WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 10 · 1 year ago

#6 Murray The Travelling Teacher

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Murray The "Murrman" Travelling Teacher shares his life experiences, as well as his life as a teacher, as he travels the world and enjoying life. His blog can be found here: https://murrmanblog.wordpress.com/

Welcome to why we work, with your host, Brian V as. He speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which will be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going and keep on working. Working's tough, but working is good. Now here's your host to why we work, Brian V. I'm Brian be at why we work, and today I have the pleasure of speaking with Mr Murray Lindsay. Good Day, sir. How are you doing? Good, Brian. How is the weather in Korea right now? Do you really want to know? Oh, here, for me it's a fick degrees every day. Where's he here before we get into it? Oh, sorry, I yeah, I currently live in regard, Saudi Arabia. Well, you were meeting a middle summer. You have me beat. I was going to say I had the pleasure of going down to boss on today and little did I know, behind all those clouds one could get burnt. And I am as red as this Cup on my back. So it was nice and hot. Not Too hot as breezy, but hotter than I expected. My daughter Said Hey, papa, you're read and I said, how red could I be? We'll find out tomorrow how much it hurts. So, Marie, I appreciate you coming on here and speaking with me and, as you and I were just talking about, talking about our lives and how they are revolve around work and getting a human aspect to it so people can be encouraged, appreciate understand that all jobs have difficulty to them. So thinking back, maybe even just a little introduction. I know you just said you're in Study Arabia, but tell us a little bit about yourself for so my name is Marie and I'm from originally from St Jean du Brods with Canada, and my career since pretty much since two thousand and one has been as an esl teacher, which means English is a second language. So originally, with the journey of my job and why I works, I started in July two thousand and one and Self Korea in the city of Daegu, and my first teaching job was Moonkong English, and over the years I became a better teacher, had I change my motivation on why I work and what are for living. Marie, before you get into Korea and you're teaching. WHOA way back, way back, when I mean get rid of Santa's beard? You were just telling me you've decided, because you're kind of quarantine as well, that you're unable is, would you say, unable to work yet, or unable to leave? No, I study of Rabia opened. Update. They reopened about two weeks ago, but my classes don't start until August sixteen and it's kind of right now up in the air. Are we going to be teaching back in the classroom or will be doing it virtually online? So when we do, when I do get back to work, I'll probably be dropping off the Santa Beer. It's good. I would love to have some girth like that. What about way back? Don't Marie, when was your when was your first job? Okay, that's actually a good question, Ryan. So my first job I was from twelve to fifteen. I had a paper route, so I'll deliver newspapers in the north and Saint John. They both thirty bucks a week and it's a twelve year old. Thirty bucks a week was like three hundred dollars, right. I mean you have concept of money. Why did you get that job? Why did you get that job. So I wanted I wanted some spending money and I wanted to you know, I was really in the pro wrestling and NHLS. I wanted to buy a hockey cards and wrestling magazines, and so I decided to get a job as a paperman. Did you happen to keep any of those cards? No, I wish I did. I had some really good ones. I had a Michael Jordan baseball card that was worth like fifty bucks out of the pack. I got it and it's probably worth a lot more now. So did you know someone in your life that gave you the motivation? Because you and I work in Korea and we see children not getting jobs until they're adults. So for you to get a job at twelve, was there someone that taught you the idea of money? What is it that kind of started the gears rolling, like, Oh wow, if I work and do something, someone gives me this paper stuff and I can in turn turn that paper stuff into something that I want. Is there someone...

...that you saw growing up that was like a instead? Probably my father, because I can always remember since I was born that he always had a job being a janitor for a manager of a mall or working at any other job in between. Right. So probably his worth at work, ethic and why he work kind of influenced me, I think. Did you after your paper route, did you have many other jobs? So you're at fifteen. Yes, so in this summer, from one thousand six hundred and eighteen, I worked at a place called BAILMAN's farms and Brown's flat and Brunswick every summer, like hollowing, picking berries, rotting it, driving a tractor and so on. Right, like really, really blue collar work, like you would go up, get up at this crack of dawn and you work until sunset. And and I did pretty much everything from picking fruit to owing to throwing rocks off of the tractor, pretty much everything. And I would work all summer and that money would I would buy school clothes, I would have money to spend during a school year. And it's actually had a lot of good memories because I I worked my two best friends for two summer as well. Do you know? It was always fun working when you work with your friends. Yeah, I have a few experiences like that. Do you remember, like now with your your more teaching experience, do you think back sometimes or when you're experiencing life. So you're out in Saudi Arabia, are you see some man on a tractor, you see someone shovel and a ditch or something. Do you think back at the time when you used to have to do the more labor jobs? Does that come to mind? Of course, yeah, I actually thought of that last night through my social media. fact, I saw person friend of mine working on a farm and maybe reflect, and I have a good lot of good memories of that at that time, because I know I was sixteen to eighteen. It was from ninety six to ninety eight, and maybe think about like the Sun beating down on your back and you're wiping the sweat off your brow and doing a lot of farm work. What did you do after that? Your this is interesting. What did you do after that year? So after that I'm going to the university, which was St Thomas University, and here to the Brunsway. So I took the journalism class because I might dream was to be a broadcast journalist, like so will be the brain he and you took the class. Or what was your major? Oh, sort, my major was journalism. So you went the full route. You were going right for it from bobby the brain from bobby the brain. He that that was the brain meeting. He was my motivational so what happened was with this is that. But the second semester my freshman year I had to do like photography and I had to get myself an slr camera and back in the day cameras are really extensive. Mine was seven hundred dollars. So I end up getting a job at McDonald's working in the kitchen. Very well done, not a Ho didn't didn't last very long. I work like what happened once. It was interesting stories that. When I first got to Saint Thomas in September, I knew I venture had to buy this asal our camera. So I applied back in August and the interview with fantastic. They were going to hire me and they said it's a Mr Marie's or any last words, that you have had the job in the PAG and I said, well, if you don't hire me, it's not a big deal because I can just go work for her king. Right, no, he didn't, and then I went to apply for other all it's Canna get it, and it's when I disapplied every week for like three months straight and then the manager said you, you have a lot of persistence. So they gave me the opportunity to work. I work there from January to March. Ninety eight. I thought you're gonna say if you don't hire me, doesn't matter. I like woppers better like but it's just ye, yes, I worked in the kitchen and it was it was all right. I end up becoming friends with some of the staff and we in a date, up being classmates at St Thomas University. One rooms in my French class. The funny thing is we had I went to McDonald's twice today for breakfast and then we went for a coffee and ice cream, and then yesterday we went. Like McDonald's never disappoints me. No, it's always the same. Brian like from CG Korea to read Siberge like it's the same. The only difference here is that they don't have double big Max. They don't know what I'm talking about when I asked I ate about to double big man. It's just it puts me over the edge. Big Mac, little sweet and sour sauce on the the top inside of the Bun, but not a I can't do the double. The...

...double just ruins it for me. What did you do after that? So why would they expect you, a student, to buy a seven hundred dollar camera going into a journalism class when they know they didn't and these or something? They didn't expect it by what it was is that I had a classmate of my name, Amanda, who or a botic camera and her camera shelling K r like this is really nice, like the Zoom Lens and you can change the aperture and stuff. She say, yeah, you just buy it at the Kodak. Remember those? Yeah, so get one of them. I went. So publy. How is the seven hundred dollars? I got to go back and Applod but the home. Hopefully it'll have my hands. I would hopefully they'll. They'll give you the job. So that that's how I discovered the camera. And then every Ye, like Ben over my university career, I worked like Greco pizza as a dog boy. I worked at Pizza Hut, I worked at a supermarket. Do you know the Real Linux Superstore? They pray out on the Halifat my mom worked. I was sure. Yeah, I work in Funtin and I had a push carts like boggy. I was like a Buggy Guy, right. So grab all the grab all the cards and bring them back into the store and sometimes I'd help the castor's bag or groceries. Actually really like that job. I've heard of my favorite job during my university tenure. So what happened to your outside if you can interact with customers and stuff? What happened to your dream or desire to be a announcer or journalist broadcast lest? Well, okay, so it was say Thomas opened started journalism. I think it was in one thousand nine hundred and ninety seven or ninety six. So they didn't have their own journalism professors and have their own department. They kind of work together. of M be CC Woodstock and you didn't. BE CC Woodstock has their own journalism program's College. So over those four years I worked as the sports editor to St Thomas Aquinas. So I got every week I got to have my own editorial and I didn't realize how far reaching it was. Like I I called it behind the man. I did like personality profiles of like student athletes, called behind the mask. I went to hockey games. Then I also had my own college radio show. I called it Busbin so originally I wanted to just play my favorite bands, like foo fighters and hunt and stuff. And Yeah, director see that you have to play underground music. You can't play stuff in here on normal radio. So he gave the ideas that when you're when you're on the air, play and in the CDs that are in the front, because those are new releases from independent labels. So when I discovered Queens of the Stone Age, like back before they became popular. But a bad part to that is that I was really irresponsible on the on the radio, live on air, I kind of disrespected one of our sponsors things like a g our shop. They didn't really do a very good job, like I want to get a guitar and the guy was very condescending to me. So I just kind of disrespected him on the air. And then I heard in the when you're on the air, when you're on a commercial, breakers like a bath phone at a red phone is like a bath. So it was it was bleep keeping right out to open in my directly to go back on here and apologize. Did you have to go? Oh, listen, now you're you like radio right. So I mean maybe you should be doing what I'm doing here. But I thought about it. I thought we'll maybe doing something in the game of yours, like talking to people through my life who taught in Korea and Saudi a radio, because there's a human elliot element every story. Every person has an interesting fifteen minutes of fame and why do they become a teacher and why are they here? And you do it for the lave, or do you do it for the money? Do you do it for traveling? I was looking up as you were saying that and I agree. Besides Howard sterns private parts, which you probably saw. Did you see talk to me? No, but I've heard of it. It. I saw it not long ago and just like you know, kind of pumping myself up to get this going, which I hadn't at that time. But that's WHO's it about? Well, talk to me is a biographical film directed. It's about will cedricty and entertainers. In it. Watch the Ralph, PD PD pet green, Ralph, Pete Green, and he was getting in trouble in the phone. was very in any like PD. You can't say that. You can't say that. But also to briant, I also had senior year of university. I volunteered and worked for Rogers cable back when it was a quni access channel. So every Wednesday night in throughout the province I'd get the got man in the camera for like political interviews and stuff. Right, so I have a hast are, give me a tight shot, zoom back, too far back, zooming closer, right. So I kind of got the...

...hang of like big y'Agra videography, photography and stuff, and unfortunately I have the the face for radio. Right. So I I kind of burned out and I didn't think I'd be able to make a lot of money and law student loans. And here's where my career reappear. appeared my last exam in my fourth year university with the PLOP, the science one. I was walking in a hall and I saw this advertisement and it said come teach English and South Korea. Make Twenty five grand over three years. Come teach English with your fellow Rad like how amazing this is. Back, like maybe, yeah, so, yeah, I like you, like maybe, like it disappeared, right, and so I pulled it off the wall and went to some of my friends's apartment. You know, we're have a couple drinks, little smoking and stuff, and we were talking about the pros and cons teaching right like I was twenty three, had forty grand in debt. So we made a chart of like how much I could save in a year and get out of the debt and the pros and cons of it. So that's how I ended up in self Korean. All I knew about Self Korea was mash, the TV show Uh Huh, because they were based in mass there were doctors during the Korean War and all I knew is that they had the World Cup in two thousand and two respot's all I knew. And I went to the public my dad went to the public library, right to the VHS tape to come over those is one hour learn of our movie and I remember the name of it. Brian was called the land of the morning calm, who show like Hypchi and show how Consan and it would show all this, all this unresting stuff. This is the van am going in July of two thousand. I'm buying a ticket, I'm in it work and like scary. The most unusual thing is through this getting might be's on finding a job for self Korea, I find out that I have a long lost, distant cousin in South Korea. This is like perfect strangers stuff. And it's America. WHO's North America? I had a cousin named Andy Brown who was there. I didn't I guess we was a distant relative on my father's side. So he was a really good go go to for like what's connection. So he end up getting me to go to his old academy, Calm English. So that that's how I started my career, which I'm now nineteen years later. Imagine that a it just ticks away, it takes away. So Yeah, you've been teaching. So is there anything that you have done since besides teaching? And then we'll get into what you're doing now. Like did you venture off into something new? Yes, a couple times. Like you, as you're aware, teaching and career could kind of burn you out. So I'd seems to me that I can go three, four years teaching in a country I didn't like walk away from it. So I've done that twice, once in two thousand and eight and once in two thousand and nineteen. So I would both times I returned home to St Jaundw Bruns of Canada and I end up working at a call center. Both times and both times I just didn't really like it after a few months. Like my last job was for windom worldwide. I was an OSD called operation support asks. So I would help hotels with their website or fixing their rates online, anything technical, and I tried, I tried to let you know the people were Nice, the job was okay, but it wasn't quite quite used to the money aspect of it. But there were a couple things they ever went on like, for example, Ot of training class and they put that to females who were responsible for training you on the floor. So they end up picking off to the mail people in my class and having sex a relationships with them. So I'm like, what is it? Some kind of slopping shop, like you know what I mean. Like so I'd kind of like put it put like a bad so you didn't you didn't get promoted because there's only a way to get promoted through there and you weren't going that way. No, like maybe two is that? Like, I baby, that's just the culture back home at you. You know, you your your responsive for training people and you just pick off who you want to hook up with. Right. Maybe that's what it's like. Like. So was it your figure? It was your job, or was any part of it? Because our family went back to Canada to and my dear wife just wasn't, you know, just wasn't feeling it, and so she wasn't feeling I was. Was any part of it going home? Was it that? or No, it was just the job, but I want to do something else. It's a good question. I think what it was is that whenever I get tired of teaching or like I'm done, Brian, I'm not going to go back to teach again, like after a few months, I kind of miss it, like for good or for bad. When you do something you do and you generally enjoy, it's kind of in your...

...blood, like and I tried, I tried to ignore it. What and that store how I came back would be another story. That and I'm going to study a raging becoming a head teacher, and it was a lot of work and I got burned out and it's very acrimonious split and that's why I went returned home, like I'm never going to go back. And it was never a money thing because I saved a lot of money home of the return home. But I didn't like where I was becoming like I was kind of binge drinking a lot and I didn't really like I tried to like my job and I try to be a part of my home town. But when you live in they who sell Korea or Shanghai, China for Saudi right, and then you go back to Saint John, it's it's you know what I mean? It's not. It's not the same. So No, I think. May correct me if I'm wrong. I think the thing is it is the same, like it didn't it doesn't, it doesn't change. It basically stays the same. But you have changed because you've experienced all this difference and then you go back you like, hmm, it's not going to change and I've changed. Yeah, that's know what I mean. Like how that might I mean, you can look at it both ways. Right, things have changed or you have changed so much that going back there it's kind of a grind, a bigger grind. Well, I like I like to be at home, like I got to spend time with my nieces my nephews and see my family and reconnecting my friends, but I don't know, like it's after a couple months, like after work, a month at the call center and being home, like, I don't, I can't see myself doing this for the rest of my life. I I can. So what happened was is that on social media I saw a cuple my friends get new jobs and Vietnam or tar and become me very wistful and it kind of brought that that love for it and I kind of went back and applied and global hole I got this university position. Can you speak like, because there's some people that may listen to this, I hope, and thinking about teaching in another country? So you, I mean, I've thought of it too, of going to the Middle East, because it's very lucrative from my understanding. Can you speak just not of what you've done, but just the differences from saying Asia or the Middle East, and both are lucrative, I think, in some aspect and and how that has how it might be appealing to people to try out to go to another country and to teaching the experience culture, Experience Food People. That's really good question. Bros. I've been thinking about that the last few days because I'm really starting my have a blog, so I'm restarting writing passages in my blog, publishing them. Well, I was gonna ask you a little going to ask you a little later how they can get in touch with you. What's the name of your blog? It's if you go and work prayed. I called Merman's blog. I'll send it. I'll send it to you, the link to it. Yeah, I stopped like a year and a half ago. Might have other other hashtags and stuff, like on instagram or twitter, any of the yeah, just Marie, Underline Lindsay one thousand nine hundred and seventy eight and you can find me on facebook. My Name Maroon Z. my blog. But training to your question Self Korea is what's really good experience. But it makes sure you figure out what you want to teach. Do you want to teach kindergarten chids? Do you want to teach elementary? Do you want to teach at university? You and I were lucky that we went in the early two thousands, so the ladder to get to university job was a lot easier and was more wide open. That speak in there. That's apt now. Yeah, yeah, but I think that the like with self created. I've never had culture shock. I was just twenty three and thinking everything was peaching. It was everything was so much fun. Like I remember my first day getting into Self Self Korea. Mr Job Drop me off and I went a why was this apartment? To my own apartment, and I want to pay for anything, and I had to go from my house to work and I end up getting lost. So I'm going getting robing to work late, I like an hours. I didn't know how to walk, how to walk there, but with Self Korea, like the things, like the nightlife is great, the restaurants are fantastic. Nowadays, I find a Self Korea with social media. You can figure out clubs or groups like softball, poker, football, bullying, arts, like it's very vibrant now, like there's there's there's things for niches that you can you can do take this thing of being homesick, but I don't think teaching is for everybody. Like you got to be able to be able to adapt, because things, things aren't, aren't the same. Like I find in self Korean, Saudi Arabia. What they say in a contractor in person, it's not exactly a hundred percent say. It's kind of like somewhere, like a guy, you know what I mean, like it's not exactly like how it is back...

...home. But yes, I get that's a good that's a good point. It's a very good point. You know I mean like you know what I mean, like you not have an agreement. It's an agreement. But with ESL and saw each other career, it's not an agreement. It's more like it's kind of like well, we can, we can adjust. It's not written stone. It was an afterthought that someone told them they better do. They better make one of these with these people just just so they have something. Yes, and the big thing is two people want to teach. My biggest advice is get a Selta, because I never gone a Celt I got it fifteen years later. Is it Selta? It basically what it is. It's like a one month intensive program. It teaches you how to lesson plan, you teach classes, you're observed by Selta. It's by Cambridge. It's five grand, but it's money will stent because you'll feel like Rambo when you're done with the bullet belt and you can pull out any, any trick for in the classroom. I never did it. So I was the worst teacher ever. From the two thousand and one to about two thousand and four, I was horrible. Well, I I took it up from you from two thousand and five to, what is this? Two Thousand and twenty. I took I was a horrible at it. So I would recommend anybody wants to teach abroad is to get a salt or some kind of teaching sirt with an online sorry, with an in person component, because you'll learn how to lesson plan, you'll learn how to teach a class, you'll learn how to like to adapt and you would write do for assignments over a month. Is really intense, but it was really worthwhile and also also to for people wanting to get in. All that you need. Generally, I think we probably get a couple of people is a bachelor degree. That is just that is the key that unlocks the door. You know, I know of people who came and didn't have it, and you can always find work. But if they want, even not to get the Salta, they can start if they have a degree. They're like, they're hanging around their house, they don't know what to do and they could try it, even though it may not be for them. Some people pull shoots and then some people last for fifteen years years. Look at me to stand a beard. I didn't look like this when I first start teaching. But you have a good point. That's a really good point, Brian, like in like yeah, all you need to for your degree now in Saudia, Raby, our middlease is a little bit different. You need an m a with an on the can't e on online im. So you need a be a with the Salta or a be a with X. here's experience and when you come here you have like there's two types of contracts. There's like university, where I'm at now, or military contracts, which I did for three years, and that will tree contract pays very well. Yeah, but it's a grind, it's a it's a it's a grind, like it's a roots, a lot of hard work. And if you I work for the US government for three years as a head teacher for proof course, responsible for thirty teachers reading the weekly reports, observing them, going over policy, holding team meetings, and I never worked for such a big company of eighty five people before. Do you mind thing? There's go ahead, go ahead, finish it. Yeah, go ahead. Yeah, so I never see. Yeah, so I never worked for something like that before. was really interesting experience. But basically, with the bill least, you need a be a and ab a, not online if you don't, if I'm not on it. May you need a Selt us, be a Celt UPLUS. Thank usually between three to five years experience with China. You need to get a university job. You need was a, be a Celta or or an M A and then you can go to an university. But China, the experience of getting a visa, it's such a hassle and now in two thousand and twenty to a lot more difficult thing that I get your stuff notarized. You've got to go in person to the Chinese consulate closest to your profits and it's how your own pocket. You got to fly there and meet and do all this gobbled book just to get like a teaching visa. Do you mind talking, not necessarily about your contract, but money of these three expenses, because you're China. China's different than when I've ever experienced but China and career Asian countries. But I think, while similar, probably Korea as a little bit more norm r American Issh you know, you can get around a little bit easier versus Saudi Araby, what kind of money are we talking about? For people wondering about this, like just getting in the door? Not only university, but kindergarten all the way up through Middle High School, elementary, middle school and high school. Okay, Rich Saudia Raby, I don't know about if there's Kitty guarden jobs. I don't know if there's public school jobs. I think there are public school jobs. That I interviewed for once. So I did public school jobs. There's university. There's other schools here, like Wall Street English. I guess they have and I have biltree contracts. So I can only go from my experience. Blue Force...

...paid me before I was promoted, six thousand us a month, which is about seventy five hundred Canadian. So when I got promoted as a head teacher, I made about eight eighty two hundred twnian a month. But you worked for that. WHO WORKED FOR THAT MONEY? Like here? On my current job, my contracts for four hours a day, twenty hours a week. It comes about forty eight hundred Canadian. If I pick up one more class, two hours, it's an extra hundred twenty dollars. So teaching six classes a day gives me about I'll say about seven thousand and seventy four hundred dollars. Canadian and my apartments free. The only thing is you got to pay for your own visa cost. Now when you come to saw your Rabi or two types of visas, once called a business visit visa and what's called in the gamma. Ninety nine percent of the time okay to do the business visit visa, because from you accepting a job to getting here to turn around is very, very quick. Could be two weeks because it is got to give you get some documents from the government and then send to you and you just send them with your pathwork to Toronto on takes three days, or Nagama, the Ad Gamma. Basically it's like your etuovs and career. I can open, have my own cable, my own phone. I came in a car. I can travel in and out of the country a lot, which is sorry. That would be like in Canada. That's like your permanent shorts. I guess maybe work visa will the visa, wise permanent resident visa or one of the H one, b one whatever visas that are down in the states, just to work visa. That's only within your contract you break. Yes, you don't have a visa anymore. Yeah, so with the Ad Gama it is like for my for my job. They brought me in a business visa and we worked on my agamma laws here. I got my a gamma rate when the virus hit and everything shut down. So yeah, so that those are the two types of visas for saw your radio. So you're making pretty good money, or money can be made in start of Arabia versus China, I do not know. But in Korea we're looking at I think when we started, or you started, it didn't go up much since. No, they did. The floor has been the same since two thousand and four like that. The salary is to teams thousand. Yeah, they it was one point eight, I think when I started at one point eight, one point nine. Then you get like two point one. That's eighteen hundred, nineteen two thousand and twenty one hundred and twenty two hundred, and that's the range. You're not going to find much over three thou here. No, right, but well, speak to China first. Then I'll talk about the expenses out these different places, because I don't know how much things cost because it's like for us in Canada. People say, Hey, why don't you go to noon of it? Or like Northwest Territories, you can make eight ninety hundred thousand. Yeah, but it costs you, I don't want to exaggerate, but twenty dollars for a loaf of bread. So they give it up to state for everything. So what about China? Is that lucrative or is that kind of similar to some? I works in some high in two thousand and ten for six months for a Wolf Disney English. I don't know if you're aware, but they closed shop as of two weeks ago. They close all the branches due to the pandemic and the Witney better things. So when I work there, my salary, I think it was Fifteenzero rb, but saw the Chinese government and Disney take a chunk of the four taxes, so I think I was both thirteenzero. I'm going to say it's maybe one thousand nineteen hundred and twenty one hundred worth Canadian a month and a month. Yes, and you can. You can live life on the cheap, but unfortunately for me I felt like Johnny drama from entourage and me and my buddy's got this big, huge, amazing baxtor pad that we couldn't afford and live life on the edge, and so I went to my line pretty fast. So China is probably the cheapest, I would say, to for living in Korea's used to be much cheaper, but I think it's starting to creep up there. What about in in the Middle East and Saudi Arabia? So you're making good money. What are you spending? No, not really basically for me, but I just groceries and Internet. Like I have a budget, talking my buch. My budgets about twenty five hundred Star storry react reacts the currency here and that's about eight hundred Canadian. So most it's my groceries, my phone, in my Internet. So everything off this goes back, goes back to Canada. So I spend what here. Now I'm going have food is basically pretty cheap. Like you can there's a pop store near my place which I buy some Kobop for like five bucks, five bucks each. They got McDonald's, I got burgger cane. Theyvell. I was really surprised. I have a lot of western restaurants like Artis Tgi Fridays, and it's quite...

...a parable of the price and Self Korea. What about? Okay, so, off of the the topics of the comparing and stuff, but specifically to you, what are you doing now? I like, not right now. They now for in your in your day to day work and when things are normal. No covid. Okay. So all right. So my schedule, my teaching schedule, was was a awesome I worked four days a week. I taught ten to twelve, one, two, three, three to five and I taught a government class in the evening from five to eight. So I pretty much work from ten o'clock to eight o'clock, with a lunch break and small break in the evening. I really liked it. I had three suffarate head two tychic classes to ass andsd which our military cadets would come to the program and government officials who work in the government of Saudi radio come like class, and I really, I really enjoyed it. I felt like I really got my legs under me to laugh. And then the cult the covid happened. Do you have your curriculum given to you? Do you have to prepare to create everything yourself? Okay, so we do have cricland, provided we have to use a textbook called headway. I'm not really a big fan of it, but through that book we asked Said Group of teachers is about seventeen and our department we developed like Sulfomenti materials, like reading, writing, vocabulary. We test the students once every three weeks, I could usually it's reading, writing or listening speaking. So we test them for that. In my department it's called Community Services. Do you evere Youngen College, because we work there together young and had two departments. One was the call this side and one was called f Ali, the foreign language. Yes, so by university's pretty much like that. So I'm fol side. Yeah, so we get clients from there, from the from the city of Yad, government officials, military cadets, and then the other department's called PYP and that's the actual university students. And in my department right now we have seventeen teachers. So within your job now, just to keep it there. And what would you like to go on to the other side. Is there some room for growth for you? What would you like to do or what could you do? Maybe Professional Development? What are you able to do to rise within the ranks? They're well, I'm doing professional development now one son hand in my assignment to my director. Tomorrow I'm going to be doing a course on how to teach online for two weeks in length. That I get a Cet with that. I like my department. I like the community services. There's no office hours. It's pretty cut dry. You do teach these these classes, pyp, it sounds like the director. They're like you got to do office hours, you got to open a club for students to join and you got to do all this other gobbly book I'm not really interested in. So I do like what I have, but the thing is it's at with my experience, in my degrees and my certificates. I could pretty much like there's military contract that's hiring and an old collige of mind gave me their their link, but I don't really want to work in an ulitary contract by if I were doing to go back, I can probably go back to that. So in your your life experience, nineteen years, I think you said, of doing this, what is what is your biggest difficulty? Like so, if someone's looking into getting into education, jumping on a boat or ship, however you get over here nowadays and becoming a teacher or maybe they just want to go to their local university and then be a teacher in a local public school. What is the biggest difficulty, the biggest challenge and maybe a reason why someone may want a second guess? They may continue, but they may second guess if this is a big problem for them. What is your biggest challenge? The biggest challenge, I think for me, originally in two thousand and one, was just lesson planning how or lesson planning how to plan a fun lesson for kids or adults, monitoring, finding out its students understand, like comprehension questions, that contact kind of stuff. I think the big thing is for me is that people have to like teaching. People have to like being leading a group of people right like, as you know, some people come to ESL and just use it as an excuse to backpack and do really Moore, mediocre work and right or, like I worked out in blue forth, some people just did it for the money, would do the absolute bare minimum. You have to do this job because you like it and you you enjoy it like it should be an fulfillment with a teaching not monetary reasons. So I found out was really difficult for me is. I couldn't get along with some of...

...my colleagues at blue forth because some of were one of them. I worked with that young an before years and he was a lazy teacher at Young Am and he worked here for three years and was absolutely lazy. He did it because he wanted to travel. He wanted to travel. He didn't really care about teaching. I do it because I care about teaching. So I guess. I guess the allies I cared too much and some people care too little. was sold that what has gotten easier for you and you're teaching. Can you think? What? What like? You know I was this way about this and now I got this figured out. Um, it's experience, like I'll give an example. With Blue Force, I was a head teacher, but people who call in sick, we'd have enough staff. So, Marie, you gotta go teach book twelve lesson for in this room so I can go in cold and teach right, so I can go into any situation of any class. That would be a government official class, military, get dance, university students in Korea, kindergarten students in China, and I not wing it, but I know that steps, I know what what to do in a class. I can just I can go and cold and do it with at the job. Do you vaguely remember your first your first teaching? It would have been in Korea, but do you remember, like if you had a fear, where you nervous was? It? Was this something that you had to get over and now you're like where are they? That's a good question. I remember that first month. I don't remember exactly. I remember like I wasn't really I don't looking back, I wasn't really trained that effectively because they opened up a school and CG on a Wednesday. They died ready to teach on a Friday and I arrived, I think, on a Thursday. So I had a cold day of like shadowing someone. But we didn't sit down and go like this is what you have to do, you have to do and it's what you have to do in your free time, this is what you have to do, blah, blah, blah. It was more like watch what I do and mimic it. So I was really bad, like I like fifty minutes, like I didn't really understand, like that's a lot of that's a lot of time to do stuff. Like I would even rush you things or not or go too slow. I would speak too quickly, I would not really walk around the class and check that spots in the class. There's dead spots in the classrooms where people can like not do their work right. I would lose my temper very easily and do a lot of yelling and shouting, and I was a horrible teacher. Since, ack it up, I got to miss stand up. You know how you get stud standing with it? Put their hands up. That's a Korean thing, right. This is a Korea if I would get to the whole like two chairs. Yeah, I mean like I was a horrible, terrible, awful teacher and after a couple years later I got really good at it. But might like that's a Korean thing. That's how they punish their students, like with books, or they get them to sit against the wall, bent like sitting down against the law. And so it's not like you've made it up, like I'm going to come up with these punishments for you. This is. This is culturally speaking, but you could think whatever you want about yourself. What is? What is? Some of the joy are, like one joy that you get out of teaching now, after nineteen years. What is something that just yeah, like crying, like that's a good question. Like the joy I get is in the students and join my class and learning. It could be the past, simple or could be how to order something online. It could be learning a list, how to how to listen for information, it could be how to scan an article. Like that's where I take the enjoyment from its students and liking my class and learning something from me. Can you know I get? I kick a lot of product and enjoyment just being productive and doing a good job for my for my for blue forks, or for PSU, my university, or for Young Jen College in Korea, like doing a good job. Can you speak to you? Said you are a bad teacher in the beginning and you got angry and that stuff. What I know about children, and I don't know if you can hear baby crime. It's not my baby. The baby's mum is out there, isn't? I would go figure out my baby as and on my baby too, and that is a tough baby, that me tell you. He's just probably not getting a cookie or something that to know what you were in save. I don't want to say the word, but like impatient Oh, I wasn't patient right to to having a joy in a student learning. And I can just think of my own children right where, whether it's teaching them to walk or teaching them to read, and I fail at it and I'm I still get upset as well. But in order for me to see them learn, I must be gaining in patience. So can you see that you are growing in patients? Like are you able to see growth in yourself from two thousand and...

...one what have you, to two thousand and nineteen? Because if you're going to see someone learn, that means that was a process before that. It wasn't they just got it. This is not the first day, this is, you know, after the first month or semester or the following year. Can you speak to that a little bit about how you're growing? Yeah, teachings helping you learn. Yeah, well, yeah, teachers helping me learn my own class, help me, help me learn how to be a better teacher, because the one pm I had retually I would teach all teach all class, treat them all the same and teach them all the same button. All classes have their own itterarcrates and nuances are every class a little bit different. One class there maybe a little more outgoing. You don't have to crack the whip. Maybe in our classic to be a little more serious, right. So you kind of figure out how how I the buy overhythm of a classroom. So with you, how are you able to look back like I, I can see me in university and I maybe you can even add to your wanting to be a journalist. My Communications Class, I was shaking and I took look to my teacher and I my professor and I said, I am so scared and she looked at me, so stop it, just keep going right. But so scared. And now I'm starting a podcast or speaking in front of tens and tens of people in classes and stuff like that. So how have you developed? Is this given you even looking into journalism? Is this giving you a better idea of who you are and how you may, over the next forty years, work? This is giving you, yes, inside into yourself. Yeah, I had a lot like the last ninety days since the virus happened. I it's give me a lot of time to reflect and I really like this podcast because made me think about what I've been thinking with the last nine days. Like how did I get here right, like there's been bumps in the road. It seems generally for me like I can work at one place for maybe two to four years and then maybe to like to accurate, like there's always like an acrimonious end and I go doing that the next place, right. So now just add it tive. I just had like ninety day, like the last three months of the lockdown. Reflect on my on my life, like I wish I did. became a broadcast during less I bobby to bringing in or Gino d e from tsn or change Duffy. But for whatever reasons, like maybe the Lord above I gives you give teach these little forks in the row and maybe it's my calling, maybe it's like the maybe it's my destiny that I had to do this when I'm doing now. So every time I get tired of teaching, I always return home and try other things and I just don't really like it them. Are you throwing away that, that dream? Are you throwing away that that desire of being a journalist or some sort of getting behind the microphone the radio? Are you throwing that away completely? You never will pursue it? Or is there sometimes you find you know I can. I can do it with that right. I can. I can work it in through this way. You, I think I've thrown it away. Like I've thought about maybe doing something like yours, like a podcast, but because I've met hundreds of people through my career teaching and everyone of them out having really interesting story of how they started to world where or why they're here now. But that's just in the planning stages. But maybe that. But I feel like I made the right choice of the career I've chosen and that's the reason why I work here. Is it just everything built to hear from July of two thousand and one, two July of two thousand and twenty, all these different steps, like I feel like I've made the right choice of my career. Like you know, I've met a million faces and I rock them all. I've taught in Korea a I you know, I reached a pinnacle and career working at a college with my friends in two thousand and five, that I am going to young university three years, that I work in altary contract like it decides. Feel like I've done everything I want to do and I can see myself doing teaching until on sixty five and then reach caure, hopefully before then, if I can map up my finances correct and hopefully freedom fifty. I think I can. You're seeing to be doing well with that. What about in I mean, I don't want to throw your dream or way or throw it at you either, but in a university where you're teaching, start our own radio program and get students to be active and you're managing it. Or because you mentioned your school, my school had a radio station and that sort of thing. Is that it? Is that a possibility? I know they don't. They don't have. I don't think they have any journalism or radio here like they do. I did notice the day before I left from the pandemic happen. They I found like some kind of university news like newspaper in English, but I'll maybe investigated when I come back. Like how is it started? Like where's it? wherees is come from? But I'm good for a lot of fun, like I just still really happy with the choices I've made and...

...were where I'm at now. Like I don't think that if I didn't choose this and I became bobby to bring he and I don't think I really would have amounted to very much like my goal would have been at Tsn. I don't think I probably would have been at tsun or professional wrestling, though. That's why I want to be a journalist. But so I feel like, you know, like back in May of two thousand, May, of two thousand and one, my last example, my last college and university exam and my career, and I saw this advertisement and low behold, ninth not nineteen years, can but nineteen years. But there's been breaks. I've done this and I really like it. You know, saw you babying care of give me up betweenity to travel. I Know Thailand, Philippines, valley, and I can figure out like, okay, maybe I can rhun older and little more gray. I could go and retire there once I have x amount of dollars on my account. Absolutely like teaching yourself get you so many opportunities, like traveling, meaning other people, meaning exploring other cultures. Like you can't get that work in if a headset and a microphone at Windham. So I feel I feel blessed, I feel very lucky, I feel very appreachtive. You know, I've met people in St John, I was home, who actually despised their jobs. Want to? Why? Because Marie was waiting for his vison. Would go to the pubs every day and hang out and people would come in. They would discomplain about how much they hated their job, and heroin told me how, luck key I wanted to, I can go back to do something my like. Like. What would what? Why would you work? It's something that you hate, you know, I mean like you know you don't like it. You're not productive, you're not you know, you do the bare minimum. Find whatever you like, what you what you do, and maybe do something with that. That's the should be. Work should be impl work should be pleasurable. You should enjoy what we do and why we work. That's leading to my next question. Mary, thinking of whether people in your own hometown, Canada, English speaking countries, people who are out of work never been in work like you and I when just out of university, you know, not when we were young, or even kids who were at twelve looking to get their first job. What advice would you give them? Not even the disgruntal worker, but just someone to to get on because, as you said, work is important. This is part of humanity. We need one another in this sort of thing. One way or another, were were linked in this, in this work life that we have. What advice would you or even things to tell them to avoid, as you were just saying, things that you hate. Avoid those. But what advice would you give to those that need some encouragement? Well, if you're looking for like for me, if you're looking for a job, we had sat sewn to concert was when I returned home. It was called like a government office, like a job center. So I went in and I already had a resume made, but I was really culture shocked that the guy was showing a fifty year old man happen like a resume. So there are there are programmers and there are things that you could do. You don't how to make a resume, go to the local job cerner, should be one your hometown. They will help you make a resume. If you have no work experience, there must be volunteer experience you've done, or maybe classes you've taken, any college, university or babysitting, that you can put on our resume. When you do get when you apply to places, you know be on time, go to your interview dressed nice. I can also number when I went to my job interview. I had a nice certain time. Someone came in, I don't know it. Thought it was funny because you know, as an our career, when you go to young Jan or young I'm university, you dress up for your interviewing. People don't really dress up for that. So no, dress, dress the best you can when you're in your job interview, ask questions, like I feel like when I applied a job in Saudi or Korea or anywhere. I know this industry inside and out, so I can ask questions. So if you're applying for a call center job or McDonald River, get a little bit of background information on the company, like the hours of benefits, vacation or whatever, and ask and figure out, because then you're also interviewing the manager. They're not interviewing you, you're also interviewing them, because it has to be. It's going to be a marriage. It could be a marriage for six months, when a year, five years, you have to work to get to work together and call up tears. As you said, McDonald's be persistent as well, right when you were yes, Marie, in this final thing. I think it's great. I mean it's funny because you and I are provinces are close together. So I think you know we're maritime boys, so we're kindred spirits. We have idea of work and the necessity of work, and I really enjoyed listen to you, and I'm sure you, I know the Mermn has a lot...

...of stories to tell and for anyone who wants to check you out to go to your blog, of which you'll send me the link to, but it's on word press. Why can you tell me in closing, why you work? What have you come to realize, you know, besides wanting to buy some hockey cards or some WWF wrestling cards back when you were twelve, to what? Get your head up, you know, with little no one behind you to tell you to do it. What is what is the motivation that you have and why? Why are you working? And seems like you you're on a plan to work till you're sixty five, but hopefully fifty. Why we work is a really good name your podcast. So I thought about why I work. Is it's in tristic motivation, like I want to be unmotivated to do a good law. It could be slinging newspapers in a neighborhood or flipping burgers and McDonald's or we're holding on a farm. Like doing the best job, but I can like working hard. Is when you work work well, you do a good job, you feel something in here right. So when you work it should be intristic motivation that you wanted to the best job you can it that and that could be with a headset at OSD and window, or could be teaching militriket. That's a blue force, or it could be teaching government officials at Princeton University. You should work because you like it and work because you're you want to do a good job, and the money that benefits is a distant third for me, but it's a nice perk. But for me I am filled and I'm happy when I leave a class room because I know that I you know, I prepared, I did a good job. That's to me, the for me, that's my essence of why I work perfect. Marry, this has been great. I appreciate it. Send me the link. Anyone looking to find Murray word pressed the is it Merman? Yeah, so it's called Mermans. So if you're tight, if you Google Murrie Marie Lindsay blog, it should come up, but it's give me one second. I'll grab the the website for it, I guess called Merman, Merman's Blogcommer, and you are from Marie us. Yeah, yeah, so it's more like Mer. If you go on and type Murrie Lindsay in Google, Murry Lindsay blog, it's you come up and it's called Merman blog and you're going to be updating that soon, did you say? I hope so, like I've thought about it. Like yeah, so it's called Merman blog. Am You are, am a Merman. Am, you are our man blog dot word press and it's just basically like I wrote. I write these like it's kind of at diary. So it's like I started in April two thousand and fourteen my left career for the first time. It is tells stories in the classroom or outside the classroom night. I stopped about a year and a half ago, but I think I have like a lot of little entries I can do now and then hopefully post them weekly and fall perfect. Marie, I appreciate your time and I hope to speak to you again and enjoy yourself there in Sod Arabia. Thank you, Brian, and I love to be out here on again. It's a really good podcast. I hope people listen to it. Thank you, Mary. Talk to you again. Thank you, Lare. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian Ving. Be Sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged into their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive, a joyful day in your work.

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