WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 47 · 1 year ago

#47 Rima Nashashibi - Founder & President at Global Hope 365 - BrianVee Whywework

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Rima Nashashibi is the founder and president of Global Hope 365 where she brings awareness and education of the tragic reality of child marriage and human trafficking around the world.    

Contact Info  

Rima’s Profile 

linkedin.com/in/rimanashashibi  

Website 

https://cacoalitiontoendchildmarriage.org/  

Phone 

+9494624888 (Mobile)  

Email Rima@GlobalHope365.org  

Twitter Rimanashashibi

Welcome to why we work with your host Brian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which would be an encouragement to us all to get up. Get going on, keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here's your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm thing Brian way. And this is why we were today have the great pleasure of speaking with Reema Anna. She she be misunderstood. Sheeb is the founder of Global Hope 3. 65. And her mission is to bring awareness to sex trafficking child marriage and to bring that awareness to the forefront of her consciousness so that we can do something to make a change. I want to find out what is her motivation. Why does this matter to her and why it should matter to us? Join me in this conversation with Rima Anna Shashi be. I'm Brian V and this is why we work today. I have the great pleasure of speaking with Reema Nashashibi. Good. I guess it is your evening, young lady. Yeah, it's It's late. Afternoon. Late afternoon. Thank you for coming on. I just did an introduction of you and about you. Could you give us a little little summary of what it is that you do? And then I'd like to take us back a little bit. Sure. Um, I founded Global Home through 65 2017 and then we started the actual work. Our inaugural event was January 8 2019. And the reason I founded it's because I was sick and tired of watching women and girls getting the brunt off. These harmful practices are harmful acts, be it And, um, civil unrest, war time or just migration, or just everyday time between child marriage and human trafficking. And so and other things, of course, Mr restrictions in Nepal and some parts of India. And if we go down the list, it's a long list. And so I got sick and tired of that. So I wanted to do something to eliminate or end these harmful practices against women and girls like child marriage and human trafficking in the U. S. Starting with California, which is where I live in Southern California. So that's why I started it because I didn't know that child marriage was legal in the US and, um, I used to do 10 to 12 speaking engagements a month in person, and that was my question. The first question to everyone is child marriage legal in the US, and everybody would say no, which is what I waas in 2016 before I got that article from Nicholas Kristof, who wrote it for The New York Times, is a writer for The New York Times. And it talks about the case of Sherry Johnson, who was 10 years old, repeatedly raped by a deacon in the church and a parishioner. 11. She gets pregnant and child welfare was going to conduct an investigation, and the church and the parents get together and they marry her off to the 20 year old rapist. And so the title. Waas, 11 pregnant and married to her Arribas. And so that's my first introduction to the fact that child marriage was legal in the US, and it was legal back then in 48 states. Right now, it's legal in 46 states. The first state to ban it was Delaware in May of 2018 followed by New Jersey in June 2018 then Pennsylvania in May 2020. This year during Cove, it and Minnesota also May 2020. So these are the only four states that ban child marriage under 18 with no exception. And usually Children are married because off parental consent. And we hear from survivors. And the general theme is that both the parents failed them and the system failed them because the parents should be the ones who protect them from harm, not the ones who put them in a harmful situation. And most...

...of the times is, too. Let their rapist in their cases statutory rape, which is a crime, get get out of jail free card, basically by marrying the victim. And so I've added child marriage to our goals. It was initially human trafficking and, you know, with covert 19 human trafficking has there has been a huge uptick, at least in the US, in calls to the National hotline during Cove in 1940% nationally and 30% in San Diego, which is just south from where I live. So that's that's what I'm trying to do is, uh, protect basically women and girls. And that's our mission. Because the mission statement of Global Home 365 is that we're dedicated to improving the lives of women and girls locally and nationally by advocating for their safety through raising awareness, education, uh, empowerment and prevention. And so our focus is on ending harmful and practices against women and girls like I mentioned, such as child marriage and human trafficking Re Matt. I mean, you have a great mission, and I would like to get mawr into this in a moment, but also you as a woman, I would like to know a little bit about your history and for this podcast of why we work in understanding you, which can give us a better idea of the project to projected ING trajectory directory of your your life, your mission in where global Hope hopes to be in the future and on the main stage. So for you, thinking of work because what you're doing is great work, there's no doubt about it. What was the very first job that you had growing up? However small and like, I always give the example of the lemonade stand or a lot of people deliver papers. Some people, you know, maybe got on stage Is a singer actress or something like that, even as a young age. Um, what was your very first job? My first job was, ah, systems analyst. Okay, for, uh, it's not selling them for lemonade. Wow. You really like never sold lemonade. E never, you know, distributed newspapers on dso How old would you have been doing this? And I mean, you and I just had a great conversation about Korea and some other things where I am And depending on one's culture, Like for Korea. Most kids, I guess unless they're financially strapped. And, um, I guess in Korea they hide that a little bit and don't allow their Children toe work until after university if they have that chance. So, kids, first opportunity to get into the real world is not until they're 2021. And then you have mandatory military service for some for the boys. So they're not allowed. Thio, you know, really work. They won't work until after they're done, even after their service. So is there a reason? Is it culturally that I mean, maybe you are working as a system analyst at 12 But it sounds like a pretty heavy duty job. No, it was after college, because yeah, culturally, I am Palestinian. And so And then my dad worked in Kuwait. Hey, was they approached him? The Ministry of Public Works. And so he helped with the desalination plants and building the sewage system there. And so I grew up there. And so you basically And then I went to the American University in Beirut, and so we were involved politically. I was the because you can see it through my life. I was the secretary off the Arts and Science Students Society. And we had the Civil War klieg where we worked within our responsible for orphanages and mentally retarded institutions. And we had programs for them. So it was all a student volunteer. Did you? Sorry. What did you take? University economics. What? What led you to economics? I mean, you seem like a lady who has her head on her shoulders unlike myself. Who did not and still trying to adjust it. But...

...what got you into even before, like in high school? How was what was your trajectory then? In to get you towards economics and finance and well, what I wanted to be is an architect, actually. Okay? And, um because when we were studying in Kuwait, it was that everything was in Arabic and you go to the American University in Beirut and everything is in English. I never had a problem except with physics. Somehow my brain couldn't do the translation well in in physics. So I switched from architecture er to economics. But we were always just like Korea and the family. We were always like, Who's going to be the top of the class? So that's it in Korea, right? Who's who's going to be the top? It's not who's gonna be second. Yes, you're either at the top of the class or are Yeah, yeah. So my older brother and I were always competing who's who's, uh, the top off the class off his or her class. And so that's when we went back home and I'm like, Yeah, so what were you looking forward to? Going to university? Was this something that, even from earlier childhood middle school elementary school, that that's the path if you get the highest that education because then once you have that base, then you can basically do whatever you want, but you have to have that base off at least be a better if it's more. But basically, that's what your life E can picture yourself or even like Koreans and wasn't like me of like a path and kind of the younger adolescent growing outside of the path where I did, and I kind of ventured off into the path. But for yourself and other people, it's your family pruning those those wings that air trying toe, you know, go to these different directions. And how did you find that? In hindsight, how did you How do you appreciate the value that your parents you mentioned your father? Uh, putting education at the forefront, especially in, you know, maybe not speaking about it yet, But the work that you're doing now where you know, some people don't have those visions and hopes for their kids, and they're doing other things. But how much did you appreciate them clipping? I mean, I don't know how free spirit it you were growing up, but I certainly went off the track. Mhm. Okay, um, I would say it Waas. I didn't have a problem with that. because everybody around you basically does is doing the same thing. Okay, so I was the way I was different or I got off that path is when I ran for student council and I became the secretary off the arts and science students, or I joined C. W. The Civic Welfare League, and we did work camps and we taught kids who were selling chocolates on the streets, you know, chewing up on the street. And we taught them English and math. And we did programs for the orphanages and then in university. Or is this even in high school as well? Some of this at university? No, this was in the university. So this is This is the heart of what I want to get out of you today and I hope we get into it at the end. But even start nibbling at it now is like I have to compare to myself like there's nowhere else Aiken go. But to say, for me and my first year university, it was making sure I didn't find my classes so I could just hang out and do whatever I wanted with the friends that I was hanging out Where did you get this? Heart and desire and and motivation and the power to be so willing to help people. Where did this kind of get nurtured from my parents? Especially? Especially my dad? Yeah, from my parents. And so I would say, politics or serving serving people. It's in the blood. Because even when I came here to the U. S, um, I was the vice chair of the Democratic Party in Orange County. For 10 years, I was the president of the National Women's Political Caucus, which is non partisan. You're laughing, which you I read some of your It's amazing all the stuff that you did. And I'm like, I I say this often, but I'm an idiot. What what what have I been doing with my life? And there's people like you that are really working and doing things that really matter and make a change. So I...

...appreciate the work. So when you said this litany of stuff that you're doing like you're not an idiot, no, no. Yes, you said that. But we don't want people to get the wrong idea because we complement each other. So because in order for people to know about what we're doing. We need you to help us tell our story to a larger audience. Correct? Yeah, that's why I love it. That's why I love doing this is speaking to people who do things that are amazing, however big or small. So because let me ask you something, though. You know, national women, political caucuses, nonpartisan. And it's about identifying what? Women training them, getting elected to office. What do you think is the percent off women in elected office in the US? I'm gonna have to go with 10% okay? No, you're really going. No, no, no, no. It was 19% in the house and 20 in the Senate. That's before the last election. That was before the last election. I was guessing, you know, hedging my bets because of the question. So I was just trying to Maybe I get it right, but I didn't think we're going to say 50 80%. You're smart. Know if we were in this canon Scandinavian countries, yeah, we would be in those ranges. And and that's why we need to increase the percent of women here in office and a Sfar as's child marriage you know, UNICEF indicates that child marriage is human rights abuse. Child marriage is marriage under the age of 18 and the State Department indicates, issued a report in 2016 that said, child marriage is a fundamental violation of human rights in other countries. And what I say is, what about our country? What about our kids? To find out that it's still legal in 48 states? When we say you countries cannot do this, we have to put you on different tiers. We have a report, and we put you on different tiers because you don't do this to find out that child marriage was still available here. Including this is the stuff I would really like to get into in a moment. But we're still back in you and university and economics again. I'm trying to shift it, not on me on what we're doing so that it's perfect. Yeah. No, no, I I totally appreciate it. So how, after you graduated, then you had your first job? Yes. As, ah, building systems analyst. Analyst? Yes. And so how was your career path shaping out? And then then into the transition of you know, your your current. I mean, I have I had a interview yesterday, and the ladies Empress and I find your, like, almost the empress of this mission, and I think it's a wonderful mission that you're doing. And so how did how did that? I mean, you said growing up with your father's with the idea of service and nurturing you. So how did this snowball start to build? And you're like, I'm I'm gonna put my efforts into this after your first job out of university. No, this this came in, uh, later. But, you know, my first job, we were doing other things, but also to help the community. Then I only worked in that for a year. Then I became a financial senior financial analyst for an investment bank, um, in Kuwait, and I was responsible for the foreign portfolio of that bank. And so we dealt with all the foreign banks that wanted a piece, you know, off that pie. And then and then I came here to the U S. And I went and Reema, just so because I know you wanna promote what you're doing, but I think your your life is powerful. So, like, even in the things that you have done, even those what we could pass over, like going to university, taking economics, getting your first job and then working in finance. And these, you know, the's big like that's a powerful message that is encouraging toe listeners as well, showing that, you know, look what you can do like these air some things you can do while also raising awareness for some of the tragedies that are going on in this world. So I think both are really good. You know, it's not just stop this, but also there is a better way to do this life or to live this life. So now you're into the United States. Yeah, and and so I went into real estate for a bit than insurance workers compensation and then for the state. And then I joined a I G as American International Group, the...

...largest insurance company in the world. And so I started as a workers comp adjuster, then became a workers comp manager, then an account manager than a national marketing manager. All within a I g. Then, uh, a I G programs marketing manager than insurance Services division for a I G risk management national accounts where we insured companies that had 700 million of annual revenue or more. We ensure them for workers come jail on. Otto. While doing that, I was doing my political stuff. I ran. Or a delegate. Uh, what was your first? I guess you did in university, right? You ran for student council? Yes. Well, in the States, what was your first running or what was your first taste of politics? Delegate? That was their delegate from my congressional from my congressional district. And back then it was Jesse Jackson who was running for president. And so I ran as a delegate in the congressional District. Had no clue an organization in D. C called the Arab American Institute Said which you run as a delegate. I said I had no idea. What how do you do it? So they sent me a fax. I'm dating myself. So they sent me a fax and they said, This is how you do it. And so we did a two minute speech and I won. I won First on the women. It was was awesome. It was exhilarating. I'm still reading the fax. You win. What I'm okay. Here we go. Yes, yes. And then? And then I ran as a delegate from the assembly district, and it was the same thing. Another fax. And then I followed the instructions on I went again. And then, um, I established the Arab American caucus within the California Democratic Party. I I was co founder of it. And the first chair, the first woman and the first chair. And so there was a lot of things as the first one in the first chair. I don't know what your your brother did, but I think you're winning there. Uh, but you mentioned the competition going up to see who could be first. And you had a few first there. And you're doing pretty well so you could tell him I said, I think you're with, no matter what he's doing, you're doing a great job. Thank you. Thank you. So? So that Z, That's basically So now that brings you into what? What is it you're doing now? What? What takes up your time? What? You know, what do you do on a regular basis? This year is a little bit different, but what would it be that that fills up your schedule. What fills up my schedule is raising awareness about the fact child marriage is legal in the US and how prevalent human trafficking is. It's that it's hidden in plain sight and that traffickers are basically targeting our middle middle school, not just high schools. They're targeting our middle schools, and they're even trafficking the young ones out of their own home and and so everywhere. As I mentioned that, I spoke. You know what people thought about child marriage, But what they thought about human trafficking is that it's all these foreign women that are brought into the U. S. What they didn't know is that 90% of the women in sex trafficking in the US are U S citizens. So it's not all these foreign women that are coming into the U. S. And everybody. You know, most people have watched the movie taken, and now, and that's another myth. No, not victims of human trafficking. Most of the time, they're co or strict by people who are very close to them. They could be a parent. They could be a partner. They could be. You know, it's either a family member or a partner who basically tricked them into becoming, you know, victims of human trafficking. And so I remember I was speaking at a club here. I was the president of the Newport between Democratic Club and after basically my term ran out. I was a speaker to talk about what the nonprofit does, and there was a victim of human trafficking also there. And she mentioned that she moved with her mom from Hawaii to the mainland to here, and they lived in the uncle, and basically the uncle abused her, sexually abused her, and then he trafficked her. And so she said, while everyone was going home after school, toe, eat dinner and do their homework, she had to hit the streets because she...

...had to bring home a quota to the uncle every time, every day. And somebody asked her, Why didn't you tell your mother? And she said, when I heard my mom always saying he is our protector is the only thing that's between us and being homeless on the streets. And that, and there's also a shame that comes in the middle of this, and that's why she never told her mother. But what she said, is nobody is cool. Noticed anything until senior year in high school when a counselor said, What are those bruises on your arm? And so it's not like the movie taken where people are kidnapped. No traffickers wait outside the schools and they look for those girls that are walking alone and they get to befriend them. They get to know them. They watch what they do on social media, they get them to trust them. And they promised them a life of endless parties and and designer items. And then the questions come in. They either get raped and they put into human trafficking. Or why don't you help me make the rent? Or or this and that? And so that's why we talk about human trafficking as that it's hidden in plain sight because it's everywhere. Onley 10% is on the street. Most of it is in the hospitality industries hotels, motels, home brothels, massage parlors. I'm talking about the US, of course, and so, um, that's what we're raising awareness about is that one is that child marriage is basically child abuse because let me go back to the story of Sherry Johnson to get the audience a better idea of this. So she waas, as I mentioned at 11 she was pregnant and they married her off to the 20 year old rapist. At 18 she found an attorney friendly attorney who got her divorce. She had seven kids, so 11 to 18 7 kids. So that means social isolation that she didn't go to school. The school was interrupted school. Her schooling was interrupted. And usually we had close to over 200,000 miners getting married in the U. S. Um, after from 2000 on, and most of them mostly are young girls marrying adults men. So when there's an age differential, you're more apt to be a victim of domestic violence. I am a The American Medical Association came in against child marriage because they said, um, the young girls are more apt to get sexually transmitted diseases be victims of domestic violence. Ah, because of the school and being interrupted, the education being interrupted. That means you're not going to college. You're not getting vocational training. You cannot basically get the wages that will allow you to raise a family of eight when you don't have the schooling But Cherie Johnson was a survivor, is a survivor, and she didn't want what happened to her happened to other kids in Florida, her own kids or other kids. And so she kept advocating with the legislators in Florida to raise it to 18. She was successful to raise it to 17. So now in Florida, no child marriage under 17 no exceptions, which is better than before now. 10 states, including California, have no minimum age. Brian, No minimum age. Which means if your parents want you to get married at 10 11 12 you and they can find a judge to approve it, you will get married at 10 11 9 12 because 10 states, including California, do not have a minimum age. I have a 10 year old daughter. I couldn't imagine Yes, yes, so I mean, how can we How can we do that? So we have to change things here, and that's basically to answer. That's a long answer to the question of what do I do during the day? It's mostly speaking engagements. I also speak at schools. It used to be in person. Now it's on Zoom or Google meets. It's digital and We're basically talking about red flags that parents and students need to watch for. We're trying to raise funds for human trafficking prevention programs that they need to implement in schools because, you know, human trafficking is about demand and supply. So how do you reduce the demand? There's two ways. One you increase the penalties, punished demand. So you increase the penalties. And then you educate the...

...public, uh, about the red flags that traffickers use so they don't fall victims. So because global whole 365 were about preventing victims from happening, because when you're a survivor of child bride, our child marriage or human trafficking, that trauma will never leave you for the rest of the of your life. The other day, like a month a month ago, I interviewed a survivor childbirth survivor who's now 80. You can still hear Brian. You can still hear the emotions, the emotions in her when she talks about that experience. And she wanted to volunteer with Global Healthcare 65 because she wanted to help women that are either going through that right now that are going to be victims of child merge or have gone through that experience, and now they're out of it. And she wants to counsel them and be their support, be there, mentor or support system for them. And so, um, that's why we're trying to prevent Our whole thing is about raising awareness, education and prevention because we don't want any girl to go through that trauma. And it could be Brian as simple as which is another example. One girl in school telling her friend, You know, my dad and I will take you home and she disappears six months later. Because the parents were financially very wealthy, they were able to hire a private investigator. They found her after six months. Well, that allegedly father that was supposed to take him home was not The father was not a father to that young girl to that front on dso She was raped. She was taken, she was raped. And then she was put into sex trafficking. And she was found out her 66 months. And so she has gone through that trauma because basically, you have 10 12 14 20 men going through you a day. What kind of ah a life is this? And they basically get them hooked either on drugs or alcohol or both, so they can control them. And so, uh, that's why we are advocating for as a safe childhood and a safe world. Basically, for women and kids. There's I saw a video. I think e would think it was Tim Tebow he's doing. He's working with sex trafficking and a mission to raise awareness is well, And he brought up there is one girl who's she was her family. Aziz. You mentioned some examples. Her family was putting her out there and she wasn't bringing home enough money. And the mother gouged out her eye or eyes so that she looked, um, in a more dire need so they can get some more money. Yes, I heard about we interviewed probation officer for the county of L. A C sect program, the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children program for L. A County. And they say that 90% off their clients basically were sexually abused before and that a good number of them were trafficked by their own family, either for drugs, for money or for both that the mother will bring them to that location so they can be abused. So they can get a fixed or they can get money out of it. Or they felt that or the kids that felt that's the only thing they could do in order to help the family. Because everybody's working 23 jobs and they can't make ends meet. And so that's why we have to have equity. We have to get to the root cars off those problems. So we need to provide. Education, as you know here is, is expensive. You want to go to higher education? Ah, lot of the people have student debt and one of the presidential candidates at this time, they're saying they're going to do something about the student that's in the U. S. And and so I've also seen things overseas because I did speaking engagements for the State Department, and I either talked about gender equity and or American politics. And so you see things as as you go to different places and you see the gender based violence, you see the gender inequality, and so you decide, um, to...

...do something about it. So you either watch or you decided to do something about it, So I've I've elected to do something about it. I mean, it consumes you because, I mean, there's a lot of this going on around you, but you have to put you have to be tunnel vision and basically not let yourself be distracted until you achieved. Yeah, and we are lucky that we were successful in having two cities pass our resolution. No child marriage under 18. No exception. The first one was the city of Irvine on August 11 and the city of Anaheim, the happiest place on Earth where Disneyland is. Unanimously. These two cities unanimously passed a resolution indicating no child marriage under 18. No exception. We're hoping to get to a state legislation that will change it for a whole state. But we're trying to come at it from different angles. I am doing a presentation for the City of Europe, Belinda October 20 at the City Council And so bit by bit. But they say that that tip of 1000 miles starts with one step. So that's what we're doing one step at a time. Rima, I have a question. I have other questions, but this is as you're mentioning, um, no marriage under 18. Without exception. What is someone's What? What is the biggest reason you any state or any local areas coming up where people bring a debate or their, um, contentious about that point? What? What is one? One reason they give for wanting someone to marry at 17 or 16 or something? What is the logical reason that they're giving? I don't understand it. I don't understand it. But Senator can only give you an example of California Senator Jerry Hill in 2017 he's from Northern California. A constituent of his came to him, and she said, a friend of hers is trying. It's going She's going to be forced into marriage as a minor and this can't happen. And she found out that it's legal in California and she wants to end that. And so he thought it was a no brainer, and he introduced the legislation SB 2 73. No child marriage under 18. No exception. It was watered down so bad that the proponents of it basically took their hands off and they said, No, I'm sorry. We cannot support this bill anymore. The way it was watered down, it no longer speaks to the goal of ending child marriage under 18. No exceptions. And some of the opposition came from unforeseen quarters, like a C l u. And, uh, you mean university? No, no. Excuse me. What is a c l U? Sorry. American Civil Liberties Union. Okay. And, uh, civil Liberties Union was against? Yeah, they they felt it's against the fundamental right off marriage and religion. But what about the what about the rights of the child to have a safe childhood? And so neither a c l u nor Planned Parenthood opposed it in the other four states, But they did here in California. So we're trying to build a coalition. We started, uh, the California Coalition to End Child Merge in on September 14 2019. We had a town hall meeting at American. Uh, you see, I, University of California, Irvine at the law school there, and we co hosted it with the U. C. I initiative to end family violence, and we launched the California Coalition to End Child Marriage. And we have partners in it and the partners in the group. And so people can go to see a coalition to end child marriage, or GTA and its partners and the partners are either victims. Survivors of child branch elected officials. Organizations are community leaders. So we're building the partners or the coalition's. And so it's across the board. It's nonpartisan. So we have elected officials from all parties and we have various types of community leaders. We have diverse organizations that are supporting us, and so everywhere that I speak. People are shocked. We just need to, um, educate and get the support of the elected...

...officials before we even put a bill another bill to make sure that it's going to pass this time. I haven't put much thought of this in this, but I'm just thinking of it now. I wonder, and you may know the statistics because I can see that there's probably gonna be pushed back of people who say, I mean, I couldn't imagine, as I said, me getting married at 18 or younger, I just couldn't imagine it being a logical like I wouldn't have any reason to do so. But some people may think, or maybe in love, right, and whether they fall, they get married at 18. But I think of like seatbelt laws or something like that, or getting a driver's license for instance, it's their statistics that show that it's better for a kid not to get a license until this period of time because they're more mature. It's just better for society is better for insurance. It's better for your city. I wonder if if there's statistics to show and I can think OK, well, listen, if there's this slim group that might have ah, riel reason like, Well, no, they're in love at 17. Why? If you're in love in 17 can't you just wait until you're 18? Right? I I love my car and but you can wait to drive until what? I'm not sure what the like 18 19 Whatever it is like even drinking and voting. Those things were shown to be a later age and something like this. So is there statistics that show that I know? I mean, there's one I always carry around, and I tell kids as a teacher, like Stay away from boys and girls because the statistic of you know, an elementary school student, middle school student or high school student dating someone, then getting married and staying married to that is very, very small, like almost 0%. So is there. Some sort of statistic that will go against that and then just wipe everything else away is being nonsense. So as you mentioned, you cannot vote here in the states until your 18. 18. You cannot sign a contract until you're 18. You cannot drink until your 21 s. So why do they have the these things? Because, like you said, they wanted people because they're making lifelong decisions. You're voting you're going to elect the president of the U. S. Or the member of Congress who is going to represent you and change life here for you in the US So they want you to be developmentally enough and mature to make those life long decisions. And so But you can get married at 10. Or that's a big I know. There's pushback. People are trying to say, Let's lower the age of voting and be like no, Well, let's not keep e mean 80%. There's an 80% divorce rates among uh, child marriage is basically and so uh, marriage before the age of 18. It has devastating, as I mentioned lifelong consequences, including greater vulnerability to sexual and domestic violence and increase medical and mental health problems. Higher dropout rates from high school and college, greater risk off poverty, their statistics for all that, Yes and so. And in addition to that, we heard from survivors of child marriage. We held the two parts summit, the first one on July 22nd WAAS. Hearing Survivor stories and August 5th. We didn't advocacy Part two, which is advocacy, which we had. Everybody who came in digitally on Zoom go into breakout rooms and they have a list, and they called their election officials, and they asked them to vote, um, to basically come up with legislation. No child marriage under 18 no exceptions or called for a meeting with them and all this stuff. But what we consistently heard from the survivors is that when they try to and because of the domestic violence and when it's a forced marriage, one of them so basically said it's rape on wedding night and rape every night. And so because of domestic violence because of the sexual violence, they tried to go to a shelter, but the shelter said, I'm sorry you need to go back to your parents because they were under 18. And so, if shelter can't accept you in some states. I just talked to a non profit organization and Iowa, and they do not in their own shelter other...

...shelters except people over 18 in their own shelter. They do not accept anyone below the age of 18 and I said, But these are some of the things that the survivors of child mergers said. They said we went to the shelter and the shelter wouldn't accept us. And you have to go to your parents who got you and dismiss in the first place into this abusive relationship. Or you have to go to the husband who is basically abusing you. And when you because of this age differential, you have no control over your reproductive rights. And that's why Cherie Johnson had seven kids. And so I forgot six or seven kids. Eso you have no control over anything on? Like you said, If you're 17 or 16 and you're in love and you want to get married, you have the choice to wait until 18. Then you can prove that your love is strong. You're gonna have a strong foundation for this marriage. But the victims of child marriage, they do not have the choice to wait. And so there's a big difference. There's a big difference here. Yeah, it makes perfect sense to me. I mean, I go back to thinking of wanting to drive a car or something. Well, you might want to, but you gotta wait and you might want to vote this year, but you gotta wait. You might want to go get drunk, but you gotta wait. And for that, especially the e. I mean similar drinking and driving. Or, you know, the irresponsibility of someone not knowing as much about politics to vote on a certain matter those sorts of things way into the reason why those age limits exist. So why wouldn't it? For for marriage and at least because you're protecting so many people is well like, that's the other side of it opposed to just saying, Well, you're not ready because that's where a lot of people have that knee jerk reaction. Well, don't tell me I'm not ready. So the 17 year old who wants to get married or the to 17 year olds who want to get married, they say, Well, we really, really want to. Well, okay. But you can wait. And not only that, by having this law, you're protecting the bigger proportion of people who are being trafficked. Yes. And, um not not just that, Uh, we have to also remember that if it wasn't for the marriage, it would have been a crime. Because it's Satya, right? And in two cases off the survivors that we heard there was four survivors. So 50%. It was a case of a statutory rape, one by by the nanny that the father chose. And that nanny was a man. And she was basically raped at 13. And then she was forced to marry him, to protect him from going to jail by that parent and the other one, The neighbor basically, um raped her. And she was forced by the mother to marry him after the mother called the cops on him. Then she was forced by the mother to marry him. Because the poor guy has kids. He was divorced because the poor guy has kids. And if he goes to jail, who's going to take care of the kids? So she was forced to marry him? Yeah, and and And? And they will tell you I mean, when you're a new adult and you have irreconcilable difference, then you can leave that person and you go rent your own apartment and start your life at 13 or 14. Who's going to rent you an apartment and you can't. You cannot drive a car. How are you going to go anywhere? Okay, you can take the bus, you can walk. But try do that here in California, where transit system is almost non existent and so so you cannot drive a car. You cannot go live on your own. But it's okay for you to marry at 12 and 13. But no, they will not rent you an apartment. When you're 12 or 13 you cannot go to a shelter because you're 12 and 13 and married. And so because then if you go to the shelter, they say go back to the parents. But I'm married. Well, I'm sorry we can't take you in. It almost seems like it was These age limits were set in the wrong order. It's marriage should have been set at this order, and then all the other ones would have fell in, you know, like even more logically, like this is You know, this is the one, as you said has the most effect on your life being married to someone for the rest of your life. You know, even you know voting it is important. You know, there's nothing wrong with voting, but it z not the day. It's not as impactful...

...on your life to be faced with this person for the rest of your life. So by setting this one first, the other ones would have fell in line. Yes, Yes. Rima, what is what is most difficult? I mean, all of what you do seems difficult. Um, what is the most difficult thing about your your work? Uh, the most difficult part is trying to convince elected officials that it's in the best interest of the child because it's child abuse. Uh, Thio have them author Bill and we and we did come up with a bill ourselves. So all what they need to do is is take it and run with it and sponsor it. It's trying to convince them to do that because it's in the best interest of the child. Same thing with trying to punish demand assed faras human trafficking because Right now, it's a misdemeanor, which I can't comprehend that it's on Lee a misdemeanor. If someone gets caught buying sex with the victim of human trafficking, it's a misdemeanor. It should be a felony, because if it's a felony, then it's going to affect you. It's gonna affect your employment. You're going to go on the national sex offender registry, so you think twice about doing that. But because it's a misdemeanor, they're going to continue to do that. And so again, it's about protecting our kids, and I don't see why we it has to be that difficult to protect our kids. What and and punish demand, come up with the legislation to punish the buyers. So when you think that there's around 45 million Children ages from 10 to 17 on the Internet here again, only talk about the U. S. One in every five has been sexually solicited. One in every 51 in every four has encountered unwanted pornography, and 60% of the teens have received an email or instant message from a stranger, and half of them have communicated back with somebody they don't know. And as far as monitoring, monitoring your the Internet use of your kids. Ah, we have global health. 3 65 Coffee meet ups, Virtual coffee Meetups once a month. One of my guests, she's ah, well known author. Um, Councilor and, um, we had our pre meeting and she's a wellness coach. That's what I was looking for. She's a wellness coat and we had our pre meeting and before the actual meeting, and she told me that she was a victim of human trafficking. So after I finished talking about the work of global hopes and she said, Well, I was a victim of human trafficking and she decided to share that with our audience the day off that specific cafa Mira and she said, Which still six in my in my mind, she said, I wish my parents monitored my phone because I wouldn't have been victimized. And at 13 years old and then she was basically forced to go sleep with other men by this person. And she said, I wish they monitored my phone. What is your What is your view of phone? And I mean the Internet as well. But I mean, just a while ago, I think I don't know what years is My first handphone, like a cell phone smartphone, was 2016. My my dear wife and I, we had a flip phone for a little while, but we were way behind the times, so we're still kind of, you know, we look like thes seniors with the phone in the hands and not really comfortable. But kids, I mean, we live in apartment. You're familiar with Korean culture. These kids have some really good phones and it Z even just on a social level. Ah, lot of these kids are going outside to play, and they're just sitting on their phones. So what is What is your view of, I guess, Internet with the computer at home, but also with kids with phones. The I agree responsibility. Our Children do not have smartphones. They have something they can call when they're finished school. So we know where they are, but it's not. There's no messaging involved. Anyone outside of who you give the number two. So what is your view with with Children and phones and what would be ideal? Okay, let me give you some statistics. Maybe...

...that those will drive it home. So as I mentioned the 45 you know, million kids from 10 to 17 on the Internet. Um, 20% of their parents tell you they do not supervisor Children's Internet used at all and 52% they say, moderately supervised, and some 71% they stop supervising after the age of 14. Yet 72% off all Internet related missing Children Cases happened between the ages of 15 years and older. So there's different things that you could dio and a lot of parents. And 62% of the teens say their parents know little or nothing about their websites. They visit. So their approach through social media, Facebook instagram and chat rooms, game rooms. And so they're approached by these president predators. You think I was on a conference? I'm on a call every week. Um, regarding what we call the Internet dangers and the use and the Earn It Act, which were trying to pass here is hold the tech companies more accountable because everything is going on the victimizing off the kids air happening on those platforms. And so one of them was the mother of a 13 year old who her first knowledge that there was something is when her niece called her and she said, Um, so and so it is going to commit suicide. And what happens is, or what happened in his situation is that somebody approached them, You know, on the Internet, they thought it was a 16 year old when usually it's a much older man, 45 15 55. They have a picture of a younger person, and so they think they're 16. And then that person convinced them to send them pictures on themselves initially in a bathing suit than without a bathing suit. And then those pictures were used against them to force them to do other things. And then when they didn't want to dio the things that this person who thought they thought were 16 and they were shocked when they met them in person that they're not when they wanted them to do other things and they didn't want to do it. Then they shared those pictures with their friends in school, and those pictures were circulating in school. And so if if you're a minor and you share and they call it sexting and sextortion, so if there's a penalty for sharing even your own picture, and it could be a felony. And you can even register. You have to register as a sex offender because you're sharing and new picture over the Internet, although it's your own picture. But you're breaking the law. And so they need Thio. You need to have a talk with your kids. Parents need to have a talk with their kids. They need to discuss the dangers of the Internet, the dangers in chat rooms in game rooms and net. Everybody who says they're 15 or 16 ar 15 or 16. If you talk with your kids and talk to them about the dangers, educate them about it and tell them that's why you're gonna monitor their Internet use. And there's a lot of applications that you can use that can do all those things. Like, for example, there's one called Circle. It's like a one stop shop for most off your parental control needs. In this one single product, you have the ability to set screen time limits, block certain sites and APS like Tic Tac or others, track Internet and device usage. And so, uh, there's other things. There's covenant eyes There's Net. Nanny. There's cost studio, so you need to be. You can't give. Yes, you need to do your due diligence about protecting your Children. You don't give someone at 13 a car and say, Go learn driving on your own. There's a danger 12 and 13 driving on their own without lessons. Same thing...

...you wouldn't send them on the Internet superhighway on their own without talking to them about the dangers off the Internet and its use. So you hold a family meeting and you explain exactly what your concern. You talk to them about their personal Internet views and you said controls and you follow them up and you limit the time spent online. And so, ah, lot of the tech companies. That's why we have the Earn It Act, which is basically it's the eliminating, abusive and rampant neglect of interactive technologies. It's a mouthful, the Energy Act, which is basically, um, right now tech companies have a carte blanche. Victims off trafficking cannot sue them, and the Earn It act will make it when past will make them accountable and will basically say you have to earn that release off liability by setting up protective measures so you can protect Children from being victims of human trafficking on your own platforms. You have to earn that. We can give it to you. Cut Blanche like it is now and so So That's so Parents and citizens need to be more involved and need to hold people accountable their elected officials accountable like human trafficking. Um, is $150 billion crime industry is the third and the fastest growing crime industry, and so we need to protect Children and women from that. And as I mentioned, um, 90% off The victims of sex trafficking in the US are women, and so we cannot bury our heads in the sands. It's hidden there in plain sight. There's red flags, but I think we're getting to the end off this. A program that's not this program, this podcast, but, ah, lot of the links that we provided, uh, will help you educate yourself more on that. And so you can go on www dot global Hope 365 or GTA or C. A coalition to end child marriage or GTA and get involved. You can volunteer. You can hold the fundraisers for us or donate. You can call if you're in the US. Call your elected officials even if not in the US. Get educated about the laws as faras child marriage and human trafficking in your own country. Get educated on that. Um, talk to your elected officials if they need changing, if they need tightening up and do something about it. Rima, I have a few more questions and why we work is about, you know, encouraging people and the work they do, whatever the work it is that they they have before them. But what? Maybe in, um, one answer. What brings you satisfaction in what you do, which is a very difficult I mean, I think you're probably one of the most hardest and a person who's in the most difficult position I've ever interviewed so far. Eso using the word satisfaction, um, I think is gonna bring it to a whole new difference. A whole new level. So what brings you satisfaction? Maybe even writing bills and seeing things past I can see is, you know, some progress there, but what brings you satisfaction and what? What is it? People don't understand about the work that you're doing and how you would like them toe understand better so they can have a better appreciation of specifically the work you're doing day in and day out. So let me ask you, what brings you satisfaction as agreement? I think you're a politician, E. I think you are. But what brings you satisfaction, Brian? I think bringing me satisfaction is what brings me satisfaction is working for my faith and my family and knowing that at the end of the day, I'm doing all that I could dio and still within a grace that covers covers much, especially when I fall short. Okay. And what about as a professor? What brings you satisfied, Uh, that students learn, they ask questions, they're intrigued.

Um, they're engaged and that you know that I at least was one step in their journey that helped them improve. Which is exactly the same for May. Because, um, when you're raising awareness about those two topics, and they're both heavy topics, when you educate them about that, when you raise the awareness when you educate them about it, when they start like you said, asking questions when they get outraged, win. They said it can't be happening when they decide they want to do something about it to change it. And you can see the passion in their face in their eyes that they need to make things better. Um, that's what brings me satisfaction because we know that that's going to trickle down and affect the life off a young girl or a woman somewhere sometime without us knowing we don't have to. Noah's long as it helps someone, even by getting them more educated on the topic. Even with getting the more educated. Now they want to get involved. They wanna do something about it. They want to change things. Or basically, if we prevented someone from becoming a victim of child marriage or human trafficking or by getting our resolutions passed when some elected officials get it. And they say, Of course in our city, this will not happen. And so that's what brings us satisfaction. And, um, I was so excited when we heard about the first resolution that passed at the city of Irma, and it was unanimous. So which is a strong message. It's like we all Democrats and Republicans, we all city council member, believe the same thing and feel the same about about this, and we do not accept and will not allow this to happen in our city. And so Anaheim seven City Council members unanimously passed no child marriage under 18. No exception. So that brings us satisfaction. Just you mentioned Democrat, Democrat, Republican. I'm Canadian and I'm in Korea, so that doesn't affect me directly. World stage America does affect most people, I guess, to some degree. How hard is it for you to do your work and not where your political sleeve, which becomes a hindrance to raising the genuine awareness that you want to raise, like How hard is it to meander when I mean you've been in politics for, ah, a number of years, You know there is a game. I don't know the game, but I hear there's a game, and it's not an easy game to play. How hard is it to meander when you have something genuine and you've got to bring it to ah forefront? But there's certain steps that you know there's rules in the game that it has to be played. Is that a difficult process and even a frustrating process for you? Um, their ways about their ways about that's you can approach it different ways. You can approach it in different ways. One. Child abuse and human trafficking is a nonpartisan issue. There's some people who try to make it partisan, but it waas I was a speaker at the Orange County Republican Central Committee, and I was the vice chair of the Democratic Party in Orange Country for 10 years. But child merging, human trafficking are nonpartisan. Issue their human rights issue. And so and whenever we talked to City Council member, I have people on my board who are Republicans. And so the Republicans approach the Republicans, The Democrats approach the Democrats, and, um, at the end of the day, it's a nonpartisan issue, and we try to make sure that is viewed as such. But, yeah, there there are some. Sometimes there are challenges. But when has life been without a challenge? It's how you address that challenge that can either make you or break you, as the question I ask is, What is it? People do not understand about the work you do like to behind the scenes day in and day out that you would like them to know, so they can appreciate your message. I basically start my day sometimes for seven in the morning or six if we're attending a conference that was hosted by people in London. So sometimes it...

...can start at six. Are Korea time zones air tough? Sometimes you can start at six in the morning and end at 9 p.m. And it's constant your constant constantly in meetings on Zumar, Google meets and on the computer on email because you really can't stop because one thing is gonna lead to another. But there is light at the end of the tunnel and Global Hope cannot. We cannot do it by ourselves. We need everybody is two point we need the support of, Ah, a lot of people. So, like for examples, my neighbors, they're so supportive that when whenever I went to speak, I had advocacy cards with me that are pre printed. They need to put their name and address, and then we will put the name of the election officials based on the address on the card will put the address label and the stamps and everything. My neighbors each one had their specialty because they see me when I used to go to meetings in person, I'm constantly in and out of the house in meetings and constantly running late. And so they say, How can we help? And so one became an expert in putting stamps on my neighbor. Was is a 90 year old woman, and she's the expert in putting stamps on those cards. Another one is attaching the seven cards thio to a pen because you need to give each person attending a stack of seven cards. I have to sign the seven cards, and so and then somebody else was entering that data and finding who their elected officials because I just did their volunteer sheets because we have to keep track of them as a nonprofit. So each one had their specialty, and I made it a point to share the success of those resolutions with them. Or when I get the latest award, the Congressional Women Off the Year Award March 2020. We're suppressions. Thank you. We were supposed to have the event march, and it was canceled. We just had its September. I think the end of September virtually be given, but they mailed the award the actual our to us from the congressional office, or I was just nominated to be for the Orange County Business Journal as businesswoman of the year. And the event is coming up at the end off October, October 29. Ugly. And so I make sure that I basically share that the good, the successes with them. So they know that their work, their hard work to support, ending child marriage and human trafficking. There's light at the end of the tunnel. And yes, there's tangible successes, and we can achieve them a little bit at a time. And that's good for people to understand. Behind the scenes, right? They might see an interview or they might hear of you in their local district. But you're hard at work and it's nice toe have those helpers to, because those air tasks that take up ah lot of time and what you want to be doing is continuing the message right? And while those tasks they're not, they're menial that but they will take away from you being the voice. Yes, they take a lot of ah, lot of time, and I'm really thankful to all of them for helping and supporting global hope through 65 by helping us with those things. And some of them are hosting fundraising events for us, even virtually, and they don't have to be high ticket item. It's like $25 a person. And so because you can do this small things and then you were raised larger amount by holding many small things. Thinking of my audience do you have for work, right? It could be specific to women, but it could be for men. Also is Do you have a tip for people getting into work? I mean, you are a hard working woman, right? So I understand why you're getting awards because you're working hard and you're working, and you know where people work for a variety of reasons, But you're working for a good cause. Do you have a top tip for people who might be getting into work? Whereas you had changing careers, right? Not, you know, until you're finding that that pathway that is good for you. Do you have a tip for people getting into work? I guess I don't take no for an answer. You must have come up with a million knows, especially in this but And e. I...

...mean, if somebody told me No, I went after them until they said yes. After your brother. Yes, I'm gonna And so don't take no for an answer. Find out what's your true passion is and treat everybody with love and compassion. You don't have to step on somebody in order to get where you want to get. And basically, that's it. As far as I'm concerned, um, I don't take no for an answer. And, um, you have to be. We spend most of my our time at work sometimes more time at work than with our families. So we have to love what we dio. So if you can be passionate about your work, even insurance, I love doing that because I love marketing. I love marketing. And so, even, if so, be passionate about it. And also, uh, have people around you who are positive people because the naysayers they drain your energy away from you, so support Surround yourself with positive people. You're leading into my next question. And I know you're still Didn't you run out of time? I not in career in the morning that I know you love Korea And I know you love Korean food. And I know you love Korean drama. So you mentioned about being busy. What? How do you balance your your life? I mean, you are busy. You say sometimes you can't be with family. You can't do these things because you are busy and no doubt that you are. How do you balance that? It and what is it? How do you find relief from the world? So I decided to do recently because I had digestive issues and which, basically I was I had to not work for 10 days on dso I had to shut down the laptop, the cell phone, and basically I know make it a point to walk at least 10,000 steps a day. I mean, I I have the application on my smartphone. I need to be smart myself and not just my phone. And so I started using that app on my phone. So I make it a point to go outside. And I'm lucky in that I live in a neighborhood where there's lots of natural walks and things like that. So I try to walk 10,000 steps a day. Yeah. Today just Before this podcast, one of our neighbors belonged to a Hawaiian band and they were practicing out on the green. And so I took my dog there and we were dancing. I mean, I was dancing and my dog didn't like the fact that I were dancing. She wanted to walk. So I'm like, Oh, my God. On they said, Come and sit with us. I said, I can't sit. I'm sitting the whole day. What a dang here. You gotta dance dancing there for 30 minutes. And then I had to come back, put my makeup on because you said it's video and audio. So I wanted to say you took away some of my dancing time. Well, you could dance if you want. Thio. I think there is a song you can dance if you want Thio. No, I I appreciate. I mean, that is we No matter the work we do, if we don't get that and we see it in in politics, we see it in with people that are in more famous or just some family members. Doesn't matter how hard you work. You need to separate yourself, um, refresh and to renew your your mind and to get your body ready because we can't go as much as we would like to. But no matter how big the causes, right, because if you don't take bottom line, if you don't take care of yourself, you can't take care of anybody else. So if I want to continue doing what I'm doing because I want to make things better for women and girls, I need to take care of myself so I can do it. Continue to do that until we can. And that now the U. N. One of their sustainable development goals is number five, which as gender equity and no child marriage by the year 2030 and the rate we're going about it here in the U. S. I doubt. Now, let me be optimistic. You hear going toe and child marriage in the US and hopefully faster than the rage. We've been going about it. It's okay. I don't want to take much of your time, but I have these questions and it kind of leads in through this. What is your ultimate goal? And I e...

...think you and I were talking about this earlier, but not specifically to this, but about a goal. And if not having the right goal, it may be discouraging. So you want to bring awareness and you want to bring education? What is, um, the ultimate idea that you have? And I would even answer first ending it would be the ideal, I guess we were talking about health care in Canada. I mean, the idea of having free for everyone is a perfect idea. Practically it just it doesn't work. Otherwise it would be working. So with ending child marriage and human trafficking, what is your What are you hoping to do? And even you hinted that, you know, to get it done by 2030 is gonna be kind of hard. So what? What are you hoping in your work to accomplish? Or at least say this is the great path to to make this world a safer place for women and kids? Because look at it this way. If you have civil war or you have people migrating because of civil war or because of climate change or because of anything or even during peace, you have domestic violence. You have human trafficking. You have child marriage. And so and women when they're migrating because of everything that we mentioned, they end up becoming victims of human trafficking or child marriage or domestic violence. And so we need to make this world a safer place. One one person at a time, one person at a time, one city at a time, one state at a time, One country at a time. Yeah. I mean, what is the law in Korea about child marriage? That's over my head. All right. Uh, I I don't know. I mean, it's I think it's probably the reason I wouldn't know is because it's it's not something that happens very often. I don't I don't think it's I don't I don't know. I I really don't know. I'll look it up after this, but it's traditionally it doesn't seem. I mean, in 2020. It doesn't seem like something that happens Ah, lot, or that it's a problem in Korea is kind of good at squishing out problems. But I'm gonna I will look that up. But it seems they have a system, you know. You go to university, then you get married like that seems like the cultural way of doing it. What goes on underneath. I'm not sure. Okay, so in Korea Oh, you found it while I was babbling way Have the Internet. I should have, You know, the civil code 2011 The minimum age. The minimum legal age of marriage is 18 years. However, girls can be married at 16 years with parental concern. Would that be? Well? No. Because you have parents that will say yes. Basically, I mean, victims of child marriage. They cannot get married without parental consent. So the main culprit are the parents. They are the parents. So they are the name. The common theme for many problems. Yes, E. It's good. You know, it's 18 at least. I mean, but her girls can be married at 16. Until consent. Yeah, I think you're doing a great work, and I don't I know you're getting late there, and I don't want to take up. I have several questions for you, but I don't wanna take your time. How about you tell me the several questions and I'll answer one of them? Well, even just anything else that you would add for encouragement. Um well, a big something. Either a big mistake that you knew that you've made and you've learned from in your work or something that you've wish you would have known. You know, just before you were you know, looking at your brother and saying I'm going to be top 10. I'm gonna be in the top seed something that you wish you knew. Starting your work that would have helped you now or will help someone who's listening. So the the idea of your biggest mistake or something You wish you would have known The biggest mistake's you learn from it. We don't even need to know the mist. Ake, Um I'm trying or something You wish you would have known in in middle school. High school? Yeah, it's not a mistake, but I can basically answer the question the way I like to answer it. Not the way you ask the question. Eyes that...

...politician is, which is basically because of covered 19. I mean things, Dan. I mean, we now know that we need to live in the present. And so I was always too busy to travel too busy to do this. Too busy to do that. Too busy. And now because I can't. I want Thio And so I'm like, I have time. Yeah, I'm in the world now, but I really I want to go to Korea. But I can't because I'm gonna be on a plane and turn is you know, everybody needs to have that rapid PCR tests before they get on the plane to make sure they're negative. And what about when I get there? So So people need please live in the present. Please be kind and compassionate to others and treat people like you want to be treated. Yeah. We spend a lot of our working, like rushing and trying to do this and trying to do this and missing out on some of these smaller things that were forced to realize, You know, as I mentioned to you earlier, I'm a home a lot because of this, and it's given me a new perspective on helping out at home and and being more responsible on do all those things. Eso cove. It has been a secret little blessing, I think for many of people to realize some of the more important things in life Yes, is that I wish I've gone to that wedding that I was invited. Thio and at times I even bought the ticket. But I said, You know what? I'm too busy. And so that's what you need to dio. Maybe if you, you probably ever do is start training little, um, Protege's to do the some of the help you with some of the heavy lifting and work and spreading that message so that you can free up some of your time. Absolutely trained the trainer. You know, we talked about that, but we never started it. So thank you for reminding me it za good. I mean, anyone listens it who hears this will be more aware, like you saying we'll check it out. Well, now I'm gonna look at more of what's going on Korea and I don't even know what the laws are in Canada. Near closing. Do you have any encouragement thinking of yourself in different careers? Different paths? Um, people are disgruntled covitz an issue even listening. Thio this about human trafficking, Onda child marriage and just discouraged about life in general. Do you have any sort of encouragement for people? Um, in whatever work that they do, it's It's the same answer that I gave before, which is you need to sit down and figure out what do you really want? What do you really, really want? What are you passionate about? And can you mix that need for financial independence and the passion? Is there a way to to marry those two together? Particularly work at a job that's going to give you satisfaction? Because, as Cove in 19 taught us, we have to live in the present, and we spend most of our time that works. So let's enjoy that life that we have and the time that we have at work. Let's do it and never taken over an answer. I'm not sure how much adversity you have gone through going through life, but you are a woman of power. You are doing a very good job, and you've had a career that is noteworthy and obviously honorable to the point, to receive accolades from some of the top places in the world to receive accolades. And I commend you for what you dio you mentioned a little while ago about reaching you. How can people directly reach you in regards to this? Or, you know you may find a prodigy protege who has to contact you and say, I want to help you. You have, ah, stamp licker, but I want to go out there and do something else to help you out. Yes, they can reach me at Rima, which is our I Amazon. Mary A at Global Hope 365 dot org dot org's so that stream and Global Hope 365 dot org's They can go to our website again, which is www dot global hope for 65 dot org's and volunteer. Or they can go to see a coalition to end family Thio. See a coalition to end child marriage dot org's You're all right, you're right, and they can join us there to become a...

...partner. If they live in the state and they want to change it in their own cities and state, they can tell us what city are they live in, and we can send them the resolution so they can help pass it in our city, our county or they have any suggestion for us, or if they wanna learn more or they want to spread the words themselves, they can email us through the website and tell us, what is it that they need and how they can help. And we'd love to hear from them. They can also go to both websites and donate if they can, to help us continue with this work, Rima, Uh, she be I go ahead and continue. You can also follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram at Global Hope through 65 or I'm at actually managed a shitty assed faras Twitter is concerned and, um basically email us and they can donate on both sides to their would like Thio have us continue with this, Anna. But I want to thank you so much for giving me the opportunity to be on your show. And also for giving me the opportunity to chat about Korea and everything Korean and practice some of my words. Jingle tingle friend. Yes, Rima Nashashibi. I appreciate you. I only have one more question. And again, the work that you're doing is great. And I do encourage people to go to those sites. I'll post them in YouTube and my podcast site. Ah, one final question. Why do you work? Because I love to work. I don't see myself sitting still. I don't know. I don't see myself sitting still, I'll get bored out of my wits I would take I usually take a break. I'll have, like, a week off and and not just and not do anything and just pamper myself in. But I love to work a week off. I mean, I'm I need more than a week. So for you just to take a week, I mean, as a as a professor, we have four months off. Oh, lucky you. Oh, my God. Lucky I wanna be. Oh, well, then there's the whole idea about the money that kind of goes and balance with it. But you do get lots of time off. So to hear that you only want a week off. Yes, I think you need some protege give you some time and travel and dance. Please send some my way. So let me ask you this. Why do you work, Brian? I work as I mentioned faith. Someone asked me this and I cut off the interview and he and I had a three, maybe four hour conversation about this. But then I said to myself, If someone asked me the question, I'll answer it. I work by Grace for the glory of God. Um, and to reveal that in what I do through my family and in this case, through the podcast to show that the as you mentioned love love is important If love has been given to me, why couldn't I show it to others? For forgiveness has been given to me So why can't I forgive others? So I work. You know, whether it's this, that or another thing if it changes but hopefully doing my best. But working under grace Because my best is never good enough. Um, And in trying to enjoy and have, you know, find with my passion your best is always good. Don't be hard on your It's something I don't know how good it is, but it's something hard on yourself. No. Well, I know what your work is. There's no one. I don't know how that you come up against opposition. Um, in the work that you're doing and raising awareness for child marriage and trafficking, I hope that you are encouraged to know that there's people in your corner. It is a valid and, um, it's a most admirable cause for you to be fighting for Children who don't otherwise have a voice. And I think there's there's other issues that brings up like abortion and stuff. But it's It's for you to fight for Children who can go against that. In what case do they have? So all the power to you, uh, remain Nashashibi? I appreciate you and Global Three Global Hope 3. 65 in your work, and I hope to talk to you again and I'll be watching for you because I think you you have a long career ahead of you as well. Come Santa...

Monica. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive, joyful day in your work.

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