WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 119 · 8 months ago

#119​ Paul Hollingsworth Bell Media Reporter & Author BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Paul Hollingsworth is a reporter for Bell Media where he has anchored and covered local and international news and sports. Paul's interests are many but his heart is with his family and local community.

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...welcome to why we work with your hostBrian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as wetogether dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seeminglymissteps, hopes, warnings and advice, which will be an encouragement to usall to get up, get going and keep on working. Working is tough, but workingis good. Now here's your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian V, and this iswhy we work today. I have the great pleasure. Speaking with PaulHollingsworth, Paul is a reporter for Bell Media. He is an author, and todayI want to find out from Paul what he thinks about personal branding, whetherthat's for athletes or people in work on such sites as linked in Join Me inmy conversation today with Paul Hollingsworth. I'm Brian V, and this iswhy we work today. I have the great pleasure speaking with PaulHollingsworth. Good day. Fine, sir, Good day to you and thank you forhaving me on. This is it's always it's always flattered to be asked whenpeople ask me to do this kind of thing. So I was thrilled I was thrilled at theinvite. Well, I'm even more thrilled that you said yes, and I appreciateyour time. Will you tell us, Paul, for some people may not know, but evenpeople who do know you're more specifically what industry are you in?What are you up to nowadays? I'm a broadcaster. I worked for CTV,Atlantic and Halifax. I'm a reporter slash anchor, Uh, focusing a local news.Um, basically, it might. My story is this. I worked at CTV Atlantic, uh,formerly a TV for 18 years as a reporter anchor. I went off and workedfor TSN for seven years, 7.5 years, had a great gig with him, literallytraveled the world, traveled North America on a weekly basis. And thenafter doing that for about seven years, I went back to CTV Atlantic almostthree years ago. And, uh, in a life filled with some mediocre decisions,going back to CTV Atlantic was a great decision because it's my home. It's myprofessional home. I get to report an anchor in my community in front ofpeople I grew up alongside covering issues that matter to me, and, uh, Ijust I just feel, you know, you get that comfort zone. I feel very blessedand comfortable in this role in this stage of my life. Very good. Will youbring us back, Paul? What was your very first job and and after asking you tocome on, I had a message. Was it yesterday? Now, from your mom, Sharontrying to get. She was checking you out and seeing seeing what you're up to andshe was messaging me. What was your first job growing up as a as a preteen?A teen unrelated to what you're doing now selling lemonade, selling baseballcards. What was the first thing you did to make or attempt to make a buck? I had a paper route for the HalifaxHerald. That was back in grade six, which would be 1980. I was 51 years old,So in the summer of the year of 80 slash 81 that school year is my gradesix year. I had a paper route in South End Halifax from about August until thenext September. It was a morning paper route and it was too hard. There's noother way saying it was because if there is. You know, we really get ablizzard to five in the morning. You have to deliver the papers and I'd walkaround with this bag of papers. So in the summer time, when the sun wasshining and the birds were chirping even as a 10 year old, there was a meatway to start my day. It was very peaceful and tranquil, but I I remember,like literally getting up on school mornings at five in the morning andwalking in snow up to my hips and delivering papers papers Very unsafe bytoday's standards, I would never let my 10 year old son go into a blizzard, butI thought I found it too hard. I just I mean, there's I'd love to tell you thatthere was a great reason why I didn't do it anymore, but it was just too damnhard. So I stopped doing it. That was my very first job. Well, you and I werespeaking before we started recording and mentioning sackful drive. I livedon sackful drive, and I did. I delivered the Daily News in grade sixand until I got fired because it was too hard. I was throwing the papersaway, thinking nobody's reading these things. Yeah, my excellent small world. My dadwas the managing editor of The Daily News. So I remember you. My dad, Isomeone came to my house and sat at the kitchen table. He's like, Okay, Brian,maybe this is not for you. Okay? Sorry. Too funny. That is too funny, mygoodness. So as you and paper routes...

...are common and I think it's good forpeople to hear people who have Children, I mean, as you rightly said, some jobsare probably not as safe as what we thought they were back then. So we mayconsider something else but having our kids. Um, if there's a kid who listensto this, there's nothing wrong with getting out there and working, whetherit's a lemonade stand or delivering something nowadays, there might be anew way to deliver or do something with social media or something, just as akid. But what? What did you start to do as you got older, maybe in middleschool and high school? In terms of work? I am Good question I In Grade 11, I got a job at Ben's Bakery onPepperell Street in Halifax. That was another hard job I was on. So I go toschool from Monday to Friday, and then on Saturday and Sunday I'd have to getup at seven in the morning. So no sleeping in during the school year tobe at work at 8 30 to work 8 30 to 4 30 at Ben's Bakery and cleaning the ovensand all the baking equipment that get just filthy during the week. And I didthat for most of grade 11. By the grace of God, by the grace of God, I broke myankle in gym class one day playing basketball, and so I had to take timeoff work, and again this happened today would be probably a workplace violation.But back then it was just a more unsophisticated time when they said,they said to me, Okay, you broke your ankle. You can offer two months. Wehired somebody in your place. Don't come back. They never said you're fired.The job just sort of evaporated. This is 30 five years ago. I hold no, nogrievance or grudge against bends. It was just It was just the way it was andI was so relieved because they didn't know how to quit the job. It was sohard. My parents probably like the fact I was working, but I was. I remember inFebruary I'd be like Oh my God, I've been working and going to school for 91straight days Because you go to school Monday to Friday work Saturday, Sunday,Monday to Friday I was exhausted and this went on and on and on, so that wasa tough job. But that job, that job taught me a lot because and I want tobe careful when I answer this, I would never look down my nose at anyone's job.I would never say I'm too good for this or I'm too good for that because thereality is if I lost my job tomorrow, I would deliver papers. If I had to do, Iwould do whatever I have to do to contribute to my family. But you learnalong the way what you don't want to do. I'm not afraid of hard work. I'm notafraid of manual labor, but I did not want to clean up the bakery for therest of my life. I had enough of a sample size to say That's exactly whatI don't want to do with my time because it's too damn hard. So that was a goodlearning experience for me. Um, and you know, it was, you know, made a bit ofmoney, boost some self esteem. I recall they paid me every Friday, which isgreat, so I didn't have to wait two weeks for payday. So every Friday I getpaid, like 70 or $80 which is an enormous amount of money back then, andit's just, you know, But it was a hard job, a good learning experience, andthen after about, I'll say seven or eight months. Thatgig evaporated when I busted my ass. I think it's a great perspective to have,and I think I've held it for a while as well, doing things and realizing whatyou're not going to do opposed to. And some people have it right. Maybe theyhave a certain talent, and they can pursue that their whole life and neverdo something else. Hopefully, they're not too high on the hog to think thatthey would never do something else. But the idea of getting these differentjobs, the experience and then checking off. Okay, I've had a taste of this. Mysampling sizes is good enough, and I realized this is probably not for me.And I believe it gives you a better appreciation for those people who dothese jobs on a regular basis. Absolutely. And well said, I just findthat the irony is or the curiosity of it all is is at a very early age. Istarted to check off things that I didn't want to do, but I still wasn'tsure what I wanted to do. So it's like that alluvial alluvial fan, that littletriangle leading into a decision. And you have this great grab bag ofopportunities in front of you. And by the time you get through universityinto your twenties, okay, I'm going to be three, a schoolteacher or universityprofessor or a journalist. Or maybe I'll go to law school, be a lawyer. Itwill take me, and I remember having those thoughts. But it took me 10 or 12years of manual labor to get to that point, and it's really interesting. Ihad no idea at the time I was getting an education that I was I was gettingeducation in life about what it means to work what it means to physically putyourself, uh, in pain, doing a job sometimes to actually perspire at work,to actually come home sweaty and stinky...

...from 8 to 8 hours of, like, literallysweating your tail off and bending over backwards to do a gig. And what youlearn about yourself, it's character building. Um, and it didn't kill me. Itmade me better. It made me stronger. And it put me on a path to make aseries of decisions which lead me to where I am right now, and I wouldn'twant to be anywhere else. So I guess it all paid off. And it was all productivealong the way, knowing that you went to spew and you took a bachelor of artswith English that you took a journalism degree at kings and your professionthat you're in now, When did that idea come from middle school high schools orsomething? That you did some experience that you had That kind of led youtowards media? Yeah, well, my dad, my dad was ajournalist. I guess he would probably say he still is a journalist once thejournalists, always a journalist so he was and and just to give you 15 or 20seconds background of my father, he was the managing editor of The Daily News.He had been the sports editor of the Chronicle Herald. Excuse me, TheChronicle Herald Years ago. He was a morning sports anchor for C. H. N sradio. He was a junior hockey coach. He was a junior baseball coach. So my lifewas saturated in sports and media. He was president of the Maritime JuniorHockey League for years, head coach of the Halifax Lines, Junior 18 when I wasyoung and running and running the local newspaper. So I had sports and mediaall around me and growing up, I was a big Montreal Expos fan. I had theMontreal Gazette newspaper in my house every single day, the globe and mail inmy house every single day. My parents watched the news, late night news andsix o'clock news every single day. We listened to the radio in the morning,eating breakfast all the time. So I had all these influences coming at me whenit came to a training ground without a meaning without meaning it, too. Andthen then if I could even dial in further on this, like going to NovaScotia voices games with my dad, he would take me to the press box. So Iwas sitting at the press box at the Metro Center 20 years before I everworked in media. I remember. I remember I told this story to somebody recently.I forget who and I was at the Memorial Cup in 2000 with the moose heads and Ibrought a friend of mine. I signed him in and brought him up to the press boxfor the game. There's 10,000 people there, great environment, and he says,Man doesn't freak you out and let you out. They let you sit up here and I waslike, I've been sitting at Pearson doing I've been doing my whole lifewhole life. Yeah, and so So I guess this is a long answer to get to thepoint where my dad didn't raise me to be ajournalist. That would be a romantic notion and an overstatement, but it waskind of a family business and He was a print guy with a bit of broadcasting. Icould always right and turn of phrase, but to come back to the answer to yourquestion, I remember daydreaming about being a sportscaster when I was 10years old. I remember staring at the bathroom mirror, talking to myself,pretending I was anchoring a sports show. I remember sitting by myself onetime. I don't think I've ever told anybody this one time in 1981 82 Theboys were playing at the Metro Center on a Sunday night, and I forget thecircumstance. But I was not with my father in the press box that night. Itwasn't that I wasn't allowed to, but I think he probably had some officialbusiness to do. Businesses do so He set me up on myself in the upper bowl, andI was in Grade seven that year at the Nova Scotia Boys yours game and therewere about four or 5000 people in the lower bowl and the upper bowls wereempty and this upper bowl was empty. But for me, I was by myself and I wassitting there mumbling to myself, doing the play by play. Yeah, and if anybodyhad heard me, it would have been mortified. And God knows I'm still notof all the broadcasting stuff I do, I'm not a great play by play man. I'm happyto admit that it's a real tough skill set, and it's one that doesn't comenaturally to me. But I remember doing that. Then I remember staring at thebathroom mirror, pretending I was a sportscaster way back then. So that was always in me. Um, if I'm beingbrutally honest, Um, I I wasn't geared for achievement at a young age, so Iprobably just dangerous about it. I probably thought when I was 10, 15years old, that those are jobs for other people to have not for me to have,um, I had, you know, George W. Bush, not to quote George W. Bush, but healways talks about the soft bigotry of low expectations. I had my own selfimposed soft bigotry of low expectations. I just assumed thosegreat opportunities were for other people to enjoy, Not for me. That isnot to say I suffered from terribly low self esteem when I was young, becausein other ways I didn't. But on those fronts, I always ended the internaldialogue sentence was saying all that...

...will never happen. They would neverhire a guy like me. And so I just daydreamed about it. And then, you know,I got to high school at the university, and slowly I started to get somegumption. I started to see some things in myself, and I went for it. I just Idecided to make that my career choice, and it was a tough path. Bye. Thatgumption that you started to develop when was the first time that eitherbehind a microphone or something specific into this path that you're on? What sort of put me When? When did IWhen did I kind of get on the race track? The work started kind of whathappened? Besides, yeah, maybe it was a school of maybe university, collegeproject or something that you had to do. But maybe even your first gig. Actually,no, it I can tell you from a life experience standpoint, uh, and it's notI don't mind talking about this in that I don't. It's not a sad thing to talkabout the bring bring down the interview. My brother died in 1991 andhe was my older brother. He was 23 years older than me, and it's a line ofdemarcation. There's everything before 1991 when I was 21 22 years old, goingto be 22 everything after. And I think when, um, I don't know the exact quote, but, youknow, when I was a boy, I did boys things, But when I became a man, I putaway boys. Things are childish things and pursued more adult things in mylife. I when I went through that family tragedy, Um, and I hope you don't mindme framing it around that, because it's a heavy topic, but it's a but butthere's sunshine in my head. When I talk about this, I just I woke up tothe notion that you know what, you don't live forever. I've gone throughthis terrible tragedy. I'm doing okay. I miss him terribly. I need to live alife that's meaningful and productive going forward. I'm not going to wasteany time because I can see from his experience, but sometimes you don'tgrow to have gray hair and I reached down deep inside of myself and I fakedconfidence. I faked initiative. I faked drive until I no longer had never nolonger had to fake it because you fake something when you say, Oh, I can't Ican't do that. I can't apply for this job or I can't take a job at the school.Newspapers started writing for it because I won't be any good. Well, ifyou fake the courage and you force yourself to do it because you know it'stime to get serious in life, all of a sudden I did that and I'm covering thevolleyball team for ST Mary's. And then the school newspaper comes up one dayand said, Hey, you know what? I faked it. I forced myself out of my comfortzone. I made this opportunity happen, and I'm reading my article. It's notthat bad. Next time I'm going to fake it a little less. And then theopportunities came up with the school, the school radio station. And then, ofcourse, when you get the king's, when you go to University of King's College,it's basically a production house. There's a radio station in the basement.There's a cable 10 TV station. There's a school newspaper and you know, youjust if you if you throw yourself off the deep end in life, you learn how to swim in a hurry andyou find that you have confidence and stamina and belief himself and selfesteem that you didn't think you had. And let me be clear on this. I'manchoring the news tomorrow night for Steve Murphy because he's off whateverskill set I have or don't have all that, others decide. I don't spend a lot oftime worried about how good I am anymore, just trauma hardest and hopeit's good enough. But you have to have a belief himself to sit on that deskand acre that show. You can't get up there without having some sort ofbelief in yourself. Those qualities didn't come naturally to me. I had toreally push myself to discover them, and it took a lot of self evaluationand a lot of stumbling and a lot of fear and a lot of doubt and a lot ofconcern to a lot of fear, doubt and concern to discover that that wasactually inside of me and slowly but surely it happened. But it took a longtime. As you say this. Do you think there's some may be tempted to do thisas well. Some false humility and people like, Oh, you know, they have thisdesire. They think, you know, some people may be acknowledged their skillset, but I just couldn't do it. And it's more of maybe not a false humility.But the idea of you just need some encouragement, some more gumption toget over that bump and knowing that it just needs to be cultivated a littlebit more whether you just have to reach up a notch and get that encouragementfrom yourself. Do you think that people are just hesitant of that first step?For whatever reason? Oh, absolutely, and and well said by you, uh, I thinkit's environmental. I came from a working class neighborhood. I didn'tgrow up alongside millionaires. I didn't grow up alongside lawyers anddoctors. I grew up alongside, um, the...

...sons and daughters of longshoremen andtaxi drivers, honorable professions. But they just were, you know, very muchmodest, high character, hardworking people, not a lot of universitygraduates in my midst. And so it's hard for me to distill this because I don'twant anyone to think that I don't think the world of those people because thesepeople are enormous to me. But I remember like you almost if you went touniversity in some parts of my neighborhood, you were different.What's that all about? Look at Look at Paul going to university because a lotof people from the university of generations that actually was the thingwhen I was a kid. And so you find yourself, You know, if you have thefanciest house on the street of the fanciest car on the street, you feel alittle sheepish about it. Well, if you display initiative, ambition and drive,I'm not sure it's off putting. But I think you think it might be off puttingbecause you're looking at people around you who are quite content with justgoing at a different pace in life, improving themselves in a different way,and so to be a super achiever. And I'm not sure I've ever was a super achiever.But to be a super achiever or to have, like world class drive and initiative can awkwardly set you apart from thecrowd. So you might kind of say, I'm not gonna I'm not going to do I'm notgoing to be that guy. I'm not going to demonstrably try my hardest in a publicway because I'm afraid that might set me different from those people. Andthey might not like me as much as I think they like me now. Does that makesense? Because that's kind of I think that's how it is. It leads into aquestion that I had for you that I wanted to ask. And it's the ideabecause you're not mainly in sports, obviously, if you're going to beanchoring tomorrow evening. But the idea of people branding themselves, howimportant do you think that is in the idea of sports? But things likeLinkedIn and other sorts of social media platforms where people are tryingto develop gain word of, you know, what is it? Pull in their skill sets, justget a better foundation on what it is. But to brand oneself, how important isthat? You see it in sports a lot, but I've heard someone the other day or Iheard somebody say It's really important for these young athletes toget a brand for themselves because they don't know how long their career isgoing to last. But also the idea of, you know, the taxi driver or the personworking at the bakery. How important is it to build the resume and and get somesort of strong foundation so that whenever it's needed, whenever they'reneeded outside of the work, now that this this foundation that they'rebuilding is going to be useful to them as a resource? I think I think it's true. I think Imean, branding is a 21st century terminology that we're here now. I think it's important, for it wasimportant in my career. It's funny. A guy had a strong background as a sportsbroadcaster. Look, I've achieved a lot. I don't know. I don't think that'sbragging to say I don't I don't think it's even humble bragging to say I'vedone a lot of exciting things and travel the world as a sportscaster. I'mstill a contract employee for T S M on the side. But because of the pandemic,nobody's traveling, so that work has evaporated for a year. I I guess going back to local news.I've kind of gone against Brand a little bit where I'm going to make surepeople just don't see me as a sportscaster. Not that there's a lackof credibility and being a sportscaster. But if I'm anchoring SportsCenter on aSunday night and I'm covering a murder or a union strike on a Wednesday, well,that's probably a bit a bit much for the viewers to pivot on. I mean, I canunderstand that there's some There's some brands going against each otherthere, so I've had to be very careful with my brand. Um, I don't think of itin those terms, by the way, I've never looked in the mirror and said, I needto be careful with my brand. But the reality is very careful not to castmyself to type, but at the same time I use social media like my Facebook page.I devote my Facebook page to Nova Scotia Marathon sports history. I'mobsessed with it because I think it's the best of our history around us. Whatdoes that tell you about me? It tells you that I have no other outlet in mylife to do it. So I've decided to make Facebook about that. I don't wantFacebook. My brand is. And this continue your earlier question aboutyou don't want to show too much initiative or show too much of yourself.I don't want my social media to ever be me talking about myself. I want mysocial media to be something that I'm celebrating the accomplishments ofsomebody else. I take enormous pride of that, so that's my personal brand. Butdoes that run counter intuitive to my personal brand covering local news forCTV? No, it doesn't because I'm covering what's happening in thecommunity, and I love my community just as much as I love local sports, history,heritage and culture the way I show it in the social media. But I sort ofdiversify those energies a little bit, but they kind of kind of all fall intothe same big tent in my mind at the...

...same time. My brand is communitypassion. My brand is being proud to be from here in my brand brand, having acommunity passion being pried from here. I think it allows me to take my work ina lot of different exciting places at work and on social media. And I thinkthat's one of the main reasons why you've found that your home in theMaritimes is so comforting to you to be part of that community. Yeah. Oh,absolutely. And I've learned some things about myself. Um, I spent a longtime chasing something that was, you know, you could psychoanalyze it likeme traveling around for TSN for seven years, seeing some exciting things,making a good buck, wearing nice suits, flying in airplanes, thinking, notthinking of a big shot, but chasing a life that kind of has some of thatattached to it. In the last two or three years, I'vebeen reconnected with I've never lost track with these guys, but I've beenmore connected with the guys I grew up with. Um, you'll see me on on Facebooklike Wally Martin and Donnie Jeffrey and Trent Lang. These guys are mybrothers, and I have realized in the last two or three years that they'rethe ones who are always there for me. Mhm. Then I realized that my formerschool teachers in my community are the ones who always had my back and Irealized the parents of the friends that I grew up with are the ones whocheer for me the loudest. I guess I always knew this, but youhave to come back to it to rediscover it and rediscovering it has justreaffirmed this love of this community that I have and I would be nothingwithout those people. I would be absolutely nothing without those peoplein my life. Um, I hope they don't think I was ignoring them for years when Iwas off chasing something because I wasn't ignoring them. But I was kind ofbusy doing something else. And now that I'm back here, I'm refocused on them.And it's been a blessing that all the people in my community have been kindof waiting for me to be back around a bit more these last few years, and it'sbeen a really nice period of rediscovery for me. If that makes sense,I just makes perfect sense. I think you I think you have underlining warning topeople about my question. A moment ago, however clear it was is if you're goingto brand yourself, make sure your your branding yourself within who you arenot being outside of who you are and then chasing that dream. And it happensall the time. I mentioned to you in a message that I interviewed Jason Baxterand he mentioned a similar pattern in his life where he went outwest and then he found home in the Maritimes. Right. And that is, I think,in my for myself to is. And you and I were mentioning this Talking about thisa moment ago is I miss the Maritimes, and no matter where you're from, youknow, they say your heart is where your home is. Your home is where your heartis, and I miss those things. And the reason is so you can be plugged intothe community to give back to to share with other people. You know, theheartaches and the sorrows and the wonderful times that you can have. AndI think you realize that. And I think it's a fair warning for other people asthey go and pursue their careers and their jobs. Be careful to stay true towho you are in the things that you not only you value, but that are worthvaluing. I think um, you you hit many nails onthe head with that, and MM. If I was going to be self critical of myself,self critical myself would be redundant if I was going to be self critical frommy career standpoint, I think because it didn't come easy to me or easily tome at early stages, I felt I had to do more to prove myself. What does thatmean? Well, I went to the world. I covered the World Series 14 timesthrough TSN. That means I missed Halloween 14 times. Did I really haveto go to the World Series 14 times and missed Halloween with my kids 14 times?I mean, seriously with my not my dog. And she had been boring it. But with myson, Um, I missed anniversaries to go to the system anniversaries to go tothe NHL draft NHL draft six or seven times. Did I really that I knew thepain it would cause to miss an anniversary, to be at the draft, that Ihave to go multiple times? No, but I was chasing something. And who was whowas I trying to prove something to myself and to other people are both.Well, whatever it was I was all the while, I think a principal person, Ithink, a good person, I think, a person...

...who's who values his friends in hiscommunity and his generous. But I think my priorities wrote a while back and Igot sucked into a career vacuum. I'm enormously grateful for the work the TS M provided me with over the years. Enormously grateful. I would doanything for these people to repay the favors. But I got lost in airports. Igot lost connecting flights. I got lost chasing stuff around the world to fillmy bucket, and they didn't know how to let go of it. And then all of a sudden,I'm like, you know, this is ridiculous. I'm just I mean, I need to, So I justYou know, I stripped it down a little bit, and here I am now. I mean, I'vebeen humbled along the way. I have stumbled along the way. I havesucceeded along the way, and I'm probably a little embarrassed by what Ichased in my life. Um, for weird psychological purposes. For awhile, with this notion of success because my note, my notion of successwas if I flew more and I lived far away from home more and I caught moreairplanes and connected more airports and had more points staying offended.The hotels that my work my employer provided for me that somehow filled mybucket. And then after five or six years, I'm like, this isn't filling mybucket. What have I done? You know? So there is a cautionary tale. It's goodthat you're showing it, too, because it shows humility and it's based on yourexperience. I think I read your quote. I don't know where you got it, but youhave a masters and falling down, but a PhD and getting back up again. And Ithink we need to learn that. And one not to be, you know, not to be so highon the things that we think we know. But in the reality of the difficultiesthat everyone faces in life and the temptations that are along the way, anda lot of people are in this boat, do you have some advice for peoplethinking of you and your paper rode as a kid or changing your career? a coupleof jobs here and there and even most recently over the last three yearscoming back to home. Do you have some advice for people who are getting intowork or changing their career? I guess Be multiple, multiple feelingsof advice. You know the notions of Be careful what you wish for And the grassmay seem greener on the other side of the street. Whatever the expression is,those are real things. You you may, when you think you take it from me when you think you need a career job,you might need a month vacation. You might not need to change yourcareer. You might not need a career switch of a job. You may need a breakfrom your job when you're fed up with a co worker or you're mad at your boss.You may need a good nap, a big glass of water and a meal, because if you likeme, I'm like a baby. If I don't sleep oreat, I cry. It's as simple as that. We all have that in this. And how manytimes have I lost my temper? I've been really mattered. I don't lose my temperin a public way. But sometimes I'm alone in the car. I'm just steaming madand I said, Well, wait a minute now. I haven't slept in three days. I didn'tdrink any water today. I skipped lunch and this guy was a jump to me. At leastI think he was a jump because it's probably just a perceived slight. Ifeel like changing jobs and not working. I'm going to show him I'm going to geta new job and not work there anymore. Well, how stupid is that? It's notproductive, whereas, and by the way, I never really flew off the handle inlife. I've never done those things, but I've had those moments where I feltlike I felt like reacting in a certain way, where all I needed was probably acouple of mental health days, a leader of water and 28 hour sleeps. And then Icould really recalibrate things and not jump the gun and make a move that wascounterproductive. So many people, probably if I have a piece of advice togive its that, just slow down and take a deep breath, Um, and I'll tell youanother another way to answer this when it comes to device. I've given thisnext answer a lot of thought and I tell this to people all the time. I'veworked very hard to take ego out of my life. We all have ego. We all have ego.I'm not. I'm not. I'm not blind to that. But ego can destroy you. Ego can make youchippy. Ego leads you to be rude to people at the drive thru who are justtrying to do their job and they don't mean to mess up your order. Ego canhave you be supersensitive in situations that don't require you to besupersensitive that are worthy of it. Ego can allow you to destroyrelationships and ego can allow you to change your focus. From what? You whatyou should be focused on. I'm sitting here in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. Myfocus is this. I want my wife to love me. I want my kids to love me and Iwant to pay the mortgage every two weeks. And I hope there's a few bucksleft over to take my wife to a movie once a month during non pandemic times.If I have that. I'm cool. And the gang?...

I didn't always have those priorities,and I think ego got in the way of it. So I worked very hard to remove thatobstacle. And I'm talking the bad side of ego. We all have ego that helps usthrive and achieve. But ego can destroy you. Yeah, it's great advice for people andwork, and we often get sidetracked. And for me,you mentioned a couple of days rest or sometimes it's just a nap. Just a fiveminute for me. I like now, but, like, a five minute just and it changes myperspective almost every day that I take a nap like, Oh, I mean, I have apretty easy life out here in South Korea's, uh, English professor. Hoursor minimal vacation is plentiful, but sometimes, like uh huh, look where I am.Look what I'm doing. How long have you been doing this? And take a nap? Mylife is pretty good, but sometimes we just need to take those breaks and geta better perspective. And, you know, as you mentioned about those jobs likethese are the things you could be doing these things you might not be doing.These are things other people are doing, and people have a little bit harderthan us. And if we keep our level keel, we won't be so quick to fly off thehandle, do you? I took professional toprofessional counseling from a woman. Her name is Michelle Fitzgerald. Sheworks at, um, I believe Robertson. Cigarette at the employee agency, HRfirm and Halifax. She's she's she's exceptional. And when you take professional counselinglike it teaches you to be a better employee, a better manager of people, abetter leader. Yeah, I didn't know this. You enter into an arena where she holdsthe mirror up to you and in a very productive way, confronts you with yourfaults and your shortcomings. You're listening skills, communication skills,your sense of humanity, your sense of humility. Um, it was so enormouslyhelpful. I carry I went to about 10 sessions with her, and I carry it withme every day. The lessons learned from her because I wish I had her at my sidein high school. I wish I had Seriously, I wish I was taking, like, intermediatelevel instruction from her. All the way through life because my parents aregood people, and I'm not criticizing it, but they weren't equipped to prepare mefor professional life. My professors did not prepare me for professionallife and to be my wife was trying to find her. And to be fair, I'm notprepared to get my Children ready for professional life. No, we're not. HR,not HR consultants. And I mean and then we all have varying degrees of socialmaturity. Um, I'm very socially mature in some ways and probably very lackingin other ways. And so having that kind of guidance and supervision from herwas so helpful, I carry it with me every day. There was one thing she shefocused on the 40 60 rule. Uh, talk for 40. Listen, for 60. I was like, Well, that seems prettysimple. And she said, Challenge yourself for the next two weeks untilour next appointment. Focus on this. I was talking 90 10. I was talking overpeople. I was blowing them away. I had nervous banter. Um, I was appalled thatthe person I was I was like, Wow, I'm on a good day. I'm 75 25 And then Isaid to myself, Well, wait a minute now. I left CTV in 2013 after 18 yearsbecause I was frustrated professionally. These are good people, not criticizingmy former employer employer for the first time I was there, but I felt Ihad outgrown the place. I felt it was time for a new challenge. Well, aftertalking to her, I'll be honest with you. I came to the conclusion I left for allthe wrong reasons. I just was. I just was in a period in my life where I wasbeing a little bit of mature, a little bit supersensitive, a little bitfrustrated over things that probably didn't require frustration, and I left.Um, it wasn't a mistake, but I bet you had. I've been seeing herprofessionally. With her guidance, I may have come to a different, differentdecision in life. Isn't it fascinating, But that's where I was in. The growtharc in 2013 was different from where I was in 2018 because I probably wouldn'thave listened to her years earlier, but that's where I was at that point. 60 40is a big difference 50 fifty's You think he got it, but 65 10%? Yeah, andI Listen, I tell you, I listened every day with people who like you and I inthis conversation, you'll ask a question. I'll answer a couple of timesbecause of the delay we stepped on each other. But for the most part, we'regoing back and forth. That's probably what people know. That's me. That's me,too. Me, too. Me too. But I talked to people every day now and I'm going, Oh,60 40 40 60. We're not I There are people who just you want to say to them,I'm sorry for we're talking every time...

...you try to interrupt me because thekids keep talking and talking. But that's but But you learn, you learn alot to get perspective on it. Mhm so funny when you're trying to interruptme, it's a little a little funny thing, but it's true, though it's totally true.And this and this and this isn't to be personally critical of anybody. I'mactually using the story to hold the mirror up to me because it allowed meto see my shortcomings and it made me request. It made me re question overand over again some of my previous decisions. And the reality is, and thiscomes back to the cautionary tale part, um, any level of success or achievementI had in my life. It was probably modest success and modest achievement.I'm not overstating that. I probably had some maturity ratios were a bit offat certain times in my life, and I needed some work on that and onceidentified that. I think it's made me a better professional, a better employee,a better person about a human being, and I like better the person I am in mywork life now. Then I did in previous iterations of my work life. It's funnyto hear that you have difficulty with this, because with this podcast, I'mlearning very slowly, uh, to listen rather than be ready for my nextquestion. So it's interesting to hear that you struggled with this and andthat's hope for everyone, because this is a different type of experience thatyou have than other people. Most people are not the interviewing or in thecamera, and there's a whole bunch of stuff you have to wait and be silentfor and listen. And if you are having difficulty with this and you know frommy small part of having difficulty with my experience, it shows other people,it's understandable that you would have difficulty with this as well. So I'mglad you're saying that it is not easy to listen. No, it is. It is a real discipline. Um,and it's going to continue to work on two. And But, you know, um, I wouldn'tchange a thing in my life because it brought me to restate a previousstatement I made. It brought me to where I am now. But if I'm most proudof myself in a professional setting which has bled into my personal life, Ihave challenged myself in recent years to improve. I've challenged myself tobe a more considerate person. Um, you know, I just try. You try to be abetter person. You try to be a better version of yourself. I'm not ashamed ofanything I was before, but I can go back and identify some pretty glaringexamples of where self improvement was required. And I was probably too obtuseat the time to pick up on and make the adjustments. Maybe it's a challengingoneself, but do you have any encouragement for people who go throughdifficulties? Adversity with their work, uncertain about their career, uncertainabout their future, where they might want things I know for a goal for youis your family, and that's a great goal. Not all people have those prioritiesset up. Do you have some advice for people that, for whatever reasons, aremaybe a little distraught, maybe depressed? Maybe just uncertain abouttheir future and not sure how things are going to turn out? Well, first ofall, cut yourself a break. Um, don't be too hard on yourself. I have been hardon myself. Um, there's the Plan A and Plan B. Have a Plan C and A Plan D andA Plan B and plan Out plans. Said, um, don't limit yourself. I have a friendof mine who is a public relations degree who is now a manager of a bank.I have a friend of mine who is an English teacher by trade who is aregional vice president for a major sports sporting goods company basicallyselling sporting goods in the trunk of his car. Um, I guarantee when he wasstudying education, he never thought he'd be selling swag. I guarantee whenshe was doing a co op work term at the Mount Saint Vincent University publicrelations to school, she never see herself in a bank manager with nofinancial background. So somebody so But just just do not limit yourself tothis. Look, I'm I'm 51 years old. I'm proud of the work I do at CTV. I'mactually very proud of it. I think I think professionally, I'm I'm in areally good place. I think I'm a good guy professional these days. And Ithink I'm doing a good job of being a good citizen from my employer, and I'mgrateful for them. You know what? I can be a fireman in two years. I have twouniversity degrees that can be a substitute teacher. If I stumble andfall, I could I have no idea what the future holds. But I'm not going to livewith myself, even at my age, to plan a or Plan B or plan C. No, no, no. Begeared for achievement. Be open to ideas. Don't be discouraged. And makesure you work. If you want to get a job as the play by play man for theMontreal Canadians. Well, guess what.

You might have to work at Costco frommidnight to eight in the morning, 40 hours a week to get a paycheck and conquer that opportunity to evenhave a chance at that. Another opportunity. You want to get a job intelevision as an anchor or broadcaster, You may have to go work at a radiostation report. Huckleberry or not, you need to be open open to adjustments. Um,you know, like I know a guy who went to Fort Kent in Maine and get an educationdegree, and you got a job as a landscaper in Fort Kent. One summarystill lives there, running a landscaping company. He's got aneducation degree, and he's got a house nice in the mind and two cars in thedriveway. Probably nicer than mine. And he's achieving. I mean, he was. He wasopen to adjustment, so don't don't limit yourself. And another thing, too,is identify the identify the landscape in front of you like media today. Youmentioned social media earlier. All the platforms out there there are newscaston Snapchat these days. There are entire broadcast news shows onInstagram. The digital universe is exploding, so make sure that if you areand I'm not suggesting someone in the Maritimes growing up to want to be likePaul Hollingsworth. But if somebody out there is 19 years old and they'relooking at my work and they say I wouldn't mind doing up all those well,you might not get to your The version of me 20 years from now might be anonline digital version that doesn't even exist yet, and that person isgoing to have to find a way to get there. And I'm the last person to helpthem because this career is morphing before my very eyes. This industry ismorphing before my very eyes, so don't limit yourself to one. It's two plans.Be open to suggestions and make sure you work, work, work, work. If I lostmy job tomorrow, um, first of all, I would have to work because I'm at astage in my life where I'm just not ready to retire. I'd have to I havebills to pay. I would sell shoes in Spring Garden road. I would work atCostco Canadian Tire, you name it. I would make popcorn at the movie theater,and I'm not even grossly exaggerating that are not even remotely exaggeratingthat. And I'm certainly not grossly exaggerating. I would do whatever Ihave to do to make money because I know working every day and being productive,build something inside of me and it positions me for achievement. I don'tthink that's unique to me. Sitting at home waiting for an opportunity to comethat might not come is destructive. So get out there, make sure you make sureyou keep working and keep going in the right direction. And that's my friendSteve Murphy will say it's one thing to be in the right place at the right time,but in order to be in the right place at the right time, you've got to be inthe right place. So if you want to have a successful career in your life, youmight want to start by getting a job. You know that's not having a job is thefirst step towards having a better job. They're not going to give you thewicked good job when you're unemployed, you're going to build up to it slowly.I have experienced lots of people. I was a resident manager and Halifax andlots of international people looking for jobs specific to their educationand only wanting to get that particular job like No, no, no, no, Just go get ajob. Start there, start there. You know, if you go to ST Mary's University, oneof my best friends works at ST Mary's, and he's got a level of expertise whenit comes to student placement student employment, counseling them towardsbetter, better opportunities in life. He was telling me. He was telling merecently, and I'm paraphrasing him. But the banks are coming to the university,and they're scooping up our students because they're looking for aptitudesand achievers and life skills and transferrable life skills andpersonality traits. As much as they're looking for the accounting major, who'sgoing to be an account like you? You get a bachelor of arts inEnglish at ST Mary's University. You might wind up being the regional repfor Molson Breweries. I'm making that up, but the point of the matter isthat's what those people are looking for now they're not looking. You're not.If you get a job as an accountant degree and you're only applying toaccounting firms, you're probably selling yourself short. I don't sayprobably you are selling yourself short, and you're probably not painting arealistic picture of the opportunities that you should be chasing out there. I think it's encouraging for people whodo not know what they're doing. They maybe have a piece of paper from auniversity or they're thinking of some other field that there's lots ofopportunity for them. If they're just willing to put that effort in. Paul, Ionly have one more question for you. Besides, how can people get in touchwith you? Besides finding you on TV each day? I think I'm on. I'm on Facebook. Um and,uh, you can, um, I'm on Twitter at Paul H. Reporter, one on Twitter. And as youknow, I'm on Facebook. You can always...

...find me on Facebook and they can findme on the news, of course, and you might find me at a local Starbucks inHalifax getting a coffee because I guzzle copious amounts of coffee on adaily basis. But I'm just I'm at a stage in my life where I'm just I'maround town and I think I think I'm approachable. We all have shy streaksthat we work on, so I have a little bit of that in the public. But for the mostpart, I think I'm unapproachable guy and people, if you if you follow mysocial media on Facebook, I think I engaged when people engage with me, Um,and I encourage people to to reach out and connect and ask the other questionsthey want. Perfect. Paul. One final question and that is why do you work? I work because I grew up in a householdwhere we did not have a lot of money at some stages of my life, and I was veryyoung. And I don't take for granted fact that I've been giving anopportunity to achieve and do things professionally in this life that I'mblessed to have, but the opportunities I have I'm not afforded to some otherpeople with who aren't as blessed. So I work to take full advantage of theopportunities that are in front of me pushing aside the financial part. Wework to make money that. That's the easy answer. But I work to takeadvantage of the opportunities, keenly aware of the fact that a lot of peoplebefore me were not as blessed as I am. Paul Hollingsworth, Bell media employee,reporter and author. Thank you for your time, and I and I appreciate the workthat you do. Thank you very much. And, uh, pleaseinvite me to come back sometime because I enjoyed it. I like I like to do itagain. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian Wien.Be sure to subscribe, Follow and share with others so they too can beencouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive yetjoyful day in your work.

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