WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 28 · 1 year ago

#27 Richmond Punch International Violinist

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Email richmondpunch@yahoo.com 

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Richmond Punch is a violin virtuoso who delivers a riveting, dynamic, explosive, and powerful performance! A native of Dallas, Texas, Richmond graduated from the top-rated Arts Magnet Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts. He honed his craft and earned a Bachelor of Music degree from the famous Juilliard School of Music in New York and received a Master of Music degree from the prestigious Yale University. He specializes in live jazz violin music for all types of special events including corporate, concerts, festivals, weddings and worship. As an accomplished musician, Richmond has produced 4 CDs in various genres that include Classical, Hip Hop Jazz and Gospel. The titles of his four CDs, which are available online everywhere are “Gospel Covers”, Finally”, ‘Back That Violin Up” and “Hymns for Botham”. Throughout his career, Punch has traveled the world dazzling audiences as large as 15,000 from Mexico to Cuba and stateside from Atlanta to Anchorage and everywhere in between. Richmond is a featured entertainer for the Disney Cruise Line Entertainer, Dallas Cowboys Club and Dallas Love Field Airport. He is also a feature on Amazon Prime’s “The Focus.” Richmond has opened for Idina Menzel from Disney’s Frozen and has entertained Hollywood Royalty and other celebrities that include Viola Davis, Danny Glover, Steven Forbes, Daymond “Sharktank” John, Omari Hardwick, Letoya Luckett, Morris Chestnut, Jewel, Bishop T. D. Jakes, Ross Perot, Kirk Franklin, Kirk Whalum, Nolan Ryan, Emmitt Smith, and Gary Payton just to name a few. He has also played backup for Kenny G and Diana Ross.  

For more than 20 years now, Richmond has given much of his time to support non-profit organizations. In addition to sharing his musical talent, he has worked with mentoring programs that include Big Brothers Big Sisters as a mentor and speaker. As well, he has worked with various school districts, HBCUs and other colleges and universities across the country. Richmond currently resides in the Atlanta area.

Welcome to why we work, with your host, Brian V as. He speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which will be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going and keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here's your host to why we work, Brian v this is Brian V at why we work, and I have the wonderful pleasure of speaking to you today with Mr Richmond Punch. Could Day find Sir Brian. How's it going? Man? I'm so it's going well. I'm so excited to start this. You and I've been kind of playing with the buttons and getting things going here and and you have a violin in your hand. You're ready to go. But before we get there, I've done an intro just before this to talk about you. But can you give us a little bit about your job and bring us back even before your violin time and your very first job that you would have had? Sure. Yeah, so, well, I started when I was five years old and well, actually my first job. Yeah, probably busking. It's probably when I was young and my mom was like this is how you can both earn some money and this is also how you can find an audience. And we went to like one of the most popular spots in Dalla Sexas, where I was born in, raised and and I played. I did like busking, and it's called the West it was called the West End and still is and and that was like of some of my first audience. But I had a couple of different business lessons there, because I also found out that another musician played there. So I was also on somebody else's turf. So I also learned about competition at the same time. So at the We ages of five through ten, is that? Yeah, there was somewhere around. Somewhere around ten, I'd say about that time. So you picked up the VIBE when I start? So you picked up the violin at five. For what reason did you pick it up? Right, I have a daughter and you know, we kind of okay, you're going to do an instrument, and here it is. So what why did you pick it up? Sure, well, the violin in part very much results of very good schools in Dallas Texas. We had a public amount of story and I just really, you know, leaned my sound, my youth, leaned my ear towards the sound of the violin. You know, when they, when the school sat is down and said here, here's the orchestra, it presented in concert. Pick, pick, pick one if you like it. You were you. Were you the type of child that needed to be told okay, now you have to go to practice, now you have to do your lessons and, you know, don't go a long time without it. or or were you on the other spectrum, being told you better put that down? No, you can't go to music lessnse today, I mean there's there's those two extremes. Right, you always have to be told to practice, and then the other is they're telling you to put it down. Where did you find yourself growing out? Sure, yeah, it's very much a practice. Or you know, I when it came to growing as a child, community, you know, having friends, all that, growing up, playing on the street. I did that song, but then I would try...

...to do it with my bottle in and I like go out with my violin and go to kids to be like hey, you want to hear me play Nice Game? You can hear me play. Yeah, and I just, you know, start busting out and yeah, okay, we just play ball. Okay, now we're going to play this awesome game and they and then my mom be like yeah, it's time for a dinner. So I about practicing. Yeah, it's time for dinner, dinner's ready. Like well, that's cool, mom, we're playing. We need to play more. That's great, though. Right. was there anyone in your family that was musical as well, or is this you're the first one to go through and like I'm going to have show you my talent and natural talent. So actually, at the same school that I went through. That was kind of a little funny story that I've found out that I had a cousin in the same school that played violin that I had never met until at that school. So but like I like my sister played after me. But but we didn't really have a real huge musical family, although growing up I discovered that cousin in the same school. That was the same school from age five until until I went to high school, and then I actually got to high school and I discovered two other cousins playing as well that also play. They played. They that cousin and the pre high school played violin. The other cousins played piano and our time forgetting what one under day but piano and you know other instruments. Yeah, so is your progressing into high school? Are you at all working in a job that's not music related, or are you staying focused? And some kids to stay so focused in whether it be a sport or a musical instrument or even sciences, and then they're not working at all. They don't need to, whether their parents are supporting them. There's there's not a necessity there. Did you have to work to help support yourself, where you had a drive just to experience other things in work? Yeah, will actually it's a very good question. So when I was thirteen there was a program for minorities called the young strings program and the still exists today in Dallas Texas. It started by the Dallas Symphony and one of my first jobs actually was working for this symphony in like a paid internship where I was a male clerk. I think I went around the symphony offices sorting mail and delivering mail and that was one of my first jobs. I was also an usher at our at our Broadway Musical Theater in Dallas called Dallas Summer. Dallas Music Hall, Dallas Music Hall, and I was a I was an usher there, and so those are some of my first jobs. I even went to study summer camp in like Aspen, Colorado. I was an usher there, and yeah, those are those are some of my early first job. So it wasn't like I had necessarily had to work, but it certainly didn't hurt. Because I was from a single parent home, you know, I was able to receive a lot of scholarships that I needed to study music. So so the work, the work definitely help. When did it become clear to your family and yourself that you have probably a raw talent just that needed to be worked upon at some point? But you were going to pursue this, because you mentioned and I know that you went on to university all for Performing Arts and for your violin. So when did it become clear to you and your family that this wasn't just like a side Gig or, you know, a hobby to do after school? As I guess in a way we have that epiphany early on, because my orchard teacher in the school, the one that got me playing when I was five and convinced my mom that that this was cool, you know, yeah, as a lot of kids today. They're like, I don't know, you know, that's cool. But that same teacher got me, told me about a program when I was nine orch is it southern...

...methods university, to do to do kind of let's see, if school was week days, it was the weekends, unless it was the week days. Week days in the summer. Very busy during school year. We days in the summer I studied. I really kind of got some of that experience early on because all, we're already a nine, I'm in a kind of like a young symphonic environment where it's like a symphony and you know and you're rewarded for good jobs. The competition comes into play. I'm bumping up chairs, the orchestra levels increase and change, and so I'm really I'm experiencing that professionalism early on. So I think, I think I kind of knew for sure early on, for sure by thirteen when, you know, when I said, had accumulated some of the Solo, you know, solo one ratings in the solo competitions, started to win some competitions and when I got into the Dalla symphony, you know, like one audition for the Dalla symphonies program for free lessons that would normally, you know, be very much out of our, you know, my family's budget. When go ahead. Yeah, no, no, so around thirteen fourteen was was the most was all of all of those things, and that's when i's not really realize the epiphany of knowing that it you have a true talent. Do you recognize at that time as well, if they're there was a pressure that then an increased pressure upon yourself to perform well? Or did you accept that as then in and you just going to keep going? Or did you did you start to feel like, oh well, now there's there's some backing behind me to push me forward and I better not let anyone down? Yeah, I had a lot of motivation. I remember when I was maybe eleven, this new kid entered school and and I was over there, you know, like this, and this kid who just comes into ours killing it is like this and like he's playing like factor notes in me, and so I like I like I'm in the you know, beginning or the middle of the book, you know, like this is our city Suzuki method book, and this kids like at the end end of one or halfway through book two, and we're like the same age. And and I said, I started kind of freaking out, you know. Yeah, you start putting pressure on yourself. Yeah, I sorry, I sorry, freaking out, like I got step up more, but I didn't know I was behind, you know, behind something, you know, Uh Huh, or and that. And it was that sense of that, that that really kind of was wanted things that propelled to that point. You thought you were the prodigy. You're like, look, look at me, I'm doing great, look at this ance. So after high school you went? Where did you go with then? Sure, my high school was a by the way, the booker t Washington Performing Visual Art High School in Dallas had alumni like Ericabato, grammy winner, Grammy Winner, and Norah Jones. Actually even, I think eat eaty Berkel, a lot of people know from acting or Broadway, were world. Eat Briquel went to that same high school and the late they ceasnout trumpeter, Roy Hargrove, so from the same high school. And so with those, the help of Dalla Symphony, all of that combined. Summer Camp Studies, interlock in Michigan, Aspen, Colorado, I went to, I got on Audi, I went I got accepted to juilliard for my undergraduate and and then my master's was at Yale University. In those steps from high school and up into juilliard, do you recognize this is is a whole nother level, this is something completely different, or was it generally pretty progressive and you can actimate to it very easily, you can adjust to...

...it? Or was it this is being, you know, I need to bring my a game every single time? Yeah, there's these are some big schools that you're going to. Yeah, no, there was definitely a right then. I knew the level of, you know, a very high level of achievement was needed and, you know, I just really push. I learned to work in practice and I learned what it meant to see results, and so I really just try to push myself and do the best I can, knowing that the at the time, like I wanted to end up in a symphony workshop, you know. So that was your goal. So what after you finish all of your schooling, and not obviously learning, because you're still practicing and playing, but what did you do for the time being to earn an income, or what were you doing, because I know you were traveling the world and you're doing bunch of things, but was there a consistent thing that you were able to do, or is it still about getting gigs and different things for different places you can play? Sure, sure, well, of course there is. What a lot of musicians can do. I mean I think more of them do it now these days and even then, back then, because I was in New York City before the birth of Naked Cowboy, which a lot of people would know from his entrepreneurship, but I was I saw something in New York that I never really seen before, which was just such a huge, you know, really like a hustle. You know hustle that work can be formed from something that is, I starts and ground up. Yeah, it's like like, like hustle is like a drive, an initiative, like I'm gonna be successful even on the small thing. And that, to a large degree, was the subway. M It was subway in New York, and then it was also this place that we have in Dallas called West village, where my sister had a job serving ice cream, Italian Gelato, and and I would go play outside of the Italian gelatto store when I was whenever I was home, and in that was my those were kind of basically, there's some of the jobs I have formed. Is there a good, good money in that? Being on the subway, putting in your do you have to put in the time? I remember I was down by the waterfront where I'm from and Halifax, Nova Scotia, and I saw this lady. We just happen to be sitting in the sun eating ice cream and watching her and I could she was there for a couple hours and then I talked to her after funny enough, and she was doing it because her daughter made a promise to always go down to the water front and these particular times and she couldn't cause she was six. So she did it for a daughter and she turned out to be a teacher, but I could just see her, you know, and then when she was done playing a set, she was stretching her fingers, but she was getting a lot of money in her cup. They're right, and she was a professional and she just knew this was a good way for her daughter. But she just showed the commitment to her daughter that she would keep it up for while she was sick. So at that time, were you able to you said a hustle, but like make some good money doing that because you are performing. It's not it's not begging your profit, performing a service for people and people enjoy it. How was the money then? Yeah, so it was definitely a means to you know, something to spending money during college, you know, not feeling like the broke, you know, yeah, college student, you know that that kind of feeling. Eliminating that, you know, I earned some days would be a hundred dollars of more, HMM, some a some of the average days were, you know, around forty yeah, or something like that on an average day, and this is years ago. And but it was good and that, you know. And that was like a day within a two to four hour period. Yeah, two to four hour period. And then there was you know, I come back again too, like naked cowboy, example. I know that it was some times when he was making like a minimum. It's minimum, got to like a Hundredzero, and he was, you know, just kind of standing, yeah, around in Time Square. So yeah, so what is it you're doing now? What is...

...it you you tend to covid kind of puts a twist, specially on entertainment. I'm sure it hurts, but what would be a regular week for you sure? Well, of course I went into two thousand and twenty with doing a tour. That my tour. You can actually find some remnants of what it was going into two thousand and twenty by the Hashtag leap, leaps and bounds. HMM, tour leaps and bounds, or you can even type in that Hashtag and you could kind of trace what was happening, especially January first, as I get it into year and I was like this is going to be the tour this year and I'm going to make leaps and bounds. Well, covid hit. It did hit right at the time when I just made a career move to really grow and expand. I moved to Atlanta on March first and I was like I wanted to be in a place where I could really grow as an entertainer, be be an entertainer, grow in that industry, not just with Violin, but also get into film and Television and become become a become a more become more of an influencer. Yeah, and so anyway, as it came to job, actually a lot of what I did to kind of defeat, you know, the covid woes of career. Yeah, is he's I went back to the hustle because, I mean, everybody's locked in side or which everything is shut down. So I started with the street performances, like I would watch the applause at eight o'clock, nine o'clock for first respond there's that was happening kind of like all over the world, and the musicians performing from their balconies. Hmmm, that was sort of like the one of the first things, and so I went and found that in the location that I am in Atlanta, and and I went out and I got to do some, you know, a nice set of performances for for that, for the plause, and I got some nice footage and some energy accumulate. I started to feel good, start to figure out that I had a path to momentum in a city that, you know, where people didn't really know me and I was spreading new, you know, plus code. Right. So then after that there's just the things that happened with the black lives matter and a lot of the police brutality watch. I'd always been a part of my message. So I went to the streets to perform to also calm people down during that time. I mean it literally like follow the you know, first of all was a plotting medical responders, and then I was trying to bring some peace or some calm or also stand for the message of, you know, of equality, all that at the same time. And I was out there performing and then I went to did more of that, and then then I decided to go back to a place that I went to before and get my card, like the two thousand and nineteen fall. It's kind of like, you know, on the never giving up on something. Yeah, absolutely, I gave my card to a place last fall while visiting Atlanta and like making the decision that I wanted to move here. I also gave my card upon arrival, kind of pre covid. Gave it in March much first. I just moved here. I gave it then and then covid hit and then so I basically I ended up well, I got some momentum through the black lives matter performances. I got some national and international coverage for performing further wake the way, performance of it is in the day before the funeral for Ray Schart Brooks. Yeah, and and I was on ABC, NBC, CNN, routers, Routers Daily Mail in the UK. I forget there's something in Australia, Australia, the different different papers around the world for that. And there's video, lots of video in some of the videos got like up to four hundred or five hundred thousand views. So so, although it wasn't necessarily like about about me, you know, the camera did focus...

...on my music, you know. So actually some of the some of the videos are its longest like like an hour, hour and a half. So who's really wasn't really neat exposure opportunity. So anyway, I went back into the same place where I give him a previously given my card two different times and and this time they had a yes for me. Of all the times to ever give up, absolutely and in the middle of the pandemic, and they had a yes for me. And so to currently I play two days a week at a restaurant here called sage restaurant in Atlanta, which is awesome. So it right in the middle of the pandemic. You know, I actually actually have work opportunity that play two days a week, Saturday and Sunday. Can you I mean now is I think maybe maybe you've experienced something similar, but not pandemic wise. But this must take a lot of air out of your balloon right, not being able to perform when you're willing to perform, unlike, you know, you're trying to get some gigs. You know, you're trying to do this show or that show, and sometimes they get shut down, maybe, or you're not able to perform. But how is the emotional roller coaster of in between jobs, IN BETWEEN GIGS? How is that? How does that play a toll on you? Sure? Well, I mean I will, you know, even I'll say pre the the job or pretty the GIG, yeah, or even in between. Now, as I look for additional things, you know, as they're definite in challenges where you have to, you know, keep stay with. You need to find out, like for yourself, like what is momentum? What is what is waking up every day and and wanting to do something productive? What is? What is it look like to want to do better? What does it look like to grow, grow when you don't even want to brush your teeth or coming here that day? Or Yeah, you know, I and know it's covid. You know, some people are like, I'm not even going to take a shower, like yeah, like what's the point, you know, but but too I stayed with all those things and I wake up early every day. I'm motivated. So where is, you know, where's the phone? What's the ringing? Or I was all my events were getting rescheduled or I was losing work. You know, nowadays, you know my phone. My phone is ringing, you know, and I it's it's just taking me to kind of really a stick to witness. There's some things that happen sometimes because, you know, in the our current world today, some of the same things that people do in all their businesses and now are on a different have a different financial scale to it. So so the earnings you might have earned pre covid, you know, it's a little it can be a little bit of a different percentage. Right. Obviously you would expect some scaling back, but that's that's been happening. So I try to adjust to that. But, you know, yeah, but things overall are really good. You know, there's matter fact there was a big one I was planning on that I would have planned on trying to be a part of if covid had not hit or if covid had a subside. Maybe. Yeah, I'm which is the march on Washington? Which one would that be? That would have been. That would have been August twenty eight. Okay, mine and actually, I think within the last seven days, I just find out, you know, as you would assuned, that they're they're going to do virtual but I was so looking forward to doing that, being a part of it, you know, maybe playing, you know, on the the National Mall, doing some things in DC. Yeah, but you know, but things are continuing on. Actually had a neat opportunity that was really inspiring to me in that never giving up, which was well, that the the thing that a lot of people need to realize in the jesting with their careers is the sometimes, within the sign of the Times, you can find your next job, you...

...know, your survival. So one of the gigs that I got along the way was actually performing music during covid tests. Never would have thought of that. Yeah, yeah, it was. I'm sorry, was actually people are driving up with their cars, you know, the long lines, see, and I was playing music while people were coming up for for Covid test. So, you know, it's like you know and like you hear about the you know, the whiskey are distilleries and people that started making sanitize and sanitizer. Yeah, I thought that was interesting. Made me question drinking whiskey, though. I was like, uh, because, yeah, makes us hobby, Hobby, so hobby sowers, making masks now, yeah, yeah, it makes us think outside the box. Yeah, yeah, and that's how I met you on Linkedin, because I know that you have your page there and that's it. Another they're great way to feature yourself and maybe meet people that you know, because I'm meeting people do that we wouldn't normally meet. Yes, I saw your video yesterday. Yeah, go ahead, I saw your video yesterday and you're cranking it out. I love that jacket. You were aware. I don't know if that is that a leather jacket or I don't know what it was, but it was shiny. Oh thanks. What color? The White One? The white one like I like maybe egg yoke like. It was kind of like it looked almost like a like not a plastic or rubber, rubber jacket. Yeah, it's sequence, is it? Yeah, Brown and white. Yeah, very shinny nose look. But that's a great way for you to get out there, right and you know, and Linkedin's free, I mean if you want it to be, and you can just advertise yourself and tell people what you're doing and then you can find gigs, like even in the corporate world, like you're talking about, getting hired in different ways that you wouldn't be able to do in any other time. So how, how could you tell me, Richmond, how work has brought you through life? So for you it's playing the violin, mainly playing the electric violin, because you're an electric violinist. How has work helped you through life? I would say that work is very much a part of the balance of life and work contributes to to that balance. It contributes to like the great like. I would say for me personally, contributes contribute to a greater me because, you know, for one, I'm fortunate that what I'm doing is extremely fun. You know, it's extremely fine. I I am able to achieve successes. You know I'm able to you know that's a thing's now. I think where a lot of people are realizing right now would work is is that one of the geniuses of work is the evolution of work, right because that's how people are making it right now. So I realized that not only have I been been working, but I'm able to figure out the evolution. Yeah, in in a pandemic you know, and to evolve and still, you know, be able to maintain or balance, you know, balance and grow and still try to figure out how to be successful in the same time. What is what is the most difficult part or aspect of being you as an electrical violinist? What is most difficult? That people that wouldn't understand that you like them to understand. Sure, the hardest part is that I have to wear so many hats. Grew right, I'm I am for or I'll say for most of the years of my life, I have been an unsigned artist and now currently, actually I have, you know, I've artist management, but still, as it comes to to like, you know, labels, the deals, you know, record deals, that record labels, I am still an unsigned artist there. So you know, that's that's...

...the difficulty. Number One, yes, that I'm trying to do where, you know, I want to say five pats, but that's probably the wrong number. But you know, selfmade PR so maybe a lot. You know selfmade practicing Selfmade, you know, Hustle. You know, yeah, practicing the time to learn new songs or verse or some New Culture. You know, like I realized to as a point in all my studies of classical music and I when I went on it to be a self employe musician and like now, like electric violin, was like nobody's gonna call me if I can only sell them mot art in Beethoven or I'm like, I'm like I'm gonna get like this mini calls, MMM, for for Motart and baits o then, but the world's going to continue to grow and change and there's all these people that like all these different things, and so I'm going to be missing this mini calls. So when did you make that transition from violin to electric violin or is that part of your training all the way through? No, electric only within the last, let's say, last two to three, two three years, years that I fully because what happened is I had regular violin first. Then I amplified the regular violin, so I attached like microphone to it. So I was I guess you can call that like Acoustic Electric, Uh Huh, in a way, in it's sort of you know, but in a homemade version. And then now I finally have a bona fide electric violin. So you saw a more opportunity in this market then would have what have been in just a regular violin. Yes, yes, and you know, it really helps. For one, it covers this particular one, covers the two instruments that I learned all my life. Now I can almost play them in like one instrument. So I can just sort of demonstrate just a little debt, because the this is a violent in a viola. Okay, you can see the five, five strings, five strings run it. It's a beautiful instrument. Are they hard to come by? I mean, you know, maybe in a pandemic, but they're not. No, they're not. It's a great instrument made by Yamaha. Okay, yeah, you's truly, you know, mastered high level. You know the ingenuity sound of the electric fo shooting electric. Yeah, give us, give us a give us a demo. Oh, yeah, sure, sure, if you don't mind. So, like what I was showing you, there's just the range, range. Music is powerful. Yeah, mostly I want to show you the range, and that I'm you know, it's the violent and of Viola combined and it's just it's just really, I mean it really literally like change my life. Music changes a lot of people's lives. What is it joy that you have about playing your music? I just love making, you know, making my clients happy. You know, one of big things I love is giving them like custom experience, you know, like like like tomorrow I'm recording, I want to say, twenty five songs for a corporate zoom fundraiser, you know, and in some of those songs I did I didn't have a lot, you know, much time, much time to figure it out, you know. But but that's that's my my business, as I spent like my whole life preparing for I think you have you have a track that you can lay down to do you want to give us a sample that before I have a couple more questions before I know you're you're late in the evening and...

I don't want to keep you more than I already asked you for. So you want to. Sure, yeah, it's really good, problem here, I'll I'll play for you. Actually, one of my this is one my latest release, is one of two songs I release since Covid. This one just is the brand new release, but then the last basically twenty four hours. The song is many people around the world know it as blow the whistle, hip hop song that has a whistle in it. The artist is artist named Sawed and she redid the song and rap to it, female rapper artists, and she called the song tap in. So tap in was her. It was a top so I did so. I took the same title of the new and I use her interpretation of it with the new new age beat, and so I named but I renamed the song tap in Violin as a way to kind of rhyme it and point it to to to my work. And so here we go. Give me a second load the problem. Mr Richmond Punch, you are a very talented man. Thank you, I appreciate you. Do you have do you have advice? I mean you've worked hard your whole life, your young life. Do you have any advice for people, whether they're you're, looking to get into music or not? Just what it takes, and you're showing it by, you know, being in the entertainment business. It is hard enough, let alone to be enduring a pandemic. Can you give advice to people who don't have a job, looking for a job, they're discourage about their job that they have, they want to change something, what it takes to keep on going and, as you mentioned a couple times, never giving up? Can you give some people some advice? Sure, yes, I'd say some of the biggest advice that I can...

...give is to do never stop learning, never stop practicing, to always have a drive to find out, you know, everything about what you want to do in life, like to find it out. Like you don't have to know everything, but you need to at least find it out. You need to you need to discover to the point that, like, you can almost like touch what you want. You could like touch, like feel the the success that you want, you know, because that's one of things that I try to do. Then it'll like what took me to the the rest my you know, three times over a year of spend almost a year trying to create that, that opportunity, and that's because I knew what I want it. I want it. I went over there and I wanted to take to to meet and shake hands and put my eyes, you know, all on their give, give my card, you know, and repeatedly, repeatedly, you know, routines. It kind of reminds you of like practicing. And Yeah, and it was and it was a big until and I would discover business and I would see the vision until, you know, I make it here in this time. You know, we can't handshake right now. But yeah, I got it. You know, I think that's one of the biggest things. Is just have to keep going, make make the goal, you know, plane to you, you know where you can see it. And like, my next thing actually is film, you know, Film and Television and scoring and things like that. That's great. One final question. Why do you work? Why do I work? I work so that, in the words of like my mother, so that I can leave a legacy, so I can work for for myself, my family, for my wife or future future, didn't our children and our future generations? You know, I work so that I can leave a legacy so that some people can have something to hopefully dance to, to cheer to, you know, to to have fun with, and that can give them a vision for their for their own work. You know that. I think that's why I work. Richmond Punch, I appreciate your time, Sir, and I appreciate your work and I hope that you find much more work and branch off into those other parts of entertainment that you're hoping to do. You've been a great guest and I appreciate your time. And since you have it in your hand, why don't you play us out a little bit and I was sure, yeah, calling an and I can do that. I do have another song. I'm gonna play a from my two thousand and nineteen release. And before that. Yeah, Richmond, how can people get in touch with you? How can they how can they reach you? Oh, be sure, of course, but words to book you as well. Sure, yes, so, of course. On linkedin it's Richmond Punch. My website is Richmond to punch dotnet. My instagram is Violin Richmond, my newest my newest instagram is also the name of my nonprofit that I'm going to be I'm seeking the five hundred and one seat, three currently for which is called strings for justice, which you can find there. If you're interested in that, Richmond Punch at Yahoocom to contact me. And thank you all so much for for watching and I thank you, Brian, for having music guests. Thank you, Richmond. I love to hear your place is sung out. Sure, and here's I'm gonna play something from my roots. Actually, all right, something classical. Almost there.

What do you do in your free time, Richmond? How do you how do you find rest? Oh, well, actually, love TV. I've been watching a lot of lot of Netflix. Netflix gets the nod to day. Yeah, HBO. Yeah, those are great. Like, I discovered a show that came out during the same time as walking dead, a lot of people may have, may or may not have watched. It's called Hell on wheels, okay, and it's a kind of about the railroad moving from being built rather as railroad system Soun's interesting. Yeah, it's a it's a really, really great show and I think I found well, I'm looking for give me one more second here. No problem. Yeah, that's ladder, Richmond Punch. Richmond Punch, you're a talented man and I appreciate your time and I hope you all the best. Thank you, and I would hope to see you in concert one day soon too. Oh, yes, yes, thank you, Richmond. Talk to you later. Thank you a pretty thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian. Be Sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive, be a joyful day in your work.

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