,...

...you know, back in the day when whensomeone died, they rejoice because he was free. At last. He was free. Youknow. He's back in the spirit world where nothing but love nothing but love.But here we're here toe learn and we're here toe suffer and we're here to learnlately. Bodybuilding. When you go to the gym, you know that way you know youdon't that wait is there for a reason. Way you pick it up that way is going tomake that muscle stronger, but it's not going to get any later until you getstronger. But everything is here for a reason. Evil is here for a reason.There's a reason why there's by Trump acted so, so incredible. If you want toknow the truth, Trump is the reason that Biden got elected. E. Saw you onJoe Rogan The interview. I was watching and you predicted Biden would win andAnd he did, Yeah, at the time. But what I'm saying, uh, the guilt again guiltis living in the past. In the past, if you want to lose guilt, don't live inthe past and and the future is not here. The future will never be here becauseit's the future. But what's here is now here and now here and now, and that'swhere we're at. And so when, No matter where your heart. If you know thesethese air secrets, by the way they've seen people first of all they don'twant to know because you're not supposed to know, You know, it's justlike a spoiler. Spoiler alert. Spoiler alert. You got nothing to worry aboutbecause at the end of the end of the day, you're gonna be fine. You're goingto go toe, you're gonna be in the spiritual world. You're going to goback and you're gonna retaliate. You're gonna look at what you what you learnand then what you need to learn. And then you're gonna come back and you'regonna be and it goes forever, forever, e. I agree. It goes forever. I agree.It goes forever. The the idea of what do we do with Jesus? And just my onlysuggest what not to be in the cliche of Don't throw the baby out with the withthe bathwater thinking of John Paul. But regardless of that, I don't want togo into. But I I think a lot of what you're saying has some truth into it,and it does go forever. It is the spirit world after, um, wondering aboutour guilt and what we dio I just by the grace of God, place it on Jesus, that'sall you can. You can. Don't forget. We are you know Jesus. See, Jesus was born in.You know, I You know I understand. You know, the The thing is, Jesus wasripped off by the Romans. You know, their their religion wasn't happeninganymore, because Christianity, it wasn't Christianity at the time. Butthis is weird profit, you know, that rode a donkey. You know, this thisweird profit. He's got multitudes believing, believing everything that hesays and he could. He really did create the loaves and fishes. And you know,all the miracles that he could do because he was He was so connected. Hey,came at a time, but look, But always remember what Jesus said is thatwhatever I do, you can do the same. All the miracles that I create, the samemind that's in me. You. That's what I was speaking to his disciples at thattime. About when I when I send the Holy Spirit that you know, you could dogreater works because the Holy Spirit will be within you. And and that was inthe dispensation in a particular time. But that that z neither here nor there. Um, but I'dlike to ask you, I don't wanna waste your time. I don't want to take toomuch more of your time. If you if you if you don't have it, Do I think whatyou do is incredible, especially knowing your background a little bitmore of which I did not know. Most people just see the stardom right, andthey don't see the struggles. And most people know that you went to jail aswell, and that was a struggle. But understanding how hard of a worker youare is what I appreciate. Do you have any advice for people just thinking ofyourself, whether it's baby sitting or mowing lawns or delivering the paper,delivering meat as well, or people who are changing careers where you wentfrom a musician too, you know, even directing some of those things you havein flow with, Do you have advice for people getting in tow work or changingtheir career? Just listen.

Listen. One time I did a movie where itsays it's God and and the reporter, you know, the red carpet saidso have you talked to God lately? And I said No, I never talked to God, Ijust listened to God. So that's my advice. Because that smallstill voice that's what guides me. That's what guides me. And when youlisten, you got to stop because you can't listen. When you're talking, youcan, but you don't hear, so you gotta be quiet. There's a meditation, really?Is meditation really is listening because you're listening. You'relistening to the sound of the blood rushing through your veins. You'relistening. And when you do that, that's when the messages comes to you. See,like a comedy. You know, a lot of times when when comedian Zahra paused, youknow, they get that pause. They're they're planning their head.They're going. Okay. Okay. Okay. So I do this one ready. Uh oh. Are I'm gonnakeep going with this, all right? Better not. You know what I mean? The newjokes, The new jokes come to comedians to yourself when you're on stage andit's something you didn't work out or you didn't really fully fully defined.But as you take that pause, you're thinking, Hey, this might work, andthen you just go with everything. Everything. There's no finished product.Everything is a finished product. it's in this stage. It's in its infancy Nowit's maturing a little more now it z old, You know what I mean? Uh, s Oh,yeah, with comedy. Oh, yeah. Sometimes it'll hit usuallybecause I got a nice report with my oversaw eso. So I'll wait. I'll waitand maybe I'll took up a little bit because I don't put me in the in themoment. But sometimes the thing of weight hit me. It's hit me a few timesand I got nobody hears. I used to be able to phone Cheech and and and tellCheech, but I can't can't anymore. So now and I used to be able to tell myway, but I can't anymore. She is on a different trip and I try to tell my son,But no, he's on a different trip to So I just got myself now and some.Sometimes I'll write jokes for myself and and by the way, that that's anotherthing. Ah, As you get older, you see people talking to themselves.Yeah, yeah, I'm realizing that when you're younger, you like that guy'scrazy and then you get older like I'm talking to myself. There's No, there'snothing the most. I think the most important commandment is judge, not that's the most important committee.And I I thought it was so important. I had picked up added on the refrigeratorfor a while. E think it got through to my wife. Maybe, although I think Jesus,he said judge not. But then he called peoples pigs and swine. So he wasn't.They don't judge, but judge rightly, I think just, you know, judge not. Butthe reason you don't judge is is because when you put yourself in ajudgmental state of money, then before you do anything, you start judging it.You said so you don't want to do that, especially in the car with the comedian,because when you get that impulse, don't judge on it, just do it, you know?Okay, okay, I do it a lot. And and sometimes especially on stage isexciting because when you get to be doing as long as I've done it onceother comedians do it, you can have so much fun with the audience. But yougotta be there because it's not a job anymore. That's important, really.Audience members. Well, right, not Thio not to be sitting there waiting. Thiojudge your joke to be open and ready for your delivering. Yeah. Yeah. Andthat's why people that I like, you know what? What big deal like? No, I likehim, eh? So many comedians. Al Franken. I get a big kick out of watching AlFranken, the senator, because he is basically a comedian. And so whensomebody said something to him, you know, I could see the comedy the yearsworking in his head. You know, a lot of I love committees. Uh, yeah, Absolutely.Yeah. No, no. Judging what it is,...

...it's like art, you know, like I say, Ihave a hard time showing my heart anybody, because it's so personal to mee i du carvings I carved. I dio I make Bong's. I make pipes. I, uh I'm doingsome painting as well. Not yet, Not yet. I did this one painting here. Why iswhy is it why is it hard to show people? I think you probably have some greattalents, Especially when dealing those sticks when you are in Canada. By thefire. Yeah, I'm not I'm not I don't do my art for people to go all I like that.I do my art for me that I like it and I'm so afraid. It's silly. I'm kind ofafraid Thio to be to be judged, you know, because I've had that happen tome. You know, people judge me, Uh, you know, when you know, not not around,they don't know how I can hear what they're saying, you know? And that'sanother reason why I find it very important to be nice Thio to everybodybecause there's nobody. There's nobody worse being rude to know.Nobody likes to be rude two and then, you know, and and not noticing people.That's why I think it's a It's very important that you notice people youknow you don't have, Like I tell people what to do. Cameos, You know, be niceto have the homeless. If you can't give money, give em a smile. You know, seethem because a lot of times people purposely don't see. They don't look atwhat they don't want to see, they, you know, or they will walk away. And sodid you see what she was wearing? You know, all that stuff, you know, it zitsso bad for the person that's judging. I have a story for you. I have a storyfor you speaking and this is Ah, rip at the church to just to be honest. Once Ibefriended a prostitute, a call girl. I guess we would have called her and andI brought her to church with me, and it took weeks and weeks and weeks thatmaybe even months to convince her to come. But one day she was finally readyand she wore her best clothes. I brought her to church. She happenedto know someone in the thing, and it was all backbenchers on. And then thatit just became speak people speaking out. She stormed out of there and nevercame back to that particular place. And it was. It was one of the worst thingsI've ever experienced especially, you know, weeks and months of trying to gether knowing her difficult life. That's what you're talking about,understanding, appreciating people in the place that they are. And and theydidn't and they dropped that. I mean, there's group of people. There wasn'tthe the whole church there, but, uh, a group of people definitely dropped theball and this girl she was wearing, you know what she would have wore on aFriday night. But those were her best clothes, You see? See what you did? No. But yousee what you did there, and you've got to realize this, too. Is that that was meant to be Because what youdid, you shook everything up. And that's that's what you take away fromthat. That's good. You shook her up. You shook them up, shook everybody up.It was It was tough. It was. It was a difficult thing. And if that happens,you know neighborhoods, you know, they don't want the black guy in there inthe mean In the meantime, there on TV, watching some incredible blackperformer, Tiger Woods or something, you know, you know, scoring theincredible being incredible. But they wouldn't want that guy in theirneighborhood. How is Tiger? No, Apparently, still in surgery that hegot an accident yesterday and California? It busted up. Yeah, he'smessed up. We'll see. It might be It might be the best thing that happenedto him, huh? Well, hope so. It's tragic when you see people who are famous Andfor whatever reasons, I mean, some people seem like they fall in a waythat is really detrimental to their career, right? Like so. But it zhopefully, I hopefully they learn, right. And I mean, I don't learn. I'man idiot, and I make mistakes and fight...

...with my wife and don't treat people theway I probably should be treating them. Do you have? Do you have kids? My twodarling Children 11. Brianna Benjamin seven. Bring in. And Benjamin. Sopretty. So beautiful, huh? Yeah. My wife's Korean. And are they speakingKorean? Yeah. They speak Korean in English, and and my my daughter isspeaking some French to because we had a friendship French immersion when wewere in Canada for a little bit. But my dear wife is hard. I mean, youmentioned your wife being good with organizing the money and all this. Mydear wife has them when they're home. Home school. Like when they're not inschool because of Corona. Just piles and piles of work they're doing there.Yeah, the Korean Asian way. It's Asian way is so cool. So Koreans are like thesole people of the Orientals. You know, they're the, uh, speaking of beautifullike Tiger Woods and and my my dear wife with the hard work is there. Iknow you went to jail, but is there some adversity? And I only have anotherquestion for you if if you have the time for it. One kind of Is thereanything people don't understand about you that you would like them tounderstand so that they can have a better appreciation of your work? Imean, in this last hour that we've been speaking, I've gained a greatappreciation for you in the work. My mom happened to pass away just lastyear, and she was 66. And you're you're going on 80 something and your work 83you're working hard. I mean, covert covert probably puts a little wrenchand everybody's plans, but I mean exactly right. And you're working hard.You look good. You have an exercise bike there beside behind you there.Treadmill. Is there anything that you'd like people to understand about you alittle bit better so they can understand? You have decades of workbefore you and knowing that you worked hard and you weren't willing to say noto anyone and you didn't care about the money. The money came But you youdidn't do it for the money in particular. And that's what I haveappreciation for. Is there anything else that people may not understandabout you? It's hard to say. You know, I I was kind of shocked the other night.We've been going up with these people from, oh, ever since the light down andbefore before, and I thought we knew each other. Yeah. And so the other daywere at the Bel Air Hotel. We're having dinner, and I said something about jail,you know? And, uh the lady go, Jim, who were you in jail now? Everybody, if they know may thankyou. That was That was news. It was had my news. It wasn't just in the localpaper. It was on. It was people talking about his kids, their kids, everything.And she goes, Oh, you Until I didn't know that. And she was she was serious.And then s o. So I realize you know that on the guy her husband hey, gotthe Corbett, he got really bad, and he came out of, but still like Trump, butthey're beautiful people on their very wealthy. Very well, Yeah, but I lookedat her. Wow. It was Sugar Ray Leonard. You know,the boxer beside me, and and there's a There were a game, you know? But I gotstrangers no more about me than and we're really good friends. This person.What? What? What I realized is people, for the most part, they don't have muchtime for anybody but themselves. And what what they say. You know theirthing, and I understand it. And I I really go for it because again, it'swhy we're here. We're here to learn, you know? And is there something thatyou dive into that people might not something that you like to do, thatit's not your work like you were just mentioning art orsomething. Well, I know I can. I can tell you the hidden fears that I have EI think more than more than anything it's a hidden fear that I had is gone.Now. I talked to Larry King because when you get older, you lose yoursexual ability. Mm. And that was my big...

...fear. As I was getting older andLuckily, I was okay. Okay. Okay. And then I had your fear was that it wasgonna happen, or your fear was that had happened. It was over that my my sexual,that it was over at that point, Yeah, was over. It's over, you know? And Imet, uh, Ernest Borgnine when I was about I guess sixties Sunday,you know, and I met awareness, and I said, Ernest, how's your sex Slaves?And Earnest says he was old. He goes, I masturbate and okay, I didn't think that. But thenI talked to Larry King and I asked, very because I had prostate cancer inrectal cancer. And so and then I tried to revive the guy, and and I was ontestosterone for a while, and it was just no, not happening. Infact, I I broke up pimples and shit. And so I had to quit that. Then Irealized it's God, So I talked. Thio. Larry King. That'sthere. How's your sex life? Vehicles non existed then he said, But there'san upside. And I said e lean forward. Yeah, he goes, You don't get jealous. Mm. Well, it changed my life. Mhm,because up into them. I was feeling you would feel inadequate. You, youknow? So what do you What would you just be? I mean, maybe it's myignorance or just stupidity, but what would you not be jealous of? Otherpeople who are are still active, jealous of my wife's affection for,well, someone else jealous of? That's what Larry was.Larry was married to a young, beautiful woman. He divorced her. He actuallydivorced her s so that the kids would get the inheritance about her becausehe knew that she's gonna marry. You know, she's going to do well, she'sgoing to be okay. Uh, with me, it was I got a beautiful wife on, and every oncein a while I'd see signs of her flirting, you know, with with guys. Andthen when when you got cancer, you know that your time is limited and is notonly limited, but it's inevitable, you know? I mean, you know, if I make it to90 it's gonna be a while, you know, that make it 100 whole shit, But that'sit, I said. And so I didn't see the end of the room, you know? And so for awhile there, I felt scared, you know, inadequate, you know,And then I, Dr Larry, and now I'm at peace. I'm totally at peace because Iknow because you've got to practice what you preach, you know, it's not.There's one thing I can tell everybody what todo. But when it comes toyourself, you've got to practice what you preach, and and that's what I'mdoing now. And so that's really why I'm devoting a lot of time into talking anddoing my carvings and because that's what I want to leave. I'm not going tosell it piece of my heart until until I'm gone. And then all that will go tomy my my offspring. You know, my kids and my family, you know, and I'm quitesure it's gonna be worth worth worth something. You mentioned jail, and youmentioned some difficulties there, but at being a piece of is there anyadversity that you faced in your life in particular? But you can use thatwhether it hinders you positively or negatively or helps you or hinders you.But you can use that adversity to encourage other people, especially inthinking of work right, Because some people goto work, they're depressed,They're they're upset. They lose a job, they're not certain of their future.Money is tight and they face adversity. So I mean thinking of your coming up ofbeing a hardworking man, right? There's no doubt about it. You are a hardworking man, right up till today, and people face adversity. And do you havesome adversity in your life that you can help appreciate? It helps youappreciate the adversity other people are facing in their lives and andencourage them in some way. Depression is probably the biggest, thebiggest threat. Thio humanity throughdepression. If you can get by...

...depression, you're okay becausedepression is like a dark hole and you can't crawl out of it. You get more andmore depressed because it's like depression ads on more depression thatyou know what I found out and and I'll kind of leave you with this. We were talking, you know, but you'reChristian Jews and Muslims, and they and they kind of these religions kindof rules ruled the planet. You know, one way or another, there's wars foughtover and all sorts of things and to believe there is one word that is used almost all old daily. And if you have the ability to just realize how the brain works,how the mind works the mind is, is it's a computer. It's incredible.But like a computer, you can't have two thoughts at the same time, you have to have one thought at a time, right? And so if you can control your thoughts, you'll never be unhappy. But there's a key to controlling yourthoughts. And that's what uh, Emmett Fox he writes about. It's called TheGolden Key that three. I boiled it down. You know,it's gone through meditation, you know, a meditation. You have a word, youconcentrate everything i e brought it down parody down to the the leastcommon denominator. Because that was really the getting down to the lowestcommon denominator is really the secret of any success. Like you can't haveanything until you lose everything. Everything. Then you can start buildingagain. Just you got a building, you tear it right down, tear it right downthe foundation. Everything. What's got it? Boom. And then you re buildsomething new, Better stronger. Bring your math and do it, thoughthat's tough. That's okay. No, But here, here's how simple it is. Here's howsimple it is. If you could only have one thought in your head at one time ata time, and I want you to try this later than the most powerful word in thehuman language is God. That's the most powerful word. When youwe saw a war being fought at the Capitol in Washington in the name ofGod, when they swear on the Bible they swear in the name of God. When you getburied, you're going to God. God is the most powerful word, so you don't haveto say it. You just have to think it. And thenwhen you ask God like I do all the time, I lose my phone, I lose it all the time. I said to God, God, where's my phone? I don't even sayplease anymore. I'll say God, where's my phone? That phony turns up because it is themost powerful thought you can have in your head. You can't have any morepowerful thought, because what does God represent? Everything. Alfa Omega. Everything in the beginningwas the word And the word was God. So right now, whatever you're doing,you lose something. You want something, anything. Put everything else out ofyour mind except the word God, and do it in a very loving, beautiful way. Andyou can do it here secretly. Like when you when you're anything if you havingan argument with your wife or anybody to stop, just stop whatever you'redoing And just think you got it. Just Oh, God. Okay. And watch the miracleshappen. Because what did Jesus do any but did all the miracles he thought ofGod. Oh, yeah. Okay, there's how can peoplereach you? And I just have one final question if you have it And thats whydo you work? Why do I work? Yeah, because it's not work. If it was work,I wouldn't do it. E I have fun. I don't...

...work. I have fun. Thank you, kind sir.And they confined you on your website. Tommy Chong's cannabis dot com. That'sa bad Well, perfect. Thank you kind sir. I truly appreciate the time you'vegiven me and I appreciate the work that you dio try. Thank you for listening tothis episode. of why we work with Brian V. B. Be sure to subscribe, follow andshare with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. E hope thatyou have yourself a productive be a joyful day in your work.

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