WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 53 · 1 year ago

#53 Syya Yasotornrat - Co- Founder of Innovation Media Enterprises - BrianVee Whywework

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Syya Yasotornrat is the Co-Founer of Innovation Media Enterprises where she helps people tell their stories through podcasts. Syya is also a consultant, storytelling advocate, and podcast strategist. Join us today and hear Syya's interesting story about her career path and how her experiences made her successful.

Contact Info

Syya’s Profile
linkedin.com/in/syyayasotornrat


Websites
innovationcalling.com/ (Company Website)
innovationcalling.com/pages/women-in-tech-leadership (Company Website)
innovationmediaenterprises.com/ (Company Website)

Email
syya@innovationcalling.com
Twitter
InnoCalling

...welcome to why we work with your host Brian VI ous He speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which would be an encouragement to us all to get up. Get going on. Keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here's your host to why Wait? I'm Brian B. And this is why we work today. I have the great pleasure of speaking with CIA. Yasser Thorn Rat CIA is the co founder of Innovation Media Enterprises. But not only that, she has many hats. She is a consultant, storytelling advocate and a podcast strategist. She knows that people tell their stories nowadays through podcasts. I want to know her story and how she can encourage us to tell our story. Join me today in the conversation with CIA? Yes, a Thorn rat. I'm Brian V. And this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure of speaking with CIA Jasso, Tauron ran. Good evening, young lady. Good morning. Good sir. Good. Sir. Yes. I spoke with someone the other day and maybe even just yesterday and he's like, Oh, I love being called young man. I go. People like being called. It's not applying that were older. It's just nice to know, Thank you for coming on here. And would you be able to give me a little introduction about yourself, and then I'm going to take you back? Sure. Sure, Sure. Okay. So when I introduced myself as my current state of CIA nous of it all. Yeah. Okay, sure. Eso. I am the co founder of Innovation Media Enterprises and, uh, also the Dallas co chair of Global Leaders Organization, on also co host of innovation calling podcasts and the Afterglow live podcast. So I'm part of a lot of stuff, and if you really want to go there hasn't been launched quite yet. Is, uh, co host of how soon was Now it's an alternative eighties and nineties podcast. So I'm kind of kind of into the podcast world. So you're not busy at all, is there really is business, um, issue when you're doing what you love to dio. Well, that's what we're going to get into CIA. Can you tell me and maybe take us back into your very first job. Nothing to do. I mean, maybe it had something to do with technology. Most people I asked this question off. It's like puppet shows and lemonade stands or diving for golf balls or something. But what was your very first job that you did? Maybe as a teenager? Uh huh. So funny thing. And I have debated to put it on my Lincoln for fun. Just because at this point, who cares? Uh, I for 30 days I worked at a frozen yogurt shopping Southern California. And it wasn't even like on for those from Southern California. You'll know the chain penguins. I didn't work at penguins. I worked at a knockoff place where you actually poured it. You're the people would support themselves. And all I did was literally stand at the cashier way there, yogurt, and then take money and move on in life. That was my first job for 30 days. How how old were you? Did you say 16? What got you out of the house toe work at 16. Um, I've always had a very independent, independent streak. My father, um, is a self made man. Hey. Came over from Thailand in the fifties and was a strawberry picker. Worked his way out of the field and end up getting his...

...bachelor's and master's at. Oh, I always get this wrong. I think it's Oregon State. Whoever is the Ducks. University of Oregon Ducks. Yeah. Okay. And, uh, he end up getting his masters there. And, um, I ended up working in the aerospace industry on was part of the first four launches of the space shuttle. So my dad was extraordinarily brilliant. Brighton talk about why we work. Maybe he should be the better person to talk. Thio. Well, I don't know if he's the better person, but it is quite interesting from picking strawberries to launching spaceships. Yep, His His group at Rockwell, uh, was is a contract. And, yeah, he was part of the group that was part of the initial power supply to just get the launched. What's that? When you literally hit the ignition button like the fire goes out, that was his little little spot of Project 321 lift top And that that trigger point that that that was his group's responsibility. So at 16 working at the and I think there's a franchise now you're saying that it was kind of a knock off, but that's a pretty, pretty popular franchise now, Something different. I'm not sure The name of it where you could just go pour your own and then you wait at the end. It's a good it's a good idea because you mix and match. What did you learn from those 30 days? Oh, you hate your well, I love yogurt. Except I don't love yogurt machines because I had to wipe that down. I I find people are extraordinarily and consider it, um, especially tired parents, and they let their kids do whatever they want. Um, I'm a bit of a germophobe as a result of it. I'll just leave it at that. It prepared you for 2020 though. Oh, I mean, I'm a I'm a gen xer. I have been long prepared for this epidemic like this. Yes, or pandemic, I should say. Yeah. So what did Okay, did you leave that job, or did you get fired from that job? I if I had probably stayed another 30 days, I probably would have gotten fired. I was I was playing nirvana like loudly in the store and every now and then, like the owner would walk in behind you as a six year old by myself in a store. That's I don't even know if that's legal at, I guess, um, But my buddy, uh, his father was a VP over at Disneyland, and there was a job opening for this new restaurant concept. And so I interviewed for it and got in, and we were the literally pilot restaurant for a huge concept that's popular now, which is called, uh, Goofy's Kitchen, which is about the character dining experience where the characters would go from table to table and you could eat and then see Mickey or I wouldn't be Mickey Mouse. But you'd see Minnie Mouse goofy and all the characters literally go from table to table, and you started with the pilot of it. We were the original. We were originally called Chef's Kitchen, and then when they were piloting it, they called us Goofy's. And then when it was successful, then it just got just It's everywhere within all the dizzy kingdoms. Now, how long did you stay with the restaurant franchise? Eso. It wasn't a franchise, it was a Disney owned organization, so I was a cast member. Um, so I was there for 6.5 years and, uh, worked as a hostess as well, uh, a waitress there, if you will. Um and then I also under the Disney University, I was a resort trainer, so I would very, very, very difficult job of welcoming orientation, new hires and saying, Welcome to the Disney family. And then I would walk him through around the Disneyland Hotel and show him the ropes of the area and stuff. How difficult. I think this is interesting because, you know, as a cast, what was the title cast member cast member? Because the show is everything is show, even from the...

...garbage cleaner to everything. Everyone would be the cast member because you're part of the experience. Absolutely. And that's what that's what I learned. If anything, I consider the yogurt places a joke. My that one was more of the have patience with people, uh, but it Disney. I learned why you wanna have patients with people, and I think there's a big difference. There's always a why on what motivates people's emotions and to me, I realized very quickly, and Disney was amazing for this, Which is You've got families. They're spending their entire life vacation savings, if you will, once in a lifetime opportunity for them to Yeah, yep. And so if this if this is their one investment that they're gonna do for their kids, you've got to give them the best experience because it may be their only that they'll ever get. So if you're rude to them, there's a saying, and I use it today, which is it's not what you say. It's not what you dio. It's how you make people feel that's what they remember. And that's why Disney has lasted as long as it has and why people love Disney. Why the brand is always top rated worldwide. How difficult was it? I mean, I worked in the hotel industry in the hotel industry, has a similar pressure, but probably, I mean, nothing compares to Disney in that sense, especially for younger people. How difficult was it to be? As I say, Be on your a game all the time in your job? Is that a challenge? It is. Well, I think that's already probably thank you to summon extrovert, but I think I really develop my coffee addiction real fast, working at Disney. It is hard. Uh, it is. Start to it is hard. Especially when you're in restaurants, right? Uh, there's hospitality. And then there's food and beverage and food and beverage. Oftentimes, you're the barrier for someone that has low blood sugar, or they've had a really trying day. And look, Disney is not cheap. So I was just thinking that, and they have to spend $20 for a burger. Yes. And this is, you know, back when I worked in the nineties, Yes, I'm dating myself. I mean, these were, like, $30 dinners for a buffet that they were charging, and yeah, I mean, I Yeah, it was. And you can't say no because you have to go kilometers to get outside of their miles, I guess. Yeah. No, it was I mean, we've done so many magical things for families. Um, I just love it, so yeah, no Disney. I have nothing to complain about. Although I do jokingly say, you know, Disney's the happiest place on earth. You know, until you worked there except for the employees. Well, well, we always say, Look, people, we signed upto work for rats. So what's going to go? What are you doing here? So this brings you into your twenties? When did you start to think about your career? Where you even thinking entertainment? Because you started at 17 or so and then thinking into Maybe if college was on the horizon. What were you starting to think in the in your teen years? Yeah. So I think like most kids, I wanted thio be I want to go to medicine. I wanted Thio. I thought at the time, of course, you know, I could be a doctor because everyone else wants to be a doctor or a lawyer or whatever. And, um, initially, uh, you know, I have that desire. My roommates in college, uh, they were part of the U C Riverside biomed program, and it was extraordinarily intense. Um, where it's this program where if you get accepted, you would get in. If you finish the program in the top like percentage, then you got accepted to U C. L. A. Medical school. I mean, it was very, very competitive where people were literally, like, sabotaging like each other's labs. It was pretty hard core. Um, I did not last very long with that program, but I had friends that did. And we have the one reared story, if I may way have the opportunities where I'm dating myself. But I'm just gonna say it. You keep saying dating yourself. I'm sure you're not older than me. So...

...then you're making me feel like I'm very old. So you're fine with your dating, okay? Because what I'm about to say, I think most people, unless you're my age, probably wouldn't know what's going on. But you might have heard of the O. J. Simpson trial. Well, a few people have people. Have s o. I remember in high school that dates me. I think it was a high school party. We just sat around and watched O J running in his Bronco. Yeah, well, I'm in college. So a little older than you. So? So my girlfriend, her brother worked at the L A County coroner's office. It's a teaching, um, a teaching facility. So she asked me. She goes, Hey, they're about to do the autopsy. You're interested? I couldn't get the shift off a Disney, so I couldn't go. So my girlfriend ended up going and she was able to see part of it. That's a story for you. The reason to get into biomed did any of that? Or did it even start earlier as your father was progressing in his career, getting a master's bachelor's master's? And did you feel that? Oh, look at my dad. Look how well he's doing. Was there some sort of kindle ing from that side as well? Um, I think it was respect. I mean, he came from nothing, didn't speak the language. He's a foreigner, right? And he had Thio overcome so much. And, you know, he came in the fifties on DSO by the time he was in college and getting his masters early sixties. So you can imagine it was a very different time in America. There was a lot of different, you know, prejudice is that, you know, obviously, I'm sure he has experienced um and I just didn't wanna let him down, like for him to overcome that without any help. I kind of took on that personality and personas well of look, people have it worse than ideo and did. And I did grow up Well, thank God as my father gave me a great upbringing I had never had want in life. And it was such a great motivator because no one's perfect. And, you know, I won't say my father is a perfect parent, But you know what? He was darned close to making me understand that the world doesn't owe me anything. And I have to be accountable for my own decisions and results. And I think that's always driven me. It's always been part of me. I don't know if I was born into it, or maybe I just saw it and observed it and kind of got I don't know that nature nurture. It's a very valuable lesson. Toe learn even at a young age, especially at a young age, after your divergence from BioMed. Where did you go? What did you get? I took a hiatus. Actually, I didn't take a hiatus at that point, so I realized very quickly that wasn't for me. I didn't have the discipline. I'm sorry. Just don't to myself. I'm saying sorry to myself, Not to you. Um I realized in my arrogance, I thought I had that discipline and it took a lot of maturity to accept. I didn't. I ended up dropping out of that program, and, um, I end up dropping out that program and, um, apologize. But I muted myself there. I ended up going into a history degree because I could get straight A's, and I decided I just need to get done with college. Okay, You want to get it finished? So I actually took a three year hiatus to grow up and mature. And, uh, when I came back, I actually transferred into San Francisco, San Francisco State University and a finishing off my degree. So not for dating wise, but just age wise. This is 25 26 27 28 around that when I left, I was 20 20 years off. 22 23. Yeah, 22 23 or so I was growing up. I think it's a valuable. I think it's a valuable lesson, right,...

...regardless of what you did and where you went. But the idea of having I took a year after failing my first year, so I was like, Okay, maybe maybe not take a year off and figure out. And then I think the world kind of kicked me and said I better go back to school or I'll be doing what I was doing at the time. But it's a valuable lesson to know that you don't have to rush into it because, I mean, you said people were taking biomed. Okay, well, maybe I could go do that or rush into university right away when you're not ready. I mean, one, it's money, but to if, at the end of it you're not even any more clear on what you're doing, then it's a big waste of your time. Absolutely. I actually, because of my my own pain points and growing up in experience, I tell all my nieces and nephews Absolutely. I don't know if you hear my dog. I apologize. I told my nieces and nephews, If you're not ready and you don't know exactly what you want to grow, you know do when you grow up, if you will. After high school, take a take a sabbatical, take a year off in England, they call it a Gap year. Take a gap year and just find yourself or go to a junior college where just get your general ed done. It's cheaper. First off and maybe college isn't for you, and and that's where I encourage everyone. Don't follow the path just because you think you're supposed to follow the path because it's right for you. Yep, you're absolutely right. There's because there is that idea, the push of universities, not important, and people shouldn't go. I wouldn't go that far, but it's just not important for everyone. And we know that because not everyone goes. But if you're pressured or you have that option and you're just going because it seems where the crowd is taking, you really stop with the current that's going against you. Take him in and assess if this is right for you at all. Or just you need one year, one semester, three years, five years, 10 years. There's really I know someone that did it when they went back to school when they were 70. So 50 60 years, right? Well, I think it's a value thing. If you don't value the education that you're receiving, you're never going to appreciate it. You're never going to actually absorb what you need to in order to take yourself to that next level, right, And that's maturity. I maybe, or just maybe again, going back to value and unfortunately, But I think the way the world works, too, is he. There's value in just that piece of paper, even if you're not even sure what the value is because you might be able to use it somewhere down the road, right? And like, did you become A? I wouldn't say it's the any sort of reason to go to university. But even if you're uncertain and you have no other choice is to go to university is not a bad thing. An alternative to do. Because for me, I took, uh, a degree. You switched it, took a time off, started again, finished. And then I didn't jump into business because that's what I took. And but that degree got me a job teaching English overseas. I hear what you're saying. You could disagree. You could disagree. What you're pitching. I'm catching. Did you become a history teacher? No. So that's the crazy part, and that's where maybe maybe my side of it is to me. That piece of paper just means you know how to follow through on a commitment, that's all. Hmm? Whether you absorbed any of it means nothing to me. Um me. Oh, me too. I agree with that now. There are now there. Now there are some disciplines. You actually have to go to college. I mean, I'm sorry you have to go to college If you want Thio, be a doctor, for example. Right. You have Thio. You know, if you're going thio, you know, be a psychologist psychiatrist. You're gonna be, you know, understanding what's going on. This...

...this thing? Yeah. I would like to think you're studying something somewhere, not just reading Google Wikipedia somewhere. Okay, So yeah. No, absolutely. But but I think there's value in apprenticeship hands on. Absolutely. Absolutely. And that's what that's being a medical doctor. That's what that's what it is, right? You have to get the base knowledge. And then there's, you know, it's almost like mechanics of the human body, right? And I've always been, um, an advocate of, you know, like, uh, I can't fix my car and there's a prima I'm willing to pay for that skill set. Mhm. Absolutely. No, it's not. Value it. It comes in many forms. I wouldn't even say and I actually have a question at the near the end about your value of education because I don't think that it only comes in one package. There's hands on there's life experiences. There's all forms of, uh, education that we all need. A lot of people push and say, Well, I don't I mean, there's the worst attitude is I can't learn anything from anyone. And people do have that. But you need people. You need teachers whether they're bonafide teachers or they're just, you know, a father is going to teach you a lesson that you would be wise to learn after your history degree. Where did that take you? Oh, sure. And I feel like I'm like, talking so much. But so, um yeah. So after I got my degree in history of San Francisco State, um, I what did I Oh, my gosh, you're making me go back in time. Yeah, Brian, I don't know if I like this conversation. I'm kidding. No, it's the best conversation to show that where you are today was not straight on the bumps. And as you and I spoke at the beginning, it's like the bumps and the bruises that you get to take you where you are and then you're finding your loving what you're doing. So how did you get there? It's okay. It's great that you mentioned that. So I answered an ad. I graduated. Had no clue. I actually broke up with a boyfriend and didn't know what was going to happen. I was supposed Thio not be broken up with that boyfriend, and we were just Thio go back to New York together. Um and so I was extraordinarily lost. I probably was at the lowest point of my life. Oh, wait, if I could say one more thing, I left When I went to get my degree in history, I left, um, Southern California sight unseen, moved to San Francisco with my best friend. And that was that was leap of faith. I didn't have a job. I enrolled in San Francisco State to finish my degree. I was three year hiatus. I needed to get off my you know what, and get a degree. I just wanted me to get done. I had been been about 22. 23 at that point, and I had $50 to my name in 1998. Moving to the Bay area $50 in your name at any time is really not much to speak of, right? Know how and why? I thought that was a good idea. I was expecting a like some money, my vacation time from Disney. But look, people No, no, I don't. Would I make that decision now? Hell, no. But at the time, I was full of optimism. And you know what? I think that's what made me happy. That's what made it happen. $50 to my name moved in June 1998 which apparently is not summertime in the Bay Area in San Francisco. Just so you know, um froze to death that first night in the apartment, but, uh, found a job waiting tables and they got my degree worked through waiting tables to together. And then I when I graduated, was that another low in my life where it wasn't where I thought it would be and answered an ad to be a technical recruiter in downtown San Francisco. And that's what got me into the technology technology part of it. And so I was recruiting for a lot of great talent, and one of my old colleagues...

...recruited me Thio, a company called Sonic Wall, which is a network security company. And I went and that's what started and launched the next phase of my life, which is technology sales. So now that you had this newfound, um, spark in your life rather than the downs, not that you didn't have any low points from there on out. But what did you really think about this technology? Before you're in customer service, you're the face of Disney. Now you're in technology. You're now you're in technology, which is, you know, behind the scenes and and promoting technology. Were you optimistic about this new role that you were gonna play or were you okay? Absolutely. Are you kidding? I was in the dot com bubble bubble number one right in San Francisco. We were right there into the thick of it. I was placing people at these companies, you know, like, you know, Google. And so I mean, that was like, crazy before they blew up, right? Um, so, yeah, I know. I was in the thick of it. That's exciting. Part of it. Right. Um, so I was in sales for inside sales, and that's basically a call center. And from there. I started understanding the technology and the value of network security back in the early 2000. And that's what got me excited because I knew the future of digital future technology was gonna have to rely on network security on DSO I knew had a job Is job security to know that, too? So So how did you get into your present role with being the co founder of Innovation Media Enterprises? Yeah. So, uh, I am getting recruited by Hewlett Packard, which is now a Hewlett Packard enterprise. So as part of the data center side of the house, um, HP And so Uncle had a relationship back then And so I got recruited over, um, I had worked at HP for almost 9, 10 years, and, um, in 2018 my job was considered redundant and I had the option to look around, and I just lost the passion. Um, that's one big thing that's important to me is if I don't believe in what I'm selling or representing. There's no fire or spark there. So I opted to take the package, and, um, I'm not gonna lie. I went on a vacation spree and traveled the world for a good year and a half. And then I realized I had champagne tastes on a zero income budget and realized I needed to do something with myself and, uh, instead of going back to Corporate America, which I just kind of didn't kind of like lost luster for it, uh, started Innovation Media Enterprises, which is a podcast production strategy. Organized company co founder, Your co founder with this and how do you define your role now besides a co founder? What is it you do? I mean, Cove, It might have changed a couple of things for you, but what is it that you do in the run of a week or the run of the day? Oh, if anything, I'm definitely still doing what I always do well, and I think that's my partner, and I balance each other out extraordinarily well. Her name is Aaron Gregor, by the way, who is beyond amazing? She was actually entrepreneur, um, and she was one that encouraged me over and over again. Toe look at entrepreneurship as an alternative to working for corporate America and eso. She's been a sexual entrepreneur and has had successful exits she knows it. She knows how to be an entrepreneur. She knows what the paperwork side of it. The business side. I am the sales marketing the face, if you will. The loud mouth. I call it on the loudspeaker of our organization. What is something that brings you satisfaction in your job that you're doing in your roles that you have is a consultant, storytelling advocate and...

...even the strategist for podcasters? Yeah, absolutely. So we focus on businesses on because of my background and technology. We do focus on our clients being from the tech world. Um so there is a challenge of getting out of speeds and feeds getting out of the, you know, the cursory stuff. I help brands understand that there's a better depth. There's a motion to who and what they are that will resonate and connect in a podcast format for their prospects and clients, especially with the pandemic. Now that we're seeing is you've got a sales force here that may or may not be able to see their clients right now. How are you going to differentiate yourself versus all the zoom meetings that are out there? People are zoomed out right. So how else can you connect when you can't physically be in the same room with, um and I think on, I firmly believe and I've seen it podcast work because what podcast? Dues. They connect in a different way in a different level, Um, and such that when there is a time for business to be had people work with people they like and trust. You can't do it in an ad. Podcasts will do that for you in the long term. I like I don't know if you call your tag line, but everyone has a story to tell. Do it with a podcast. So my question of what brings you satisfaction? Would it align with your tag line and finding these stories of these people in their podcast in some of those stories that might bring you inspiration in your work? Yeah, I guess so. Yeah. It's that satisfaction of knowing that maybe there's you're bringing a new story, a new voice to the forefront that maybe people even think would be interesting to someone. There's a lock for every key, right? So, yeah, that satisfaction of knowing that I'm sharing, I'm helping someone to get them to share their story. That's very satisfying to me. Absolutely. CIA. In the many hats that you wear in the roles that you have in your business and some of the other things you're doing, What would you like? People toe understand? So they can understand Maybe the value you're bringing to the podcast world or to hearers and listeners. But if there's one thing that they could understand about you so they can appreciate your role or you in the work that you're bringing Mm. Wow. That's a tough one for me. Um, it's funny. I like to bring out and draw people out to share themselves. And yet at the same time, when you want me to dig deep into myself, I have I struggle with it. Right. Um, you're doing well by the You're doing very well, by the way. Thank you. Thank you. Uh, you know. Oh, wow. Okay. What would you like someone to know about CIA? I know it's crazy. I'm not crazy. Despite what everyone says, e just just I love life. I love people, and I love to see success. I love to see people be successful, Especially if I had like an iota of help to get them there. There's something about and I say this, you know, all ships rise with the tie. You know, That's why I think I'm such an advocate for podcasters. Uh, even if, like, I was actually talking another podcast editor and, uh, the guys like you know, we're competitors, right? I'm like, not really. There's so much to be had. There's so much business to be done. Why wouldn't I be, you know, cheer you onto success? You know, there's like, other there's tons of other, you know, podcast studios out there that do it differently. Or do mawr or do less or whatever to me. As long as we are a great community and we're supporting one another, there's enough business to be had, and I love that, like, I genuinely want other people to be successful because when...

...they are, I know I'm going to be. And that's that's something about me that sometimes I think people don't believe it almost seems like the market is saturated. But what is your view on the saturation of the podcast movement, as some people call it? I heard the statistic about, you know there's 500 million YouTube channels. But on Lee, was it? Do you know what the three active podcast? 1.3 million million? So there's all seemingly. If there's any room to grow, there's there's some What do you think about it? So Okay, I, uh, actually is going on this week as we're talking podcast movement. Um, is a great event space that gets all the podcast industry folks together. Podcast. So you shot the podcast. That's another one that's based in Florida. Um, Guy Raz was one of the head speakers. Or excuse me, Mhm guy Raz was one of the Panelists, and he sat in a room and there's about 1000 people in this room and hey said, Look, I would rather have a room of, ah, 1000 people like you guys sitting here that knows me that listens to me that enjoyed what I have to say and then if there is a call to action that you will follow through with than having a million Twitter followers who may or may not listen to one episode every now and then, and that to me, has motivated me toe, encourage everyone that's looking to do a podcast is. Do it for yourself first and foremost. And if you want to try to stand out and try to be the next Joe Rogan, you know what I think. In this day and age, you may need to niche and be really hyper focused on a area of topic to stand out. And then as you kind of get that following, then you could broaden out. You could still do a general type of podcast, but that's it's a long, harder fight uphill because there's so much out there. But you know what, though that's not necessarily true, either. I mean, if you just got that magic pill and someone just like you and then you could just blow up and go viral, so it's, I don't know, it's, Ah, put the effort in. Be authentic to who you are. That's a critical part. Be authentic because you know what? You're not gonna last long. You'll have what we call pod fade, and you'll just stop podcasting at some point and get upset or disillusioned by podcasting. When the actuality is is you didn't put the time into planet to make sure that you're doing the right things for the right reasons, with your podcast with hoping people having people understand about you hoping that people are successful knowing the saturation of the market. How do you stay productive? How do you keep going? I mean, with the different things you're doing, And I mean, maybe a lot of coffee, but the idea of you know it is a very competitive market. There's, you know, lots of clients that want to be the best, or at least to be up there. And your job is to kind of meander through it all and help all these people. But at the end of the day, you're a person like everyone else and maybe not wanting to get up. How do you stay productive? Well, you know, it's funny ever since I started this business, uh, I've never not wanted to get up in the morning. And I'm not a morning person. I'm a night owl, like now I'm actually starting hit my peak of like happiness, if you will, like So, um, you got to do what you love. You got to be authentic to who you are and what you are. Um, yes, there are. Because we focused on something branded podcasts. It's not quite the same as, you know, underwater basket weaving it is. And not at the same time. Um, because sometimes it's very intentional. You gotta know who your audience and who you're talking to. Okay, Like I said, you could launch a...

...podcast and have only 100 listeners. But if those 100 actually buy from you, is that not better? Right than a million? That does nothing. So, um and and there's the other thing, too, is you know, there's a lot of folks that talk about monetization, podcasting and all that stuff. You can make money off podcasting. That's what I'm doing for a living now, right? There's gonna be days. You could get rejected. Absolutely. I've gotten rejected. Do I like it? No. In fact, I was actually gonna post a video on Lincoln saying how much I hate it. It hurts, you know. But you have to understand a No. Today doesn't mean no tomorrow. It just means at this moment, time they don't need. You want you hear from you. Whatever. That's fine. You're not gonna please everyone. But you know what? I actually have gotten clients from. Gosh, since we've launched our business in 2018 this There's been quite a few that called me back saying, Hey, we're ready now let's talk Even in the pandemic. In fact, are the pandemic actually has been good to us? We've done more work because of no one could go out and about. Well, you said, at the very beginning you're doing what you love and your dream. So that's a motivating factor in keeping you productive. I got to say one more thing. Um, because I've been producing Ah, lot of amazing podcast on our clients are amazing. They're guests are beyond amazing. It's crazy. I love listening to other people's podcasts and conversations because you learn so much from it. And I think selfishly that's why I keep going to because I'm I'm getting free. I'm getting a free masterclass from hearing all these other podcasters. I mean, for you, Brian, listen to your podcasts and the interest interesting guests that you have. I'm just like, Well, I was gonna say you're a great example of that of a great guest to listen to. Thank you. All right, but you're right. There's a lot of value, I mean, and sometimes with all of the noise of all the different podcasts, Unless you're sure of what you know what niche you're looking. Thio, learn about all the podcasts bring. Most of the podcasts bring a lot of valuable information if you have an interest in what they're doing. So those guests that they bring on or even, you know, some people have the ability to just be their own solo host and bring out a lot of information. There's your right. There is a lot of information toe learn. And a lot of people have very interesting guests. You have? I've actually I enjoy listening to you. So I really appreciate you having me on, Well, the idea of work. So for you in your work, what is a tool that you could not do without what is very value. But what is the thing that keeps you most efficient in what you do day to day? And it could be like an internal thing. Right? I spoke to someone yesterday and he said his heart. Um but what is it? Something that you need? It could be a sticky pad. Whatever it is. Yeah, that's funny. Oh, my Because anyone that knows me knows I'm extraordinarily not organized. So uh huh um, honestly, for me and I'm working on it and it's a struggle. Uh, I have had to use my calendar as a Z, like even for my free flow thoughts. Like I've been throwing stuff up there reminders like I know I will forget in 10 minutes about something And so my calendar looks very disorganized or looks like, Oh, you're overly book. But oftentimes I just use it as a way to remind myself You need to stay on track. I'll give myself timers of Did you accomplish two tasks here? You know, for this day or this moment in time. So for me, if you're anything like me or you're super busy, cap the calendar is your best friend. And if color code, it however you want to whatever that's...

...that will keep you in line, especially if, um, you're you know, an entrepreneur and you're kind of doing everything. All that was a lot of different balls. Cso, Tauron rat. What is your top tip for people getting into work, thinking of my audience and people listening, getting into work Or as you and I have experienced changing careers. Mhm. Uh, no, you're know who you are and find your center. However, you want to find your center and what works for you, whether it's religion, meditation, exercise. Uh, you know, for me, sometimes it's a good glass of wine or a few more. Um, it's you really have to know who you are. Doesn't matter what career you're in or what you do to jump, especially in times of uncertainty. It will keep you level and stable. So that's my big advice. You mentioned a couple of times a couple of hiatuses and doing things that you wanted to dio. How do you find that rest? Balance of work life choices to separate yourself from your work. So I didn't do work life balance. So when I was working, I worked. I rarely went on vacation. The worst stretch was a good six years without taking a vacation, so I was burnt out. I'm not gonna lie. In 2018 I was breaking into hives for the number stress off that I had to do another forecast. Call the idea of a forecast call. Now I still get like tingles. It was just It's a triggering thing emotionally for me. What do you mean by forecast? Call eso in sales you needed to give more on this story is just giving. Is this giving you highs by speaking neo CIA, CIA? Let's work it out now. Okay, well, finally get it over with and it's behind you. You are trying to make me cry. I know I'm not. I promise you, but let's work it out now. No more hives. So explain to me what it is. We'll work through the waves and will smooth it all out. All right, Ready? So, in sales, you need to have touch points with your management team so the management could report to their management on the status of opportunities projects. Where you in this process, you're the management or you are You're the sales been going to touch upon the I was I was I managed an account, so I was tipping point spearhead for sales. I still function in a sales capacity, but I did not manage anyone, but I did manage that account. So I had a team that I still had to I don't want to call manage because they're all peers. But let's just say, uh, collaborate with very heavily heavy collaboration. And I needed things without the management title, so you can imagine how fun that is. You have no power, but you need a lot. Yeah. So you really have to learn how Thio share value with people in order for them to give you their time on information. So, yeah, I had I had to do a lot of reports back on different divisions at, you know, at HP. And, uh, that was stressful because there'll be times I had no information to give and so therefore reflected poorly on me if I didn't know the status of, you know, one division over the other. So it was very stressful. Well, you learn how to share. Oh, I certainly learned how to share. I don't know about my colleagues. There's a few there that if I saw them, I would flinch. No, I'm kidding. That s so bad. It taught you a lot. It was a valuable lesson. You don't have to do that anymore. No. And you've worked through it? Yes and no. I mean, I own my own business, so I still have my own forecast calls it myself, so I don't use that term anymore. But I absolutely do the same techniques. I got trained...

...into that. So, yeah, what gave me hives? For some odd reason. As an entrepreneur, it doesn't give me the same reaction, but I'm using the same process. See what is something? I mean, thinking of your yogurt days. What is something you wish you would have known around that time that you could impart to others? Now that might help them along the way. I think I mentioned it earlier. Um, I didn't fully I think I kind of I think I stated earlier, which was I learned very quickly how selfish people could be or inconsiderate, self motivated people could be. Like I said, the way parents would just let their kids, like, literally take scoops of stuff and just chuck it across the room, and the parents would be like, Oh, you're so cute, Billy. Um, and then with Disney showing me, you know why you want to give a good experience, right? Whereas being resentful towards that experience. But you never know. Maybe that was at one time Billy was able to ever get out, right? So because I don't know what path these people have taken knowing seeing that back then and knowing this now, I think I again would go back and find my center to understand. You know what? I can't control that kids movements or other people's reactions, the team, even at HP, whether they would give me information or not. Sometimes, if you can't control something, it's not your problem. And that's the biggest thing I had to overcome. For myself, it's valuable to learn it's valuable learn. But also we need reminders because we're presented with those types of situations almost every day, whether with her own internal struggles or with other people presented to us. Okay, okay, I need patients. But understanding their shoes their path a little bit better, just whether it's just to get through it or Thio. You know, people say empathy towards others and in trying to help them out, too. So Brian, like, if I may ask you a question because you're so chill, you are like calm as all get out. Have you always been this like steady and ask personality? Asked asked My dear wife, No, no, I I think I am in between those mountains. You know, I've gotten in fights before. I've argued with people before I've freaked out before, Um, and I might do it today, but, I mean, I'm going back to your dream and what you love. I really enjoy doing what I'm doing here, and you're not going to see the worst of me here, trying to present the best of me here. But my hope is to draw out from other people. Some of I mean I'm open to answering other people's questions and your questions about me. But the idea is to figure out about you and to show that for me I mean, sometimes I do lives like for myself, and I'll just say how much of an idiot I am. And I've made the biggest and the worst of missed aches. And or, you know, I could paint them even worse than just saying missed aches. But the idea is that I don't know. There's a grace that covers it. And if I could, as you said, you learn a lesson of needing patients. I know I need patients, but I always I tend to forget the other side of why I need patients with other people. And that's usually where I find myself struggling the most say with my dear wife and I she and I would, you know, say it openly that many times we don't get along, But it's one another not recognizing the other person's perspective, usually or our Children or something like that. But being being here in South Korea, where I don't tend to get to talk to as many people as I would like to just because of the language barrier, Um, I really...

...enjoy these times. So it's kind of like, Oh, I get to talk to someone and maybe that's why it seems so chill. Um, yeah. No, I love it like I e was just fascinated, like seeing that you're from Are you from Nova Scotia? I am absolutely. From New Valley Coast, Nova Scotia, Canada. Yes. Okay. Yeah. So I was looking at your background. I was like, how does one end of going from Nova Scotia Thio? You know South Korea, So But I think you got a teaching gig. Well, it Z, I like how you're turning around with me, but I might No, no, my mom. Um, my mom just passed away in February from cancer, and but she was working years ago when I was in high school. Even before that, at a hotel motel in our hometown of Lower Sackville in the owners were Korean, and I happened to during my university time met a couple who just happened to come from Japan. And they were like, Oh, it was so awesome. You know, we went and taught English for a year now. They took a hiatus from university, and then they went and taught for a year. And then they came back and said, Oh, that would be awesome not knowing what I was going to do in life. And they said, Oh, yeah, But don't go to Japan at that time. Um, they said go to Korea because the economy is better. And then because my mom knew the Korean people, they were introducing Meteo as you and I were talking before we started about, you know, Where you from? No, but where you really from? Uh, and they introduced me to give tea and chopsticks and all these sorts of things. And when I finally decided to go, he the owner of the motel said go to the city. He knew someone here, and he would kind of take me around. And he and I have been friends for 15 15 years now, Um and that's that's how I found myself coming here on Lee because I didn't know what I want to do after I graduated from university, and then I married my dear wife and had two kids. And now you know where he is? Awesome. I love it. I love it like I love what you're doing. And I love that you're bringing these stories to life. Like I said, if you could, we all have a story to tell. Maybe it's because I we were talking about, you know, I was doing my boyfriend's genealogy earlier before we started. Yes, yes, yes. Before we started. Yeah, I'm sorry. Um, you when you start looking at birth dates, death dates, birth dates, death dates and right now, then you would see them showing up in a census. Over time, you just become a name on an Excel spreadsheet on DSO. I love the stories and the stories. Exactly. Maybe that's maybe that's why I got my degree in history. It was the right call for me. Um, because everyone has a story, and that's I think that's great. How you say that everyone has a story to tell and you're it's right on. It's a It's a great slogan. Its's a truth that I think even in what we're talking about, learning patients and understanding that person's story. And I think many of you and I were speaking before this to just many of the problems going on a lot of the noise. If we really took a moment, regardless of someone's background and regardless of what they're doing, we would be much more gracious to these people, whoever they are and, you know, to me, to you, to you, to me tow them or us. We would be much more gracious if we just took a moment rather than just say I need patients, you know, serenity now bite my tongue to really take a moment of the worst of the worst or the most different from the most different from this side of the aisle to the other and just have a little understanding. I fail at it, but at least it's a goal to try to attain. Oh, I get you on that I every day I had mentioned this. I am from California now, live in Texas. So you can imagine how schizophrenic my social media posts are. My wall looks like in all the social platforms. So, um, but the whole thing is this. And I think...

...that's the critical part. Two of what? What keeps me motivated? What keeps me going? I have had people that I've encountered that I was like, Wow, I don't even like it was a person like I don't I don't I don't know if I could do business with you, Right. But you know what, though? Uh, like I said, we're all human. We all breathe. We all eat, You know, we're all we all die. Uh, there's commonality in our experience. In some capacity, I'd be hard pressed to think even some of that you abhor. There wasn't something One little iota positivity that there's something that you connect with in some level. Some level. Yeah, on. That's where I think that's what keeps me. I think also motivated every morning because, you know, look, we get rejected in our business. All the time right? You get rejected in friendships, you get rejected and familial relationships you have to just stand up and get up and wipe it dust off and go. Okay, let's go. I think it's when it gets abusive towards you. Then maybe you need a bow out, but, you know, but life is meant to be picked up and move on and maybe pivot in another direction. CIA Is there any mistakes that you've made all jokes aside that you've learned a valuable lesson from something that you've brought with you? Oh, you don't even have to divulge. You don't have to divulge the mistake, but just where do I start? I have, like, I mean, I almost feel like I should do that like scroll and be like here. Let's let's start reading. You know, there comes the history teacher boom apartment or or like Santa Claus like Oh, you're not getting nothing this year, kiddo, Like let's start Geo. Uh, you know, mistakes are meant to be learned from I I made a lot of Mexicans and I'm still making mistakes, and you can on Lee take lessons from it. If you consistently make the same mistakes over and over again. You really got to do some soul searching, and that's easier said than done. Okay, look, people, I'm drinking water right now and I've mentioned it. But you know what? There's been a few times I have one glass of wine too many. I'm getting to the point in my life or my liver. Maybe not recovering as fast as it used to be. But you know what? I enjoyed it at the time inside Canada, but there's there's, there's, there's what's that thing? Repercussions. There's there's consequences for actions you gotta pick into the priority and what's valuable toe learn from right. And then when you dio Gosh, what a life lesson that you've got and it just makes you a better person. So if you lived a life without any mistakes, I feel like you haven't lived life. To be honest, as I mentioned to you earlier, I was gonna ask you about education and the value of education. Where do you hold that? Especially, I mean, not toe beat the drum, but thinking of your dad right, which I'm not sure what he did before you guys or he immigrated first, but the value of education. It doesn't have to be formal like you know what you're doing now you unless you're taking some extra credit or courses on the side, it's all you learning hands on. Experience may be talking to other people getting some advice, but where do you value education and importance there? And so there's formal education and there's common sense in life education, right? Um, I think both of them are balance, right? So let's be honest. There are some personality types that just don't function well in either or situation, right? Some folks need discipline, and you know what? I'd actually put. Military is part of education because I feel like for some individuals, they need that hard core doesn't mean hard core disciplines. Military to me. E. I live in South Korea, where it's mandatory to do two years, and I know most of the guys hate it. Not all of them, like the Korean guys, but I'm like you guys can implement. I mean, I know it be a big...

...political brouhaha implemented in North America, but I'm like there's some people that could use it. I mean, I could use a couple of years of military training, But there's some other people that could really use it, you know? Uh, yes, but we have the freedom. Uh, it's true. Yeah, America, at least have the option, Like, good suggestion. Look, just because you have the choice and options to do you think doesn't mean you should take those options, right? Like, but I think that also Oh, gosh, I think it blows out a critical thinking. Um, critical thinking skills. And that, to me, means whether you're street smart or you're book smart or your into submission Military smart. There's critical thinking that your brain that you need to dio that Onley you inside you can can process that right? That's the magic of being a human, right? Is Do I have the ability toe look at the set of facts presented to me and make a decision based on that. So education, to me, is nuanced in the context. It depends on your personality. It depends on, um, what you're looking to do, right? I'm sorry if you are going to be my lawyer and argue a case for me, but you Googled it. Uh, that's a problem. Okay. Um, so yeah, there are some careers that do you have to have education on. There's no two ways about it on there's others. I mean, do I? Did I really need a history degree? You know what it showed me? That I could research things on my own and find solutions, or I see repetition. I see history repeating itself, for example. That's why the history degree was valuable for me in my career as a sales person. So it's how you apply. It's not the paper per se that makes sense. So there you don't always have to have a degree. But if you dio, it also shows that you have discipline, that you finish something that you said you're going to dio. And accountability is a big problem right now that maybe I shouldn't go down that path too hard. But well, that I'm thinking of the students here in Korea, that crew in create society or Asian societies or generally speaking in Korean, particular education is the foremost it's top priority. If you're not the best, you might as well give up and I find, and maybe it's a technology. Things were older and we didn't grow up with phones computers as much. And I find a lot of these kids do lack that the street sense or even critical thinking skills. It's like if it's not in the book and I find that Korea while the education is good, right, I find it's better than many other, like public programs. It doesn't connect the subjects like, you know, why is this important? It just learned this, memorized it, put on the test, and I find a lot of these kids. You know, there's garbage on the road and it's right beside a garbage can. The thought to pick it up like there's there's not there. Um, some of those things in street smarts and critical thinking is lack. I mean, and on the other side to there's, I know lots of people, lots of street smarts. But to find a library, it would be there would be hard pressed. Yeah, well, maybe you could have more of Ah, uh, independent individual. I really value the ability to solve your own problems. And so I do. I don't have Children, but I do encourage my sister's kids like we'll talk about a situation and I'll say, Well, what? How would you solve this and I'm shocked at times, Like honestly, for me, like Google is like go to If you don't know anything, just go to Google or go Doc go if your security minded writers don't like that But, um, that's not the first place to go. That's what's the weird part to me. I'm like, Wait, What? That's like the Encyclopedia Britannica of modern age. Why wouldn't you go Way...

...to put it. Yeah, someone needs Ah, podcast. Critical thinking situations on what you would do in these, I bet A Oh, my gosh, could you? Magic made it like a quiz show type. Like how fun would that be? What would you dio A, B, C or D? Or just How would you do it? Just do a podcast and give them a a situation and hear them talk through their logic. And let's see what happens. How fun would that be? Although I could see being a little expletive like if someone fails, I guess you know Adam, call in show. Tell us what you would dio. There we go. We're just your audio, like right? So, CEO, is there anything else that you'd like to add and thinking of the audience in an encouragement for people who maybe just quit their yogurt job because they hated it. They're six years deep into a career that seems lovely on the outside, but and the background. It's really difficult. And they're not knowing what they want to do for university or for their career. Or they find themselves in a time like this, where their job is no longer, they need to switch careers, even if they're in their fifties. You have any words of encouragement? Seriously, I just heard this today with one of my clients and I I and and by the way, he's in his thirties. And, uh, there is something to be said about mentor ship, and he doesn't know this, and I will never tell him right now because his ego will totally fly off the wall. But, uh, seek people that have knowledge and errors that you lack, right? Um and that should be from a career perspective. When you network, over time, you build a network and you amass amazing group of comrades. You know, community members, whatever have you But when you're starting out, you don't necessarily have that right. So my thing is, reach out. Even if you're 50 years old, Reach out to all the people you've talked to over time. If you're starting out in your career, reach out to people that you respect and say, Hey, look, here's what I'm thinking. Can I bounce things? And I hate that sounds cliche bounce ideas off of you. But seriously, can I get to know you? I wanna learn about you. I wanna learn about your history, tell me about yourself. And from there they'll talk to you, um, and make it a reciprocal relationship, right? Not just to take, take, take. And I think sometimes that happens. Um, but the biggest take away is try three letters, but I love it. I love it to death. Just try. There is no harm. There's no shame in trying in the In the course of the universe, no one will ever blame you for anything. If you didn't just try once, whatever it might be. Not illicit drugs. Let's be clear, whoever's out there, but just try everything from CIA uso tor. Not just like Okay, Mom, I heard from the professional lady. Exactly. I'm with God. No It's the last thing I need. But you know what, though? But seriously, with you and your kids, like, would you ever fault them for just trying. Now, granted, you gotta make educated decisions on that. Don't freaking. I'm gonna jump off 100 ft bridge because I just want to try it. No, I mean, you gotta be smart about Absolutely. But in your career, if you're looking for a second career, first career 10th career, who cares? There's no harm nor file because every experience will give you wisdom. CIA yose a turn rat. Where can people find you? How can they get in contact with you and connect? I am always on LinkedIn. I'm heavily on LinkedIn just because of business. My focus. I'm not gonna lie to you. I guess you could find me on Twitter as well. I am s Yeah. So, um cso, Tauron rat on LinkedIn CEO. Yes, I said that I'm sure I will pop up eventually. Uh, unique. Enough name just s y y a And you. I'm sure you'll find me somewhere, but yeah, I, uh, and...

...always my podcast innovation calling afterglow. And, uh, how soon was now podcast you are busy. I have CIA. I have one final question for you. And that is why do you work? Because the alternative to me just doesn't even register. Life is meant to be lived. Experience. Have fun Fall in your face, Get up again. That's why I work because it za journey. So do it be part of it. Make your own path and everyone has a story to tell Oh, my God, I think you're my better tagline than I am And you're living that story CIA, Yassa Tortora Thank you kindly. You've been a pleasure, and I truly appreciate you taking the time here today. Brian, thank you so much for having me on. And I totally look forward to hearing more of your guests. Your music. Thank you. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive, joyful day in your work.

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