WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 37 · 1 year ago

#37 Susan De Lorenzo Transformational Life Coach, Speaker, Author BrianVee Whywework

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Susan De Lorenzo 

Transformational Life Coach, Speaker and Author  

Susan’s Profile 

linkedin.com/in/susandelorenzo  

Website susandelorenzo.com/ (Personal Website)  

Email susan@susandelorenzo.com  

About

"I am a transformational life coach, inspirational speaker and author of the upcoming book, Pulling the Gems from Adversity. I specialize in coaching and supporting women who are coming out of life-altering adversity, and guide them to retrieve the insights and valuable experience to use as the building blocks for a new life. Through evocative coaching and providing the tools for transformation, clients learn to "pull the gems" from their adversity to design a full-spectrum life of success as defined by the individual. It is an honor and a delight to support and guide clients to their personal success. I am certified as a DreamBuilder Coach by the Life Mastery Institute in California (now named The Brave Thinking Institute). In addition, I speak publicly and virtually via radio and podcasts about overcoming adversity and living your best life through empowering choices."

Welcome to why we work with your host Brian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which would be an encouragement to us all to get up. Get going on, keep on working. Working stopped working is good. Now here's your host to why we wait. I'm driving. This is why we work today. Have great speaking with Susan Day Lorenzo Susan Dey Lorenzo is a motivational speaker. She is an author. She is a transformational coach. She has written a book pulling the gems of adversity. She speaks primarily to women, but I know her message. Resignations with everyone that we all come across things such as cancer, divorce, losing our job. And she speaks to the core of those. And what we're to do is fine the gems in them. So let us listen today to Susan Dey Lorenzo. I'm Brian V, and this is why we work today. I have the great pleasure of speaking with Susan DiLorenzo. Good evening, you lady. Well, actually, it's your morning. It's my evening. Morning in your evening, but *** good everything, Teoh, Thank you very much. I did a brief introduction to you just prior to our speaking, but would you be able to give us a more close and personal introduction to yourself? Be happy to So yes, first starting with that naming and Susan Di Lorenzo and I'm a life coach. But I like to go back and tell everybody that it's really about being an invasive cancer survivor whose marriage ended right after treatment ended, and that it was the 12 punch that sent me into everything else that followed that I really felt like there's a great saying and do you think I can remember who it is? But it's It's that there's two important moments in your life the day you were born, and the day you found out why. And um, I feel like that was my wake up call. And ah, it just took me into a new place that I wouldn't trade for the world. I wouldn't trade that. And you hear that from a lot of people who have gone through, um, big adversity like that, that it just changed their life so much because they let it if they didn't, you know, let it destroy them. They said, Oh, my gosh, I'm getting a do over, which is what I thought. So, Susan, before we get into specifically of what you're doing now, which I'd like to talk about because my mom just happened to pass away in February because of cancer. But as I know a little bit about you and as you're speaking, uh, I'm getting that Jim, right. You know, unfortunately for her, she didn't make it through, But there's other just other people can glean. Yeah, from the adversity Rico through. But when did it all start? Susan, when did you get that first job? And what was? Yeah, I was Ah, I think it was a typical American teenager who finally wanted some money in her pocket, you know, and one of that sense of being ah, more adult know that having that kind of responsibility, I got my driver's license. And, um, I, um, go another typical American teenager job at a fast food place called Kentucky Fried Chicken. KFC and I o KFC take the emphasis of That's apparently why they changed to KFC. But I still like friends. Really had some tonight. Oh, my gosh. Oh, yeah. I think it's still a pretty popular item. And yeah, I remember getting all dressed up for my first big interview, and ah, I definitely overdressed for working at a, you know, interview at a fast. They saw that you're eager. Yeah, they knew. I was eager, and, uh and then I traded in my awesome outfit in the interview for a red polyester pantsuit with a matching red cap. So you got it, though. Yeah, Yeah, I got it. And I loved the collaboration. I thought it was really exciting. I got to see behind the scenes at KFC and thought, Wow, recipe. Yeah, that usually happens. Yeah, Yeah. But, uh, you're mentioned. Just, you...

...know, for driver's license and getting out. Was there another motivation to get you out the door with? Someone may be pressuring you to go. Maybe you saw Snow. They were encouraging me. They wanted that expert. My parents wanted that experience for me, and I think they were proud of me that I thought of it on my own. I wasn't Fortunately, you know, I grew up in a home that, um, we weren't rich But we didn't have to worry. I'd put it that way. We were all set pretty well. Said we had a pretty standard middle class to okay, existence like that. So, yeah, my parents were pleased. And, um, you still have that motivation on your own? I do. How long did you keep your KFC, Joe? Uh, I think it was my a summer job into the full. And, um, I loved the employees, the customers. That was another thing. I never faced customers. I was really young. I was friendly, you know? And, um, some of these folks, I don't know if it's being carnivores or what, but some of them were having a really hard time. And I went when I was in tears at the front counter when somebody would you still think at me and I said, I don't think I like this job anymore. If it can be tough, I mean people, as I remember growing up having KFC, it wasn't cheap, right? For for myself and my family said this was, you know, this was a treat. So you wanted it perfect. And you wanted raid away. Yeah, And you didn't. If the lines were getting crowded. People were like Have been waiting here, you know? Um so it was really sweet, though, because one of the guys from I'll never forget that's one of the guys from in back of the kitchen came up and was like, It's OK, Susan And then one of my dad's good friends, this big Italian guys like, hey, liver alone, just doing the best she can. Look, it's crowded in here. It's so I feel like OK, I got I got my peeps you back. So this is in high school, is it Not? Said 16. 17 high school, Brian and And the next year, I had the best job ever because we all had this really beloved English teacher Great being guy. And he had a vegetable stand. Oh, you can't here. Yeah. Oh, no, I can Yeah, you're never your You kind of jumped, but that's OK. I saw that. And I wonder if it's this Mike, but well, I'll just be really careful not to jiggle around here. I hope that's ok. Um, yet a vegetable staying here? Yes, he had a vegetable stand and ah, it was in front of this home for mentally retarded adults. I know you saved something like challenged or whatever that it was not a term that we thought was falling off. Yeah, it was common at the time, and it was a beautiful combination of felt. And I ride my bike to the stand and I work at the stand. I got to read because he's an English teacher while I'm in between. I I did my job and I'm like reading Dostoyevsky and selling vegetables and having ah, these wonderful people from the home would always come by to visit with me. And I thought, This is a good life. I could I could do this. So, in high school for these couple of years, were you starting to think of a career path? Did you have something in the back of your mind starting to know you and say this is where you might want to go? No clue. No clue at all other than thinking about college. And I did have a dad who traveled internationally. He was an international businessman. He traveled in Latin America. We'd often have people from Latin American or home, so I knew I wanted. So I was speaking foreign languages in high school. I'd, um I really loved the global village in my home, and ah, my grand parents were immigrants from Italy. So I love I, you know, diving into different culture. So I knew it was going to involve that. I couldn't put ah, finger on it until I think I looked at the idea of becoming a foreign service officer. I thought that sounded really cool. This isn't high school. You thought of that. I researched. Yes. Yes. So I did pick. Um, in college, I picked international relations as a major, and I really loved it. I think everything but economics. It's like that. Isn't it funny? Like my child. My daughter, as I mentioned to you, is making cookies here. Uh, I see her, especially with the podcasting, like she's loving the idea. And those little influences kind of creep up in there. Not necessarily intentionally, But it's I mean, it's it's it's commendable for parents who are at the home and being a good influence on their kids, and we know it doesn't always happen, but just those little sort of stepping stones were waiting there so beneficial for kids and just to encourage listeners to do...

...what you can, and I fail all the time is right now I just have my kids making cookies. My son's reading a book by himself. I could be there, but they know I was home all day with them. But, you know, you know, I fail in many areas, but if we have to our ability, Yeah, just to try our best and to be those little pebbles for them toe walk along. And that's what seems to have happened with you and your father. At least he kind of set. At least I love the experience he brought into our home and I love that he you know, I thought it looks so glamorous that he kept traveling 14 hours to Brazil, which probably wasn't on. And, um, you know what's great, Brian, when I think about it, that was a really great, um, thing about what we noticed on her parents and pull and think I would love. That, too, is my mother was a great entertainer because in this and ah, great cook. And so that's always been a part of what I love to do also. So you're right. We pull in those things that just feel uplifting and give us a charge. And good point. Yeah, we can a lot from we also get that boy. I'm not going to do that. That looks boring. I probably encourage them. You don't want to do this part of the job, but I'm doing so into college. Were you starting to define exactly what you wanted to do? So you are already on a path. I love the curriculum. And I loved my teachers. I really had a lot of great professors, and, um, I did have a great internship, um, at the U S. Information Agency in Washington, D. C. I was lucky. My parents, my grandparents lived there. So when I got the internship, um, I could just live with my grandparents and go in and and work down the street from the White House, so that was really cool. And I felt like a fish out of water, though, cause I was the only one. I grew up in the Midwest, and I noticed that everybody else was from these Eastern Ivy League colleges in the United States, and I'm like, Oh, where are you from? I'm like Oh, boy. Ah, you know, cause they it's a culture I found. And I did later live in Washington, D. C. After I graduated from college. That is very much about where did you go to school, and and where do you work now? And ah, and I was in my job out of college. Was not, you know, is taking the foreign service exam. I kept missing it by one point. Brian. I was just crushed. And then at the third time, I missed it by two points, and I said, Okay, I'm just got, um So I ended up at a market research firm with these really bright young people, was a the owner of the firm was only 30 at the time, and he had all of these out of college new grads doing on this market research in the banking industry. And I love the people. The work was kind of tough because I put us on the phone to market to marketing managers of banks at again. I'm like, Hi. Yeah. Do you want to talk to me about joining us and No, no, no. And it is almost like being back at the counter of the KFC? No. So, Yeah, but I great people there and a great experience living there. I lived right on Capitol Hill for that experience. Susan. Jumping ahead now, do you think? But you kind of mentioned it that in Washington there and there's for other pockets where it does where people perceive you in a grander light, depending on where you went to school, your socioeconomic status coming here to your life. Now, was that a Was your perception correct? Or were you able to strive anyway if you wanted to? Or is it? You know you're in this town. The only way you're able to succeed is if you go to these ivory, these schools or can you? You know it. Maybe it's a comfort, a self confidence thing that if you just do your work well, you will be able to succeed as well. That's them. Ultimately, that last part is true. That's true for anything. No matter what you do, because there's this driving us, there's this connection we can have to know it's our thing to Dio, but I do want to say, looking back, I think that was a leg up. There was less questioning about what you were going to Dio because you were trained at this place and came from this echelon. I'll say so, Um, it's a yes and no, there's a that leg up, but then it's still up to us to todo to deliver. I'll say So you're after your experience in Capitol Hill. Where did you venture off to Germany?...

I you know, when you're something Germany that came next. Bryant s Oh, yeah, I got an internship in Germany. Um, and this I've been in D. C for a few years in the Wild thing, and the young people at the time and in D. C often are thes limited positions with a congressman with the courts, you know, getting their experience before they go on to grad school. So it's constantly having to make new friends because my old friends or fairly new friends actually were relieving to do the next part of their journey. And so I thought, you know, I'm tired of trying to make meet new people all the time. I'm going to go somewhere. And so I had this opportunity because I spoke German. Um, and I still badly speak German um, to go to Germany, and I started to get my German brushed up. I worked at my dad's friend's cousin's shoe store in Coburg, Germany, and, um, you know, my vocabulary was centered around shoe lace and he'll and a vacuum cleaner. So I, um, you know, just got and they had a little dog, a little docks in. You know my name Susan. The dog's name was Suzie, so they'd start accidentally calling me by the dog's name. What's reading? Funny. Um, great experience. Love those folks. And then I went up to Dusseldorf and I did work, um, at a consulting firm where I basically was a glorified copy maker. And I didn't know you were injured. I got delivered and it was a great place again. I everywhere I've gone, I've just been able to reap the the heartfelt gratitude of a great relationship always meeting the next person on your journey that's actually building you. And may you know that that the people we meet along the way that we can take things from, just like with our parents. So that was great. And I lived in this little, um, Catholic rooming house in the old city of Duesseldorf with people from Poland, from France, from Finland. And we all had to speak German to communicate some new, some English, But we all kind of a German were listening to us. Probably sounded like a room full of it. Hodler's talking to each other, you know? So curious. So I understand that completely extend my Korean ability. Oh, really? Huh? How long have you been there? Brian is my over 10 years now, but that's not a good excuse for my ability. Ah, there's always time, But you probably have enough to get by. Right? Well, I have my dear wife was Korean, so she could help me the whole way through your ambassador that I just lean on her. She is my crush. Ah, wonderful. So, as you went from Germany, you obviously went to California. What was the transition there? Well, I I had a little bit. Oh, I took. I tell everyone that I came back from your cause. I traveled through Europe. I took all the money I made in Germany, and I won't my way through Europe through, um Austria, Italy, France, England and Scotland. And then I said, I came home broke, uh, fat and needed a job. So I stopped my parents. You're hungry for a job? Yes. Hungry for a job. And, um and so, yes, I have family out in California. That's always a great anchor, I think, cause you just having a friend or a family member makes it easier, I think to hop over to something else. Did you have a little bit of a grounding or landing pad? So, yeah, I had my aunt there and my grandmother was now out there, And, um, and I I looked for were not knowing what you're going to dio just you had a family knowing, just like here I am. And I probably took some temp jobs when I first got there. They're great to get you going when you first Ah, land somewhere, I think. Getting a temp job. Yeah. So you're not gonna believe this next job I had because I was really having trouble. And I was heartbroken over this one job. I really wanted there at Disney Point of all this experience, though Any inclination as to what? I was just flying by the seat of my pants. Brian, I really didn't want to work for a living. Frankly, it's like what I felt like I was, um, all along, even through school and and in the work life is much as I agreed we had to do this. It was like I was some...

...alien who came to this planet. Was like, What? We gotta work and pay bills and we have taxes. I mean, can we just do stuff that we want to dio? But so you mentioned this, though, because there's a lot I did that to almost up until I was 28. When I first came to create, I started taking things a lot more seriously, and there's lots of people who do it, and some people are doing it, you know, maybe a more risky way of doing it. But you didn't do it that way. You were going to a place where there's a place for unemployment, and even though you weren't sure of what you were doing, you were still making ends meet and you were in getting some very valuable experience that you can come back very valuable experience. That's true. But I was only I was following the Onley model that was modeled to me in my family and around me that the structures I went through through this was like, um you know, you goto school, you go to college, you get a job. And it was actually probably at that point where you know, you're You think OK, now it's time to get this is my model. Get married, have Children, you know, for maybe even by the house before you have the child. And And it was like this feeling like I was flowing through this model. Um, but not wholeheartedly. Just like I didn't know what else the model would look like. Now I dio there's lots of models, but this was my model. And I ended up getting a job through a friend through a big corporation. But in their collections department, Can you imagine? I mean, here I am. I'm still is kind and, you know, whatever. I'm like hyo me. Your car payments three months overdue. King can use in that to us. No, I don't. Don't stop calling me. It's o, um And actually, some people appreciated the kindness because too often they don't normally get it. And I'd actually get money that way. So, you know, that was it wasn't my favorite job, but I really learned some skills in that job. And it was the job that, um, actually got me over to the east Coast. I got transferred over to Massachusetts, and I wanted to move by that point anyway. And it was like the universe said, Great, We're gonna put you on a plane. Your car's gonna be driven out there, and you're gonna land right in Boston from one coast in the next. Yeah, And at this point, I'm in my late twenties and I'm wondering, am I ever going to settle down? And, um, I just gonna keep moving. So that was That was good. When I landed in Massachusetts, I felt home. I felt like New England. I got yet, you know, this was a place I've been to once before and had some sense of, but the access that we have a new England to the ocean, to the mountains, to the forests, to going to a city like New York or anywhere. It's a great launchpad to so many places. I'm from Nova Scotia so that there's a lot of comparison between main risk ocean and they're beautiful. I would love to go. That's on my bucket list. Bryant. It's a beautiful place. Yeah, wonderful. It's funny, though, how you can go to a place and you feel like home. Even though it wasn't your home. I think that's your soul saying this is our place. This is where, at least for now you landed, right, you know, and you don't feel like a nomad anymore. I didn't. I shall put it in my terms. Ah, I felt like, you know that almost that same feeling. If you bought a house and you walk into the home and you know it's your home, that's the one you're going to buy. That's kind of how I felt when I when I landed here in Massachusetts, Cinnamon, Rhode Island, which I feel I love Justus much. Yeah, it's funny. Just about two months ago, we bought our first apartment home. But House of private home and my dear wife was wanting that to fulfill her idea of life for 14 years now. Oh, yeah. Congratulations. Great. When we walked in, she was like, This is home like this is yes. That's the feeling. You just know you've arrived home. Your something in that? Yeah. Yeah. Yes. Score. Yeah, that's what was the new job that you were doing on these coast. Same job. I got transferred on, and Ah, yeah, And I ended up meeting my first husband there. My husband and ah, that was, um, really the road down to, um, that job ended. I'm thinking now that I've ended and I took a temp job at a financial place, and I was always in kind of on the perimeters of the financial industry. And this one put me right in it in in institutional...

...marketing for a big, um, big organization and again. And the people were so smart, so interesting. That kept me going. I never and and all of these jobs felt like I'd found me in them. I just felt like I found something I could do get paid for and enjoy on very general terms. But not like that soul fulfilling. I'm in my place kind of feeling in a lot of you don't find that Ah, lot of people don't because they think and this is me. Um oh. Well, I did the best I could. I'm just gonna keep doing the best I can and making the most Yes, definitely keep making the most of whatever you're doing and draw the gold from it, for sure. But as we keep going, I'll tell you that it's absolutely possible to do what you love. And it it does take a journey or a kick in the pants, which is mice. That's the way I So I think this is how you're getting into your in your finance at this point, you're married? Yes. And then everything is all pretty in a bow. Yes, yes, it's It's the checklist I was telling you about earlier. You know, I just finally checked off the marriage. The house? No, not right away. We we were in an apartment for a while and did not have a child right away. And and then, yes, that was that great feeling of walking into this house, which I now call this old house because it's so much work. But it was our house. And, um and then having this baby, I was I was pregnant when the house was bought on. So yeah, I checked everything off the list, but I also when in doing So I settled for a relationship that, um, I already knew was going to be very difficult. But I married what I knew because I had a parent with depression. So I was like, Oh, I know how to do this. You it's it's not conscious. I said that. It's like you fit your little peg into that, um, round hole that you are. You know that? Just bam. There you are gonna handle that with their luggage? Because I've seen it before. Exactly. Exactly. So I walked on the same kind of egg shells in a different way to make myself feel safe and not, um, get any of the what? And Sheffield calls depression fallout, you know, we're trying to, and it's a co dependent coping method. I mean, I didn't know any of this stuff. I just It was all unconscious. So, um, I set myself up for, um really a lot of challenge and unhappiness. It wasn't every day like that, but it was an overall pallor, I'd say over my life. Yeah. And Ah, my, um big wake up call. And And I want to back up and say my mother had breast cancer and she got it when she was 38 years old. She had a mastectomy of her right breast and little that I know that that would be my foreshadowing that at 38 years old, I had an 18 month old son and I'm in this marriage. I'm in the house of working full time. I'm taking a train into Boston 40 minutes away. I really didn't feel like there was enough with me to go around. I was just flat out exhausted and very disappointed. I felt like a failure, like, you know, You see, I was brought up in this model of you can have it all, woman, you know, you can have this great career. Ah, baby, you can have a fabulous home and you're traveling, And it isn't this glamorous. You know, you wear this shade of lipstick toe work, and he's awesome clothes and you put on the face and you go in. And it was all falling apart for me. So bad marriage wasn't That must have been in the fine print or the cancer must have been. You didn't see that? Yeah, I didn't see it because I was pushing down all these feelings to be, ah, annexed. Already a survivor, a different kind of survivor. And because of my family history, I had to start getting mammograms at age 35. And I've had a few, and I thought, Wow, I don't look like my mom. I'm not anything like my mom. I'm not gonna get cancer. Oh, well, I'll just keep going for these mammograms. And sure enough, it age 38. They kept calling me back into the room to do more films, And I'm I'm a frantic because I have to get back to have more about Hey, we got things I got. You know, I gotta pick up my kid at daycare. Can Can we hurry this up? And and finally, they're calling me and I can barely hear because the train is leaving, like, 15 minutes. I've gotta run, like, half a mile down the street...

...to catch the train. You know, I could have thought of something else to do, but I'm just on this schedule, Uh, and they're telling me No, we see something and you've got to schedule a limp back to me. Ah, and I'm falling apart because my mother lost her mother when she was 18 months old. And here I have an 18 month old son, and I'm already thinking I'm just like in this Catalan drink now. I'm just bawling. I made the train. I'm bawling all the way home, called my my mate, and, uh, I couldn't find my keys to the car, and he had to come and see me at the train station. It was, um, really. And the wild thing Brian is that was just a little cancer that ended up just being, um what they call stage zero. And I had this some back to me, and I was like, Whoa, what was that all about? Well, that was scary, but I had to have a follow up appointment with a radiation oncologist. And I'm already thinking, Hey, it was zero stage clean margins, which means they got it all. And the little boastful like See, I beat that. What was that all about? Sheesh! Wow. And then this radiation oncologist has a medical student with her. Do you mind if we just do a medical exam? You know, breast exam for the student, and I'm like, Sure, no problem, Doc. You know? And she's palpate ing the left press. It's great. She gets over to the right breast and stops and and looks at me and says, Has anybody talked to you about the lump in your right? Pressed what? You know, when she brings my hand to it, she brings the medical students hand to it. Look on, boy again. Unlike I don't have time for this, there was actually ah, book out at the time called Breast Cancer. Let me check my schedule. That was such I was like, Well, that's that's very important. And I had plans, Dammit! I was going to my, you know, high school reunion, and I was going on vacation. I don't have time to schedule another lumpectomy and yeah, I had to do it. I still did those those other things, and I fit it into my schedule. But I, um, had the same surgeon who did the other one. I'm like, Hi, doc, I'm back And he, you know, did the surgery and then came out and said it looked worrisome. And in my mind, I couldn't conceive what worrisome meant. I thought in my mind them it. Oh, it's definitely like the last one I wasn't going to go any higher than that. Yeah, I could make a deal with God that Okay? It's probably just like that one had no big deal, but no, it was, um, invasive. They had to do a lumpectomy. They didn't get it all, Um, it was in my lymph nodes and, ah, because they didn't get it all. I had to have a mastectomy. And that was the rial journey of life kicking my butt and ah, telling me No, you don't have a schedule anymore. You gotta lie down. You got to do this whole year of treatment and just being really with yourself. Yes, you'll have support. You know, there's this support around me, but it's a journey we can only take alone and with your spirit. And that was the greatest journey of my life. You know, the rest that we, um that came to be was that my marriage ended after this, but this was the molding journey that prepared me to hear that my mate didn't want to be married anymore because I knew I had just come through cancer. It wasn't that I loved hearing that, um, I barely had any hair on my head, Uh, was like, um I'd say over a year since the whole thing had started, Um, and maybe four or five months since I got the cancer free diagnosis and I knew my marriage was in trouble. We had gone to couples dealing with cancer workshop at this hospital, and he said some things that were really alarming about our relationship. But I didn't deal with it then because I had to focus on getting better. I knew that I was getting near the finish line of being done with cancer treatment, and I had to shelve it. I couldn't. I just I consolidated that. I compartmentalized that for another time, and this was the time I brought it back out. And I said, You know, we got at work on this. We got to get back to where we were, and he's nodding his head and he says, actually, I think I need to live alone. This'd is kidding. This is with you, as you said with barely any hair. Oh, yeah. I mean, I don't I can never put myself in your shoes. But...

...the only word that I'm thinking is hope it doesn't seem crasher there, but feeling naked like yes, so vulnerable. I guess there's a better word. Yes, Thank you. You're leaving me like this now? Yeah. Yeah. And And it was hard, you know, looking back that I imagined I can now do this being in his shoes, knowing how unhappy you are. He hung in there for the whole treatment, really was a champion. And and now is like, Okay, we're getting to this part where I've got to be honest. And it was devastating. I went up to the bathroom and I say, yelled to God, Do you think I could just have a year off? Yes, I was like, Are you kidding? May on da. And I was like, What about that baby? You know, sleeping up in, um, that broom right now? What about him? And, you know, he was like, Please don't make me feel any more guilty than I dio And, uh and I recently sarcastic at this point, I'm like, Yes, sorry. Gosh. Sorry about that. Um, yeah, she's, but yeah, that's that is the truth. That it was a heart wrenching decision, but on my end, it was like you got to be kidding. He was, and that's Yeah, everything's getting wrenched. Yeah, everything's getting wrenched, and I am. It took me a while to get my brain around That It really did. I I use this phrase, Brian, when I when I speak in public that I thought the universe was kicking my butt, and over time I came to learn it was actually cleaning. My house was clearing this new platform. And here we are, talking about work. It led to the work I'm doing now. It didn't happen right away. I did end up being separated. I did go back to my job where I'm working on corporate world on taking the train and every day, Um, I I work with great people. I love the collaboration. Ah, the work itself was dull to me. It was same stuff, different day kind of work. And, um, I felt even more obligated to that work. That would be, you know, that idea of having benefits and ah, being in a position where I could care for my child if anything went wrong. We also feel you had less places to turn. So you couldn't turn to your husband because he wasn't there a lack of seeming options as well? He was a very good co parent. He really was good about helping picking him up from daycare and wanted to be in his life. So thank God for that. You know, that was not everybody has that part of the story. But I did feel that his care was largely on my shoulder, and so is the care of this house. I mean, looking back, I probably would have moved into a condominium, but I thought of the idea of having this backyard from my child and holding holding it all together. I still was in that mentality of holding it all together. Um, and and isn't that interesting? Because a year later, ah, tree fell on my house and I got pneumonia. I'm like, Oh, man, I was mad. I was like you. Now I'm like, I already gave at the office. I don't need this. Your when you're off got my one year off, and, uh wow, that was wild. Really wild. Um, it was Ah, wild journey. And it was still showing me, You know, I was happy to be alive. I started dating somebody a wonderful guy from France that I had met at my friend's wedding. So we had a long distance relationship, which was perfect as a single parent. I wasn't dating somebody in my town all the time. It was just a nice, wonderful thing. We were on the phone s o. I was feeling such appreciation for myself in this because it was somebody who really adored me. And I started to see myself through his eyes and appreciate myself, even though at this point and recently had reconstructive surgery, I always kidded that my torso look like a road map for all the surgery I'd had on it. So it took a lot of trust to reveal it to anyone. And, um, it was just a wonderful way of through his eyes accepting my own body and my own gifts, uh, has a woman, and as a person that led me to search for even more. And it was really at the point where a few years into this I got laid off. I got laid off from my job and I saw it again because of cancer and divorce. I thought, Oh, another deck has been cleared for me. I wasn't doing it on my own. And and we hear what? Um, my mentor, Mary Morrissey, loves to call.

Ah, the signals that we all have off longing and discontent. We may be able to push down the longing and make excuses for what else it is we may want to do. But discontent keeps punching away at you. I don't like this. This isn't me. How much longer do we have to do this? You know, in this we moment of being with our spirit, And so this clearing of the deck through the job, I thought, okay. And I'm still trying to do it the logical way, which is okay, what's out there that I would love more than this. And I was looking for I was into holistic health very much after my breast cancer. So I was looking for and I'm in marketing, so I thought I could market for holistic health organizations whether there's an industry format that I could, um you know, um what they call that a a group that forms ah, group of holistic companies. That is a representative, that I could help market and promote holistic health to other people. It wasn't happening. Although I found in the searching that's wonderful organization in California called the American Holistic Health Association. I reached out to long to say, Hey, anybody out here on the East Coast I could contact and they said no. But we love it. If you would write about your health journey, we have people sharing that, and they ended up publishing my, um, work. They ended up publishing something I had written, and I didn't even I just was starting to see myself as a writer. Yeah, I was starting to write I I'd written a book that I I wanted to call. Um, I can't believe this all just happened to me because I just did a big download, a big dump of whatever just happened to me between cancer and divorce. And this this French guy. It was just like, Wow, um, and and so, um, that was my idea of Well, I'm I'm a writer. And in the meantime, Facebook was a big thing then and I had barely gotten onto it. And that's where I started learning about life coaching. Something popped up and it was Mary Morrissey Ah, in her life mastering institute that began with a sentence which you like to be a speaker. A teacher, A coach like click. Yeah, that sounds good, huh? And so Ah, from there I did. The training was online training. And then we go out to where they are in California, and we do a certification program and your meeting other coaches, You're really getting a great sense of, um, of what this program can do. You get it while you're in the training. And the thing I would say to anybody else who wants to be a life coach is that you want to align with, Not on Lee. Um, the training that's involved in it. You want aligned with the messaging that you believe everything that your founder believes, or the person of the organization believes him. For me, it was living a spirit driven life, listening to longing and discontent, knowing what those signals are and then being given away. That's codified. I already believed everything this person was saying, but to have it packaged up in a program instead of just spewing random things. I learned through cancer and divorce, putting it in a package of transformation for other people and I chose my clients. You know that phrase, Brian, Your messes your message. So I knew that my clients were agreed to be, ah, women coming out of life altering Ah, adversity you? Yeah, that's when I felt like my work life started coming alive. And did it happen right away? No, I didn't go out there and become a million dollar coach right after I started. Is it possible I But it is not. In my experience, I didn't do it that way because everybody has certain paradigms about what it's supposed to be like. And And if I didn't work hard enough, you know, it wasn't gonna happen that way. But what I could do is find another job knowing what I know. And it was in the financial industry and start working in the background, getting clients, public speaking, getting a website, creating a block, getting into radio ultimately, and instead of walking in as a corporate cubicle worker hoping to be a coach. One day I flipped. And it's the very training like I do with my clients. I started walking into the office is the coach who was working in the corporate world and people started to see me differently, and I and my colleagues would start coming to me with coaching questions which I loved, and I would keep working on my business while doing this. So I called it my bridge job and, ah, I held on to my bridge job,...

...though I held onto it thinking I had to be at this perfect place to lose it. And once again the universal, you know, it was like up or laying you off, unlike okay, and I called that moment instead of anguish ridden. It was more like when I call scary happy, you know, they're cutting me loose, you know, Here I go. And before I left the door, I had a new client and a speaking engagement, and I thought that was a sign from the universe, like, Okay, you got this, You got this. It doesn't mean everything's been perfect, but opportunities have always kept presenting themselves to me, and I've always listened to What's the next step? What's the next step? Because that's all we have. Nobody has that whole. Well, unless you have such a planned career, I'll say that could that could happen in the corporate world you have a planned career, but in this kind of entrepreneurship, I'll say It's really that What's my next step? What's my next step? What's inspiring me? What's that guy Join? Oh, I'd love to do that. I don't follow a rule book, but I follow my internal zinger. You know that part that goes, Yeah, you should do that. And there's always a little bit of fear around that. There's a little bit I always know when I feel a little bit of nausea and I want a faint I'm supposed to do that. And that was true with, um, getting into radio. Um, it's why I had it in mind that I wanted to be on a radio program. I actually wrote it. I'm in writing in a journal. I said this year What I want to dio I want to be on a radio program within two weeks. Somebody was marketing to me to be on their radio station transformation talk radio, and I thought, Whoa and it scared me at first like oh, I said I wanted that, But oh my God! And so I said yes. But it was like through this woozy feeling and I always know afterwards, just like the life coach moment where I sigh. I invested to be a life coach with no job in a single parent. Was this calm that came over me after feeling all the anxiety was, I did the right thing. I did it and it's my next step. It's my next step. Susan, can you speak when I start reading about you? I thought it was It's great. I mean, I think your clientele are mainly women. But even just listening to you, I know your message is not solely for women. It's universal. Yeah, sure, Yeah, is when you mentioned how you're looking at people in their setbacks and bringing out the gems in them. Do you have some examples? I mean, whether it's divorce or cancer or job loss, you know, as you and I see there's so many brands or flavors aren't there. Yeah, and I was thinking about this a moment ago before we started. It's just so many people go through adversity, and it would be so beautiful to hear everyone's story because everyone does have a story. Everybody has its and it's it's there to awaken us. It's never meant to smash us, and I love that you use the word gems, Brian, because that's the name of a book that I'm just finishing the manuscript on called Pulling the Gems from Adversity. And that's the invitation. To be honest, I looked it up and I found it. So it's not like I guessed a Well, it's a great segment was good. It's a great before, so yeah, but then that's a great title of a book. And it's just so wonderful because there's so many people who go through the things that they go through and they use them and they're horrible things and many there has enough X. We want argument that excuse to say that I would understand if you wanted to give up, because that is horrible. But even in the tragedies that people go through, there's so many wonderful gems that can be taken from them. That's right, that's right. And that's the invitation. We don't have to take the invitation. We can let that defeat us. What I fine happens when we let these things to feed us is life keeps trying to wake us up with something else. We get into a pattern until the pattern doesn't serve us anymore. So it's almost like graduating when we take the invitation. And for me, what were my gems learning that I played small, that I didn't think it was possible for happiness in my life. That I had such low self esteem and low expectations. And that was the do over for me is to put myself in a place of reverence from for my life and for what I can bring to the life and that there are no mistakes were all here for a purpose. And when were facing, especially our mortality.

Because, let's face it, we all have a beginning date in Annandale. Nobody gets out of here alive. So, um, that is my invitation to your listeners, Brian, is that we have to consider. And in the book I put in the five stages and the first one is called Holding Firm in a storm. What are the mindsets? What can we do for ourselves while we're in it? So many of us try to resist, um, hide and there's things we can do, Ah, to give herself some peace and allow some help to come in. And then going through past that. You're coming out of the adversity. There's the invitation to start considering Pull out a pen. Really? Reflect What did I What is different about me now what is coming to me now? Um, what would I love my life to look like now? What are the new possibilities that I never gave myself permission to consider before? What are my longings and discontent? And not everything can come with you. You can't hold onto resentment. That's another section of my book. Not everything can come with you. Resentment. Poor self esteem. There are some things that have been hidden in our closet for so long. This paradigms thes negative beliefs and habits we've had. We gotta clean out the closet. It's just like going to your closet and saying, You know what? This doesn't fit me anymore. I'm gonna wear this now. I've got to go shopping for for what I know is in here and and then finally advancing boldly. So you've gotten to the point where you're discovering new possibilities. Your cleaning out your closet. Now let's go for it. Let's go for your dream. Don't have to go back. Some people try to cobble back their old life again. Now where was I? And they even insert like I could have inserted the same kind of made again if I hadn't learned that message. We have to see. What part did I play in my drama, right? That all the world's a stage and were merely players. As Shakespeare says, Here we are on this life stage, we have this avatar minus called Susan DiLorenzo, and I'm playing a part Well, what if I want a new role, right? The avatar doesn't necessarily change, but the role changes because I've given myself, Ah, a new stage to be on. And it's a higher stage of awareness. That's what I want. For everyone is just to keep checking in and getting the awareness on what is my part in my adversity story so I can put that behind me, take the gems and build with these gems of awareness on this new platform that's really gonna set my soul on fire as you say that I'm thinking of someone holding a tree and a storm going by in the storm being gone, and they're realizing their unscathed, raising their hand, enjoy and jumping along happily and joyfully knowing that they made it through. And in doing so. As you said, you can't bring your old ways with your year old close your old, your attitudes and unforgiveness and a newfound gratitude in your purpose given life. And I think that's one thing that strips stripped away from people nowadays is we're just just random things with no purpose. No, you certainly have a purpose. I don't know your purpose or any other persons purpose, but I surely know you have one. Oh, yeah, you're here. There's a precinct. Yeah, it's Ah, it's not random. And and, uh and I love to come from, I'll say the knowledge that we chose to be here, that it wasn't just like, Oh, somebody just threw me on the earth. And now what? Ah, there's a checking in connecting moment of the divine in us that I love. And you said something beautiful about the tree which I wanted to go back to, which is yes, we've been shaken like this tree in a storm. We may have lost some leaves, but we're still here. And that feeling of resilience and power from being the tree in the storm. Ah, is something you don't want a list. That is one of those gems. Hey, you want to say good for May? Really good for May. I'm standing. We had a typhoon here two days ago and I stayed in my apartment and I videotaped the typhoon going through our apartment area and the trees were literally bent rate over. And I sent it to my dear wife because she was at her mom's and I was supposed to go pick her up. She's is the time to pick us up. Yet I took a video and sent the video. Is that? I don't think so. But those trees air perfectly up right...

...now, right? And and they're probably stronger for it. Some, you know? Yes, Herr Cultural way of some sort. Yes. In there. So many examples in nature off. Ah, great ways of being right being the piece. That's the eye of the storm, right? The center of the storm And I love the words circumstance. Circumstance is this right? Circles circum and then stance. We aren't What's happening to us were standing in the center observing it. It is our feedback off all our thoughts all are paradigms. All our ways of believing or coming back and saying this is what you have created for yourself. And until we own that guess what keeps happening here you are here. Your thoughts here are your beliefs. You don't think Ah, life is very good. You don't think you're good enough. You're going to get all the feedback that keeps proving to you that you're right. Whatever you believe. You're right. Right? What is that Henry Ford phrase. Where do you think you can or you can't? You're right. Yeah. So many people that are self defeatists. They I mean, the other almost looking for a reason. Teoh. It's a it's often model for us. And I think, Yeah, I think we can see that in her own family sometimes or in the groups who fall into you know, that phrase. Misery loves company. Also, you know, we can all agree that excuse the language. Life sucks, you know, And you can be in the club that says, See, there's another look at that. There you go again. Well, but just like I saw about it, right? And yet the people that are building their lives are going toe. There's not that you don't acknowledge the facts that something unfortunate is happening. But you're looking for the gold. You're saying Wow. Look, it's like that, Mr Roger. We have Mr Rogers and there he always talks about in a crisis. Look for the helpers. Because what does that happen? You see somebody, you know, rescuing the animals during Hurricane Katrina, building in a bringing people into their homes, that whose homes were lost in a tornado. What does that do to our spirit and uplifts us? So look for the helpers. Yeah, and we can do that in our lives with whatever. Good. There isn't our allies. We want to focus on that and then create more. I think Cove it is, is showing some of those types of people who have the same perspective is you as well that are still working, Still driving. It's driving, Still going after their goals or dreams and their passions while the other people are. So it's over, you know? Look. Oh, yeah. This is This is never gonna end. We're all gonna die. Yeah, there there is an end date. I know. I felt that way with cancer. Like Wow, where wins my in date on that one because that was a long year. But some people have it even longer. Some some, uh, chronic illnesses and other diseases go through years of treatment. And, uh, I think that the thing we have to hold onto is there isn't in date or I love this phrase, Brian, this is what it looks like. Well, everything's coming together that I really believe in this just like in my own life. There's a shakeup going on to create something even more beautiful for our world, and this is what it looks like. What if this is what it looks like? And instead of the wonderful old are EUM song, it's the end of No, actually, that's a great song used. It's the end of the world as we know it, and I feel fine and I feel fine because its like that whole idea of holding. And I do believe what we're talking about is the energy we bring is reflected back to us. Imagine that on a mass consciousness scale, holding a vision of the earth we want in this time of really feeling kind of dark right now, and in divisive is very divisive, but everybody wants peace for the world. Everybody wants harmony for the world. We may not agree on politics, but we know that is a no more war, right? So we can still hold a vision for the world that create creates a mass consciousness and and helps people treat each other better. Susan, what is it that you do now like maybe covert has changed the way you do things. But what would be a regular week for you now? Yes. I still connect with people like you had love doing these podcasts. And, ah, and in sharing positive messages that people have been talking to were also positive. I love that I'm working Teoh. Just like I said, I'm on the last chapter of my book and then I'm going to be going back in and passing, giving another past two and then handing it over to an editor. So that's taking up a lot of my time. I still have clients, so I love we. You know, we just talked on the phone, and there's something about I'm happy to do.

Zoom with clients, but I think there's something about that disembodied voice against people a little more courage. If they can't look me in the eyes to reveal a truth that needs to come out there for us toe work on. So there's that aspect to the clients. I love being in nature. I take myself. We live down the street with some woods. We have a beautiful farm nearby where I feel like I'm in a Jane Austen novel. And I should be wearing a high waisted dress with my little spaniel looking with eso being in nature, we have a dog. Having a pet is so awesome because they really help us during stressful times and, um, our talk. It's a hustle that way. Um, so that's my week, and I certainly connect with family and friends on the phone, and I try not to be in places where I have to wear a mask too much because it makes it reminds me of, Oh, we're still in this right? I don't want to be. I have to wear him where I have to wear them, and even then I smile under my mask. I went at least be able to see that I'm you know, I just want people see. Okay. My eyes were smiling at you, even though I'm kind of anonymous right now. This is your second book, Will it not? You had. Thank you. Cancer as well. You know, im I That's gonna be my second. Because that was the book I said was I can't believe this all just happened to me and I didn't have the writing skills. I had the download. It was all in chronologically, no character development, nothing. And I combined all the things that I learned that I'm putting into this book. I had two books in one, so actually very things from mentioning that, um, it shows me too. I should probably there somewhere on my platform that's showing up. And I got to take a town. Um, but that thank you. That is the book in my on my radar screen is going back and doing the work on that in making it a straight memoir without hate. Try acupuncture, try Breaky. You know, cause I was think this happened to me and you should do this. And it was just a big jumble of a book with great information, But it would take the reader's eyes be spending, but it's a great book of them are great ideas with titles, and you're gonna bring them together. But the idea of just pulling, you know, getting the good things out of the bad things. And they're they're they're always there and that we shouldn't overlook them. And we should look hard for them as looking for diamonds takes some time. That's a good point, Brian. That's a good point because it's not like we miraculously say, Well, I'm cancer free. Let's see now there's some down. There's some Deke, you know. What is it? Decompression? Yes, so were decompressing thes. Things kind of floated. It's not like you just pull out your clipboard and you're just making this list of all your gyms from adversity. It's really when you're fire is let go or downsize, it's You're not skipping out of the office, not at all. And you know what? I'm gonna bring up another good point. I saw a therapist and ah, and it's the same thing with life coaching. It's a great way to help download this stuff. Also, what is it like you doing a lot of things that I think you're doing a lot of great things for both men and women. What is difficult aspect of what you're doing? Maurin the speaking and in your writing and in your coaching? What is something do? It's a great question. I think it's it's still the idea of refining my message. And, um, I'll say I'm not a big marketer. I love attracting clients. But ah, I'm getting marketed to so much by different, um, things. You should do it this way. You want a PR person? Do you want this? And it's almost overwhelming to me that I I go back to that spark of. I'm just going to post these videos now. I'm just going to put, you know, send this out to my email list, and I feel like it's almost organically growing this way. And when I get that zing feeling or the light headedness thing that I get, I'll probably say, Okay, I gotta to that. But yeah, that would probably be my greatest question Mark, I'll say of of procedures there is that Ying and Yang with you have these marketers coming for you, but you also have other people saying No, just content. Just keep putting it out there and more natural flow to it. Are you Are you seeing our use hearing or listening to people telling you to refine your message? Or is it you understanding who you are in your growth? Saying dance, need toe, find its internal refinement? And I think that's the call of the spirit and all of us, whether whatever work were doing or whoever were being in the world. It's It's that refinement of really and getting that really close...

...communication to your divine and and really saying, Am I being authentic and in my integrity? Ah, with what I'm saying, what I'm doing and how I'm serving in the world. And that could be a simple way even if I had stayed. Ah, a Kentucky fried chicken if I was bringing in every day knowing I was making people have a wonderful experience every day that they knew they were going to see my face at the counter, um, and that I was making a difference in that felt good in my heart then. That's great with what you're doing with people. With setbacks and the disappointment people are facing what is, you know, one of the most satisfactory examples or what is it you finding most joyful and what you're? That is an easy question to answer. Watching or hearing will say this to the light. Come on in my client's face or when I speak and people come up and they're so excited because they finally kind of got it out like a line on a dream they had had that they may have put away for a while. But they're starting to feel excited about their lives again. And ah, and then seeing the lessons like the whole thing about that, like going on in the, um the possibilities that are sparkling in their eyes at that moment are the greatest gifts to may. I mean, if this is another good reason that I'm not on zoom with my clients, sometimes I have tears coming down my face because I'm just so moved in my clients and and I know other coaches will agree with me on this, too, is they say, such gold there they're realizing so much that I'm writing away with a pin like that is brilliant. That is brilliant, what you just said, and we record our calls because I want my client to go back and listen to themselves and hear what they're saying because they're going to have that much more fortification to move forward. Susan, If someone wants to get into coaching, transformational coaching and wherever they are, they might be a KFC. They might be in Germany. It's for anyone who feels the call. How would you direct them? Or some advice you would give them toe, find their path into transformational coaching? That's a great question for me. It was so easy. Like I said, Brian had just popped up and I was like, Yeah, you're my girl. You're saying everything I already believe some, that is. Do some research there. I know if you Google this now for May, my company, they just changed their name from Life Mastery Institute to Brave Thinking Institute, which is a great name is That's what it takes, brave thinking to move your life along. Um, so brave thinking is to do it would be the group that I It was founded by Mary Morrissey, and she is in this business, the longest over 40 years. You're not going to find people that have been doing transformation work this long, And so I really think they're they're wonderful. You're gonna find other programs. So what I would highly recommend is that you are aligned with the message from the beginning that you're already like I am on board with this message and then look at how your training look at how you're taking your client through this information. Does that all resonate with you because you're gonna have to do the work first, you're gonna be going through the training first and in working on yourself before you ever get out there with your clients as a transformational coach, speaker or author what? What would you like people to understand about what you do that they may not understand? May see you up on a stage or conference room were online. What would you like them to understand? Whether it could be something difficult or just so they have maybe a better appreciation of what you're trying to. I love that question. Yeah, I think you might be under the impression if you don't. If you're not familiar with life coaching that this coach is gonna tell you what to do that I'm just going to tell you. Oh, you want to do this? Well, here, follow the, you know, follow these steps and and it's really about holing out what's inside of you. I'm gonna give you the tools that help you formulate a dream. Ah, get rid of your I said not everything can come with you. Ah, get working self esteem. How are you going to deal with failure? Because, boy, if you take this journey, you're gonna be up against a number of things for your questioning your abilities and and know how. Eso we're packing a toolbox for you. And in the meantime, important questions are being asked of you so that we can draw those things out of you. It's evocative coaching...

...where you're all of a sudden gonna hear yourself saying as the client that the things you needed and I'm going to repeat, be reflecting back there. Some of the negative things they're saying, coming up with questions that make you go. Do I really believe that's true? Or is that just a old pattern for me that I've got to clean out? Yeah. I mean, as I just grew up in sports, knowing that the coach doesn't play the game for you. The coach gives you some of the plans, The lessons, Um, but it's you who? That's what you're doing. You're giving life coaching lessons. That's it. They're going to get out on the field. Brian, that's a great analogy. Yeah, I can't get out of there in the field with them, but I make them. And what is? What's Doesn't coach do they make you accountable? Yeah, so when we get going and you're taking some brave moves, right, you're using your break thinking and then you're moving into action steps, but they don't have to be giant. There's a great phrase that even baby steps will get you up Mont Everest if you keep taking them. And that's the other thing in transformation. Yes, certain things can happen quite quickly for us, the light, bulk and all of a sudden just come on and we're going to take those steps. But we compete ourselves up. We look at other people we wish to emulate, and we see them. It's overnight successes. We don't see all the work that that it took to get there, and so we want to give ourselves permission to take every step of the journey. Time is going to pass whether we do something with it or not. So we might as well be taking the steps to make our hearts sing and make our hearts sing. In the meantime, just knowing that we're doing this, we're doing this thing, Susan, and it's gonna take whatever time you're leading into my next question, which all of this interview has been. Good advice. But for my listeners, who maybe just getting into work, discouraged with their work, you know, maybe, as you were in finance, you were doing it. It was part of a necessity. Almost. How would you offer some encouragement for them to keep going and maybe diverge or yes, find again? That motivation toe why they're doing what they dio to why we were I will tell your listeners that they owe it. Tiu, I'm just gonna say you you, uh you owe it to yourself to at least find out what you would love. And in those signals are already in there. You may have suppressed them, but those air easy to draw out again. There's so many ways to get clear. And you may already know this and and think? Well, these are all the reasons why I can't write family responsibilities, benefits That's always a pickle in. And what I say is I didn't do it overnight either. I kept You can keep your job and still work. It's something you love doing. You can be the singer. You could be the artist. You can be the life coach you can. Ah, there's something in you that needs to be expressed. And when you don't that that disappointment has to go somewhere in your body, whether through some negative thinking. Ah, think poorly thinking about yourself that you don't have what it takes and you drew the short straw like That's what I thought. But it's not telling you to quit your job. Or maybe you feel you can. That's fine, too. You're gonna know that part, but all I know is it's not all or nothing. There is a building process that can go on in the background. While I was walking into that office, I was calling up the library to see if I could speak in public. I was writing articles. I was building a website. I got my first few clients, so it's just that idea of, you know, it's the stuff you're doing at while nobody's looking. Even that's going to keep building your life and get support. You don't have to do this along. I love you can get support. I love This is what you're saying because I find a lot of people will say, Drop everything you're doing and go do with you what you love But you're saying you conduce do something and do it your love And then as they come together and wait till you see yes, yes, you'll see that it becomes your launch. Patton, right? You're building your launch pad. Let's say in my method, you know, and you'll hear other amazing stories. There is something about taking a huge risk that that that makes a quantum leap. But it's it's It's what you're able to withstand, I'll say in your in your personal life. There's some people that can rip off the Band Aid, right, and they just let it go. But others who need that feeling and they feel responsible for a family. I think that's a great way to go. Susan, I know you said you're on radio. Do you still have the podcast to thrive. No, I quit...

...that, um I'm doing just this. Uh, Brian, I'm just doing, um, guest guest appearances because it's so much fun. I'm not writing all the episodes like I was ah, in 2018 and 2019. That was rich experience in most of those episodes of my blog's have gone in and some form into this book. Then I'm putting out now. So it was such a rich experience. And my plan is to go back to podcasting once I'm done well into getting this book on its way and out the door. Well, I'll have the time. Sure. This book pulling the gems of adversity will be good. Are there other ways people can get in contact with you to reach? Yes. Yes, easy enough. So I invite your listeners to find me in two places. Also, just to get a sense of if you haven't already Ah, you can see my blog's. And here's some other radio episodes. Yeah. Is Susan DiLorenzo dot com s u S A N D E L O R e nzo dot com There's a lot about me there. Ah, you can also sign up for my email list. I promise I won't spam. Um, I'm very much a once a month. Or if not that, if if even that I'm on a really a good professional Facebook page to where I put in a little five minute videos about overcoming adversity. And it's facebook dot com forward slash dream Coach Susan, and it's a capital D. C and S in that restaurant in case. And so they will always see a little snippet event inspiration around, coming out of adversity and building into a new life on that one. A swell. And then my email Susan at Susan di Lorenzo dot com. Susan, you mentioned you live out your farm and you like to take a stroll. But what is it you do for rest besides that? You're busy, and, um, I'm a piano. I love to play the piano, and I love Yeah, I did say walking deny a meditation and reading, and anything that causes laughter is good, too. How would you say in your experience, from getting your first K f g C job to traveling the world from coast to coast? A swell? How has work been a constant in your life to encourage listeners of the importance of work and how his work help. Whether you shape the work that you were in or how it has shaped you. How is work been there for you through your career? So all right, great question, Brian. For me, I'll say it's about building relationships with others. Ah, creativity has been huge for me in any drama I've had. And when it was less than what I could do, it always felt very constrictive. But yes, relationship relationship with myself in being an integrity that's always huge for May and and then finally, um, just the joy of putting in a good day and knowing you help someone is in some ways is a great feeling, even whether on a team or delivering what you said you were going to deliver. Susan, I appreciate your time, but I have one final question, and that is why do you work? It's an answer to an internal call inside of me, and initially I was like I said in the earlier part of our, um, talk. Brian, I was thinking Why we have to work? Yeah, Why do we have to do do this like drama made by people like No. 15. I knew I was going to do this and I was going to do this. Why I'm like this is a terrible set up. We should just be playing and learning stuff goes as a kid. I was like outside in exploring animals, rocks, snakes and everything and and so this idea of going into a building and sitting in a classroom, and now I'm gonna go and sit in a cubicle. I never thought that I never got that, but when I felt the contribution in the connection, then it It's natural. It's a natural feeling as much as the players because it's a form of play. Ah, and I can always find something good and every job I did. It's always a part of that growth. Susan, I like what you have on your website. It's as you work together to help sustain belief while taking inspired accountable action. And that seems from this interview what you're doing to help people who have faced setbacks. It maybe not even so obvious setbacks in people's lives but willing to pull those gems Oh, from people and...

Susan DeLorenzo, I truly pre appreciate your time here today. And it was very nice meeting you. Thank you, Brian. It was a lot of fun. I so enjoyed our conversation. And I just want to wish all the best to you and your listeners. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian. Be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others. So they to be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive a joyful day in your work.

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