WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 102 · 10 months ago

#102 Nelson Tressler - IGOTSMARTER - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Nelson Tressler has every reason to stop working and give up. However, Nelson has turned his circumstances into productivity. Nelson is the founder and CEO of IGOTSMARTER and the author of Unlucky Sperm Club.

Contact Info

Nelson’s Profile
linkedin.com/in/nelson-tressler-75876590

Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/nelsontressler1

Twitter
https://twitter.com/tresslernelson?lang=en

Instagram
https://www.instagram.com/nelsontressler/

About
"Most people never accomplish their biggest goals in life, consequently they are left to live a life that is inferior to what they are capable of living. Therefore, we’ve developed a program that provides people the tools, knowledge and support they need to live the life that they were destined to live." (LinkedIn, 2021)

Welcome to why we work with your host,Brian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as wetogether dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seeminglymissteps, hopes, warnings and advice which will be an encouragement to usall to get up. Get going on. Keep on working. Working is tough, but workingis good. Now, here's your host to why we work. Brian V E um, Brian B. Andthis is why we work today at the Great Pleasure. Speaking with Nelson Tressler.Nelson is the founder and CEO of I got smarter. He is the author of UnluckySperm Count. And today I want to find out from Nelson how we can make betterchoices. So we're not living in our circumstances. Join me today in myconversation with Nelson Tressler. I'm Brian V. And this is why we work today.Have the great pleasure. Speaking with Nelson Tressler. Good day. Fine, sir.Hey, thanks for having me on Brian. No, Nelson, thank you for coming on. Ireally appreciate your time. And I would like to know, knowing that youhave been in several different businesses. What what industry are youin now. And can you tell us a bit about yourself? Yeah, So, I mean, we just started anapp in a program called I Got Smarter, which is a goal fulfillment programthat is associated with an app that gives people all the tools, theknowledge, and especially the support to finally achieve their life's biggestgoals. And in what industry would this be inin particular? Uh, probably. And it's a self help and goal fulfillment. I don'tknow if there's kind of that perfect slot for it, but you know what the APPdoes is it gives them a program for people to achieve any goal in theirlives and all of their, you know, categories from health toe wealth tobusiness, to spirituality, toe lifestyle, you know any goal? It's thatprogram that, you know again gives them all the tools that they need to finallyachieve that, and that that was one of the things that we really realizedwhere there were so many people out there that were just a few choices awayfrom, you know, living that life that they wanted to live and the I gotsmarter program and app gives them those tools, knowledge and support tofinally do that. Nelson, Knowing the number of businesses that you've beenin and successful ones at that, how did you come to be who you are in the senseof what would have been your very first job? Maybe you were a teenager sellinglemonade or delivering papers. My first job was when I was nine years old and Iworked on the on the back of my uncles garbage truck and did that all the wayup through high school until I got my driver's license and then went andworked construction. I had a kind of, ah, stint during the school year. Onthe weekends. I worked for a caterer, Um and yeah, I mean, I sold stuff doorto door when I was a kid. I worked at a junk yard on some weekends for for aguy who had a junk yard down the street. So, yeah, I had quite a few jobsgrowing up. Nine. I think. Nelson, you're the youngest so far to havestarted work a little bit like 10. I get a few for 10 12, but nine isespecially E mean you're not Ah, man. Who's afraid to get your hands dirty?No, I mean, yeah. I mean, the garbage truck was in our family, and I wasalways willing to go and and enjoyed doing that. And that's still to thisday was one of the most enjoyable jobs. Probably because I was a kid and got toride on the back of the truck and, you know, felt like I was grown up. And,you know, my family needed the money at that time. So what was What was yourmotivation? I mean, at nine to say I'm going to go out and work and get somemoney. What was the motivating factor? Was it family? Was it yourself? Well, I got quite the origin story. Youwant me to get into that and and kind of go down there? I think it's It's astory that gives you the authority, thio and even theinspiration for people to listen to and understand where you're coming from.The perspective that you have on life. Yeah. So, um, my mom got pregnant withme when she was 15 years old. And while she was pregnant with me, her father,who was the local trash collector in...

...the town drove into the town square.There he spotted two police officers. He stuck a gun out the window andopened fire on those police officers, killing one and critically woundinganother. And my grandfather was eventually captured and brought tostand trial, where he was facing the death penalty. And during mygrandfather's trial, my mom, uh, got up and testified that the reason that herfather had shot and killed that police officer was that that police officerhad raped her. And she was now pregnant with me. And my mom's testimony worked.My grandfather's first trial ended in a hung jury. Eventually he was foundguilty and sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. And,you know, leaving behind me. My mom, My mom was one of 15 Children you know, inthis small little town to deal with the circumstances, Uh, that he did so thatthat's kind of where my life started. Um, you know my mom, you know, I'meventually born to a 15 year old mother in a small town. You know, everythingthat has to do with, you know, the circumstances surrounding my birth mymom ends up meeting a man who becomes my stepfather. Come to find out he's analcoholic, very physically and emotionally abusive to me and my mom.Eventually, they have four Children and in quick succession and because of thelifestyle that they're living, a lot of the basic needs of my siblings fallupon me is the oldest from diaper changing, the bottle feeding to wakingup at 2 a.m. Thio, you know, put crying babies back to sleep. You know, it hada huge effect on me in the fourth grade. I flunked the fourth grade withStraight s, uh, I couldn't read, couldn't write, couldn't spell ended upgetting placed into special Ed where I had dyslexia. And, uh, eventually oneday my stepfather was walking home drunk from a bar. Somebody else wasdriving home drunk from that bar and ended up hitting and killing him on. Itwas at this time that my mom here she is, She's lived, Ah, tough life. Up tothis point, she has five small Children. She's never worked outside of the home.She's dropped out of school in the eighth grade and losing my stepfatheras bad as he was to us pretty much left my mom with no hope and really novision of how she was ever going to care for, you know, five small Children.And it was at this time that she decided that she was going to go aheadand take her own life, and she attempted suicide. And fortunately shewasn't successful. But when she did get out of the hospital after attemptingsuicide, she determined that she wasn't gonna be able to carry care for allfive of us. And that's when my family got split up. And then I went to golive with my grandmother, who was the wife of the man who shot and killed thepolice officer. And that took me up to about age 10 or 11. That, well, that that gives some of themotivation for you to work so hard when at what age did you I mean, find outabout your grandfather and the police officer. At what age did that storycome to your mind? Well, I mean, I I always remember that story and and inmy book The On Lucky Sperm Club, there's a lot of twists and turns withthat story. And, you know, I don't want to get into them now because it's partof the book and part of the suspense in there. But, yeah, there's a lot oftwists and turns in there, but no, I mean, I was always aware of that. Imean, I was always that kid in this small town. I mean, if you've everlived in a small town, you know, people are are always up in your business, andthey know all of your business and eso. I mean, I was always that and had todeal with that. And you know what my family's last name represented and whome and my mom represented. So that was constant. Did you ever meet the policeofficer? No. He so the police officer was killedbefore he was the one that was killed. Not the not the wounded one. So? Sothat was the part of the story that I didn't quite get because you said hewent to jail. So your grandfather, my grandfather went to jail. I thought youwere saying that the wounded police officer was the one who was eventually now and and how? How about yourgrandfather. How many years did he serve? More than 40 years and he endedup dying in prison. What a horrific, horrific story andknowing your story and then starting to see this motivation in you to work andhelp. I mean one at a necessity, right? Helping raise your brothers and sisters.But also a desire Thio, Maybe improve...

...or two. I heard one guy say that whenwe have difficulty like this usually are wise of why we do something,especially initially is to escape, right, just to run, to get out of thissituation and then go ahead. And I did that. I mean, when I went to go livewith my grandmother, you know, um, for the first time in my life, I didn'thave to worry about, you know, caring for my siblings. I didn't have to worryabout my step dad coming home and beating me or my mom and I started toreflect upon what direction my life was going. And one day a counselor came andtalked about what it was going to take to get into college. And that's when Ikind of thought, you know what? What if I What if I graduated college man, mylife would be set from here on out. And, you know, I remember thinking to myself,You know, Nelson, you can't read. You can't write. You can't spell your inspecial. And, you know, of of my mom's 15 brothers and sisters on Lee to haveever graduated high school, none have ever gone to college. But, you know, Isaw what direction I was going, and, uh so I started to do the things that Ithought would get me into college and eventually, you know, 12 years afterthat, four different universities after that, in four years in the Air Force, Ibecame that first person to graduate from college. But what I was able to dowas joined the Air Force, which got me out of that town and which got me, youknow, for the first time in my life, you know, I wasn't, You know, when Isaid my last name, it wasn't, you know, people asking questions about you know,what my grandfather had done and you know what I represented. And for thefirst time, I felt like I could do anything or be anybody that I wanted tobe, and it was very liberating. Uh, T get out of there and escape. You know,everything that that represented. So the military gave you on out to start pursuing what you felt wouldbe beneficial for you. So how did you start to get over the idea of what wasin your past for the betterment of your future? And what were you starting tothink? As you said, the number of degrees that you have, what made you decide in those fields?Well, I mean, the one thing was a soon as I graduated from college, you know,I realized you know how powerful goals can be. And, you know, I use I. I set agoal to graduate, you know, to become the first person in my family tograduate from college. But after I was able to do that, I became obsessed withgoals and personal development and, you know, saw the power in them. And Iwanted to become a better version of myself. And I started to go to everyseminar I could, you know, afford to go to. And I started to listen toe all thebooks that I could get and subscribe to the magazines and and I, you know, used,you know, gold programs every year. And what I eventually was able to do was,you know, design a life that I couldn't have even imagined. And I used goalsand personal development in every area of my life. And, you know, 20 yearsafter graduating from college, I went into commercial real estate right outof school. You know, I was able to become the number one salespersonworldwide for a top five commercial real estate firm. Several times in theretail division, I was able to start more than 10 businesses, including oneof the largest privately owned pet resorts in the country. And, you know,I was able to write a book, and now I've started. I got smarter to helpother people, uh, used goals and personal development in their lives and,you know, teach them how to design the life that they wanna live. So goals airso powerful. And I truly believe that you really you can accomplish any goalso long as you have enough time enough energy and enough focus to do it. Atwhat age are you suggesting people start developing their goals. And whatwould they look like at that age? Well, I mean, I was in seventh grade when Iset that goal to become the first person to graduate college as young aspossible. I mean, you know, everybody should have a goal. Whether you're youknow, you're young and you wanna be the starting quarterback on your, you know,peewee football team or, you know, play shortstop on your Little League teamgoal goals. Nothing happens until somebody sets a goal and then starts towork towards it. And the sooner that you can teach somebody the power ofgoals and the power and the opportunity to become a better version of yourselftoe always be working on yourself because all goals start with the typeof person that you are. In order to...

...accomplish a goal, you have to becomethat person who can accomplish that goal. So goals really come down tobecoming a better version of yourself, no matter what that goal is. So a soonas you can learn those skills in those strategies, I mean, I've tried to teachthem to my kids eyes early as possible, because what a huge head started is toeunderstand the power of goals and personal development at an early agefor personal development. What aspects of your life is that touching?Obviously it would be all of it. But what are those specific areas? Yeah, I mean your health, your wealth,your business, your relationships it really is everything. And what personaldevelopment comes down to is striving to become that best version of yourself.And you know that that's the magic is. Once you see what potential lies withinyou, you will never be the same. And I think that was one of the thingswhenever I graduated from college and I actually saw some potential that liedwithin me that I couldn't see five or seven years earlier once I saw that andunderstood that man, uh, there's greatness in in me. And now all I haveto do is really take that action and be determined. Thio, release thatpotential. You know, it's a lot like you see a big chunk of wood and thatbig chunk of wood on the forest floor is just sitting there and that thatchunk of wood could, you know, has all this potential but that potentialessentially will rot into the forest floor if nobody does anything with it.But if somebody picks up that log and they bring it home, you know, theycould put it in the fire. And now all of a sudden it's heat or its light. Ormaybe it's, you know, you could build something out of it. Or maybe ah ah,log sculptor, you know, create something beautiful in it. All thatpotential was in that log. But until somebody grabbed that log and startedto work at it, it would. It all went for not and that's the way we all are.We all have this, you know, magnificent potential within each one of us. But wehave toe work in order to let that potential come out. And so we have book ends on this soasyoung as possible. Do you also do you suggest a swell? Iwas speaking to someone yesterday. An interview with someone was retired andhe he's enjoying life. But I think he would be the first to admit thatthere's not that many goals set before him. So you do you have another side tothat as well. For people are getting older. Yeah. I mean, success is not anevent. It's a journey. And becoming that best version of yourself reallyshould never end. Uh, you know, I I believe in always being active andalways being pursuing that better version of yourself. And you know what?It might not be that you wanna climb to the top of the mountain of businessanymore once you get older. But, you know, maybe it's time to continue beinghealthy and having enough energy to keep up with the grandkids or the greatgrandkids or, you know, starting a foundation to give back at the end ofyour age or what? Whatever your goals are, and whatever your values are, Imean, goals should never really go away. I mean, my my goal is I want to be 130years old, laying on my deathbed, surrounded by five or six generationsof people that looked down at me and have nothing but admiration for me. Imean, it should never end. We should always be striving to become thatbetter version of ourselves and always have goals. And I think that's whatkeeps a lot of people young. I mean, there's those studies out there thatmost people you know end up dying five or seven years after they retire. And Ithink, ah, lot of that has to do with they stop moving. They stop having that,uh, those goals to shoot after and and the purpose in their lives. And I thinkto stay young, you keep those purpose, they they're absolutely gonna change.Your goals will change, and your vision will change. But you should always havegoals and always be striving for them, no matter how old you are. There's many people out there, Nelsonthat will use their circumstances as an excuse. And so I see for you you lackedmaybe some motivating powers from the family, some encouragement and all thatone where I mean with your counselor, that kind of gave you an idea of thestudent counselor that suggested going to college. But I think it's great what you'redoing because you're a voice for some of those people who don't have familyinfluences at home to encourage them. Where did your influence come frominitially, And do you see that your voice is an influence for those peopleeven people in their twenties and...

...thirties Thio encourage them tomotivate them to set their goals and personal development ideals. Yeah. Imean, first of all, you know, when I moved in with my Graham, I have aspecial bond with my grandma. I lived. I lived there my first few years oflife because my mom was 15 years old. But, you know, my gram almost told meevery single day. You know, Nelson, you're gonna make something of yourself.And she told me that so often and believed it so wholeheartedly. And Iloved her so much that I think that was a lot of my motivation to do somethingwith my life, to prove her right s. So I think it all started there. I wasalso fortunate enough to be in the Big Brother Big Sister program. And I got agreat big brother and his wife who, you know, showed me some contrast on howother people live their lives. And I think contrast is a very importantthing to people because, you know, when when I was kind of stuck in there withthe family with with my family, I didn't know that life was any different.And, uh, I got some of that contrast and realized that it was some, you know,something different that I wanted. So there were those things, Um, goodfriends. I mean, Jim Brown has that quote, you know, show me your fiveclosest friends, and you're the average of them. And so I think, you know,definitely being around good people. Um, but yeah, yeah, I I think I had, Youknow, success is never a one man show. I mean, there's always people who helpyou and motivate you and inspire you. And and I definitely had a lot of thosepeople, you know, coming up through my career. And I think that you're aninspiration as well, because understanding people are in variouscircumstances, even your book unlucky sperm count. The subtext is you are nota victim of your circumstances, but a product of your choices. Yeah, and Iwholeheartedly believe that I mean, one of the philosophies that we have that Igot smarter is that we take 100% responsibility for our own success. Andthe reason that we do that is there are people out there that want to blame, uh,their circumstances on other other people. Things happening in the world.What what have you? But as soon as you start blaming, you give away the powerto change something. But if you take 100% responsibility for your ownsuccess now you're in control to change that. And that's what my book is. Imean, my book, The On Lucky Sperm Club. I really pull back the curtain becauseyou have a lot of people who see somebody who's maybe, you know, hadsome success in their lives. And they either think that that happenedovernight or they think that it was an easy ride, and that is almost never, uh,you know, never what happens. And I really pulled back the curtain, youknow, all the way from, you know, me and my wife struggling on beingseparated, Um, you know, and then almost losing everything in in 2000 andeight during the recession and just showing that as long as you're willingto keep going and keep fighting for what you want, uh, if you don't quit,you can't fail. And that's what I wanted to portray through the on LuckySperm Club. If someone's listening now, that tends to live in theircircumstances and excuses. What would you suggest is the first step to get them in the habit of makingthose right choices? Well, the first step is to realize you you are incharge, you're in charge of your life, and I wholeheartedly believe, 99.99%that we are exactly where we choose to be. Um, you you choose to be whereyou're at, and if you get to choose where you're at right now, guess whatyou get to choose where you're going to go by making different choices. Youknow, it's a it's a lot like getting, ah, hand of poker dealt to you. Youknow, you get five cards or seven cards and you look at your hand. You don'thave to keep that hand, you get the discard it and get some different cards,and the way to do that in life is to start making different choices. If youdon't like the hand that you've been dealt, start making different choices,making make some choices that they're going to get you to where you want togo. Um, and when you realize that. Holy cow. You know what I can? I candetermine the the direction of my life through my choices. You'll startunderstanding how important how important choices are. And I think alot of people don't realize that. I think a lot of people think I'm gonnachoose, you know, whatever it is with their health or with their wealth orwith their relationships, they don't understand how powerful you knowchoices can be. And, you know, I talk...

...about this in my book. You know, onechoice can change the direction of your life. And you know, when you realizethat it's not gonna change your life completely. But one choice can changethe direction of it and then continue to make those type of choices. Andeventually you're gonna get end up to where you want to go, Nelson with, Igot smarter and you're unlucky. Sperm club and your other businesses thatyou're in. What is some satisfaction that you're getting out of this? Butalso, what are some difficulties? Yeah, I mean, you know, first of all,the difficulties. You know, e I told you my story about my family. And youknow, I've got some family that was not happy that I came out with this book.And so now I've got you know, some of that, which is sad because, you know,that was the last thing that I wanted to happen. Ah, so I mean, that's kindof sad, but I don't regret doing the book because there anyone that wasupset or disheartened. But then maybe after just watching you thrive readingthe book, they kind of turned and maybe warmed up to the whole idea. And whatgood It's bringing. Yeah. I mean, I think there's some of those and but Butthere are definitely still, you know, that that that handful of people, Imean, my mom had 15 brothers and sisters. That's about 150 cousins. So,you know, Ah, handful of them are kind of, uh, not happy that the book cameout, but but on the on the satisfaction side of it, and we're you know what?When you're dealing with haters, you know you're on the right path becauseif you have no haters, nobody you know, nobody is gonna hate on somebody that'snot doing something or or, you know, feel like, you know, they'reaccomplishing something. So you know, anybody else out there that has haters?You know what you're headed in the right direction. Keep doing what you'redoing. A sfar as, uh, satisfaction. Almost every day, without exception, Iget messages from people who have read the book and who it's changed theirlives, and they've received inspiration and motivation. I mean, I was at myson's baseball game and I have older sons who had played baseball and andthis gentleman came up to me and he talked to me and our sons playedbaseball five years ago together, my older sons, and now I have a youngerson playing and he has a younger son, and he's like, You know what? I readyour book, and I remember seeing you and your family, you know, five yearsago and just thinking you guys had it all together that you never had anyissues and you were living, you know, this incredible life. And then I readyour book and saw that you and your wife struggled and you were strugglingwith your businesses, and it really was, you know, encouraging to me to knowthat you know people. Everybody goes through struggles and, you know,talking about his wife and how he started to treat his his wife betterand because of what he had read in the book. And, you know, I get messageslike that all the time. And that lets me know that by writing this book, youknow, it's gonna help a lot of people take control their own lives, inspirethem to, you know, do what they need to do to go after their dreams and theirgoals. So as the founder and CEO, and as an author and working now, cove, itkind of puts a twist on things. But what is a process that you go througheach week in the work that you're doing? Yeah, co vid threw us for a curveball.I mean, we have a company called Six Months to Success, which uses an app,but they meet in person in groups, and they had a goal guide over them thatwould help people stay accountable. But with co vid, you know, meeting withmeeting in groups was not not functional. So that's we developed theI got smarter app which allows you to work virtually uh, with with a successpartner to help you stay accountable to do what you said that you would do So,yeah. I mean, but But that's the way every goal is. You're always gonna getthose hurdles. And, you know, you have two choices when you hit a hurdle inlife, you either can stop or you have to grow so that you can get over thathurdle. And, you know, that's one of the things that I think one of mysuperpowers is. When I hit a hurdle, man, I just want to figure out how toget over it and keep going. And I don't I don't want to stop. Once I determinedthat I want to do something. Uh, I just want to keep going and accomplishing it.And that's what the program I got smarter does for people. It helps themto do that through the tools, the knowledge and the support. So, as yougo through your week, are you finding yourself on zoom calls? Are you writingmawr? Maybe some of these little...

...intermediate goals that you might evenhave for a week. Yeah, I mean, right now, my goals include getting my bookout there Thio to tell my story and and kind of exposed my story and and the Igot smarter app And then it's to grow the the app and to get that as manypeople as I can expose to the app so that they can use it thio to bettertheir lives. And so we're just working on doing whatever we can t do those twothings right now. We're not coaches. Uh, you know, we're using this app forpeople to, uh, you know, use our program and use the app to achievetheir own goals. So we're just spreading the word on that throughthrough the book, through podcasts like this And then through our social mediachannels and and everything that we do there on the personal development side, Whatis this skill that you're working on now? Especially as a businessman? Yeah. I mean, I've always been inphysical businesses and haven't, you know, kind of dwelled into the digitalarea. So this app is all new to me, and I never had any social media until Istarted this business. So I'm trying to figure that out, and, uh, you know, Iwas always the type of guy that was happy. Thio be in in the backgroundwith all of my businesses. And now I'm building ah, personal brand and it'sthe total opposite. So, yeah, this this venture of I got smarter and and beingan author is, you know, 180 degree turn from what my other businesses were, andit's challenging. And but it's also inspiring and motivating and thatsomeone could think, Oh, well, look, he doesn't know what he's talking aboutits new, But this is inspirational in that the content you have, you have theknowledge. The experience with the technology side is something new, butit's also new for all of us, right? The idea of you know, these APS and stuffthat have just been coming out over the last decade, and it shows yourdetermination to master it and help provide your content two people in aneasier, more effective way. Yeah, I mean, you know, the one thing is, isI've used the strategies, the philosophies in the techniques, and Igot smarter for the last 25 years. It's not something that I've pulled out of abook or pulled off line these air things that I've used, things that work,things that didn't work. And it's the program that I came up with to giveeverybody the absolute best possibility of actually ah, following through withtheir goals because the one thing that we do realize is we don't have aknowledge problem. I mean, people know what they need to do to accomplishtheir goals. For the most part, we have an execution problem. We just don't dowhat we know we need to do and that's what I got smarter is doing. And as faras the technology side, I still don't know the technology side I have. I havepeople on my team that know that and help with that. So I mean, that'sthat's another thing. When you go into business, you don't have to be good ateverything and I mean, I learned that early on in business I've surroundedmyself with people who make up for my weaknesses and, you know, I I focus onthe things that I do really well and the things that I don't do really well,I get people on my team that do do those things very well. And, you know,business is never a one man band. It's it's a group of people. It's a team ofpeople who all have that same, you know, vision in that same goal. How are youstaying productive. You You're busy, right? You could make yourself busierif you choose to be. But what's getting your feet off the bed onto the floorand staying productive in your day? Well, I mean, I gotta plug my app. Igot smarter. I mean, one of the things that we do in in the program is we havea morning ritual and that morning ritual plans out through the APP ourentire day and has us focusing on the things that are really going to moveour goals for forward. And, you know, we're talking about gratitude everyevery morning and we're talking about, you know, self help, philosophies andstrategies found in our program. Every morning through the app, we'rereviewing our goals every day through the app and then every day we set, youknow what things need to be accomplished in order to get closer toachieving that goal. So, at the end of your morning ritual, which only takes,you know, five toe 10 minutes at the most. When you're done with yourmorning ritual in the I got smarter app. Your entire day is planned out itselfpopulates, and now all you have to do is start checking off boxes on yourtask lists. And at the end of the day,...

...we have another ritual that's calledour evening ritual and that that goes into reflecting upon, you know, how wasour day? Because our choices matter, right? So we're reflecting upon whattype of choices we made. What what we did. You know, we're figuring out whatwe need to do the next day. So it's really just living life with purposeand knowing every single day what needs to be done. Because most people fail attheir goals. The time that they fail at their goals is that they don't havethat clear vision of what needs to happen next. With the I got smarter app.You always know what needs to happen next. I mean, we break these big goalsdown into what we call four weeks prints, and then we break those fourweeks sprints down into milestones, so there's always that sense of urgency ofwhat you have to do next. No, I think it's a great idea, especially as you gothrough it and given idea of waking up in the morning here, your goals set foryour morning here, your afternoon. Here's your week. Here, your neck.Here's your month and that's a great I mean, it's a no brainer. So kudos toyou for coming up with it. What about a tip for people knowing that you at nine,we're working on a garbage truck and also had a couple of different jobs.So there's people who just get into work for the first time, and there'sother people who changed their career. Do you have a tip for people toencourage them in in starting work or not being afraid to switch over, ifthat's for them? Yeah, yeah, I mean, start now and start where you're at. Imean, that's the that's the problem is most most people just never start. Uh,they get inspired, they get motivated. But then they want you know, all thetraffic lights to turn green before they head off on their journey tofulfill their their goals. And you know, success is a lot like walking throughfog. I mean, as we stand there, you know, we can't see the the entirelandscape, But, you know, as you continue to take step after step afterstep by actually doing something, that landscape starts to open up and youstart to realize, you know, all the things that you need to do. But if youjust stay put waiting for that fog toe lift or waiting for all the trafficlights to turn green, you're gonna be standing there and you're gonna you'regonna find yourself there in 10 years, and you're gonna be regretting that younever took action on your dreams and your goals. So do it Now, start whereyou're at and move forward. Yeah, Moving. Thinking of moving forward butalso looking back at mistakes that we have made. Is there one in businessthat you made that? That lesson has brought you forward and you're lookingat that as you make these decisions? Yeah. I mean, I owned a chain ofChildren's daycare centers in Las Vegas, and I unknowingly hired a childmolester to run one of them. And, uh, when it gets my gut, but I kind of feltto peer pressure of my regional manager. Uh and you know, fortunately, it almosttook us down. But fortunately, and I talk about this in my book, The OnLucky Sperm Club. Um, but, you know, I don't wanna give the ending away, butyou know that you are always going to make those mistakes. And again, uh, ifyou don't quit, you'll you'll get through it and just keep working at it.But nobody, you know, it's only a failure after you quit. But if you justkeep getting up, I mean, if you fall 100 times, get up 101 times and keepstriving because the only time that you can fail at a goal is if you quit.Speaking of striving and what character trait have you found to be mostessential? Obviously, with mistakes or having a circumstance like that, youcan see people a little bit better of who they are. Experiences through work.But what is a character trait that you found to be essential in the workplace?Uh, you know, for success. I think having a long term perspective,understanding that today is not the end all and understanding that it's aprocess and that you're not who you, you know today is not who you arealways going to be an understanding that you're going to get better. But it,you know, to have patience and believe in the process and understand that youwill eventually reap what you sow. Um, you know, I think that's one of thethings that kind of keeps me going and, you know, keeps me inspired when thingslook really bleak, understanding that, you know, eventually I'm going tofigure this out. Eventually, I'm going to get it to where I need to be or I'lleventually pivot and and figure out...

...something else. But just keep, Justkeep going. You've mentioned your degrees that youhave had that you have. Where is education? But also where is exercisein your personal development goals, and how important are they for people? I mean, I would you know, I was happyto get my college degree. Uh, but I mean, if if I had to choose betweenunderstanding personal development and choosing between that and a degree, Iwould take personal development every every time because you're you'rebecoming that better version of yourself. I mean, you get a degree andyou're becoming a better version of yourself. But then that degree kind ofstops. And as quick as the world's changing now, Jesus, the degree seemsto be, uh, you know, outdated the minute that they hand it to you. But,you know, growing and becoming that better version of yourself, that thatis a process that never should stop. And we talked about that. I mean, weshould always be striving to grow and learn and become that best version ofourselves. What about exercising for you? Is is something part of yourregiment? Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah. I work out five days a week. I love to hike. Ilove to be active. I love the bike, but yeah, I mean, health, health is wealth.Uh, you know, if you've ever gone through a health crisis, you know thatnothing else is important when when you're going through that crisis. So Ithink we should all put that, you know, health at the top of our priority listand and focus on that and make sure that you're always striving to be behealthy. You mentioned your your shorter term goals of promoting. I gotsmarter as well as your book on Lucky Sperm Club. But do you have anoverarching goal for whether it's your company, your business, your enterprise?I mean, my biggest goal in life is you know, I I've set a goal to be marriedto my wife for 50 years. I want to celebrate my 50th wedding anniversarywith her, and we just celebrated our 25th. So I'm halfway there. Yeah, thankyou. And so I mean, there's a lot to go into that. I mean, one is being healthyenoughto live that long and, you know, doing all the things Thio make her wantto be with me for that long. But yeah, I mean, family and and my relationshipwith my wife are, uh, number one of my priorities. And I could accomplish alot of things business wise or financial wise. But, you know, if Ifailed at that goal, uh, I don't know if everything else that I did couldeven come close to making up for it. It's hard, isn't it? Nelson, thespeaking to someone recently and well, it was actually the guy who retired,and he said, What I regret the most is not spending enough time with my wifeand my kids because I was so busy doing this thing for them, but to the theneglect of them. And he said, But now he's making up for it. But he's sayingThio us, don't do that right. Spend that important time I think everybodywho's at that age, uh, says that. And yet, you know, I think when we're youngand and we want to go out and take on the world and, you know, succeed inbusiness and our careers, we kind of lose sight of that. And, you know, I Idon't I don't fully believe that your life always has to be balanced. I knowthere's some people that believe that, you know, you always gotta have thatbalance there. Sometimes in your life where you're going to have thio, paythem a little more attention to your business. You know, especially whenyou're starting off and you gotta you gotta keep the lights turned on. Butthen there's other times where you know you're gonna have thio pay some moreattention to some of the relationships in your life. And, you know, I I thinkhaving that balance there, But But really setting your goals andunderstanding what your goals are and then holding true to them. So if you'regonna, if you're going to say to yourself, You know what? Myrelationship and my family is my top priority. Well, then you gotta act likethat. You can't just say that it can't just be lip service and or if yourbusiness is your top priority or making a million dollars, you know, whateveryour priority is, you just have to stick. Stick with that, uh, and holdtrue, Thio. What you're saying? It's funny. I know here I'm in SouthKorea and there's lots of families who have the father stay here and sendtheir families to America or Canada, and they stay there for years. But thenpeople look at that and say, What are you doing? You're putting your careerfirst? No, they're actually they're really putting their family first andgiving them a different life. But it doesn't look the same for everyone.Sure, Yeah. No. And you know, kudos to...

...those guys who are willing to do that.That that That's a huge sacrifice. And, yeah, is there anything about you thatpeople may not understand? While knowing this, they would have a betterappreciation of the work that you're doing? I mean, you know, as I said here,I've been fortunate enough toe exit businesses and, you know, I have enoughpassive income. Thio never have to work again as long as you know, everythinggoes well. I'm doing this because I want to change the world. You know, oneperson and one inspiring goal at a time. And I know the power of that. And, youknow, I know that goals can you know the way that I want to change the worldis by changing one person's world and that one person you know has the powerto change the entire world. And if you change enough people's world, it'sgonna have that domino effect to make a better world to live in. And that'swhat I want to do. I mean, I I've I've come from, you know, horrible situationtoe living a life I couldn't have even imagined. And I know there are so manyother people out there that if they had the right tools, the right knowledge,the right support. They could make Justus drastic transformation withtheir life as I did. And I just hate to see all this wasted potential out thereof people. And I just wanna help anybody who wants toe, you know, changetheir life and and really start living the life of their dreams. It xyzinteresting. You say wasted potential. We look at athletes who get lots andkind of wasted whatever they dio. We're easy, Thio judge them for But ah, lotof us waste our own potential. We may not be a professional athlete and wemight not have this big contract, but day by day, we're wasting this one time.But the talents and skills that we have to use to put forward to help others tohelp ourselves. Yeah, No, I I agree 100%. And I think we all I think we allowe it to the world to reach is much of that potential Aziz we possibly canwith the adversity that you've obviously faced growing up just thebedrock of your story coming into the world but also thinking of otheradversity. You mentioned marriage difficulties. Just there's probablybusiness difficulties as well. Do you have encouragement for other people whoare facing similar or even different adversities? Yeah. I mean, like I said,the only way you can fail is if you quit. And I mean, you know, with mymarriage, we wanted to quit several times. You know, it felt like it wouldbe easier to quit and, you know, but we both had the same goal we wanted tohave, Ah, family. And we wanted our marriage toe work. And we just keptgoing at it, and there were days where we couldn't see it ever working. Butthen eventually, you build up that momentum and you get through thosetough times. I mean, if you're if you're you know the saying if you'regoing through hell, just just keep going. And a lot of times, that'sthat's really what you need to do. I mean, if if you're having a bad day, abad week, something bad in your business, you just keep going. Don'tdon't give up, you know, and again, in my book, I talk about a few of thesethings and you know the only reason that I'm sitting here talking to you isbecause I kept going And, uh, you know, I could have quit and and I would havelived in a drastically different life. I mean, that's one of the things Idon't have a lot of fear in my life. I don't give it much heat because I knowmost of it. All of it exists in your mind. But the one thing that scares meto death is if I wouldn't have moved forward with that first goal ofbecoming the first college graduate in my family, like I would have forfeitedthis life that I'm living and I think we all are like that. I mean, I thinkwe all have that different version of our lives. I mean, there's there's twoversions of our lives, right? The one we're living in, the one more capableof living. And it scares me to death that I could have forfeited this by notbeing brave enough to go after that and not being determined enough to keepgoing when things got hard, because they did get hard. Yeah, you are an inspiration, and Iencourage people to get the book, get the app. I got smarter unlucky spermcount Nelson. How can people reach you? Besides going to Amazon to get the bookfinding? I got smarter. What are other ways that people can get in contactwith you? Yeah, you can go to nelson Tressler dot com and, uh, you know,every everything's there, the books...

...there. But as you mentioned, the bookis on Amazon and it's It's on audible. I love Audible. I mean, it's one of themost rewarding things in my life is that I actually get to listen to my ownbook inaudible. I've listened to thousands of books, but that's beencool. And then, uh, I got smarter is on all the APP stores. It's on Apple andit's on Android so you can go there and download it. And right now we're givingaway 33 days Thio on the APP so people can try it out and make sure it's agood fit for them. And then it's only $9.99 after that per month. Nelson Tressler, founder CEO of I GotSmarter and author of Unlucky Sperm Club. I appreciate the time you give mehere today, and I appreciate the work that you dio? Yeah, I appreciate thanksfor having me on Brian. Thank you for listening to this episode of why wework with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe, Follow and share with others so theytoo can be encouraged in their work. E hope that you have yourself aproductive be a joyful day in your work.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (123)