WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 70 · 1 year ago

#70 Philip Ridgway - Shipping Industry Consultant - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Philip Ridgway is a shipping industry consultant who provides IT and serviced backed solutions to global companies who ship bulk, dry and wet, cargoes around the world. Additionally, Philip has known tough times and has hit rock bottom, but has a new mind set that has allowed him to turn over a new leaf and power thought. With a new lease on life, Philip believes that pour love and honesty into others is the best medicine.

Contact Info
Philip’s Profile
linkedin.com/in/philip-ridgway-24453a80

Email
p.ridgway@marcura.com

Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/PhilipMRidgway


Twitter
https://twitter.com/pmridgway

Instagram
https://www.instagram.com/philipmridg...

...welcome to why we work with your host Brian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which would be an encouragement to us all to get up. Get going on, Keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here's your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian V, and this is why we work today. I had the great pleasure of speaking with Philip Ridgeway. He is a consultant in the shipping industry, where he provides I t and service back solutions to global companies who ship uh huh cargo around the world. Now, I've known Philip since high school, and I want to find out how his journey has been thus far. But I also noticed a Philip that he has a sense of positivity in his life. And I want to see what is the root of that positivity and how it is affecting his work. Join me in my conversation with Philip Ridgeway. I'm Brian V, and this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure of speaking with Philip Ridgeway. Good morning, young man. Good morning, E. I just said because you told me is only six. Because usually I got people in North America, so it's quite opposite. And it's pretty early here. But I said, Man, you're looking pretty fresh for six. And you're like, Yeah, I was about four. So good on you. You got the reading in. You've got the meditating in. You got your run in, Philip. It's nice speaking with you. And I'm glad you're on a path that seems to be positive. Can you give us a little rundown? I did a brief introduction to us before we started recording. Um, could you give us a brief introduction of yourself and just get us up to speed with you? Yeah. So originally from Halifax, Nova Scotia, where you're from. Oh, come on. You're not originally from Halifax. Don't do that. Thank you. Come on, man. You're originally from slower sackful. Don't get it confused with New Brunswick either. Through. Come on, man. Were originally from sackful, boy. I mean, you could may not have been so I didn't want to push it too much, but e got you sackful proud. Yeah, so born and raised there. And then, uh, the abbreviated version is I left Canada in 2006. Originally moved to guitar for approximately 78 years, Um came in and out of the Middle East. Just try going back home, opened up a couple of businesses and then my most recent stand back Middle East Dubai. Now you heat. Since 2000 and 17 have been here since with my amazing wife from Philippines and two little girls who are three and four hidden four or five. So that's the very short version that didn't That is a good version. Take us back, Philip. Because I know you and I were talking a moment ago and I reminded you of when the last time I saw you, which would have been just prior to you going to guitar I'm guessing. What was your What was your first job, Philip, a za teenager growing up in Sac town. What is something that got you out of the house? And what did you do to make a dollar? Very first job was newspapers. So that existed, which was quite early. And then Sunday flyers. You may recall those so used to deliver those that was prior to 16 the legal age because you were allowed to do those things. And then when I turned legal 16, I worked at Wilson's Got stock. In fact, on...

Circle Drive when it first opened, you may recall, Why did you go start the newspaper route? Parents just instilling discipline, hard work. You don't get what you work for, just all that stuff. So it was a bipartisan, just parenting and then into Wilson's How How long did that bring you? Is that up until high school that you're working with Wilson's Wilson's with high school? Yeah, and then high school into University Year one. I then shifted over to most menswear, Um, in hindsight mall, which I work for, uh, almost 10 years. Then do you have the long time ended up being the assistant manager there at that age, which was really, really cool, because back then Tommy Hilfiger and Gant and chaps, all that was huge, right? So I was getting all the new stuff and feeding my ego unknowingly, you know, all that stuff. So yeah, so in high school, back it up a little bit. What were you thinking for your career. Or were you thinking that seriously, What about school? What was what was going on in your mind then? I wasn't really, because I was pretty much I'm guessing like a lot of people just unguided. Uh, not really kind of knowing where I'm going. I had one role model who worked at Investors Group, so I probably unconsciously wanted to get into finance to the investment world because he was, because that's what success looked like to me. So I think I wanted to model that, um but I didn't really have Ah, true passion or driven result for that, if you will. So did you go off into university? I thought that you what did you do after high school? Uh, Mary's become and a major in finance. And again, that's probably because in hindsight of this role mall that I framed it successful. So I wanted to become without actually having self awareness and figure out what you like. So Yeah, that's kind of what I did. So go ahead. Yeah. Yeah. And then I did move into for one year fruit and 55 London Life, and I didn't do that for a year. I think like a lot of people did, but you realize quickly that 100% commission is no joke. My further you think of hurt. So there's still no Steve Foot and I both went for that job, and I recall he went with it for a little bit and I had the interview and I could just no offense to Freedom 55. But it's just a grind. It's a grinding type of position, 100% commission, and it was one of my major, my first major interviews, and I could just see the interviewers head, and I find this is true for any interview that I've had since their head was getting smaller to me. So I felt I wasn't as interested in the position. But kudos to you for lasting a year, because it's tough because what I've right off the bat, I was like, You mean I have to ask all my family friends and and like that was the very awkward to do that. I've learned since that there's a lot of jobs like that. If you know if you have something you promote, you will tell people. But right out of college or university and and starting a job like that. I wasn't comfortable doing it, and I felt it was to have a grime. But you're also young and inexperience. I lack confidence back then. I don't know if you recall Jonathan Lewis from high school. He hey, be good for the podcast, F Y I. But he's one of the rare individuals who has done quite well for himself. But if you were to speak to him in a deeper level, there is a deeper wise to why that waas, right? Yeah. Yeah, it's a great, uh, man...

...respect whoever does that. So were you at Moe's on and off throat this time? Is that Is that how that worked from it? High school in through university? Yeah. So I was there throughout university. And then when I left or finished universities, all right, that's what I left most and then had my first career job. I had high aspirations, right? Because we all do. So that's where it was. When did the itch start to think about moving abroad? Well, that's an interesting story itself. So I had met someone from Newfoundland and we got married and she got a job over at the College of North Atlantic coast of Newfoundland on they landed a big contract with the Qatari government, and she got a job there so that I actually followed her. So it wasn't really an itch. At that point in time, I had left the investment world, and I was a year and a half in what's called the Freight Forwarding World, which is international shipping of containers. So I was young, didn't know much, and I thought would be cool to get international experience. And why not go or where it's safer where she's got a job already. So just follow her off her coat. Tails. That's pretty good. Did you find that was a difficult because even getting into your position now is a consultant? Was that a difficult transition from not having the experience in freight and then jumping into a position like that was that hard mentally to learn the ins and the outs of the game? Yeah, that's an interesting question. I've always been a kind of person who just I just I'm very hungry for knowledge and learning, so I would say no from the learning aspect, but very difficult from the cultural aspect because, as you may know, back then we were very much in a bubble. In this culture, there wasn't a lot of different cultures around us, so I left that the news was predominantly American news. It's all being watched and I had one paradigm. I then moved to Qatar and met. I mean, you name the nationality Europeans, Asian from all all areas, language barriers was a massive property for me. I had to learn a new language called Broken English Justice sloping down eso. All of that was quite difficult. Which took, I would say a good year to frankly, it could even be longer. So you mentioned that you had left guitar and started different businesses. How did that transition go or what happened? Thio end your career and guitar and to start something. Well, the first one was 2000 and eight. So I work for a company in Qatar called Geo This Wilson and they never had an office or presence in the east coast of Canada. So I actually approached him and said, If I go back and open up my own office, can I use you guys as the global network on, they agree. So we did that. But I was getting into a business for money, not for what I loved and did just completely not in the right mind frame. So we broke even in the end. But then I dissolved it after I got an opportunity to move back to retire. Then two years later, Phil could you see, like you're making a point a side point that it wasn't something that you loved but in in that proposal to bring the company in Canada, could you sense that, like thinking of listeners, you know, where they're they're in a job, that they're doing something they may not love. But there may have been a sense for you that this is not really what I want to do, but I gotta pay the bills. I got to do this. What I really liked is something else. Did you have that sense or was that Did that come later on? I think I've always had that innate sense. However, the drive of doing it to impress others exceeded that voice, meaning that I was mawr excited about...

...bragging to others and friends that I had the business at a very young age. Look at me. Look how well I've done. Um, instead of this is actually what I love what I do and make a difference behind yet, um, and this has all been obviously, in reflection years later. But the unique sense was always there. Yeah, because I recall the days in the business where I should have been in passionate growth mode. I was just extremely unhappy. It was difficult to communicate to others because, like, everyone else said, But you in the business doing great. Wow. Good for you. It was all just surfaced, blah, blah, right? So yeah. Yeah. How long This lasts from 2000 and eight. Two years? Two years. But then what? What was before you made the other transition? Were you Were you planning it in advance, or did it just end? You just stopped. How did how did you plan or did you plan? Well, yeah. So I we still to my network again that I had made already in Qatar on said, Look, it's opportunities come up like Beatrice and coming back and call it state called the Universe. So however, it suits you. Um, I had never been on the clients. At this point, I have only been on the service provider side and a smelter which makes aluminum where you need them for the rest of the world opened up in Qatar and they needed a head of shipping on bond. I had made contacts from the old days. One thing led to another. That was a very lucrative job that I look back on and gain incredible experience on. So it manufacturer product, which I was part of a plant which did that. And it was just invaluable What I've learned there professionally and personally in a side, like the reason why I do this podcast is because the skills and talents people have Can you comment even from this short period of time of, say, four years off, all the things you learn coming, you know, I don't know. Did you spend time in Newfoundland? Yeah, well, I live. There are a lot eso coming from the East Coast, you know, even as far East Coast is Newfoundland. And then finding yourself on the other side of the world learning about something that you had no idea prior to that. Can you comment on the idea of just learning just how valuable it is to keep on learning, especially, and not to be afraid. But as you I think, and we'll talk about in a little bit, you have a desire and the heart to keep learning even. You know, we're getting up there. Yeah, eso what I've learned. I didn't know this until I started reading. So everything that I am now is built by books. There's no question about it. I'm an avid reader. It gives you perspective and for me, good confidence. Because if you read these books, um, you know that you're not alone. It's almost like this collective on energy, which you can tap into. And I've learned that by learning you're progressing when you're progressing, that means happiness, and it's where confidence is built. So once you can learn that there is no failure. The only failure that I have learned is that you don't get back up and we all have them. But most don't speak about it. So once I learned that it just became irrelevant to not try and not ask questions and learn. How long did you stay with this? And I know we're approaching a big benchmark for you in 2015. But how long did you stay with this company? And from 2010? Three years at the smelter. Three years. Sorry. Five years. Five. Yeah. All the...

...way to 2015. Yeah. So I know as you had mentioned to me, and I kind of wanted toe not know fully what happened. But you said this was a big turning point for you and kind of some people say that proverbial rock bottom sort of time. So are you able to divulge what it was? That kind of change? Your perspective and your new course on life? Yeah, of course. So we my current wife and I left Qatar just because we had enough of the Middle East. So I thought again your own guided, you just run to num things in your life. But when we came back, we invested in the rights of the franchise called Freshii. So fill the idea of leaving Qatar had nothing to do with Qatar had nothing. You just you were just ready for a fresh new start trying something different. Yeah, So at that point, you accumulated quite a bit of savings, and I wanted to try to own a business again. But again, I made the mistake twice that I did it for thinking that I would get rich money and not with the love and passion. So we invested in the rights for five franchise locations exclusively in New Zealand and New Brunswick for fresh. What is that? What is that company? So it's fresh, but two eyes on the end and it's a Canadian franchise and they predominantly are into glue. Free salads, balls, um, healthy. Very much, my friend items. So a family restaurant sort of deal, but with Yeah, it's called fast casual because, yeah, but it's quick. Um, it's basically I would call it a healthier enhancement of the subway. But obviously what? That comes a premium, right? Eso we had bought that and put literally all of our savings. Enjoys thinking that. Go knowing that we're at a we're going to be at a cliffhanger of a story. It won't be a cliffhanger, but you're gonna tell us what happened. How is the process? And I know you have a different perspective now of pushing all of your chips in Were you both, Like, just this is gonna be the best. Was there even some of that reluctance? Ian, there? How did that? You know? Because that's, you know, you spent five years in guitar making some money, saving some money, going back, thinking, talking about it, probably talking to some mentors or people and people. Everyone's like, Oh, yeah, it's just gonna be great. And then you're like, how was that process for you? Because people do it today, right? Yeah, It's an interesting question because I thought back on those moments Ah, lot. The answer now is on quickly different than how I felt then. So how I felt that I was so entrapped and engulfed in ego and arrogance that I thought, there is absolutely no way this is not going to work because I have always succeeded by either force or aggression or just all wrong, ineffective energies. So I thought, How would this be any different? So when I went all chips in, there was absolutely in my mind. Then on I really thought that was reality. There was no other option. So now, in reflection, I've had multiple chats with my own leg, wife and said How How do we do that? Why don't we go like half of our savings or 45% or whatever It was right, but that when it comes through, great pain and struggle when you get on the other side, right, which...

...is now in migrant is gift. It is how I've learned, but that hasn't come with a lot of work. So how long or pushing the chips in? Did you realize you just didn't have the courage to continue month or two? Yeah, it was scary because we had injected three major substantial shareholder loans on I recall looking at my wife. It's like yesterday, and I get kind of mostly even speaking about it. We're sitting in the restaurant, and I handed or wrote our last shareholder alone, which were the shareholders, and I said to her it zip. If this doesn't last, I don't know. And at that point, even bankruptcy was not an option, because how I used to frame bankruptcy was failure. But then, after I spoke to my chair accountant, who is hired to be very factual and unemotional, thank God I recall him saying to me, uh, you have no other choice. It's fine. Lots of people do this bond. It was 200 grand and total approximately right. And he goes, This is nothing like the banks don't even care like they have way bigger fish. But in my mind, it was like life altering. My world was over, but in hindsight it was to a degree. And it's not a lot of money. It's a lot of money, but it's not a lot of money in the grand scheme of things. Right? So, uh, did you have Because, I mean, you're talking five years ago, so minus five years off your age, Still young. Still not young now. But the point is, did you think was there somewhere in your head? Even though you have a different perspective on life now that you're young, even if it fails, I could bounce back even though you were sure it was gonna work. Did you think even if this fails, I'm gonna be alright? Because I could still work. I could go back to guitar. I can go do this. Did you have any of that insight to think? Even if it fails? Because you have to think there is a possibility. Yeah. So paradoxically, Yes. And that was my problem. I always had that. No, but it waas that because I used to look around and not everybody had an option. I always had this tax free Middle East haven I could always go back to in Recoup. So therefore, exactly. And therefore I was never fully invested in the was should have been committed. Thio. Paradoxically, that was, uh, I was the handcuffs on me, if you will have you experienced in meeting some. You know, expats in the places you've been other people in similar situations where you know, I'm in Korea and I've come across this all the time, people who save money, and they say they're gonna go back to Canada or the United States, and life kind of slaps him, and it's not as easy as they thought. And they sold their house here. They're buying a house there, and it fails, and they're just losing money. Fist over fist. Yeah. Yeah. So what's interesting about that is from, and I forget the time frames. Um, when this all happened, I was silent for a period of time, and I think it was a year or two for sake of conversation as a machine. But I've learned that shame can only reside in secrecy, silence and judgment. So I was concerned that I would be judged Andi. I wouldn't be liked. But then when I started reading, I realized that I'm amongst pretty great company. A lot of people who we put on these pedestals today have either had almost bankrupts before have gone bankrupt. And then I started speaking about it even locally in Halifax. I know predominant business owners who had failed more times than Nathan has succeeded. And then I was like, I think I'm on T o. Actually, I'm going bankrupt. Eso it because the...

...journey of enlightenment, if you will, on realizing that that was supposed to happen. And my pain now is really materialized into my greatest gift message. Not all gooey. Yeah, it's just been self realization of that. And staying silent wasn't helping you. Not at all. It was just crippling. In fact, moving me into a very bad place, which is scary talking to yourself, telling you how bad you are, you're it. Yeah. Yeah. So from 2015, how long did it did it take for you to start to see the light to start to see that you can get out of this. Well, so in April of 2016, I moved back. No, I'm mixing that. I apologize. April of 2000 and 15 I moved back to recoup, and I was gonna do what I always did come back here numb myself in alcohol because that was my choice. I always find people have women, drugs or alcohol, and they choose one to escape the thoughts in their head. Were all of them, you know, or all exactly, uh, mom was always alcohol because I could control it, and I could numb my pain. I didn't realize until I read more and I was remembered my own happiness. And it got to a point where we got pregnant with our first girl, a daughter in May of 0, 15. And the alcohol wasn't working anymore. And I was like, This is weird. Strange. It always works on deny started reading for the for the for some of my life in October of 2000 and 15. And that's when I began to wake up, if you will, on dive hundreds and hundreds of books podcast Just feed in my mind with optimism and just cut off all news four years ago. People think that are nuts, but they're like You have to watch the news, Why? It's not offering anything except for fear. And um, yeah, that's kind of what's happening. It's funny with news and not to get off on a tangent. But like people always pit one news outlet for another, but it's actually owned by the same people. So it's just so bizarre. And and news is like, if you can find something out is fine. But the news that's reported on 99% of the time now like news, is lots of news. Stories are missed because you know people have an agenda, and that agenda is is not uplifting. It's not positive, like that's when you see some positive news reports and you know it brings a little thing to your heart or, you know, a tear to your eye, and you're like, Oh, look at that. Something going. But they don't report on that most of the time, and that's why I think you're onto something of not watching the news and just feed your mind with some things that are good for you. Positive, uplifting stories of people who have overcome adversity, Those air all good for us and it's well worth the time. It's It's something. I mean, I think you're on to something. So from 2016, is it the same position you're in now? Or did you did you switch over to a different job from your condo? So then I again it comes across very sporadic because it is because I was just still a running trying to figure out life. Andi, I've also learned that when you keep yourself busy, you can get out of the Internet native of your voice. And that could be quite self destructive, if unmanaged or if unaware. So I left 2016, came home and work for a company there locally. And Halifax? Yeah, on...

Guy came back in 2000 and 17. That's where I've been since. So how is your, like just thinking of family? How is your wife for coming and going? How is that? Is it been helpful? Is it? Ah, little harmful. Do you warn people about that? Do you say you know it's just part of your journey because I know for myself being married Thio, South Korean lady, that we've gone back and forth to Canada maybe four times or so. And it's really strenuous on the marriage because from my wife's perspective, my dear wife's perspective, she just wants a home. And it wouldn't be so bad if it was here or there. It's just the idea of settling and just looking at your chronology. You've been all over the place for a good couple of, you know, decades here. So how is that or how do you direct people to let them know and how what you're doing? The way you're thinking now has given you a broader perspective. Maybe it's Yeah, travel is good. That is all wonderful. Or you're finally settling down and you have ah Mawr concrete plan. Yeah, well, my wife is the complete opposite of me. She is, um, the She's quite then and as most of the Asian culture, they're serving in nature just how they were raised. And I have to be constantly aware of that because the person that my kind of personality could just bulldoze and be unaware. Take advantage of the situation yet, and that is the constant awareness that we're trying to bring into our marriage because she's been taught her whole life. I don't want to have a voice, and I'm like, No, no, you do have a voice And then I can then steamroll. I could be quite aggressive eso in their lives growth. So we actually speak about that, So that's insight from That's really good. I want to answer the question, but I never even thought of being both. You and I are married to people from Asia, but I think there is even an undercurrent with women in general, but not to My mom was a single mom worked really hard all of her life that there's thes thes general cultural. Um, awareness is, um, acceptances That happened. And men, I think, have a greater responsibility to understand where our wives air coming from and appreciate the differences, value them, and at the same time, not steamroll them because we know we could, and you and D o. E always liked it, too. To balance life is about balance and being in the present state now, often you go on either side of that. You're being out of balance in the aggressive state or will be lower energies depressed, right? Passive. And okay. Yeah. So whatever energy state you're in, you'll just do it. And I know immediately now it just comes from practice. Now I'll calm down. I'll try to get more present, and then I will always go to her and say, You know, they did it again. I'm sorry. Holy shit again. Give me Unravel that in Pakistan. Why that waas And then come to a root cause. And just speaking about it is the key. Most people don't speak about it. They put it under a rug, it collects energy. And then it comes out in other forms, which has nothing to do with why that's actually happening, but comes back to this, um, levels that you should be discussed in those moments. So how is she with the moving back and forth? Yes. So, because of her cultural upbringing, she was Yeah. Okay. Like I'm finally right. But now that we're here, the last three years, I have and...

I know it's not a coincidence ended up in the position. I am part of something which is much larger than myself. And I completely understand how Bless I am being that spot. Because most don't have the luxury leader create something which is bigger or you're part of something. So I found that, and we're for the first time in our lives settled, and I can feel it internally. So she's like, don't wanna go back for a while. You're in Dubai. I don't think we mentioned that you're in Dubai. Correct? How is that? Is a place for people I didn't know much about to buy. I mean, certainly not at a high school, but coming here is, you know, in Korea, you hear more about it. A lot of expats jump over there and start work there. How are you finding life in Dubai? Um, everything you need is here in terms of logistics supply, chain conveniences. All of that is here. There's in terms of like minded people associations. Is it, like 60 40 60 60% foreigners there? I thought I read somewhere. There's a lot of expats of Internet is very international. Yeah, because yeah, like your most population would be Indians and then Filipinos. Yeah, locals would be, uh, the least on. Did you get a mix of Europeans, Americans, Canadians? It's very new area to right in the city. It's very well, well mapped out. And, uh, yeah, innovation able its's Yeah, very well for themselves, but expensive. From what I hear, it's quite expensive stream. So where you are now, fill in your job is a consultant for a shipping in this shipping industry. What is it you do each day? What is what is part of your work? Yeah, so my main agreement and it's kind of funny because I pushed against this. I'm responsible for new business all day, every day. Well, because left sales way back in 2000 and six because it's something about always felt plastic and false. Um, this, like it's a very negative label in general, and I went over to operation. So when I came to this job, they do it very differently. It's more about service. It's more about sharing. Connecting first and all of that will then happen. It's very much in line with who I am s O. I don't even like saying that I'm in sales. I say I'm on the commercial team because as soon as I say sales people have their own labels and they're bringing those thoughts What that is. So that's my job. All day, every day is to bring in new customers. I used to travel the world to be in front of customers, but then covert happened. So we've been forced to do things over Zoom or teams. Eso. I spent a lot of time right here on this. What is difficult about your job, Phil, whether it's the shipping part of it or being, you know, trying to attract new customers, the most difficult is I break it down to two things, effectively communicating the message from their lens. That's very difficult. And to in that same vein, changing the paradigm of doing something different than what is being done now because we're going in to inject platforms to change how they're working on. And that's very difficult to ask companies because it's a big change and people don't make change unless they understand why. Thinking it's interesting, you know, because we come from the same same cloth, same area knowing that, you know, in 2006 or 2005 you are at Moe's, and now you're working internationally, with a pretty big company doing very well. What? What is the satisfaction that you get out of this position, or...

...even just living where you are, or your new mindset on how how you're living? Oh, so this organization is around for 20 years, and they are reshaping and changing the industry for the better. They're making it more transparent, transparent, were compliant. They're bringing in platforms that it never existed. So what I love the most is we have such a great offering to actually just improve people's lives. And I love people. So it's not about what we do is just about serving people in helping them. And as soon as that that light turns on with effective messaging or building trust connection. It excites the crap out of me every day because it takes a while. I know that a lot of people understand shipping, but what would a typical customer require of your company? Oh, that's a big question. Um, a lot of what we do is we remove the administrative burden of documentation that they had today. We move it from analog into digital and feed that back to them with I t platforms in a digital format. And what will their company also require in terms of shipping? So what is the typical Do they bring cargo to you or you pick their cargo up? And then you should whoever does that work So we reside in the middle of the industry. So we are a data curation company which we have evolved into, So we sit on Ah, lot of the data transactions of the industry. We feed that through data factories and then feed that information back to them, which makes them more empowered and gives them both their own benchmarks, plus the industry benchmarks. Okay, understanding that about what your company does, what is something else that you think either people don't understand about what you do in your position, or you yourself with your new perspective on life that you would like to understand that they can have a better appreciation of you or your company. We need to do a lot more work in building trust and communicating why we exist. So what I mean is, I sat in a meeting two weeks ago with a very, very large player in the industry, and they were asking questions about who we are, who owns us. What happens if you go public? What happens? What happens? What happens? Because when we are asking for companies data, that is their asset. And it's so precious because, as you know, it's more precious than oil and gas. Now it's all about data and information, right? Eso we need to build this trust and communication as to why we're doing what we're doing. And we're in this for legacy to transform industry, not for profit money. So that is our biggest unlock that we need to overcome. Yeah. I mean, that's probably common denominator with most companies trusting one another. Phil, how many hours are you working? How busy are you? And you work because it leads me to my next question. Oh, it could be. So. We serve the world, so I have you because their time zone, it could be anywhere. From you know, it could be a quiet day. Four hours, which I hadn't seen a lot but 89 hours. How are you staying? Productive. And maybe this is where you might want to talk to about you were doing. And part of this is, you know, from your 2015 change and coming over and this this year, a new change with your 75 hard day. Is that what is challenge that you're doing? How do you stay productive? What's what's keeping you going?...

Yeah, So Hey, it's the Internet native. You need to constantly remind yourself why you're doing what you're doing and just inspire yourself as to why that is. But also what I've learned is I never worked out in my life until a year or so ago. Never fit again. Built by books. When I read these books by various authors, all of them exercise and I'm like, That must be something I didn't want to because it's shit. I mean, it's not fun running and all that until you go past a certain point. But the more that you are exercising, the more energy you have, the more balanced you are because you exert the energy, which could be internally. You go with them back to your balance. So that and just pure self awareness all day, every day, just trying to always observe what you're doing, what you're doing, um, just leads to great part of the activity That's fine. So this helps you stay productive. What about this? This 75 challenge? Are you done that yet? I think I saw your post recently. Have a couple of days a day left? Yeah. Tomorrow is across that finish line pump. Where did you receive this from? Is does this something you made up on your own? What is this? 75 hard day challenge. I saw it first from a friend of mine. Um, he posted it on Facebook that he was doing it, Um, he's a guy. I look up thio eso about that, and I might And I knew it was a mental toughness program. And to follow all those rules is no joke. And I was a bit nervous getting into it cause I was like, if I commit, I connect, there's no what is the basis of it? What is required of you each day. So no alcohol for 75 days, No cheap meals. You gotta eat clean. Whatever clean is know what meals. What was it? Know what? Meals cheat meals? I think so. No treats no females, not yeah. Tuber goats a day, 45 minutes. Each one has to be outdoors, which is easy here. But if you're in Canada, that's hard because it's cold. One gallon of water, 10 pages of a self development book a day and one progress picture. So rest picture on social media or just for yourself, just yourself. Like I, uh, have bought the app. So I put it in the app, right. But the idea behind it is we, as humans will always want to take the path of least resistance and convenience. But I've learned that taking that path resides or promotes no growth of progress. So it goes back to what we have spoken about originally. Doing hard things is pain and struggle. And that's where all your growth comes from. Everything in life. So challenge a challenge. What is your goal? What is your plan? After tomorrow, I'm gonna have a break. But then in February 1, I'm gonna phase one because there's an evolution of it, which is all those rules plus a bit more. But it's only for a month. So yeah, there's always the next level you gotta push. So there is an app. There is an app for this. This is its own program. Okay, very good. What is the proper name for it? 70 five. Hard by and, uh, yeah, yeah, I think it Zounds like a challenge, and it's interesting, and I would like to incorporate it in my own work out. I challenge other people to do so well because, especially, it's so well balanced, right? As you said, it's a mental challenge, too. It's not just a physical, it's just touching on all aspects. Actually, it is that it is a mental toughness. Everyone sees the way that's all. But it's the internal. It's not the external birds going by. I...

...apologize. But what is something, Phil? Maybe it's this these sorts of tools with APS and exercise. But what is something that helps you stay productive in your work helps you work efficiently, right? So it's just I've learned that the work that you do in private is what you'll get in the public by results and things actually happening. So for me, every single morning four AM is not about anything except for what time are you going to bed? Do we waking up at four. AM Agent Uh, No, no, no, no, no. But it's good. You get your work done. You're in by eight and your by four. It's It's something, you know. It is something. But if there's wisdom in that, too, like don't be a fool and try to go to bed at 12 and wake up before you're never going to do it. You're never going to do that. No, you're gonna suffer for it. But I mean, what you're doing is is it's good advice, and all of these things help people progress. And I hope there's listeners that say, Well, man, I've been sitting on the couch. I eat snacks all the day. There's no it's not. Ah, what did you call it a tete snack or something? It's not a cheese is just something I do all the time where I hardly ever exercise or I don't get up early at all. I'm always pressing the alarm or I just wake up when I feel like it in any sort of notch. Out of those sorts of bad habits. Um, yes, I hope people listen to from you. It is just gonna help you, right? It's No one's gonna help. I mean, what we've learned over 40 years, Phil is no one Ain't no one gonna help us. You're only gonna You're only gonna help yourself. Yeah. How do you feel? Um, make your separate yourself from your work. So making those life work, child choices, figuring out, OK, work is done. And now I can enjoy myself. My wife, my family. How are you able to do that? Because a lot of people have difficulty with turning work off, especially. I mean, one good step is turning off the news, not paying attention to the news, because some way that's eating away almost as bad as work would do. Eso you said most people struggle, as do I, And as of this moment, I do because it's e love it so much, and it could easily bleed over into all of that. So again, it just comes back to that awareness. When you're out of balance, you have to ask the questions. So why you are? And if the answer is you're doing it again, you're bringing work into your narrative that excluding the energy on your wife and your kids, you have to stop and also ask your wife to hold you accountable. So it's just constantly having that So if awareness narrative going on your mind plus your apartment calling you up just difficult because of this subservient nature of Asian culture, they always say they will, but they don't always. Which is, uh, I don't again. Growth comes in not too right. So, thinking fill of when you started your newspaper route getting into work, you might have been a little nervous. You might expect. I'm excited putting on that bag and delivering your first paper thinking, Oh, you know the world's gonna end if I don't do it right or getting into Mose and doing well or changing your career a couple of times in the Middle East. Do you have a tip for people who are getting in tow? Work for the first time? Or changing their career as you did about the business is just changing and getting out of something. They're not really Fonda off, but into something that they love. Uh, from in hindsight, after now, having a degree which we could go off on a tangent, a serving my life, um, is two things just just be hungry for...

...knowledge. Don't ever stop asking questions or just ask questions. People hardly ask questions. Don't be afraid to look silly with the question that you're asking, because there's potentially unlock that people aren't asking in that concrete's connection with others. And just really just be kind because I was an ass early in my career way all work because you're just controlled by unconsciously going states be kind, and it'll just blossom in ways you could never possibly imagine thinking back of not being as kind as I mean being the opposite of kind of my case for many, many years. Is there something in your past that you've since learned, or a mistake that you made that you can let us know about or let listeners know that? Here's the lesson I've learned based on being that person that I was, or that person who missed some insight that someone may have like a mentor may have been shouting at the top of their lungs, but I just wasn't mature enough to listen to. But please listen to this and learn so you don't have to make that same mistake. Yeah, there's two things and they go hand and hand just low down, slow down and listen far more than you talk, which is very difficult for a personality like me. I thought I was always writing, and I wanted to prove as to why I was right to everybody. And you, miss moments, you miss moments where you can learn things. We can connect with people, and those have been my biggest unlocks. Now, in meetings, I try and be the last to speak. Just watch and feel, Um, because there are lots so much value in those moments. Speaking of value, how has your idea of character and you've had a great number of employment experiences and you would have met lots of different people? Where do you throw character in the in the midst of ah profession, a career poor defined character A bit more like you, just like you're speaking about their integrity? Yeah, their values, their integrity and what they what they bring. I mean, my question that I used Thio kind of bring up is where do you put character? Do you put it ahead of your career or not? Because a lot of people and you would have met them In many industries? It's career. First, the title first. This is most important and I might drag along my character connected to a piece of string, but that is last and my me getting this job or making this money is most important. How have you learned that may not be the case just by it all looks back to filing for bankruptcy in 2000 and 15 because I had identified and labeled myself with the money I had in my account, and I realized that has nothing to do with life, because when all that goes away, all you have left is your character, and all you have left is the relationships. So I once read, It's not your net worth it your network and it's It's so true. So it's been flipped on its head for me that that if you lead with character and that is your predominant state, everything else will didn't actually need to take care of itself. But surrendering to that is where it's quite challenging because the ego comes in and says, Look at him and look at him and you start seeing other options. But it's very temporary.

It's not permanent, is what I've learned. E. I guess, to go to the the Tortoise and the hare that the tortoise was wise for going slow. I don't know if the quote is yours enough, but you have it on your social media Of my desire to grow far exceeds my desire to defend my position. I wish I had that tattooed on my forehead as a kid, and I would like to have it at the forefront of my beak in life because we always Where did you get that? We always kind, you know, I wanna be right. You and I were speaking about this at the beginning, but wanting to be right but rather wanting to grow. And as you just spoke about being the last to speak because you can learn so much rather than saying your position. Yeah, I got it from a guy that I follow online. There's three or four predominant thought leaders I follow online that I really resonate with current Ray with Australia. I don't know if you've heard of them. Eso he said it once in one of these content creation. I was like, uh it's like just it just hit me and it's my mantra now, So I do it in everything that I do in life were so terrified to ask people, How did I do there? How did I come across The Onley thing that I can control is the perception of of others. It has nothing to do with me. And if I reside in the place of I've got it all figured out, you've lost because you don't you really don't. So getting those 3 60 feedback loops all day, every day given moment resides so much growth. Potentially. We just had that vulnerability to unlock that. I think it's a great first step to take by asking other people you know their perspective and what they perceive of you. We also have to warn that not all people are going to be right, but at least having that willingness to be open to feedback and criticism rather than thinking, Hey, I did a great job, but you bring up a great point because you should also listen to the speed back, meditate on it or just think on it, feel it for yourself. It may not also be accurate, but you throughout these, considering I think more than you practice it, right? So, uh, Phil, I have just a few more questions for you. But do you have a goal in your work now? Is there something that you're hoping to attain with your new life perspective in the way that you're approaching things? Is there a goal like Ah, humble goal, That just something you'd like to see happen? I would like to become the chief heart officer of the organization. Very good. Is that a hard path? Thio, you're saying the chief heart, our officer, is that actual position or you're just saying you want to be the heart of the operation? It's not. I would like to have it created. I think all of us within us wanna have in an environment of a desire for growth over a desire to see the New York position. However, when you're in most corporations today, I've had the luxury of being in quite a few of them, very large scale. They know it's there, she level but don't quite know how to deal with it. And I would love to step in that gap and be the voice of influence for the people doing the actual work and that higher level who could actually impact the influence. And James that brings us into culture, right? And I don't think I You hear you hear culture, but it's only recently that I'm understanding. Culture is more than just this country in that country, right? It's the whole the whole atmosphere, the whole, you know, the...

...love or the commode. What's the word? The working, the collaboration that people have in the company and that is the culture that you want to raise you want to amplify. You wanted Thio sustaining and you wanted to be caring as well, 90%. So it's just creating an environment where people feel safe, truly safe cause if you could do that and that's no easy task. But it's possible because companies that do do it. I'm just people can be creative, innovative, and the results have no maximum and the giving people the freedom to know that they're valued. And there's a place for them as long as they want to contribute and they're putting their best effort forth. I think it's it's a great way. I hope you get that position or create that position, Phil, is there any thinking of the difficulties along your path? Right and you can have 2015 as a benchmark or turning point. But most people, including yourself, we can look back every years, had difficulties. There's always up and down thinking of the listeners who are going through those highs and lows and more so the lows. Do you have any words of encouragement or any last bits of advice for them? Yes, do not frame pain and struggle as a bad day and don't run from it. Um, I love this from Tony Robbins. I figured out that light is happening for us, not to us. That is your biggest thought. Knock if you can remove, you, go from any situation and figure out. Why is this happening to me? And what can I learn from it and grow from it? You're gonna be a entirely different person. Well, it's similar to I saw on your one of your posts. You posted Mike Tyson's hotbox of him just saying Life, we have to be conforming Maurin toe life, not getting life to conform to our ways. Something along those lines and where we come up with most difficult or most difficulty is when we think you know we are in control of all of this stuff. And if things were not going according to our plan, uh, then life sucks. But life can be beautiful in the midst of the difficulties because that's where, as you said in the beginning, where we do our growing 100% and I love that content from Tyson because here's the toughest man on the planet reduced to tears and I don't hear not because we all live there. But we all put on these mass to hide that, and it's just if it's not more sustainable, it goes to the and I hear it a lot lately to is E like Frankie MacDonald called bullies the bullies on the Internet or people who are ripping other people down, and it's because their lives are miserable. It doesn't mean our lives are not miserable. But if someone's willing to go out there and rip somebody down, then their life has to be miserable, too. Yeah, and it takes. It takes a maturity on our part, Thio. You know, I saw someone else who was challenged by a bunch of kids to a fight, and it takes maturity, not toe. You know, flex your muscle flex you know to show that you're the stronger one because there's no need to prove it. But we have a responsibility to be mature in these situations and know that life is going to hit us. And sometimes turning that cheek is the best, best way to move forward. And knowing that that had happened, we could learn our best lessons and the because I just gotta say it to add on what you just that had asked, and I have really learned this just through hard work, and it's always hard...

...work. Even now, I will always be until we die. The only thing that we can control in life is how we respond to things. That's the only thing that we have. Eso, whatever happens, if someone cuts you off in a car you can't control, it cannot happen again. But you can control how you respond to that either pissed off or say you know what he may be in Russia. He may be having a bad day, I don't know, but I mean there's much growth and peace in that right. If you could do that more and more, that's the essence of my desire to grow far exceeds my desire to defend myself. Phil, how can people get in touch with you or contact you? However you wish. This is my email, Philip at the bridge way dot com. But I'm on instagram, LinkedIn and Facebook. Quite activist there. Be with life, but I will be eventually. But yeah, there is. Your mediums fill one final question for you. And that is why do you work? Who? Why do I work? It's a great question. Right? Um oh, Uh huh. For me, it's no longer about the money. Although it's nice e work as it's the vehicle that allows me to grow in the areas which I've explained over this podcast. So it's just a vehicle, um, to allow me to exercise those muscles to grow the person personally and professional. Philip Ridgeway consulted in the shipping industry. Man who is on a mission. Positivity is his vision. And I've greatly appreciated this conversation with you today, Phil. Thanks, man. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive be a joyful day in your work.

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