WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 107 · 1 year ago

#107 Ross Rebagliati -Ross' Gold 'n Olympian - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ross Rebagliati is a Canadian Olympian. Ross won the gold medal in the 1998 Nagano Olympics Games in the Giant Slalom. Since then, Ross has continued to work hard to provide for his loved ones. Most recently he launched Ross'Gold which is a smoking and accessories company.

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https://www.instagram.com/rossrebagliati98/?hl=en

...welcome to why we work with your host Brian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which will be an encouragement to us all to get up. Get going on, keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here's your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian V, and this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure. Speaking with Ross Rebagliati, Ross is the 1998 Olympic gold winning snowboarder from BC Canada. He is also now the owner of Ross Is Gold. Today I want to find out from him how hard it is to be an Olympic champion. But also how valuable is it to him to stay true to your family and friends? Join me in my conversation today with Ross Rebagliati. I'm Brian V and this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure speaking with Ross Rebagliati. Good day. Fine, sir. Yes, It's good to be here, Brian. Thanks for having me. You just corrected me on your name. I pronounced in the introduction as Ross, Wrigley, Adi and it's there's no a g sound and a lot of people got that wrong. Everybody gets it wrong. But you know that's wrong. Is the new right? So I'm good. Asai said you have Ross's gold. So if people could remember you as that there are a foot ahead of the pack. Ross, what industry are you in now? And what are you up to nowadays? So officially, um, I'm part of the cannabis industry, but on the ancillary side, So we've come out with, um, are growing products first nutrients. The Ross Gold Nutrients is about to hit the the shelves within a couple of weeks. Now, we're just finalized the packaging, and we're dealing with the printers right now, so that's amazing. It's been a long time coming. Um, what? We've got pre rolls coming from our licensed producers that will be supplying the dispensaries here in Canada, as cannabis is now illegal substance that could be consumed on at a recreational or medical level. And so we've got yeah, host of other growing products like led lights coming out by Alias, and we've got working with pro mix soil on on the soil side of things. And then we're working with geneticists and laboratories toe create, uh, proprietary, raw, schooled strain that we can have our craft growers producing with our soil with our lights with our nutrients and with our consulting on on the growing so we could get a consistent product. And I think, you know, everybody wants to have that consistency when they buy their, um there cannabis. They wanted to be the same and get used. Teoh, you know what What branding is all about And that's ah, you know, being there and and supplying what? Your customers what they're expecting. So we figure that's the best system. And so we've got the nutrients, the lights, the soil, the genetics and we're putting together a package for our hand selected craft growers. And, you know, there's a lot of growers out there, but just like wine, you gotta have that. That passion, you know, for the for the cannabis to really, um, produced at that level. So yeah, it's an exciting business. And, you know, I think, of course, I've been part of the cannabis business officially since 1998 where when I was in Nagano, Japan, when I won the Olympics and then inadvertently tested positive for THC and was momentarily stripped of my medal. And then I was reinstated within a couple of days. Once they realized, um, cannabis wasn't on their list of banned substances, I was reinstated. So, um, it was at that juncture that I decided to embrace cannabis on a public level, even though prohibition was really Yeah. Ah, scary thing, actually, back then. And, you know, I did take a lot of, you know,...

...flak for being, you know, out of the cannabis closet and for being an athlete and for being an Olympic gold medalist. That was promoting, um, a substance that was on schedule one, you know, And it was a schedule one substance, and it was purported as as being a dangerous, uh, you know, just something that society didn't need it. And I was I questioned that. And by the time I got to Nagano and I learned so much just from my own experience on how cannabis helped me as an athlete, help me stay healthy. Help me not, um, go out and party and drink and, you know, really gave me the opportunity to be the athlete that I wanted to be, even though I was growing up and living in a, um, you know, a ski resort party town where skiing wasn't always the priority. Um, cannabis helped me keep skiing or snowboarding at the time. Um ah. Priority in my life and getting to the Olympics. So, Ross, you mentioned to me before we started that you come up. People come up to you nowadays and they think of you as Ross's gold. Yeah, they don't. So I'd like to get to know a little bit more about you. But a moment ago, did I hear Canadian geese flying by? Did I hear something? Is that what I just heard? Yeah. There they They're confused. I don't know. They, some of them don't go south at this date here and fly around in a circle together all winter, but yeah, no, that was Canadian geese. Most people have like, these computerized backgrounds. You don't have to move your phone, but you have one of the most beautiful sceneries behind you. This is your front yard. You show me a moment ago. You have a beach and lake and you do your water skiing on there like it's picturesque. It's epic. I'm telling you were in wine country. You're in the Okanagan, um, on the Narmada bench, you could look it up and, uh, it z really the epicenter of cottage country in Western Canada. Really? So we're really fortunate to be here. I was just skiing this morning. The local resort here is called Apex Mountain, and it is steep and deep, my friend. And there was a blizzard up there. I just got down. And it was just like ripping down the mountain about that interview with Brian and a on a personal note. Ross, I have a friend in Nova Scotia, Canada, and I thought of this earlier to say and I want to say his name is Chris Swartz Christopher Swartz, and he is an avid snowboarder. But as you know we are. We have little mountains on the East Coast, but he loves to go out west a much as he can. Would you be able to give him a shout out? He loves Volkswagon bugs and snowboarding like this is and for his whole life. If you ever go on his Facebook, he just loves snowboarding at has been advert snowboarder for a couple of decades because so could you give him Ah, shout out. Yeah, Brian. Right now. Brand Schwartz. Chris Christopher. Sorry. Christopher. Chris Swartz. Chris Short? Yes. You have any tips for him too? Well, I'll tell you what, you know. My my line is you find your limits and start from there. So that's that was kind of my philosophy Growing up, I think it's all about will power. And you know, if you're out there, you know, equipments important, everything. Hands and friend all you know, But But really, it's all about about passion and expressing yourself and not worrying about anything you know, other than what you're doing and being in the moment. You know it Zen thing to be up on the hill whether you're skiing or snowboarding. And on the Volkswagen side of things. Chris Schwarz. I have ah, sick are 32 and it's jacked so you can look that up. That's a Volkswagen as well. But yeah, I'll look you up on Facebook and we'll connect. Yeah, I'll see if maybe he'll go out west and you guys could could hit the trails together. That would be sweet good Ross getting people to know who you are. It's been a little while since the Olympics. Did you work as a kid before getting into snowboarding? Is there something that you did as a teenager? Pre teenager? Just something to make some money. Oh, yeah. I've had lots of jobs. Was your first job? I was a paperboy. Nice for about six or seven years. The morning paper. Um, six days...

...a week. I guess I started when I was around 10 on. I did it. Um, I probably did it for about four or five years. It was the had toe. Have it done by 6. 30 in the morning, and then I would go to school after that. So it was a little, you know, one of those That was my first job. And then, um, I worked up north in my dad's mining camps, actually as a teenager and spent a lot of summers even as young as great one. I was in northern Saskatchewan in exploring for uranium back in the seventies, 1978 was my first mining camp experience as a little guy. And then I started working in these camps when I was 17 18, and that's right around when I started taking snowboarding seriously. And then I was hired on as a coach after that to coach summer camps for Craig Kelly and his summer camps at Blackcomb Whistler Blackcomb. How old were you when you won the gold? So how or even how when did you start making money in snowboarding? To the point where you thought this could be a career. So when I was 15, I started snowboarding, and when I was 16, I was sponsored bye. Three or four different companies. Burton snowboards. You know, I already had ski racing. I wasn't getting any free equipment. We were paying for everything. And then as soon as I started because I ski raced until I was 15. And then I e found snowboarding and gave up ski racing, much to my dad's, you know, chagrin and gave it up and started snowboarding. And then by the next year, I was sponsored and, um, competing. I was sponsored by Burton Snowboards, Oakley sunglasses and I don't know, some other. So as you are sponsored and getting some money in, and then right up until the Olympics and after the Olympics. Did you work at anything else, or is it strictly in snowboarding or, you know, in winter sports? Yeah. I was able to just, um, actually know that what I did when I was 19 was I bought a house in Whistler when I was 19 and that waas in 1990. And, um, I had snowboard sponsors at the time, and I had a bunch of prize money that I used for the down payment. Maybe it was 91 actually. And I used to down the prize money for my down payment and the house, and Whistler was only 200 grand. But at the time, you could buy houses for $10,000 in Saskatoon. And so to buy one house, I could buy a whole block for the same price in Saskatoon. But I went for it anyways. Why did you go for a Ross at 19, buying a $200,000. How? I mean, that's 1990 one, right? That Yeah, that that's a fortune. Yeah, it was a fortune. Um, but it dawned on me that, um that was living at our families condominium and Whistler at the time, and I wanted to branch out on my own, and I didn't wanna be paying rent to somebody else's mortgage. You know, I wanted I figured that out even before I started renting as a teenager. And I was looking through the newspaper, and I looked at this ad for this cool Gothic arch, Um, in the woods. It was amazing, and it was 200 grand, and I put $10,000 down At the time, banks were just giving money away like you couldn't go wrong. And what happened was later that year, I lost one of my sponsors, and so I panicked being young, and I sold the house in Whistler and it sold for, like, 50 or $60,000 more than I was asking for it. And there was a bidding war on it, and I made 200 grand in less than a year. It doubled that year, and the light bulb went off in my head, and so I took the money, and instead of $10,000 I put down $200,000 on the next house. And then, by the time the Olympics came, I had already flipped like half a dozen houses in Whistler and was kind of paying for my snowboarding, but it wasn't really a job, right? I just signed, you know? And then I lived in the house and I rented out rooms. Um, I eventually started doing my own...

...renovations, and my last house and Whistler is like an epic. It was 7000 square feet, post and beam. Um, it had, um like there was five levels on it. There's three suites like it was aren't really right. Plus, the living house, like the living space in the main house, was over 2000 square feet. And then there was three suites and a giant basement. Um, do you still have some of that property or other properties besides your home? Now, do you still dabble in real estate? Yeah, we actually have Ah ah, Airbnb right now that we, um, rent out in Kelowna and it z beauty, right? I I put a artificial golf green in the front yard. It's less than five minutes from a really nice golf course called, uh, I think it's Bear Mountain, and then you have a website for that. Do you have a site for that? Or how people. How can people getting contact with that? I'm not familiar. I know Airbnb, but I've never add Ventured in one right now. You can just DME on Instagram or Facebook Ross Rebagliati, 98 were literally putting the code lock on it like this week and and listing it so it's it's brand new. As you can see, we're on the lake. We just moved here like, a month ago. Um, and this is a family property that our family has had And in, um, you know, for decades now on it, it sits empty pretty much in the winters. So were, you know, because of the, you know, the situation in the cove, it and everything. We decided to get crafty and sort of maximize because we don't really know. You know what the future holds? There could be, like, some variants, you know, throwing a wrench in tow into everybody's plan. So we figured that we would move into the cottage Airbnb the house, and you know what I do for a living as far as my nutrients And the whole raw school stuff is remote, like I don't need to be in in a office or anything like that. So I'm flexible like that. So as you are buying houses, flipping things, making money is even a teenagers. And then your twenties you win the gold medal the height of your career. What was the trickle effect after, Say the who? La la The celebrity of you? When did you or did you? But I think you always were down to earth and ready to work again. And when did that occur for you? Yeah, that's a good one. I mean, for a long time, I was too proud to work. You know, like Ross Rebagliati can't just get a normal job anymore on, uh, you know, I was down to Earth, but that was experiences where you have, say, seven or 8000 people jamming the Eton Center. Or you got a whole entire international airport full of fans and screaming girls wearing wedding dresses And, um, you know, smoking joints with Keith Richards right before he goes on stage with Mick Jagger. You know, hanging out with Dan Ackroyd and the roots guys and in Toronto, meeting supermodels and race car drivers and famous boxers and, you know, like, kind of as down to earth as anyone could be, still lift you up a bit. It's part of, um you know what happens. It's like, uh, medicine. If you you take a certain medicine, you're gonna feel like this. And that is a certain kind of medicine that, um, people deal with in different ways. I'll tell you that I could relate to the people that have ah struggle with, um that sort of a lifestyle and being I recognized not only by name, but visually and not even within your industry. Like I was comfortable in 1990 I was on the cover of Trans World Snowboard magazine. Mm. And that started off my my snowboard career. And I was a No. One person within, You know, the snowboard community and I go to Europe. And if I was skiing or snowboarding at these World Cups, you know, Europeans would know who I was just by looking at me. But outside snowboarding, I was just a regular guy. But this kind of that brought me elevated me, um, into the more mainstream. And then, because of my advocacy for cannabis since 98 then helping Canada bring it into a federally legal, um, program here in Canada. As you know, one of the people who, uh, you know, put their neck out during Prohibition. I had a store and clothing line, and we had glass and all...

...everything like I had. I launched my glass when Tommy Chong just got out of jail for having glass. So, you know, it wasn't Is that the reason I saw him on the interview yesterday? What was the specific reason he went to jail? Yeah, he was when he did that seventies show, he was in jail that he was allowed out to do the show, and he was in jail for his son having a line of glass called Tommy Chong Glass on. And you mean like a bond or something? Glass, glass bond or what do you mean by glass? Correct. Like a line of glass? Um, cannabis smoking paraphernalia. That's why he went to jail. Yeah, And so he took the rap for his son because it was his name on the glass. And, uh, you know, that was just like a nice little niece thing that his son and I taught his son how to snowboard, by the way and that early snowboard camp back in, uh, 88 89. But, um, so you start developing all these products as well. After 98 were you specifically staying in cannabis? But did you get another sort of job like, I don't know, filling gas tanks and cars or the gas station. Did you do anything outside? Or do you stay pretty focused? No, man. I built houses. Good. And I'll tell you, uh, I guess it was around 10 years ago, and so it's been around 23 years since the Olympics, and it took me 10 years to really get my head grounded again, where I would go back to work and I did. I started working in Whistler at the time as an operator. I was operating excavator and skin steer, um, putting in service lines and building new neighborhoods in Whistler. And then after we finish servicing the whole entire neighborhood, I got onto a carpentry crew and started building the houses, and I did that for some time until I had a um I was dealing with a custody issue with my previous wife at the time, and we had to move from Whistler and That's why I sold my house. There s so that I could have 50 50 custody of my son. And so we moved from Whistler Thio here where I grew up anyways, but I mostly just spent the summers here, so it was no big stretch for me to come here. I miss Whistler. Yes, but this place is epic. Let me tell you, it's crazy. Lots available room for me, which is good, but yeah. So, um, that's when my job ended in Whistler building houses. But before that, I was I built my own house like that 7000 square foot post and beam. Like I built that, um, I took it over. Where did you get these skills? I mean, you worked with your dad in the mines, but where did? Because you mentioned even doing your own renovations at 19. Where did those skills come from? Just diving into it. Basically. Like the first thing I had to do was that first house that I bought. I eventually had it rented out as well. And first thing I had to do with that is changed the wax seal on the toilet. I like There's one bolt and there's another bolt. I'll take that off and see what happens, right? And you just That's how you learn. And, um, you know, I was doing it for myself as well, so I didn't have a boss like looking over my shoulder, you know, giving me a hard time or helping me one or the other. And but over time, I acquired enough skills just doing my own stuff that I was, you know, as a laborer, you know, you could just get on any crew, even if you don't know anything. And if you stay long enough, eventually they will teach you. And next thing you know, you've got a gun in your hand and, you know, wearing a tool belt. And that's the same thing that happened to me. Like, right now, right out front of my house, I could show you. Right now I have a 16 ft tool trailer with $10,000 worth of tools in it. And I was at this time last year I was working, framing houses in in the Okanagan right here on the lake. I framed two houses on the lake here last winter, and another two houses um, upon the mountain. And then we were building a giant ah slab foundation slab for a huge tilt up. Still warehouse. When Cove. It came last March, and I was working on that site. Um, you know, I'd wake up at four. In the morning, and I'd be at work by 6 a.m. in the dark and make my breakfast in my trailer and get to work. And but there was 20 guys sharing when you know Porter party, right? And I'm listening to my headphones that, you know, I listened to the news constantly, and I was following that what was going on...

...with the pandemic in China. And I'm like, bro like they're not calling it a pandemic yet. I couldn't believe it. And then I walked off the job on, like, March 3rd. I told my boss I'm like, bro, this I don't feel safe. And March 4th, what is the lock down? And I called it a day before. Um, I would have called it even earlier if I would have had the scientists like anyways, um, yeah, I'm hearing korean. It first kind of rushed to Korea. And my dear wife was like This is a problem like it's gonna be all right. I don't know what it is, but we'll be fine. But she's No, no, no. Get her massive one. That's it. Right. And, uh, yeah, I'm a big believer in science and masks and the whole, um, strategy behind you know what we need to dio. So it's it's thinking, thinking of all these jobs that you hadn't. I just keep thinking you're a hard worker and it just it shows. And I'm glad that you did those jobs. And I have an uncle who was framing houses and I would help once in a while or, you know, just be a goal for more or less but hard working jobs, especially in your more up north source. Colder. I mean, Nova Scotia is not Florida, but cold, you know, warming up the hand, you've got the nail gun out, you're pulling nails. Whatever you're doing, do you have? And I wonder, being on the site with some of these guys. Do you have a pressure of being on Olympian one, like keeping yourself in shape, but also just, you know, I was an Olympian and I think part of What you said before in an interview with someone else is that you kind of had, like a not a cocky but attitude towards the reporters after you were done and saying, I don't care about what people think. But there's also a pressure that people do think this stuff and they're working around you. And so is there a pressure? I interviewed Christina Smith, who was the pioneer. I don't know if you know who she is of the Canadian Bobsled Women's bobsled team, one of the first people to go in it. And she mentioned, you know, there is a pressure for her to stay in fit and, you know, just have a little, you know, watch what's going on. What about for you? 100%? Yeah, I feel a lot of pressure, uh, to stay in shape. I'm in wicked shape right now. Um, if I had took my jacket and my shirt off, you think I was an m m a fighter? But, um, just being on the job as an Olympian to like, I I play a game with people to like, I love not telling people who I am, but they recognize me. but they don't know why. And a lot of these guys I worked with on Carpentry Cruz or in their twenties and then they were like babies when I was at the Olympics. And so they've seen me enough over their lifetime and heard the name enough from their parents or whatever. Um, that they recognize me, but can't just place it. And so I let that go on for a long as I can. I find it hilarious. Uh, when they do realize who I am, Um, but then after the cat's out of the bag, there's kind of more pressure because it's kind of like, Well, why were you on our crew all of a sudden? That's the question. Why aren't you a millionaire? How good. Why the you know, Are you doing this for, you know, 20 bucks an hour when Dada Dada and the answer is is because for one thing, I like it. Secondly, I can do it. Um, third, I'm trying to do something that costs money. A Sfar to start my own company, start my own business, create something out of nothing. Packaging, paying graphic design artists. Um, you know, doing white label deals like all the what I'm trying to do, cost money. And I've spent hundreds of thousands of dollars trying to do what what I'm doing. I have my own money and of investors money. And, um, there are times when it comes down to the point where you gotta strap the tool belt on and I call the tool belt the money maker. So you gotta you strap the money maker back on once in a while and you pull some hours, And that's just the way I was brought up. And, you know, I love going to work. I love building houses. It's awesome. You know, I hate screwing up, or and that's just part of anything, right? Um, you know, the pressure toe, you know, to be an Olympian on top of that performance, like you gotta be three stories up, tied off, you know, with with fall lines. And you're like hanging over trying to nail gun, like the choice and the the whole e mean it's crazy work, right? But on top of that being, you know somebody that is in the media like then I'll be off work one day because...

I'm gonna be on TV, and I got to go to Vancouver to a studio, and then I come back like, where were you? Like E was on TV? Whatever. Such a weird. Oh, go do your TV show start rising. Yeah, but does that work in against you to that? If you know one what they're saying or what they're thinking like, Oh, Ross, why are you doing this? Do you start to think? Yeah. Why? Why am I doing this? Why aren't i e Yeah, yeah. How come I'm not a millionaire? I don't know. Why am I building houses? You know, it's it's hard work. Like, you know, when you got a a lift of plywood with we've got 100 sheets, apply with each one weighs around £60. You gotta carry all of them to the roof. You know, it's like, holy shit. Question yourself. Every trip. Yeah. Okay, right on. Then you get your, like, lifting up each whole sheet over your head to the next guy, like, 100 times in a row. But at the end of the day, you know there's camaraderie, and there's, like, a whole sense of belonging and accomplishment when you see, Like, you know, we're building nice houses on the lake like multimillion dollar palaces. And I'm so proud toe say, like some of the houses that I've been a part of, um, to see them standing there. And I've even left some gems in Whistler that that I worked on, um that I go by every time I go to Whistler just toe to see how they look and how people are taking care of them. So, um, the same in sports like to win the gold medal. And that resonates over time. You know, it kind of definitely. It's like a fine I don't drink anymore. But it's going to use the analogy of a fine wine like it just gets better, better over time. And, you know, the winning and losing and going to jail in Japan and getting out of jail and getting my metal back all within three days, um was traumatic for me and I you know, I had PTSD for a good 10 years after that, um, where I didn't work and I didn't get my mail. And I didn't pay my taxes. And I got audited by the Canadian government because the newspaper said. I made $10 million. Um, are expected that I made $10 million and you know, I'm getting audited and I'm, like, depressed. And they're like, Where's the money? I'm like, literally living in my camper. I bought a big piece of property. One of my last big moves in Whistler was I bought this piece of property on Green Lake Whistler and Blackcomb reflected. I went onto the lake right in front of my property was 33,000 square feet and I had this zoning to build a boutique hotel and I was gonna had the roots guys gonna be Ross's Roots Lodge. And at the time, I don't know, the Whistler Municipality changed my zoning when I presented my building plants at the town meeting or whatever, and they changed my zoning. And that just sent me because all of a sudden I was carrying this huge property. And then 9 11 happened right when I was about to sell it to this guy in Washington millionaire Microsoft guy, and he got wiped out by 9 11 and the stock market crashing. And then I was I had this huge overhead, $15,000 a month and just crushing like as a 29 30 year old, um, to deal with that amount of pressure eventually sold the property for double what I paid for it and, you know, it was successful in, you know, paying off my debts. But I lived in the camper for two years while I was trying to get that financing toe happen to build the hotel. And it's just a learning experience, and, you know, if I would have known better, I would have taken the guys quarter million dollar deposit and told him where he could go on. And instead I tried working with the guy and carrying my debt longer so that he could buy my property from me. And, you know, those were just some mistakes that you make in in life and in business is cutthroat as well. And, you know, I've been involved with the raw school brand out for eight years. Then we're just launching. You know, I was six years prior to legalization when we started raw schools and we knew that it was going in the direction of legalization. But we had no crystal ball, and we didn't There was a lot of stores already open, and I felt like I was behind the ball. Um, you know, I was put on the no fly list, also at 9. 11. And, um, you know, I think when my daughter was born eight years ago on my wife, when I tried to travel down to California from Whistler or where my mom lives in the winter and they turned me around, Um, because of just being associated to cannabis at the Olympics. Um, that was,...

...you know, pretty heartbreaking. Said the baby in the car and the dog and my wife. And it was a trip. And it's a few hours from Whistler to just to get to the border. Um, and that was really the deciding factor in Okay, You know what? I've lost everything that I would normally try to protect us. Faras coming out of the cannabis closet, and I'm not allowed to travel anymore. I'm losing opportunities, Corporate Lee. Because of my association to cannabis. I'm done trying to be that guy, that Olympian, that perfect Canadian, whatever that is. Um and I decided that I was going to go with my passion, and I was already an advocate for cannabis and doing lots of interviews about why athletes like Michael Phelps would choose. Like I was the guy that went on NBC Thio fight for Michael Phelps on. Then there was the guy that was on NBC to say, you know, the opposite, like white cannabis is bad for you. So, like I've been doing this for sticking my neck out on the line for other people and for the industry in general for decades. Two decades. Um, but this is when I decided to put my name on it when I finally got turned around again. Um, and after being put on the no fly list in 2000 and one and nobody said nothing, it was in the newspapers that I was on the no fly list. So there was just a lot of challenges, you know, around my life and what I wanted to do. And, um, you know, the hand that was dealt in Nagano was something that I embraced, but I didn't necessarily want to put my name on it formally because Prohibition Mhm. I wanted to be an advocate, but I didn't want to be like illegally profiting financially from cannabis at the time because I still wanted to be legit and not end up, you know, in jail, like so many people were, families were being ripped apart. Kids were being taken away from their parents and so forth. Um, and it was no small thing that what I was embarking on at the time and s o that was eight years ago, um, still launching the first product. Now, after eight years. Um, actually, that's not true. We did have the line of glass. I was successful in opening a store during Prohibition and I was literally, like, Come and get me. You know, I was fed up and I need to support my family. I couldn't work in the corporate world because of my association to cannabis and building houses is great. But that's not what my aspiration in life was. It's fun. I love it. But like, for me, cannabis is like snowboarding or skiing. It's like an extreme sport, you know? I love growing it. I'm recognized now, Um, pretty internationally, Like I've got some fans around the world that that follow my my growing techniques and how I grow cannabis and in particular, my outdoor. If you look on my INSTAGRAM account, you can go back and look at my last three years of outdoor, and it's really a magical journey that I like to share with other people and you know, my techniques and what I do toe to create the, you know, the cannabis that I that I do on and cross the thing about you that I I enjoyed the most. You know, being a fan, someone watching, growing up, knowing who you were is the quote of you saying as I mentioned a moment ago of not caring about what people think about your friends, and that's what you're stuck to at that time. And as I said, you mentioned you're maybe a little bit to too confident with your answer. But I think the core of the answer was how much you valued your friends and your family. How has that, if at all changed, or how much have you even hammer down on the idea of staying true to your family and your friends, and how important that is for listeners? Yeah, I mean, at the time, I didn't have a family, so my friends were my family um, my friends helped me learn about life and how you know about snowboarding and about. You know, snowboarding can be a lifestyle like these guys looked at snowboarding as a legit or skiing as a legit way of life. And that's coming from Vancouver. I didn't have people around me that thought that way. You know, they were known as ski bums on bond. These guys were like most ski bums, like their pro mountain bike racers, pro road bikers. That that was their off season, was staying in shape by doing backcountry touring and and that sort of thing. And um, yes, all right, what was the main question on that one? How have you grown in valuing your family mawr and understanding how what you said then is still applicable today? So, like I say, I was I had no family at the time, like no way for kids and stuff, and so that that was really important to me that,...

...you know, I I stuck behind my friends, and over time, you know, it's been 20 years. I don't have the same friends anymore. You know, I have three kids and been married to my beautiful wife, Ali for 10 years. And you know, we're super happy together and, um, the whole nine yards and it's number one. I mean, the priority for me now is is my family, and you know, there's nothing else proceeds that it's that's family first. And so it's tough on that end to do what I'm doing as far as creating, trying to create a brand in the industry that is got companies with billion dollar market caps. I mean, I'm up against the big boys is no joke. We've got Budweiser, We've got the alcohol. Uh, tobacco companies, we've got the tech companies. We've got all kind of people with deep pockets Uh um, getting involved and as soon as you get a license So you've got people breathing down your neck to sell it to them, and it's cutthroat out there, and I'm trying to do it, you know, bootstrap style, you know? So it's taken me longer. I can't just throw down like, $10 million you know, and I just don't have that power. But what I do have is brand traction, and I have support by the people and and eso I'm I know that they're cringing. The closer I get thio bringing any products because I had all this stuff during Prohibition. But it's changed. Excuse me, and I've had to re reboot. And this is Ross School two point. Oh, and you know, the whole process is completely different and the the the path of least resistance for me was the growing because I'm allowed, I have a license I'm allowed to grow. I can show people my techniques and the results of those techniques. I could get a, um, my own nutrients and my own l E D lights and work with a you know, the biggest, uh, soil company in the world and create a system that creates a consistent product at a super high level. And it's magical. It's so much fun. But at the same time, um, that's the path of least resistance. No, no license is required. I can get my growing equipment and toe practically any country in the world. Um, you know, it's just a nun believable, like the nutrients company that I'm working with is in 35 countries, right? Like during the gold rush. Everybody knows what was the most profitable, and it wasn't the gold. It was the picks and shovels. Right s. So that's that's kind of, um, you know, my angle and the lesson that I've learned from history. My dad being in the gold, um, industry for his whole life as an exploration. A geologist. Um, that was something that we learned ages ago. It's good to for you knowing that you are a hard worker, that you don't necessarily have to rely on this business wholeheartedly. Therefore, you're able to step back and look at it from different perspectives so that you can allow it to grow rather than rely. I need this because you can. You you have other skills and talents that you can use, but it giving rather than being. You're all in. But it's not 100% absolutely necessary do or die. So you have a different perspective which can allow your company to flourish. Yeah, I get a different perspective also from the people I'm around. If I was just in the corporate world trying to launch a brand and go public and just try to drive the market cap up, I'm not hearing from the people at that point. I don't know what the with the policies anymore. But when I'm building houses, I'm literally working with the guys that are gonna be buying my wheat. Um, and I know what they want, right? They want rolling papers with a hammer on it to represent the builders. It's I'm gonna have rolling papers with a hammer on it. I'm gonna have a lighter that has a hammer on it. 19 1999. Ross I had a Katie University of Communications course and my presentation. My first one was on Alexander Keats. Those who like it like it a lot. I was scared, completely scared to do a presentation in front of 40 people. My second one was legalize it. Don't criticize it. I played Bob Marley in the background and handed out zigzag papers to everyone in the class. This isn't that when was now in, like, 1998? No way. 1999. Yeah, that's hilarious. It's It's pretty funny health. And it's the what you would think to is how things have changed right to the point where you came on the scene as this person who...

...did this thing to now how Canada is and the United States, as you mentioned, getting turned away from California. Uh, how things have changed completely. Yeah. Amazing. Big, big turnaround. Um, back then, like not even half the states allowed cannabis just statewide, as they do today, uh, legalized completely at a federal level in Canada, which is one of its the first G eight country to do that. Um, and the talk, um, you know, and I've heard a lot of people say that and credit me for bringing the conversation up at the dinner table or at the kitchen table, Um, 23 years ago, but it's stayed persistent. And one of the interesting parts was when I had my Ross Bold store in Kelowna in 2017. How many seniors were coming in? And, you know, it was a beautiful store, like, you know, it looked like a like a really nice jewelry shop. Or, you know, um, it was really nice to be in. And, uh, anyways, they were the most, um, curious than anybody else, Like you would think. Oh, the 5th, 40 50 year old guys, you know, maybe start thinking maybe they should smoke some weed and see if that you know or whatever, but it was actually the seniors. So I mean, it's changed the conversation. Um, even on the side where you would think the most amount of stigma would lay with the seniors because they were brought up with the war against drug big pharma and the whole like, you have to take a pill or it's not riel. Um, but the thing is, they've been down the road. They know that it was fake. They know they got duped. And that prohibition was a farce. And it was only a political play at the time, for many reasons, but all politically motivated. Um, and, uh, so thinking of listeners, Do you have advice knowing that you were a paperboy, that you're a hard worker Now you do some different jobs when you need to, but also having your own business. Do you have advice for people getting into work one way or the other? Yeah, I don't That fear decide. Be a deciding factor for you. Um, I think the thing that you want to do least is the thing you should do most. Um, you know, I think the fear of learning a new skill keeps people um, this suppressing feeling for people toe like retrain or are to rethink their life. And I think for me I've had to rethink my life and and retrain and do that multiple times, Um, as an athlete, as a person, as a father, as a as a husband. Um, and there's nothing that that's more helpful for you. I think toe be able to morph into, um, a different situation and and to be flexible and not be within the box and to try toe expand, you know what you're able to do. And, um, for me, it's been the sports that keeps me confident enough to to feel that way. And so there's there's kind of a one of those things where I get the endorphins from from cycling from running from skiing from my kids. That gives me the motivation to, you know, feel like the confidence that I could go on to a drop site and work on a multimillion dollar house and, you know, or toe start a nutrients company and work with licensed producers and try to be part of the cannabis industry. Um, you know, to me, like the idea of being a sponsored snowboarder and going to the Olympics was a pipe dream because in 1987 you know I wasn't allowed to snowboard in any ski resort in Canada. There was snowboarding didn't exist yet, and 10 years later I was winning the Olympics for snowboarding and I was a ski racer. So even at a young age, I decided to change things up. Um, of course, at the ski racing was a huge benefit to me as a snowboard racer, and I didn't start off snowboard racing because they didn't even have race boards when I started snowboarding. But I was in the freestyle scene, but being able to see the opportunities as a freestyler, But on the racing side that I was like, Oh, man, I could win races Probably easier than I could win a half pipe contest because I just have to go against the clock and my that's when my ski racing kicked in. So all these skills that I have now, like I was just...

...building houses last year again. Then I had those skills from years ago from when I was living in Whistler. So, you know, before I was building houses, I had the whole store going in Kelowna and during Prohibition and was earning a living that way with the glass line as well. And then during the end of Prohibition, in the beginning of this new legal era that all shut down for me. But I was able to rely on my carpentry and, you know, continue feeding my family and putting food on the table and getting, you know, keeping my kids and ski racing. And, you know, it's expensive to live in Canada and to do all that stuff that I want my kids toe to do it because that's you know my life, right? So, yeah, that's what I can say that people starting out or and even other people that are in industries like, for example, there's a lot of guys that were in the oil industry that don't have a job anymore on, and they have to retrain and and figure out what to do next. And it's no small feat. No one's. No one's there to help you. No one cares about you. You're the only one on earth. I mean, that's really you have toe, pick yourself up on your own, and I can tell you from my own experience that, you know, I've been as low as you can get and still be alive and been able to rebound from that. And, you know, it's because of the diversity. I guess you could say that has given me the opportunities that I have now. You mentioned how big companies air getting into cannabis. What is your take on character in cannabis and the idea of maybe what people are producing, how they're going about doing it. I mean, there's probably a lot of wrinkles that need to get ironed out with what Canada the government's doing with things. But where do you see character in this? Well, that character and passion kind of go hand in hand, right? So right now, because of the corporate nature of the cannabis industry being, you know, a publicly traded commodity. Now, um, there's not a lot of cannabis character, you know. It's mostly like corporate minded people that aren't cannabis. People that see an opportunity, um, financially. And it's just a play with cannabis as if it was a play for suntan lotion or Tesla or anything else. It's just happens to be cannabis, so that's affected actually, the industry a lot and disrespected the industry that got as to where we are today that fought during Prohibition, Toe end Prohibition. Um, and so there's been a lot of those big companies kind of rethinking how they're trying to approach, uh, the retail end of it and connecting with their consumers were before they were simply trying to drive the price, share up and have a huge market cap and do a whole bunch of acquisitions and create value for shareholders and not think about their products, not think about their consumers. And that's been lacking in the industry. Um, now things have changed a little bit, and you're allowed to have these smaller craft grows that are, you know, small production and high high end. You can't grow high end cannabis on a grand scale. It has to be, you know, within, you know, 2000 square square feet. That's the biggest you could go and still get quality. Um, so farm gate sales is another thing where you can have your production facility with, uh, a little outlet store, and that's kind of like wine tours, where you could go and do wine tastings and buy wine directly from the vineyard. So they've allowed that now in Canada. And the next thing that's coming down the line that before you weren't allowed to produce your own weed and direct it to your own dispensaries. In fact, you weren't even allowed to own a production facility. And the dispensary he had toe had to be a Chinese wall and and excuse my my terminal Big wall. Yeah, that's right. Yeah. And you had to have, like, a separation. And and so they've changed that, too. And they're opening it up because they're realizing the safety of cannabis doesn't require, um, the numbers just aren't showing, um, that there's, like, a huge danger or concern for public safety or public health regulation in between. Is that the idea to get okay? Yeah, I was to control because they weren't like the politicians aren't candidates people they didn't know from experience that cannabis is a safe products. So they had to learn from statistics and, um, that sort of thing. So we've got the stats that proved there weren't more car accidents. There's actually nobody dying from cannabis. It's actually very...

...safe. Um, you definitely don't want to take too much. Everybody knows that. But you're not going to die from it or wake up with a huge hangover. Um, but, uh, you know, now that those numbers air out there relaxing, who can grow it, they actually want to get the black market licensed and get them into, like, really facilities because they understand. Like it was just, ah, bad decision that was made 80 years ago. But it never stopped the production of cannabis, and it just became more popular, actually, and these growers are worth their weight in gold. I mean, can you imagine? Somalia is growing for the last 80 years under Prohibition that grow wine that all of a sudden Oh, you're not gonna hire those guys when wine goes legal, right? Like those were the We call them legacy growers. I'm a legacy growing your If you have a craft grow, you have a license and you need a grower. You don't want a guy who's 20. You need a guy who's 40 years old that we've been growing for 20 years. That's who you want. And that's the same when you have a vineyard, you want that Somali a to have decades of experience. You know, if you're a top brand, um, it's the same thing with cannabis. It's very finite, um, techniques. And there's lots of ways toe go wrong. Yeah, And I think with Ross's Gold, you're putting character at the top, just knowing what you've gone through and your work ethic. Thank you. Well, you know, we definitely try toe, you know, walk the walk and talk the talk. And it's, you know, one of it's used either one or the other, right? Eso I have sacrificed? Uh, probably I could have gotten started by now, but wouldn't have had control over, um, the company. And what's your goal? What's your goal for? Ross is gold, maybe. Overarching goal. But maybe something that you see in the horizon Well, I see the whole thing, right. I see having all the equipment that you need to grow it. All the nutrients, um, everything that you need to grow cannabis. And then on the other side. I see, um, well, brick and mortar was a bigger thing until the virus came, but the grand plan was tohave franchise brick and mortar dispensaries. Pleasant online store with delivery. Um, with every kind of cannabis product you can have. And it was basically, like, Ross cold world like I wanna have eventually. Like, you're not allowed to have grow equipment and cannabis products in the same store right now. They don't allow that. But what I would like to see is a store where you can have the whole growing section. You can have the whole connoisseur cannabis part, you know, and then you can have consultants in there that can help you. You know, fine. Tune your your selections and and just have, like, everything under when? Under one roof. One stop shop. So you go in there? Yeah. You're gonna buy some pre rolls, You might buy a little bit of weed, but if you smoke weed like me, you can't afford to buy a weed. Like I probably go through a pound of weed a month. And that's at a store you're you're looking at, um, this is my dog, E miss Bigger dogs. Here in Korea, they have all these little lap dogs that Oh, yeah. Yeah. This is ballot. She's like Corso account. Of course so, but she's only six months. She's a young guy What kind of what kind of can a Corso can? Of course. Oh, eso It's Ah, mastiff. Okay, look like a like a lab of chocolate lab or something. Yeah. They usually have cropped years that appointees, and I don't I'm not a believer of that. So she looks like a big lab, But Corso's air, one of the bigger dog breeds. So you have planned on having Ross's gold around the world, for instance, Wherever it's Yeah, I got a big following in Europe and all of our partners Air TMP certified, Which means we can operate in Europe. I actually have an Italian passport so I can even work in any country in Europe. A swell. So, um, you know, I spent I lived in Italy at the end of my career and spent almost 10 years on the World Cup tour there. Um, no idea, Ross, Knowing your your goal. What is something that maybe people don't understand about your industry that you would like them to understand? Yeah, probably that cannabis is actually part of a healthy lifestyle. Um, I think that's the number one thing. Your body actually has it one of its biggest sensory I think it's the biggest or the second biggest sensory, Um,...

...organism that you have in your body is called the Endo Cannabinoid System. And since Prohibition, people have been cannabinoid deficient. That's like being deficient in vitamin B 12 or vitamin D gets very at least the depression. It leads to anxiety. And I think Big Pharma knew about this from the beginning. And that's why they're producing all these anxiety and depression drugs because of prohibition of cannabis. Um, you know, cannabis. It was legal for thousands of years prior to 80 years ago. Uh, in some countries, cannabis was a staple diet, like in India that they would feed kids, um, different cannabis extracts and, um, foods that were infused with cannabis for colicky kids that were crying a lot and use it for all. I mean, before Prohibition, cannabis was the base medicine. In every medicine. It was like the one thing that was in everything. And then you would add your herbs and another medicinal things into it. But before Prohibition and before Big Pharma, almost everything had cannabis in it. On a on a medicinal level for for people. Um, you know, we've been lied to and the propaganda spread around the world because of the United States being the leader of the world and, um, having cannabis on the scheduled as a schedule one substance. Um, you know, it has. There was a lot of racial motivation behind it. There was a lot of corporate motivation. Like DuPont, Um at the time was vying Thio create synthetic sales when at the time shipping industry was done with sailboats with hemp sails and ropes and DuPont came up with synthetic sails and ropes and they, along with a bunch of other industries, lobbied the U. S. Government to make cannabis illegal, um, so that they could corner the rope and sail industry. Uh, Henry Ford was powering the Model T Ford with cannabis oil before the explosion of oil, and they had thousands of hectares of hemp growing to create oil to power the Model T Ford before the oil industry started. So, um, it was all corporately motivated. And, um, they used the basically the fact that the the African Americans who were brought over from Africa is during the slave trade. We're using cannabis, and they allowed them to use cannabis because it kept them calm as it does for everybody, Makes people enjoy their life when they might not otherwise. But then, after the slave trade ended, they knew the African Americans were using cannabis and use Prohibition Thio, you know, make arrests and to incarcerate. And for the last 40 or 50 years, they've been filling up prisons with simple possession of cannabis and mostly, um, racially motivated and colored people are being arrested for this sort of thing. Um, white people have no issues whatsoever with, um with cannabis unless they're at a high level growing operation or something like that. And it it's ridiculous. And so for anyway, this has been the fight that we've been fighting for decades since 98. I've been personally involved. Um, now, you know, it's all under the bridge now, and, you know, we're all trying to move forward. We're all trying to put the feelings behind us, being on the no fly list, losing my gold medal, you know, tricking me like, literally I I felt the three drug tests before I went to Nagano for cannabis, and no one told me I was ranked in the top three in the world before I went to Nagano on the original snowboard tour. But the media wasn't following that because of the fake snowboard tour that the fist started to bring snowboarding into the Olympics. And then I tested positive for cannabis after I won, and they tried to take it away from me when it wasn't even on the list of banned substances in the first place. I'm the orderly gold medalist or any medallists from the Olympics that's been reinstated from losing a medal in the history of the Olympics. And you have to wonder what their list being the Holy Grail that it is. You know what they were thinking? And I could have gone down a different road and on decided to not pursue any litigation or anything like that and to take it. Mm, um, and to embrace it and to try toe be vindicated by my own Proactiv involvement in Canada. Yeah, I think there's that stigma, and it's funny, too, with pharmacy, where we're told to take these pills, of which we have no idea or they take, you...

...know, the last 10 seconds of a 32nd commercial telling you all the side effects of these pills that you might take and these air Good for you. These air, these air legal, these air what you're supposed to take versus what you're saying and all the benefits and the lack of side effects that ever appear in them. Did you at that point, did you lose the gold medal at all? Did they take it physically from you, or did you have possession of it? I had possession of it in my front pocket, but I refused toe, take it out or look at it. Um, in any way they were supposed to take it from me. The Canadian Olympic Association and representatives that were with me during that time were instructed to remove the medal from me. But for whatever reason, they didn't have the heart to do it. Because of the circumstances, they didn't believe that, Um, this should have been an issue. Other gold medalists in prior Olympics. And I'm not going to say sports. I know who it is. I know who they are. Tested positive for cannabis, and nothing was ever said nothing was ever made of it and everybody and we didn't know that as snowboarders and even as snowboarders. We thought we was on the list of banned substances and we were trying not toe positive for it. Like for two years prior to the Olympics. I wasn't smoking we very much. But then in the spring of 97 I decided, OK, I'm going to completely 100% stop just to meet the criteria, because I knew I would be going through a bunch of drug tests leading up which I hadn't by them. Um and we didn't know at the time in in 97 what the length of time the cannabis cannabinoids would stay in your system for which is quite some time, actually, which adds to its effectiveness. But a Sfar as an athlete trying to pass a test, it's, ah, a little bit trickier. So we didn't really know what the situation was. I didn't know I could test positive for second hand smoke, for example. And so even though I wasn't smoking cannabis, I was still going. You know, when my friends got off work, I would go over to their house, and that's what we did in Whistler. You go skiing and you go, you know you have a dinner with friends and you have some beers and smoked some joints, and then you go home and do it again over and over. Um, as you you don't you don't wear gas masks. Or maybe in the future, you would have. But at that time, you weren't just Hey, guys, just one second. I mean, if doing move it, we would have masks on, but don't know if they help. Probably not. But, you know, it was it was, uh, one of those things where I had a clear conscience about what I was doing. Like I didn't lose any sleep the night before the Olympics over this. Like, I had no idea this was going to be an issue on when I the whole controversy happened. That's when my three drug results, my positive test results for cannabis prior to the Olympics were made public. I didn't even know about it. And they're like, Oh, he failed all three of his test for cannabis before he even got to the Olympics. That wasn't part of it, Ross. I only have a couple of questions for you. And there's a thing in the nagging me. Do you have your gold medal. Yeah. Are we able to see it? Give me, like, 10 seconds. No problem. We'll look at the your beautiful scenery out your front. Okay? I'll be right back. Like minus one. Beautiful Ross Rebagliati. Everyone his front porch. Okay, E right. You know where I keep this bag? This is my my pro mix back stash. Yeah, this is the rial Gold Ross gold stash. Before I pull out the middle, I'll show you where to keep it. So this is a timer for a light? Um, here's some edibles. Thes air some. These were some seeds, some cannabis seeds that they buy a Ross gold packet as well. That comes with little gold medal that comes with a Yeah, Yeah, they get the gold medal I've got. I've got trimming scissors here for working on cannabis plants, and then, Okay, there's a bunch of other stuff in here, like like grinders. Yeah, but this is this is the little bag. You can see it shining. You should get a replica replica gold medal. And then when people buy your packet to get this whole little set up and it's the Ross gold packet, Yeah,...

You get your Ross's gold. So I recently did a photo shoot for O v O for a drink, and they flew me to L A to do it. And when I got to the, um, Hotel Bel Air that they put me up in like it was first class, I don't know if you know it will be open. Anyway, Um, the the jeweler for Rovio and Drakes, jeweler in L. A came to my hotel and picked up my medal. And overnight before the photo shoot, they re gold id it. So that means putting on another layer of gold over top. Yeah, they put gold on it because it was wearing out from 23 years of people looking at it. Did you? Did you ever bite it as they dio? Yeah. You had to bite marks. Yeah, you see it? Where is it? They're on the top there. Let me see if look like there was a Yeah, there's a little there was a little dent right there. All right, You can see it, Ross, thinking thinking of this with this in your hand and knowing a lot about your story. But obviously you would take almost 50 years to know you completely. Is there any adversity that you have faced in life that whether adversely, um, or positively encourages you or discourages you in your work, But to use that adversity to encourage others in their work? Adversity is, uh, unavoidable. And my philosophy in life is because of adversity, and it is that everything happens for a good reason, even if it doesn't seem like it. At first, um, it could take five years for you to realize why that car accident happened. Um or you know why you lost the gold medal or whatever happened to you? You You will find a reason eventually Why that had to happen to you in your life. You know, for example, like, I would never would have met my wife if I had no one and lost the Olympics. And this whole happened. This whole thing happened. I never would have. Um there's so much like destiny involved in in adversity. Um, we grow from adversity. I mean, that's that's where you know, everything comes and is is born from adversity. Um, and our society doesn't like that thought, though, because we wanna have everything. Like instantaneously right. We've got Amazon prime. I want it now. I wanna go to the store. Now. I don't care if it's three in the morning. Um, but when you can't go to the store when you don't even have the money to go to the store where you know, when your your truck, like my one time my truck was out of gas on the side of the highway and Whistler for, like, a week because I was broke and the tow truck driver knew it was my truck and left it there. And I was hoping he wasn't gonna leave it there because I was embarrassed. Yeah, and I finally got enough money together to get some gas and walk down the highway and put it in my brand new truck that I couldn't afford another big mistake. Um, super embarrassing. But you know, those air, the life's lessons and you you learn, um, how toe manage money better And, you know, from going broke, you learn all kinds of things. Uh, the value of a dollar. Um, you know, you can't understand that. You know, when I was when I was younger, buying houses and flipping houses, I was making hundreds of thousands of dollars at a time and spending 10 $20,000 on plane tickets to go. Racing was nothing for me, but I was like 25 years old or 23 years old doing that. And so when you just don't understand, like, how much someone has to work in one hour to earn, like, $17 on and until you're like like I'm gonna be 50 years old in July, Right? So last year, when I was building eyes 48 years old, I was making $17 an hour before taxes and, you know, wasn't even clearing $100 a day. And I was busting my back, Uh, you know, framing houses. But because I understood the value, what I was doing from being broke in the past over my my lifetime and going through...

...the things that I went through, Um, that's not even part of the thought process. It's like you just pick yourself up and you do what you got to dio, and you know, that's Ah, that's the bottom line. There's there's no adversity, is the, you know, the root of success. I've always said that, you know, toe You know, winning is a losing game. You've got to be a good loser, Teoh, To be a good winner. Um, you know, you're gonna you're gonna lose 100 times and win one race. You know, like I would I would enter in one year, I would enter maybe 20 World Cup events. And when went so I'm losing 2019 times and I win one time. And that's the way it is in life. And that's that's business. Also, um, you you haven't learned anything in business until you've failed at business until you've got bankrupted company. Until you have left shareholders hanging until you've got employees with contracts that you can't pay. Um, well, you fooled a company. Um, unless you've done that, I don't care if you have an MBA or whatever you got out of school. That doesn't mean anything. As you noticed, we had a little battery technical difficulty. But, I mean, you gave us a beautiful view anyway. So what more can we ask? And you seem like you have something your patio lanterns on now? Yeah, it's dark here in the last 10 minutes. That happened, and we got the yeah patio lanterns. That's right. Well, you gave some good encouragement. Ross, how can people get in touch with you? And I have one more shout out because I figured Chris Swartz will be very happy to hear you gave me. Showed out. And he'll probably wanna go snowboarding with my other friend, Stephen Foot or Steve Foot. And he brought snowboarding is so if you could give him a shout out, you might see the two of them out there at West with you one day. Okay, Steve Foot? Yeah, let's hook up and we'll go cruising around with with Chris Schwarz. And, uh, yeah, I look forward to that. I'm open toe meeting people, that's for sure. How How can they reach you with Ross? Is gold? What's wrong? The best way to contact me at the moment is through my INSTAGRAM account at Ross Rebagliati 98 just d m. Me and um, yeah, I get back to everybody that comments on my pictures and who dems me. I'm also on Facebook, but not as much as I am on instant. So for now, that's the best way we'll be going live with our raw school websites in the next few weeks here, so stay tuned for that perfect one final question, Ross, and you've touched on it a lot. And I really do appreciate your work ethic. But why do you work? Ah, why do I work? I can't not work. I mean, it's It's like I have to like Why? One of the common things that big CEOs of companies who have started big brands say, like Steve Jobs, for example, is Why do you Why did you want to do that? And the answer is, Is that I had to. I had no, that's my passion. Like I can't I don't wanna work for somebody as much as I wanna work for myself as much as I want to create something that is new. And when you see a brand like Samsung or a car brand like whatever Ford or or Mitsubishi, that doesn't mean that new brands can emerge like tests left. For example, um, you know, when I look at the biggest nutrients companies in the world, there's a 19 year old kid. Every men the end of the day learning about nutrients for the first time. That doesn't know that Ross School nutrients isn't leading industry stop and industry leading stops. So you could have, you know, a huge brand. But you still have to get it out there, um, to the demographic. And so that's my passion. That's why you work. Ross Rebagliati, gold medal winner. And Ross Ross is gold coming to shelves near you. Or contact him for getting some the nutrients and other supplies that he offers. I have appreciated this time immensely, and I appreciate the work that you do. Thanks, Brian, via appreciate, uh, being on your so And that you thought of me for this segment, so I'd love to come back anytime you got something going on. Always welcome, Ross. Take care. Peace brother. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. E hope that you have yourself a...

...productive yet joyful day in your work.

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