WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 28 · 1 year ago

#27 Richmond Punch International Violinist

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Email richmondpunch@yahoo.com 

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Richmond Punch is a violin virtuoso who delivers a riveting, dynamic, explosive, and powerful performance! A native of Dallas, Texas, Richmond graduated from the top-rated Arts Magnet Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts. He honed his craft and earned a Bachelor of Music degree from the famous Juilliard School of Music in New York and received a Master of Music degree from the prestigious Yale University. He specializes in live jazz violin music for all types of special events including corporate, concerts, festivals, weddings and worship. As an accomplished musician, Richmond has produced 4 CDs in various genres that include Classical, Hip Hop Jazz and Gospel. The titles of his four CDs, which are available online everywhere are “Gospel Covers”, Finally”, ‘Back That Violin Up” and “Hymns for Botham”. Throughout his career, Punch has traveled the world dazzling audiences as large as 15,000 from Mexico to Cuba and stateside from Atlanta to Anchorage and everywhere in between. Richmond is a featured entertainer for the Disney Cruise Line Entertainer, Dallas Cowboys Club and Dallas Love Field Airport. He is also a feature on Amazon Prime’s “The Focus.” Richmond has opened for Idina Menzel from Disney’s Frozen and has entertained Hollywood Royalty and other celebrities that include Viola Davis, Danny Glover, Steven Forbes, Daymond “Sharktank” John, Omari Hardwick, Letoya Luckett, Morris Chestnut, Jewel, Bishop T. D. Jakes, Ross Perot, Kirk Franklin, Kirk Whalum, Nolan Ryan, Emmitt Smith, and Gary Payton just to name a few. He has also played backup for Kenny G and Diana Ross.  

For more than 20 years now, Richmond has given much of his time to support non-profit organizations. In addition to sharing his musical talent, he has worked with mentoring programs that include Big Brothers Big Sisters as a mentor and speaker. As well, he has worked with various school districts, HBCUs and other colleges and universities across the country. Richmond currently resides in the Atlanta area.

Welcome to why we work with your hostand Brian ve as he speaks to people like you from all over the world, as wetogether dive deeper into our motivations struggles, joys, seeminglymissteps, hopswarnings and advice, which will be an encouragement to usall to get u get going and keep on workingworking tiworking is good. Now,here's your host to why we were Rinbithis is Brianv at why we work, andI have the wonderful pleasure speaking to you today with Mister Richmond Punchgood day, fine, Sir Wellbrian how's it going man i'Mso s me well, I'm so excited tostart this. You and I have been kind of playing with the buttons and gettingthings going here and and you you have a violin in your hand, you're ready togo, but before we get there, I've done at intro just before this to talk aboutyou, but can you give us a little bit about your job and bring us back evenbefore you're viled in time, in your very first job that you would have had sure? Yes o? Well, I started when I wasfive years old and Um. Well, actually, my furthest job Heis,probably busking, Itas, probably h when I was young and my my mom waslike this- is how you can both earn some money, and this is also how you can find an audience, and we wentto like one of the most popular spots in Dallas sexes where I was born andraised and Um and I played I did like Buskan and itis called the West. It was called the West End, rnlives and Um, and that was likesome of my first IENS, but I had a couple of differentbusiness lessons there, because I also found out that another musician played there. So I was also on somebodyelse's turf. So I also learned about competition at the same time, at at theWe ages of five through ten is that yeah ther were somewhere aroundsomewhere around ten. I I'd say about that time, so you picked up t Su Vivewhen it was oni, so you picked up the violin at five. For what reason did you pick it up? Ihave a daughter- and you know we kind of okay you're going to do aninstrument, and here it is so wha. Why did you pick it up sure? Well, the Violeng, a part very much. U Result ofvery good schools in in Dallas Texas. We had public Montissauri and I do notreally you know leaned my my sound M, my youthleaned, my ear towards the sound of the violin. You know when they when theschool sat us down and said here, he's Te Orcstra it presented in concert. UUh pick pick pick one. If you like it were you were you the type of childthat needed to be told? Okay. Now you have to go to practice now you have todo your lessons and you know don't go a long time without it or were you on theother spectrum being told you better put that down? No,you can't go to music lessons. Today I mean there'sthere's those two extremesright. You always have to be told to practice, and then the other is they'retelling you to put it down. Where did you find yourself growing out sure Um yeah, I just very much a practicer. Youknow I I um when it came to growing as a childcommunity. You know having friends all thatare growin up plane on the street.I did that SOM, but then I would try to...

...do it with my biin and I like go outwith my violin and go to kids. A'l be likeyou want to hear me play a nice game. You can hear me play yeah and I just you know: startd busting out,yeah, okay, we just play ball. Okay, now we're going to play this O osand they, my my mom, be like yeah,it's time for a dinner, so about practicing it's time for dinner or dinner's ready.I e!! oh, that's cool M, we're we're playing. We need to playmore, that's great thoughright! was there anyone in your family that wasmusical as well, or is this you're the first one to go through and like I'mgoing to have show you my talent, a natural talent, Um, so actually at thesame school that I went to, that was kind of a little funny story that Ifound out that I had a cousin in the same school that played vilend that Ihad never met until at that school. So Um, but like, like my sister playedafter me, but but we didn't really have a real, huge musical family. Althoughgrowing up, I discovered that cousin in the same school that wasthe same school from age five. Until until I went to high school and then Iactually got to high school- and I discovered two other cousins playing as well, also play they playthey that cousin in the prehigh school played violin, the other cousins playeda piano and I' forgetting what one under did butpiano. You know other histoe Esyeah, so as you're progressing into high school.Are you at all working in a job? That's not music related or are you staying focused and some kids too stayso focused in whether it be a sport or a musicalinstrument or even sciences, and that they're not working at all? They don'tneed to whether the parents are supporting them. There's there's not anecessity. There did you have to work to help support yourself ore. You hadto drive just to experience other things in work. Yes! Well. Actually, it's a very goodquestion: N Um. So when I was thirteen, there was a program for minorities called the young sthings program and itstill exist today in Dallas sexest. It started by the Dallas Symphony and one of my first jobs actually wasworking for the symphony and like a paid internship where I was a maileclerk, I I think I went around the symphany offices, uh, sorting, Mal and delivering male, andthat was one of my first jobs. I was also H M in Uer at our at our Broadwaymusical theater Um in Dallas called Um h, Dallas Summer Dallas musical OASmusical, and I was I was an usher there and so those those were some of myfirst jobs. I even went to study summer camp and h like Aspin Colorado. I wasin user there and Um yeah those those ere, some of my earlyfirst job. I I wasn't like I had um necessarily had to work, but it certainly didn't hurt,because I I was from a single paret home who you know, I was able toreceive a lot of scholarships that I needed to study music, so so the workto work definitely helpd. When did it become clear to your family andyourself that you have probably a raw talenges that needed tobe worked upon at some point, but you were going to pursue this 'cause youmentioned, and I know that you went on to university m all for Performing Artsand for your violin. So when did it become clear to you and your familythat this wasn't just like a side? Gig Or you know a hobby todo after school, I guess in a way we Hav that epipany early on because Um my Orca teacher in he school the onethat got me playing when I was five and and convinced my mom, that that this was cool. You know y there'sa lot of kids today. They're, like I don't know, you know, that's cool butum that same teacher Um got me. Um...

...told me about a program when I was nine,which is at southern methag university. To do u to do Kinda, let's see if school was weakbays, it was the weekends es. It was the week days weekdays in the summerovery busy during the school year week days in the summer I I studied. I really Kinda got some ofthat experience early on because aler already a nine I'm in a kindof like ayoung, symphonic environment, where it's like a sympony. U and you know and you're rewarded forgood jobs. The competition comes into play. I I'm bumping up chairs the Orcstra, lebels increased andchanged, and so I'm really I'm expeencing that Um professionalismearly on. I think I think I kind of knew for sure early on for sure bythirteen, when you know when I had accumulated some of the stolew H, you know solo one ratings and the solarcompetitions, um started to win some competitions and Um. When I got into the Dallas SIPI, youknow like one audition for the Dolla simpany program for free lessons y thatwould normally you know it w be very much out of ear. You know my family'sbudget when go ahead. Yeah Noloso around thirteen fourteen was wasthe most was all all of those things, and and that'swhen I hi en, I really realized the epiphany of knowing that you have atrue talent. Do you recognize at that time as well? Ifthere is a pressure, then n increased pressure upon yourself to perform well,or did you accept that as Dinnin an you're just going to keep going or didyou did you start to feel like? Oh well,now, there's there's some backing behind me to push me forwardand I'd better, not let anyone down yeah Um! I had a lot of motivation. Iremember when I was maybe eleven this new kid entered school and- and I was over there- you knowlike this andthis kid who just comes into ours,killing it. I is like this and and like he's playing like factorand notsnand so like like I'm in the you know, beginning or the middle ofthe book. You know like this orcity Szuki method book and this kids likehave the in end of one or halfway through book too, and we're like the same age a and I Istarted KINDOF freaking out. You know, but you start putting pressure onyourself, yeah yeah, I s started freaking outlike like. I got I step bur I didn't know I was behind.You know behind something you kN Uhhor, and it was that sense of that that thetreally kind of was wone, O tating of Refilm. To that point, you Sai, youwere the prodigy you're. Like look look at me, I'm doing great look at this. So after high school you went. Wheredid you go then sure my high school was by the way thebookerty Washington Performing Visual Arts High School in Dallas Um had a amni like Ericabadu, Grammy Winter Grammy winner nor Jones, actually even Um, nothing et Edi briqual. A lot of peopleknow from acting or Broadway wworld Idi bracell went to that same high schooland the late Decease Nou trumpeter Roy Hargrov from the same high school, and so with Thos the help of Dal Symphony.All of that Combined Summer Camp Studies, Um interloct inMichigan, that's been n Colorado. I went to uh, I got on Jus W. I got accepted toJuliard for m undergraduate and, and then my masters was a Yale Universtyyin those steps from high school up into Juliard. Do you recognize? This is awhole nother level. This is something completely different, or was itgenerally pretty progressive and Um? You could accumate to it veryeasily. You can adjust to it or was it...

...this is being you know, I need to bringmy a game every single time, yeah, there's Um. These are some big schools that you'regoing to yeah yeah. No, there was H, definitely by then I knew the level you know. Avery high level of achievement was needed. Um and you know I just really pushed Ilearne to to work in practice and I learned whatit meant to see results and so Um. You know I do. I really just try topush myself and do the best I can knowing that at at the time like Iwanted to end up in a sympony workshow. You know. So that was your goal. So what, afteryou finish all of your schooling and not obviously, learning 'cause you'restill practicing and playing, but what what did you do for the time being umto earn an income or what were you doing 'cause? I know you were travelingthe world and you were doing a bunch of things, but was there a consistentthing that you were able to do, or is it still about getting gigs and different things for different places? You can play sure, sir well, of course there is um what a lot of Musicans can do. I mean,I think, more of them. Do it now, these days than even then back then 'cause? Iwas in New York City before the birth of of Naked Cowboy, which a lot ofpeople would know from his entrepreneurship, but I was, I saw something in New York that Inever really seen before, which was jus such a huge. You know really like a hustle, you know Um t eHousle that work can be formed from something that is. I starts from theround up. Glon is like, like, like Hussle s like a drive, an initiativelike I'm gonna Le Accessble, even on the small thing, and that to a large degree, was the subway MHM Tit was subway in New York, and then it was also this place that we have in Dallas calledWest village, where my sister had a job serving ice cream Italian Golado ndand.I would go play outside of the Italian Gelado store when I was whenever I washome and Um, and that was my those were kind of basically d. Some ofthe jobs I for is there good good money in that being on the subway, putting inYo r. You have to put in the time I remember I was down by the waterfront where I'mfrom and Helofax Oascotia, and I saw this lady. We just happened to besitting in the sun, eating ice cream and watching her, and I could she wasthere for couple hours and then I talked to her after funny enough andshe was doing it because her daughter made a promise to always go down to thewaterfront in these particular times and she couldn't 'cause. She was six,so she did if for a daughter, and she turned up to be a teacher, but I couldjust see her, you know and then, when she was done playing a set, she wasstretching her fingers, but she was getting a lot of money in in her cupthere right and she was a professional and she just knew. This was a good wayfor her daughter, but she just showed the commitment to her daughter that shewould keep it up for e while she was sick. So at that time, were you able, to you,said a hustle, but like make some good money doing that 'cause, you areperforming it's not it's not begging, you're, you're, profi performing aservice for people and people enjoy it. How was the money? Then? Yes, so it was definitely a means to.You know something to spending money during college h. You know not feelinglike the broke. You Know Yepchildor college student. You know that thatkind of feeling eliminating that Um ye I earned some days- would be a hundreddollars. A more MHM UM, Um Somea, some of the average states, were you knowaround forty dollars Yehor or something like that. Um H on on an average day- and this isyears ago and bt, it was go, and you know that was like a day within a twoto four hour period, yeah, two to four hour period, and then there was, youknow I come back again to like naked cowboy example. I know that therewas some times when he was making like a manimum himinimum got to like a hundredthousand Um, and he was you know, just kind ofstanding yeah around in Time Square yeah. So what is it you're doing now? What isit you? You tend to...

Kovige kind of puts a twist speciallyon entertainment, I'm sure it hurts, but what would be a regular week foryou sure. Well course, I went into twentytwenty with doing a tour. The matur, you canactually find some remats of what it was going into: Twenty twenty by theHash Tag, e leaps and bounds or leaps and bounds,or you can even type in the hasack and you could kind of trace what washappening, especially n January first, as I had it into year- and I was likethis is going to be the tour this year and I'm Gong t to make leaps and boundswell cobit hit. It did hit right at the time when I just made a career move toto really grow an expand. I moved to Atlanta on March first and I was like Iwanted to be in a place where I could really grow as an entertainer. Be BeanEntertainer go in that industry not just with Bioland but also get into film and T, and Television and becom becom become more becme more ofan influencer him? U, and so anyway, Um as it came to job actually a lot of what I did to kind of defeat. You know the covet woesof career. Him Is Hes. I went back to the hustle because I mean everybody's walked in side or thingssut down. So I um started with the street performances. II would watch the applause at eight o'clock, nine o'clock for first respone, there'ster was hoppening Kindof, like all over the world and the musicians performingfrom their balconies MHM. That was sort of like the one of the first things,and so I went and found that in the location that I am in Atlanta and H and I I went out- and I got to do some-you know a nice set of performances for for that for the plause, and I got somenice footage and some energy accumulated. I started to feel good umstarted to have to figure ou that I had a path tomomentum in a city that youknow where people didn't really know me, and I was brand new. You Know, plus Cot,but right. So then, after that, the e, the things that happen with the blacklives matter and ot of the police, mutality Um Wath I'd, always been a part of mymessage. So I went to the streets to perform to also calmpeople down. During that time I mean it liberally like followed, then you knowFirsta. I was applauding medical responders and then I was trying tobring some peace or some calm or also stand for the message of youknow of equality all at at the same time, and I was out there performingand then I went to Um. I did more of that and then then I decided to go backto a place that I went to before and gave my card like the twenty nineteen fall in. One of likeyou know, on the never giving up on something Aso, I gave my car to a place.Last fall while visiting Atlanta and like making the decision that I wantedto move here. I also gave my card upon a rival a KINDOF pre covehit Um gave itin March much first. I had just moved here. I gave it then and then codlithit and then so I basically I ended up. Well, I got some Momentu um through theblack classom outer performances. I got some national. An internationalcoverage ever performing further wake. The wake performanc is in the daybefore the funeral, Moror Race, Art Brooks and an BIS on ABC NBC, CNN Rruters, Um ruters Daily Mail in the UK uh. I forget thes, something in Austra,Australia, the different different papers onaround the world for that and there's video lots of videos and some of the videossgot like up to four hundred or five hundredthousand views Um. So so, although it wasn't necessarily likeabow about me who the camera did fos on my music, you know so actuallysome of the some of the videos are as...

Longast like like a hour hour and ahalf it as really. It was really neatexponnr opportunity. So anyway, I went back into the same place where I' giveen ypreviously giving my card like two different times and and this time they had a gest. Forme, an Um of all the times, toever give up absolutely an in the middle of apandamic and they had a yes for me and so two. Currently I play two days aweek. A a restaurant here called sage restaurantUm in Atlanta, which is awesome so right in the middle of the PANDIMIC ow.I actually actually Har o opportunity. I play two days a week m Saturday andSunday can you I mean now, as I think maybemaybe o've experienced something similar B t not pandemic wise, but thismust take a lot of air out of your balloon right, not being able toperform when you're willing to perform. Unlike you know, you're trying to getsome gigs, you know you're trying to do this show or that show, and sometimesthey get shut down, maybe or you're not able to perform. But how is theemotional roller coaster of in between jobs in between gigs? How is that? Howdoes that play a toll on you sure? Well I mean I w you know even I'l, say prethe job or pre they gig or even in between. Now, as I look for additionalthings, you knowis they're definite challenges where you have to you know,keep stay with. You need to find out like for yourself like what is momentum?What is what is waking up, everyday and and wanting to do tosomething productive? What is whatdoes it look like to Wanto do better. What does it look like to grow growwhen you don't even Wan to rush your teeth or comg in here that day you K, O,you know, and it's cobed. You know some people are like I'm not even going totake a shower like yeah like what's the point you know Um but um to. I stayedwith all those things. Mhm Um and I wake up early every day, um I'mmotivated UMSO wheres. You know wheres the phone wasn't ringing or I was Ol.My events were getting rescheduled and I was losing work. You know I um nowadays, you know my phone, my phoneis ringing and I it's it's just taking me to kind of really a stick to witnessUm there 're some things that happen,sometimes because you know in our current world today,Soe of the same things that people do in all their businesses now are on adifferent, have a different financial scale to it, sort the earnings you might have earnedUm Precovet, you know it's a l. It can bea little bit of a different percentage right Um. Obviously you would expectsome scaling back, but that's that's been happening Um, as I try to adjustto that Um. But you know Um um yeah. The things overall are reallygood. You know, therewas matter of fact, there was a big one. I was planning onthat. I Would v Plannd on trying to be a part of if H, Cobett had not hit orif coved had subsideaavy, I, which, as the march onWashington W, which what would that be that wouldhave been that would havebeen August, twenty eighth Oncameon, and actually I I think, Wenr in thelast seven days I just found out you know, as you would assume, that they'rethey're going Na do virtual Um, but I was so likelooking forward to doingthat. Being a part of you know, maybe playing you know on the the National Mall doing some things in DC yeah, but you know, but uh things are continuing on. Um actuallyhad a neat opportunity, eas really inspiring to me to in that never giving up, which is well t that well the thing that a lotof people need to realize in adjessing with their careers is the sometimeswithin the sign of the time you can.

You can find your next job. You know you're survival,so one of the Geegs I got along the way was actually performing music duringcobet tests. Never would have thought of Atyeah yeah. It was a actually people weredriving up with their cars. You know the long lines mhmtosee and I wasplaying music while people were coming up for for Kobe test. So yeahit's, like you know, and like you hear about theyou know, the whisky RThe distilleries and people started, making SanSanatizer yeah. I thought that was interesting. Made me question drinkingwhisky though I was like a yeah. It makes this a hobby hobby. So how t e hobby sewers nd minky mask nowyeah yeah. It makes us think outside the box, yeah yeah and that's how I met you onLington, because I know that you have your page there and that's anothergreat way to feature yourself and maybe meet people that you know 'cause. I'mmeeting people too that we wouldn't normally meet. I saw your video yesterday. Yeah goahead, no, NO GOO! I saw your video yesterdayand youere cranking it out. I loved that jacket you were wearing. I don'tknow if that is that a leather jacket or I don't know what it was, but it wasshiny. Oh thanks, the white one, the white one like likemaybe egg Yok, it was kindof like it looked almost like, like not a plastic,a rubber rubber jacket, yeah and it's sequin is itlain Brown and white. YeahYeah Very Shiny. No, I but that's a great way for you to get out thereright and you know and Linton's free. I mean if you want it to be, and you can just advertise yourself andtell people what you're doing and then you can find gigs like even in thecorporate world, like you're talking about getting hired in different waysthat you wouldn't be able to do in any other time. So how Ho? Could you tell me Richmond howwork has brought you through life? So for you, it's playing the violin,mainly playing the electric violin, 'cause you're, an elector violenist.How has work? Helped you through life hm? I would say that work is very much a part of thebalance of life and work contribute to to that balance. It contributes to likethe rat, like I would say for me personally, up atributes hetribute, sogreator me because MHM, you know for one, I'm fortunate that what I'mdoing is extremely fun. You Know Uh 's, etremely, fun, H, I I am able to achieve successes. Youknow I'm able to Um. You know that's a thing now. I thinkwhat a lot of people are realizing right now with work is that one of the geniuses at work is theevolution of work mhm right, because that's how people are making it rightnow, so I realized that ow only have I been been working, but I I a I'm able to figure out theevolution in in a Pendimac, you know and to h, bevolved and still, you know, be able to maintain o balance. You know balance or N and growand still try to figure out how to be successful, an the same time. What is what is the most difficult part or aspect of being you as anelectrical violinist? What is most difficult that people that wouldn'tunderstand that you like them to understand sure hardest part is that I have towear so many hads Ta r right I'm. I am H for or I'll say for most of the yearsof my life. I I've been an unsigned artist and nowcurrently, actually I have you know I have artists management mm, but stillas it comes to to like you know, labels Um d deals. You know rectordeals record bl. I I'm still an unsign artistthere sothat's, that's the difficulty...

...number one EIS that I'm trying to whereyou know. I want to say five hats, but that's probably the wrong number buyou know self made pr made a lot Um. You know self madepracticing self made. You know so you know practicing the time to learn new songsor or some new culture Um. You know, like I realized oippoint in all mystage, O classical music and I whent I went wanted to be a self employedmusician and like now like the electric Balin I's, like nobody's, going to callme if I can only sell them Motar in Betoen or I'm like I'm likeI'm going to get like this. Many calls MHM R for most art, Anbates Oen, butthe world's going to continue to grow and change, and there's all thesepeople that, like all these different things, and so I'm Gongta, be missing.This many calls. So when did you make that transition from violin to electricviolin, or was that part of your training allthe way through no electric? Only within the House e Al Two to three two or three years,three years that I fully because what happened is I had regular violen first then I amplifiedthe regular violence. So I attached h like microphone too. So I was, I guessyou can call that like Acoustic Electric uhhh Um in a way I sort of youknow, but in a homemade version and then um now I finally have a bonafite electricviolence, so you saw an more opportunity in thismarket, then would have would have been in just a regular Pioan. Yes, yes, N,and you know it. It really helps for one it covers this. sperticular ncovers te two instruments that I learned all my life now ill almost playthem in like one instrument, so I can just sort of dimistrajust a little,because the this is a violent, inofviola. Okay, you could see thefives five strings, five strings earning it'sa beautiful instrument. Are they hard to come by Um? I mean maybe an Apendamic, but theyr M, no they're, not it's a great instrumentmade by Yamaha ocan Yeah Y ys. Truly, you know masterd high level. You knowthe intenuity, the sound of the electric bashing legric yeah, give usgive us a give us a demo. Oh Yeah, sure Sur. If you don't mind so like what I was showing you, thereis jus the the range the range Um music is powerful. Yeah mostly, I want to show you therange in that I'm M, you Kno ' The violen, an o Oa combined,and it just it'. Just really I mean it really. Theyreally like changed. My Life. Music changes a lot of people's lives. What is it joy that you have aboutplaying your music? I just love making you know making myclients happy. You know Um Wan, O bisthings, I love is giving themlike custom experience. You know like like lit tomorrow. I'm recording want to say twenty five songs for aCorrizoom fundraiser, you know and and some of those Um songs. I D, I didn't have a you knowmuch time, but sime figure it out. You know, butthat's that's my my business as I spent likemy whole life preparing, for. I think you have. You have a track that you can lay downtoo. Do you want to give us a sample that, before I have a couple morequestions before I know you're you're...

...late in the evening- and I don't wantto keep you more than I already asked you for so you wantto xor yeah, it's areally a good problem m here, I'll play for you. Actually one of Min h. This is one. My latest release is one of two songs.I really sence Cobert this one just he's a brand new release, but then the last basically twenty fourhour hours. The song is many people around the world know it has blow thewhistle um it', a hip, hop song that has a whistle in it Um. The artist is artist named Sawiti hand.She redid the song and rapped to it. Female wrapper artists and she calledthe song tap in Um to tap in was her. It was a to so ISO. I took the sametitle of the new and I used her interpretation of it with a new new agebeat, and so I named, but I renamed the song tap in Violin as a way to kind of Ryme it andPointinto to to to my work, MHM, and so here herewe go uh. Give me a second Loado Oio Einino, I a Mister Richmond Punch. You are a very talented man. Thank you appreciate you do you have do you have advice? I meanyou've worked hard. Your whole life, your young life. Do you have any advicefor people, whether they're looking to get into music or not just what ittakes than you're, showing it by you know being in the entertainmentbusiness? It is hard enough, let alone to be induring a pandemic. Can you giveadvice to people who don't have a job looking for a jobthey're discouraged about their job, that they have? They want to changesomething what it takes to keep on going and, asyou mention a couple of times, never giving up, can you give some peoplesome advice? Sure, yes, um...

I', say some of the biggest advice t aI can give is the to tonever. Stop Learning, never staptdpracticing to always have a drive to find out. You know everything about what you wantto do in life like to find it out. You don't have to know everything, but youneed to at least find it out. You need to you need to discover to the point that, like you can almostlike touch what you want you got like to like feelthe disuccess Statu, more Um, yeah 'cause. That's one of thethings that I I try to do. Um then o like what took me to the the restaurant. You know MHM threetimes over year of spen almost a year trying to create that that opportunityknow then, and that's because I knew what I wanted I I wanted. I went over there and Iwanted to to take to to meet and shake hands and put my eyes. You know on their GIV, give my card, you knowand repeatedly MHM repeatedly. You know routines Ar kind of remind you of likepracticing nd Ye h and it was, and it was untol and I would discover business andI would see the vision until yeah. I uld make it here an this time.You know we can't handshake right now, but yeah I got it, you know Um, I think that's one of the thebiggest things is h. You just have to keep going H, make make the the goalyou know plane to you know where you can see it and, like my next thing,actually is film. You know film and Television scoring and things like that. That's great one, final question: Why do you work? Why do I work my work so that, in the words of like my mother,so that I can leave a legacy, so I can work for for myself, my family for my wife or future o futures in ourchildren and our future generations. You know I I worke so that I can leave a lecacy so that so people can have something to hopefully dance to tocheer to you know to to to have fun with, and I can give them avision for their for their own work. You know, I think, that's why I work Richmond Punch. I appreciate your time,Sir, and I appreciate your work and I hope that you find much more work andbranch off into those other parts of entertainment that you're hoping to doyou've been a great guest, and I appreciate your time and since you haveit in your hand, why don't you play us out a little bit and sure call it Anan? I can do that. I dohave another song. I'M gonna play MHM from my two thousand and nineteen release andbefore that Yeah Richmond, how can people get in Toug with you? How canthey? How can they reach you, Oh theorr, of course, or to book you as well sort? Yes, so of course, on Lincon it'sRichmond Punch, Um. My website is Richmond to punch DourNet, my inst Grammais Violin Richmond, my newest Um. My newest insogram is also the name of my nonprofit that woant to be I'm seeking the five or one s three currently for whichis called strings. PROJUSTICE MM, which you can Um, find there if you're interested in that Richmond Punch at Yahoo, dot com tocontact me, and thank you all so much for for a whileatching. I think you Brian,for for having music ges. Thank you Richmond. I love to hear your placeshung out Tue and here's I'm going to playsomething from my roots, actually...

...something classical almost there. What do you do in your your free time?Richmond? How do how do you find rest? Oh Woa, actually, love T V. I've been watching a lot of lot of netflud. That fix, gets the the Noda yeah HBO MH Um Yeah. Those are great, like Idiscovered a show that came out ing the same time as Um walking dead. A lot of people may avmayor may not have watched it, Hong Hell on wheels, okay and it's a kind of about the railroad H.moving from being built rate, Thi rairwoald system sounds interesting,yeah, it's it's a really really great show and I think ie found Welli'm looking for give me one moresecond here, no probler Yep, that's the Latterrichmond Punch, Richmond Punch. You are a talented man and I appreciate your time and I hopeyou all the best thank you and I would hope to see youin concert one day soon too. Oh, yes, yes, thank you. Richmond talkto you later yothank you for listening to this episode of why we were withBranmebe sure to subscribe, follow and share with others. So they too can beencouraged. There Werei hope that you have yourself iproductive y joyful day,Inyour Work.

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