WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 83 · 1 year ago

#83 Mel Allen - The Real Voice - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Mel Allen is a voice over talent at TheRealVoice.com. Mel also also does work in narration, commercials, imaging, explaining, videos, eLearning and is the host of his own podcast AnyVoices.

Contact Info

Mel’s Profile
linkedin.com/in/therealvoicemel

Websites
therealvoice.com (Company Website)
facebook.com/TheRealVoice (Facebook)
instagram.com/therealvoicemel/ (Instagram)

Phone
802-343-7589 (Work)

Email
mel@therealvoice.com

Twitter
TheRealVoiceMel

About

"With beginnings in radio in 1987, where I honed my skills in voice over work, retaining clients and finding new ones.

Today, I have continuing to develop my talents and skills in voice over and occasionally coach those new to the industry." (LinkedIn, 2020)

...welcome to why we work with your host Brian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which would be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going on and keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here is your host to why we work. Brian V. Um Brian V. And this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure of speaking with Mel Allen. Mel Allen is the owner of the rial voice production. He is a voiceover actor coach, and I want to find out today from him. Besides all of the other things that he does in his work, what's the difference between an imposter in a fraud and how he differentiates between the two and how one may be better than the other? Join me in my conversation today with Mel Allen. I'm Brian V. And this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure speaking with Mel Allen. What do I have here? The morning? Good evening, young man. Yeah, it's evening here for me, right? now, And, uh, I think we're in different parts of the world. So what time of the day is it? Their e Think we got 6. 46. 30? I guess it's with nice. It's not good that I was talking to someone yesterday said, Wow, you look good for six. In the morning, Whatever it was. And I go, Yeah, but I'm a You don't want to see me at night time. Last night, I went to bed at nine o'clock. Wow, I can't. I'm not a night person. Mel, thank you for coming on here. You and I were talking that it took us a while where I canceled a couple of times. So your gracious right off the start and it was my fault of technical issues and, well, I think, you know, protecting me from technical issues. And I appreciate that. So on then, I know that my last couple of weeks have been really insanely busy, and my schedule got a little out of hand. So I apologize that I had to cancel on you a couple of times, but, you know, we're talking. Oh, and that's that's important thing. Mel, can you give us a snapshot of what, who you are and what you're doing. Now I see that you have the rial voice going up and going now. It's pretty strong. I know you also have the rial voice audio production. So can you give us just a snapshot of who you are? Sure. So my background is in broadcasting. That's how I got my start in doing voiceovers and eso heavily in the production side. That was where I was producing commercials, did that in TV for a little while. So producing audio is definitely something that's just been in my background for a number of years. And s O, I mainly focus on voice over these days. But, you know, occasionally I still work with clients who need to have audio production done. I've done some demo production with some folks, um, one of those few people who doesn't always follow the rule of Don't do your own demos in this industry. A voice over, um, and I keep my toes in radio broadcasting as well, because I I just I really love it honestly. And so. But my main focus is the real voice. I do have a podcast. Um because I was kind of dispensing information to voice over talents on my own channel s Oh, that's any voices dot com, but that's just kind of ah, more of a fun, creative outlet for me. Eso that when I'm not doing voice over work. I have some downtime I can focus on on that channel, so but it's it's a good outlet. I've been talking to a few voiceover actors and people in the industry. I have a question up front is their on off voice that you have like you have a very deep, nice sounding resignation voice. Is that like if you're talking to your significant other or you're someone in your family your like, this is Mel, or is it a different voice? Is it they come for your working voice in your regular voice? Um, I basically just it. It's my voice. So when I was like 11 years old, my voice just completely bottomed out. And, um, I have my basically my sick voice and my my kind of just waking up voice. And then there's my regular voice. So, you know, I can obviously tone it back. I can reel it in, but you know, I just kind of the voice I have. So it's not a it's not a fake, you know, voice that you hear when when I'm talking at all, I'm not not forcing it at all. It's, uh, as a matter of fact, a lot of times I pitch it up so that I'm not in such a deep and resonant kind of territory. So, yeah, I find listening to my own podcast of me speaking. I feel like I don't know if I'm kind of and I have a specific question to this for you later,...

I guess maybe is the difference between being an imposter and being a fraud. But I find for myself like as I get comfortable speaking with a guest, I'm just getting lower and lower. Or and then I had a couple of people comment like, you need to jack up the energy and get going, and then I'm like, Well, I could, but then I feel like I'm faking it, but it does bring some livelihood to my voice. I understand that. But as I sit here and get comfortable, I just don't want to cross over that line of from being an imposter to a fraud. Before we get into that, though, Mel, what was It would have been your very first job outside of unless it was, um, in voiceover, but maybe as a kid. So, um, it's funny enough. I was actually just telling somebody this story today that I was a kid when I got behind a microphone. So, um, I was I was a high schooler. I think, like a junior in high school, Any prior jobs to that I'd had were actually just kind of working for myself. So I was kind of an entrepreneur from the age of about nine. Um, what did you do? The oh, what did you do at the? That's what I like. This is why we work. So the idea of people wherever they start, whatever they have done, whatever they're doing now and all that path in between I find is interesting and I find it's encouraging to people who say, Well, what should I dio? I don't know. We'll look at Mel Allen. He's doing this now, but he started at doing that. Yeah. Yeah. So when I was a kid, um, I did a lot of kind of creative things. I just was a habitual drawer. My brother's picked up the guitar and didn't want me to hang out with him and jam out. You know, they were older. So s so they closed the door. And so I just picked up a pencil and started drawing stuff. And so I started doing commissions when I was a kid. So here I am, You know, like, nine years old. I'm selling commissions. I didn't want to mow lawns a lot. Although I did that for a couple of people. I don't really want to shovel snow, although again, I did that for a couple of elderly neighbors. Eso I did creative things to support myself. I actually sold bait. Well, funny enough because there was plentiful in the area that I was. We had a lot of what we called nightcrawlers. Yeah. Remember nightcrawlers for my kids. Those are big words, right? Roundworms? Yeah, Earthworms. So I I you know, I made a lot of money I bought, like, my own bicycles and things like that. So, um, I just always had that kind of self starting thing. And when I started working for other people, Um I just realized I didn't enjoy it as much, you know, it wasn't creative. Um, you know, the benefits aspect of it is was what led me into, you know, working in a corporate world. But I always had something creative, uh, in the back end. And when I first started doing voiceover for myself from home, I initially didn't think of it as something that I could make money doing it all until I've been doing it for Gosh, it was like 10 years, and I finally realized I'm I'm actually making a lot of money doing this just as a as a fun hobby When some friends of mine called me into their studios, you know, they worked for TV stations or other radio groups that didn't compete with us. And, you know, I'd get 25 then I was getting $50 and I was getting $75 and then I was getting over $100. You know, each time I did it and I started realizing Wow, this is really fun. I'm making really good money at it about, you know, not even trying. I was making about a third of my income doing voiceover. And so that was when I really kind of dove in, Got a big client, got myself set up with a home studio and went down the rabbit hole of, you know, doing voiceover from from home. So what? What were you drawing as a kid? Uh, Rolling Stones, logos, kiss logos. Any of the bands that were really popular at the time? Um, you know, people would pay me, like, 50 cents a dollar, you know, to do stuff. It was just And it was just fun. It was cool and probably totally copyright infringement. But, you know, you still do. You still draw. Oh, gosh, Yeah, yeah, yeah. My logo, my website. All of these things. Uh, you know, I still like all the graphics that are behind me. I put together eso um actually, that was my foot in the door for getting into radio. Was actually I was hired as a graphic designer, So I learned how toe take the drawing onto the computer side. But I still have sketchbooks all around me. You know, you'll have an idea. Did you take lessons or it was just just a talent that you had. I just kind of was self taught for much of the time. I did take, um I took two years in high school, and then one year or two years in college, I can't remember exactly which. But, um And when I was in high school, I actually started working with one of my art teachers, part time art teacher,...

...and she worked for some local companies. Ah, lot of people might know Vermont Teddy bear company. Um And so, uh, I really loved working in oil pastels when I was at that period of time, and that's what her main main medium was. And so I'm working with her on, you know, huge 4 ft by 5 ft or or larger big posters that she's doing for Vermont Teddy Bear company. And I'm doing, uh, the entire background in, you know, like this kind of rainbow of of oil pastel. So that's exciting. That was Yeah, it's funny. You mentioned earthworms because it really rang a bell with me. It's something I even don't even think I said in a long time. But we also has kids used to gather, and it's it's funny you made some money off that and kids wouldn't think that nowadays. I mean, no, I shouldn't say that Like I had a lot of kids with, Ah, lot of kids wouldn't think like there's a source of in go grab some worms and go by a lake. But I don't know wherever people are fishing nowadays and just put a little sign and make it at a cardboard like earthworms, right? But just is just I think it's great that you did that. And I think it's great for people to think about of. Maybe they have kids and just trying to get them to get the ball started that in 20 years they have a story that, Oh, you know, when I was a kid, my dad made me go get some earthworms and digging them. I remember digging, getting a shovel and digging down deep, pulling that up that big old long. Yeah, my dad built me, Ah, whole box in the backyard and I was the one dragging him out. It was funny because I wanted to get them for myself. I love to go fishing when I could during the summers and eso I had, I had my dad built me this box so that I could take the earthworms from the farm down the road whenever they would plow. I would just go out after the plow. That would be just picking them up off the ground, throwing them into a big old bucket. So we built me a box in the back yard. I throw them in there and then any time I go fishing, I grab some and and it just started from, uh, somebody saying like, Hey, do you have any despair? And I was like, Yeah, I'll sell them to you for a quarter. Yeah, and so sure enough, you know, couple couple weeks later, I'm out on the corner down the road by by the park where people are going, you know, their parking their cars to go to the river and go fishing. And I did a little cardboard sign that said, You know, um, 25 cents a dozen and I had little yogurt cups that I was throwing them in and handing them to people and and then people were like, You need to charge MAWR. That's what I was thinking. I was like maybe you put 50 cents on you learn supply and demand economics right there on the spot you didn't need. A couple of years later, I was charging a dollar, and people were still like, you know, you should charge Mawr. These air Great. You know, because they were buying the old stale ones that air in the, you know, the gas stations that air half dead. And they're like yours. They're, like, fresh, and they're great. And there, you know, I'm catching the biggest fish I've ever caught, you know, with with your bait. So that's great. There you go. There you have it. I was, You know, I bought my own bicycle as, like, a 10 year old kid with money that I made. You know, I've got friends who were struggling pushing around, you know, a lot more around an acre of property. And I'm getting nightcrawlers following behind a tractor. You know, for about 15 20 minutes and I'd have a week's supply. As you're you're in high school. You're doing voice over work at this time. Yeah, thinking you mentioned college. So what were you starting to think for college? And how was that process for that decision made? So the when I was in high school. I started on the college radio station. Andi was doing voiceovers for that college radio station in high school in high school. You're on the college radio station? Yeah. Yeah. So you forward thinking that's pretty good. I was just do that like I'm a high school student. I'm going to the college and I'm going to be on their radio station, let alone college students who would be too scared to do that. It was really one of those odd things where I think it was my response to fear, right. It was not that I wasn't afraid. As a matter of fact, I you know, like a lot of people, I I have anxieties, right. But, um, I remember the first time we did the radio show, you know, with me. And it was a couple of friends. And we're talking about music and musicians and just our thoughts on them and and and then playing, you know, one of those musicians that we were talking about, um, our first shift came up and the radio are the record ended because it was literally records that we were playing at this college radio station. record ended and we all just look at each other like who's gonna talk? And I jumped up and I hit the button. I talked, and I was like, Hey, that was so and so we'll be right back. And here's you know, this man and I turned the microphone off and I turned around. I was like, You guys, what's going on? And two of the guys got up and just walked out. It was just like we can't...

...handle it. We can't do that. So it was me and a buddy, and we just ended up sitting there, and I I was so scared. But I kept coming back and I loved it. I just fell in love with it. And then the manager at the radio station said, Hey, like, um, I like what you're doing. Can you record all of these pizzas and our station IEDs and all of these things? And, you know, little did I know that was setting me up for, you know, working in voice over that. That work that I did at that college radio station got me hired at my first, um, my first professional job in radio and the It's a funny story and how I got it because I was on spring break and I met two people from a radio station on my spring break trip. And, you know, we're sitting there at the table having drinks, you know, What do you do? What do you do? And and they're like, we're in radio and my girlfriend's like we were in college radio, and I was like, They don't want to hear this story. Shoddy eso. Anyway, the couple drinks later, and they were like, No, tell us the story, like, you know, tell us what you did in college radio and so they were like, You need to come in for an interview. And, you know, they were We were all from the same kind of area that we all flew out of the same airport. And, um so, yeah, we got back. And two weeks later I had a job in radio after a spring break trip. So see parents spring spring break trips air good. They are good. They can't be mostly not music, mostly not. You know, probably the most drunk and the worst sunburn that I've ever been in my life. But you know, got a job interview, but to a job. Do you have a favorite movie? A radio movie? Oh, I mean, uh, if I was to just and I asked that I ask that because I can picture you know, that you guys sitting around there in the record ends and, like, maybe scratch it off the side or something, then okay? And then it reminds me of so many of the movies that I saw a boat radio, and it just makes a good clip. So then it just started to make me think about movies. Do you have one? Yeah, like Good morning, Vietnam. I mean, was just, you know, with Robin Williams was just fantastic. And it was one of those. It was one of those movies where I had to respect the fact that it wasn't like, you know, w k R p you know the show where they're just swinging a microphone all over the place, you know, anytime. Wolf man Jack wasn t V, even though he was in radio, you know, he's always being ridiculous. And, uh, and the funny enough, the equipment that I started on was actually the same type of equipment that was in that movie. Good morning, Vietnam. So it was this, you know, military color, industrial grade, kind of stuff that looked like it was left over from, you know, from from World War Two era. It was It was old, you know, It was all analog, and, um and it was just very prone to breaking. But at the same time, if you got in that sweet spot, if you learn how to work it it was fantastic. And there's nothing that sounds like that still today, you know what? Even our asses good as our digital equipment is, it just misses some of that warmth that the analog had. And and that's funny doing this, this type of stuff. Now for me being relatively new to it that I'm when I watch movies and I see a microphone, I'm like, Well, what kind of microphone? What kind of like Yeah, yeah, human. You know, something like, I've definitely fallen into the whole trap of Ah, Mike locker. I have the closet behind me That probably has, and I've pared it down. Uh, I've probably got about a dozen microphones in there right now, and I have two that are out on loan that are coming back to me soon, so I've got a lot of microphones. So what was your decision in to get into college? What was what was it that you were decided to take? And how did that come about? Eso? What I wanted to do in college was actually continue with art eso I went to college Thio to be, uh, taking art classes. I liked a lot of the professors that were at the college. What were you hoping to accomplish by taking art? Do you want to be on artist? You want to be a teacher? You wanted I actually wanted to be an art teacher? Yeah. So, um, I was going for my art education and, uh, background in psychology as well. I figured, you know that that might help out with teaching as well. And, um, but I just I really loved art. And I had the opportunity between high school and college to actually teach a class on our class to a group of high school kids, and I loved it. I thought I was gonna hate it. I thought it was gonna be awful. The person who's actually supposed to teach it didn't show up. I was supposed to be her tha and she ended up being late or not being around for most of the time. So I taught just these entire segments of the class all on my own. Was this a required course or was it a And it was...

...kind of it was part of this bridging thing that, um, that I'd signed up for with this group called Upward Bound. I'm not sure if you've ever heard of upward Bound. Um, they they got me basically in eyes, a high schooler. That was how I ended up at the, um connecting with people at the college as a high schooler to be on the radio. And the mission of that organization is to get people who don't have a family member who's been through college before to get into college. And, um, I didn't actually end up completing college, funny enough, but, um, but it was almost because I was like, I've got great job opportunities here in a field that I've been training for for years. Or I could go back to college and find something that I might not even love as much as what I'm doing. So so in this program that you were in and these other students were and when when you went back to teach, are they receptive? Where you receptive students, or was it just something people chose for you to jump into? So then being in our teacher, where the students really into it? So you said that you enjoyed the experience or were they? They were gun hole about trying or they, uh they weren't and a lot of them signed up for it. You know, just to be kind of like, Oh, I'm kinda supposed to take a certain amount of classes, you know, during the summer program. And so I'm gonna take our class because I don't have to do anything. And, Well, I just paid attention to what they were doing and a lot of the kids, you know, like I'd be talking and and they would be scribbling, you know, in their note pad. And I'm like, Hey, it's an art class. I'm like, Why don't you come up here and show the rest of the class what you're doing on the board and let's make a project out of that when scribbling becomes good. Yeah, And it was like, you know, it was like, Hey, like, if you want to do like this well, here's how to shade, You know, this kind of ah thing. Or if you wanna make that stand out here is a way to make that stand out. And, you know, try drawing it with with this, you know, with a Sharpie, as opposed to that pencil that you're using. And you know, your bold design is going toe jump out on. Then I showed them we did a whole section of the course on making T shirts and I was like, Look, you can have anything that you want in there except for graphic sexual or, you know, things that are, you know, basically like the seven words you know from George Carlin, like your parents won't be happy if I allow that to happen. So basically, whatever you want to do, if it's a band name, if it's, you know, uh, something that you're you're into your interested in. And they just ate it up because nobody had said What do you want me to teach this class to you? about. And so it was, You know, it was just very, um, very eye opening for them, his kids to be like, Oh, like art really is about what I wanted Thio to be about. It's not, you know, Yeah, there's there's the teaching of how to draw something better or the pulling the creative experience out of people because there would be people in there who came in who they were drawing stick figures to begin with there like I'm not an artist. And I'm like, Yeah, but you're creative, like I know you're creative because I've seen you, you know, talking to other people and telling stories. I've seen you do it so, like, let's bring that out of you in a way which is creative and, um, visual, um, you don't have to be the best. You know, drawing figures to be creative and to be artistic. Mel thinking, talking to think about that and what you're saying. What's your experience with people not believing they have a talent or skill or they're not creative in this sense, But they just need to get over that hurdle over that roadblock because maybe they're putting that they're themselves What's your experience with whether high school students or just your years of experience in the industry? Yeah, well, I think that I find that a lot of the time when I was in radio and I was copyrighting and I would have clients who, you know, they've got a furniture store or they've got an Italian restaurant. And I would ask them, you know, Hey, what's Ah, really great story about your restaurant like, um, you know, not give them really any framing for it. And I'd be like, you know, we don't really have one. And I was like, Okay, well, why did you decide that you wanted to do a mainly Italian food as opposed to, you know, French Canadian, like we're really close to Montreal. Why, you know, why aren't you making French Canadian meals and that launch into a story about you know, how their grandmother or whatever came over from another country? And this was the cooking that they would do and all of the great memories of the holidays? And I'm like, That's it. I'm like, I'm like, That's your story. E was like and it took me two questions to get the story out of you and I was like So don't Don't tell me you're not creative or you don't have a story. I'm like I recorded that. I'm going to send that to you. You need to write that down like that needs to be on your website,...

...and we're gonna put that into your commercial and on. And so, you know, it was just great for me. Thio, sit down with people, ask a couple of questions, pull these amazing stories out of people who thought that they didn't have one and it could be anyone. I mean, you could be selling tractors. You could be, you know, fixing mo peds. It doesn't matter. There's always a story. There's something that got you excited about doing that and why you choose to go in and do that every single day. Right? That that makes that a unique experience for you. And there's the creativity in there somewhere. You know, like the why we work. It's it's almost always there. There's some unique process that happens. I'm sure you have great experiences talking to people about all of these topics yourself, and and that keeps you kind of coming back for more being like, What am I gonna find out from the next person I talked to? What do you think people's reluctance C is in sharing their story that were they beaten down to the point where they don't think that they're worthy, that they really don't see something in all the forest of their life? Where is it? The reluctance he comes from? I think that you're hit the nail on the head. You know that they've been beaten down. Somebody told them one time that they weren't interested in that story. And, you know, they think that they don't have one, and, um, it's it's never been. You know, somebody is never given the time, I think, to validate that with them. And when somebody does, you know, they realize I think you know frequently, not always, but frequently they'll realize, like, Wow, this I really do have a good story. I really do have a good reason for you know why I'm living my life this way and there are a lot of people actually who are kind of like me out there, and I think that's one of the amazing things of social media is it allows people who have those stories to find each other and connect with each other and kind of amplifying, Um, those voices, you know, The opposite of that is that you have people who are not so creative for amplifying this is to, you know, so you have to sift through that. But, um, but I think that there are a lot of people out there who don't think that they have an interesting story who kind of find out that that that they really dio and that they could really open up and they could be validated. And they can have, you know, people who are going to listen to that and want to hear more of it. Honestly, Well, that's what The world of podcasting. There's a podcast for virtually everything now, so and people have audiences. So it's really interesting because I've actually recently reached out to some Facebook friends and you say you want to come on my podcast because I, you know, I've had other advice is that always reach higher, always go to people who are higher, and in that sense, I'm reaching out to you, right? Someone with the experience, But I also want to talkto friends, family who write that there's not overtly Ah, wonderful story. But I know there's something in there and it's thes people like Oh, no, no, You know, I can't I have nothing to offer. There's nothing for me no, You really do have something And I think it's it's really interesting. So when you were back in teaching, was the interest for you not high enough to pursue that or have you taught since? And I mean, you mentioned that you're still drawing, but in a teaching Yeah. Yeah, So I I I learned very quickly that there were a lot of teaching opportunities for me in radio and in voice over and then, you know, in broadcasting, I didn't need to be kind of, you know, in the classroom, in that classroom aspect, even though I've been in classrooms before. As a matter of fact, I actually supported myself through with an I T. Job for many years, and I taught entire groups of people you know how to use software. You know, everything from excel, too. Uh, you know, Skype for business and other things, and I create the whole training program for it and and teach people. So in that aspect, you know, I've done that kind of work is well, but a lot more of my enjoyable teaching eyes When somebody who is new to broadcasting comes in and they're like, How doe I do this, How doe I record myself. And I show people, you know, some mic technique and some different ways of of editing their audio and, uh, and some of the techniques that I've developed. And, um so I'm able to teach people on a really regular, ongoing basis with those kind of, you know, the voice over the podcasting, the audio on the broadcasting kind of all wrapped up. So over the years, I've done ah, lot more of that than I think I ever would have in a classroom kind of atmosphere. So, Mel, now what is it you're doing? Say full time for employment? Is it the voice over production and distribution? Is this part of your full time gig now?...

Are you doing another job on the side? So I am basically doing voiceover full time. Any time that I've got kind of down, I'm I'm planning my podcast and, you know, work with that, and, um And then I do keep my toes and radio, so a zoo. Matter of fact, all this week, I am on a morning radio program. So I'm getting up before the crack of dawn so that I could be in and on the radio, and, um and then I have so sorry. What does that look like? I mean, that's for me, Maybe other people, but for me, that's interesting. So what is he doing in the morning show? So it's Ah, it's a country, uh, country radio program called The Morning Round Up. And it's on 98.9 w. Okay. Oh, and basically, we just host a show talking about what's going on in the world talking about the traffic that people are running into the weather conditions that are gonna be out there and, you know, yesterday Ah, big topic of conversation. We had people calling in every 15 minutes about a tractor trailer that slid off one of the exits because of the snow that was happening in in our area. And, you know, people kept going by this and and calling us up and saying like, Hey, I don't know if you guys knew about this, I just jumped in the car. So this is happening and thought you should know about it. And so what time do you get up for that? Ah, this week I've been getting up mainly at about quarter of five. I am so tomorrow. Uh, my co host said he's not gonna be able to be in. He's feeling a little under the weather, so I'll be getting up at 3:45 a.m. in the morning tomorrow. And when does it typically a show end for you in the morning? It's 5 a.m. to 10 a.m. When the show goes. So, um, then you do this five days a week. Uh, I do it just kind of on an as needed basis. So the two folks that air there, um, they sometimes go to different seminars for radio or other things that they're doing. They together have eight weeks of vacation. So any time there on vacation or they're out, or where they can't be there for any reason. Um, I go in and I feel it. And so it's just, uh it's just a really fun way of keeping all of those skills really active. Um, it's a great crew. I didn't ever think that I would be back in radio. I left radio to do voiceover full time, and, um, all of a sudden I met these group of guys and they were like, Hey, can you come in? We'd love Thio. See if you know you're interested in working with us. We've heard nothing but good things. Uh, turns out I've worked with a number of people that worked there over the years. And so, um, I just was like, Yeah, you know, I'll come in here, I'll help out now and then And, you know, first it was just like, Well, stick me in this corner on the weekends or stick me in this corner And they were like, Now you should be here during drive time. You should be here when most of the people are listening. And I'm like, Hey, that sounds great to me. So no, I've always loved radio, and it's especially, you know, those the morning shows or something along those we had in Canada or Nova Scotia in Halifax, I guess, is Q 104 C 100 they're just they have a good crew and you can hear if they have a couple of people working together. They mesh well together and interviewed someone recently Brodie Smith, and he does the morning show in. You know, he's doing country as well. So I say, asked him. So I'm asking you, Do you have tow like, country to do country Mhm. You know, I have nothing against country, but I just I thought, Do you have to like it to do it? I think it's a lot like snow, you know, It kind of builds up on you. It feels like it can crush you, but after a while you learn that you could do a lot of things with it on and chew, and you and you learn ways, you know, to to kind of enjoy it. So I would say that it's not my favorite type of music. It's not what I typically listen. Thio you know, obviously there there are some artists like Johnny Cash that that stand out, you know, there even some Dolly Parton songs that I am. I'm a big fan of and you know, I have a couple here and there that that I feel like our guilty pleasures. But, you know, for the most part, um, it's not the music that that draws me in. It is the camaraderie with the people and with the listeners. You know, it's amazing. Uh, if you have a question you know about like, Hey, we're hearing that there might be some traffic issues We got disconnected from the person and somebody give us a call and tell us what's going on so we can pass on the word and the phones light up So that connection with listeners with people who are out in that world, You know, there are part of my day and I'm a part of their day and and it's just kind of, Ah, beautiful relationship that eyes in radio. I almost replicated that in a podcast one time where I was able to do it live and we had a phone system set up and, um, but it was It was difficult to maintain that, whereas radio, it's...

...just always there, and you know there's there's obviously set up that you have to do. There's preparation that you should do, you know, looking into what it is that you know, might be something that people would be interested in hearing about on there drive into work that morning. But it really is one of those things where I go in prepared and sometimes I don't talk about any of that stuff because there's enough information coming into me that I need to pass on to the world that that that takes up the entire show, the entire five hours of them there, even though we're playing music, we're talking in between every song and really having that great relationship. There's an interesting community that that starts to build. It really is. Yeah, do you do you get? And I was gonna ask this Brodie Smith, but I didn't. But now I get to ask you, Do you get to? You said You have some guilty pleasures of songs that you like. Do you get to pick them? Or is that something the production crew that I have no idea and way out of my realm? But how does the selection of songs? Sure, So we have Ah, we have a music director and that music director basically follows. You know what air trends, what are the songs that are basically kind of, you know, heading up in the charts. A Sfar as radio goes. The country radio station that I work at is a kind of a current hits radio station. So that's what they already not much Johnny Cash, right? So we have what are called flashbacks every hour that will play or every other hour that will play. You know, an older artist like, uh, you know, we'll throw in a Tim McGraw. We'll throw in a Reba McEntire. We'll throw in, you know, maybe even a Willie Nelson or a Dolly Parton. And, um, there's a little flexibility with some of those. Ah, lot of the music is pre selected, but there, uh, there are lists that we get of, you know, songs that it's like, Hey, you've got some extra time or if you're you know, if you're running, Ah, little early, grab any of these songs and drop them off. And so you go through and you, you know, you look for songs that you really like, and and those are the ones that you you you drop in first. So it's interesting. It's I really find it interesting. So this is part of your life Now with the voiceover and all the other work, What is What is a process that you go through with the work you do with your voice over work? Sure. So, um, most of my work comes in with networking and referrals. I do get some from social media where people, you know, we'll we'll see a post where, I've, you know, put an audio or video together of some work that I've done or I have these what I call 30 by thirties, where ill find a video online that doesn't have any voice over in it. And I'll play a 32nd clip of that without any voice over. And then I'll write, UH, 30 seconds voice over four for that and I'll play it. What do you mean by A? You'll find a video that doesn't have voice over, so you know companies out there they might be demonstrating a product, and they've got some text and they've got video, but it's just music underneath it. There's no there's no voice over. And I'll I'll grab a portion of that video and I will write I'll, you know, right accustomed 32nd voice over for that. And so I'll put him side by side, Put it out online, and people see that. And occasionally those have gotten me some business where people have been like, Hey, like, I can't believe that you did that with that video. Like I never thought of it. Is not that this is not a database of people looking for voice over your finding. What could be potential work for you, right? Yep. And so I reach out to those companies. I tag them. I'm like, Hey, this is coming out. Look for this on social media today. I'll tag them in the social media post, and so those sometimes get me work. And that's like your your earthworm sign. Yeah, I'm farming, you know, just firming it up. Here we go. I'm ready. Putting my sign out on the on social media to be like, Hey, I'm here. I've got something. If you're interested, here it is. And then I get a lot through referrals and networking. So I'm part of some different networking groups. And you know, you wouldn't think that me talking Thio, you know, a chiropractor or, um, you're talking to somebody who's a massage therapist would get me work, but it does get me work through those. It's called B, and I I'm not sure if you're familiar with it. And they started off his business Networking International, and they've just shortened it to be and I But they have organizations all across the world. And, um, you know, I've got referrals from Italy from Vietnam from let's see, the Philippines. So I've done work all over the country, and, you know, I mean, all over the world. Scuse me and mawr. You know, it seems Thio come in. You know, I'll find these little pockets where there are these, uh, folks who are doing English as a second language classes or they have a lot of, you know, people who...

...speak a different language. You know, maybe that's English. Maybe that's French, whatever. And so they need a voice over talent who does, uh, that so they can do a version of their their training video in in in the language that they need done. So So it's really, um it's really a lot of, uh like you're saying kind of building. You know, I have, um, spreadsheets that, uh, that I'm always working, and I'm always looking for one of the types of voice over I do is called imaging, and, um, that is on radio television stations when you hear a voice, but it's it's not one of the radio hosts or it's not one of the TV hosts. And, you know, maybe it's just that top of that top of the hour station identification that legally they have to run. Uh, that's in a voice, and I could be that voice. And so I have lists of radio and television stations and producers who make those types of things all across the country. And I'll send, you know, email blasts out every so often with a new demonstration of, you know, type of audio package that I've done so for. People may be interested in getting into voice over, and this is my own curiosity. But maybe other people wonder to in terms of work, and you're willing to say that you made 25 cents off your earthworms and jacked it up to $100.100. Where does the money come in? In the sense is it paid by pay per project project by project or and or is there also commissions in this game is, well, there are little teas and stuff like that. Yeah, there are a lot of people who do stuff, you know, commission based only, Ah, lot of people who are in the voice actor category typically do that. You know, they there may be doing small games or maybe doing small APS on DSO. They're really largely a commission based, and they'll, you know they'll advertise. Hey, my commissions air open. I can do five different ones today for me. I found that when I've done work like that, the money amount has typically been on the lower end, and so for me to do this is a viable business. There's a dollar amount that I that I have to make eso most of the work that I do is can be found on what's called the global voice acting Academy Rate guide. So they, um, put together rates for everything from audio books to commercials that are on television to the imaging type work that I'm doing. It's a great, great way for people to be like What should I charge? What standard? What's the standard? And so I based a lot of my rates on on that guide. You know, I flex them depending. Uh, you know, for example, I just did a project for a client who wanted 20 pieces of audio. Um, better each anywhere from 2 to 5 minutes long. And so we worked out a rate that worked for there. But it seems like a big, big contract for you. That that seems like a pretty good Yeah, that's a It's a really big contract. And they've actually tacked on, you know, four pieces to that. So, um, that's actually to date. That one will be the biggest rate that I've ever, you know, for a project I've ever quoted out. So that's really nice. Do you need a manager, E have one for, you know, for some of my work. And, um, it's one of those issues where I've, you know, if I thought about getting a manager or an agent, but at the same time, um, I keep myself pretty busy. And I wonder, you know, if I would have issues meeting, you know, meeting some of my clients if I if I was to have somebody in the middle on some of those clients I've had for a long time. I really like I really enjoy working with, um that client that I just did that for was the one who actually, uh, first requested me to do enough work that I went out with the check that I got from them because I said I'm going to need at least 25% up front. The reason I needed that was because I didn't have all the equipment at home and I didn't have access to everything I needed at the radio station that I worked at. So I went out and I bought the pieces that I needed with that money that they paid me and set up my first home studio. That must have been a happy day. I mean, just the idea of like, this is only 25% and I'm buying what I need to buy and buying what I need to buy for clients for years to come. And so that home studio that I bought from that client I probably ran for for about four years before I replaced any of the equipment in there. And, um, it really is a It's a wonderful. It's a wonderful way of making a living, right. I'm I'm bringing words toe life. Um, you know, depending on the client, I might be doing all of the audio production for that. I tend to do a little less of that these days because I'm focusing more on the voiceover aspect of it on, you know, voice acting and and in such, but, um,...

...with ease, the flat rate story, the flat rates Are they flat rates, or do you also get residuals or royalties later on or thereafter? I've done a couple where I've done some royalties and residuals and typically for me, I've found that those haven't been really, you know, lucrative. Um, it's more, you know, the product common common in the industry. It is very common, but the issue is that I do mainly what's called non union nonunion work. I've done a couple of union jobs or union eligible jobs. Um, and those ones are typically the ones that will have those residuals built into them. But I don't because I don't have an agent. I don't have ah manager in that aspect of, um of this audio world. I'm not doing that kind of work, and it's great work in in a way, right, because it does pay the dollar amount of it is really nice. But one of the things that I personally like is that I've had relationships with some of my clients for, you know, 10 years, 15 years, And I talked directly to the client, and I can help them write a project Sometimes if they're sending me scripts And I'm like, Hey, you know, do you mind if we have a quick chat about this? I'm not sure your message is getting across the way that you wanted to. Um, Can can we chat and and maybe rewrite this? And I've got a great relationship where we're able to do that so I wouldn't have that if I was doing something. Just through agents now switching gears a bit just will not really the idea of something difficult to build the work. Do you dio I know that you you had a freak accident. Your throat accident where rather to save your throat, I'll let people know what happened. You were drinking coffee and you're holding your phone and awkward position. You moved your neck and you heard a pop and then, I mean, that puts you on the injured reserve for several months where you had toe go down to a whisper. So I'm sure the idea of protecting your throat is one of you're You're fully doing this. This is not a side gig, and even your sidekick is still using your voice. You're not struggling worms anymore, right? Like you have a radio show that you do in the mornings. So what is difficult about your job? It might be maintaining your voice, but it may not be. Yeah, it's It's definitely It made me very aware that I have much more delicate instrument than than I thought, you know, I was definitely taking it for granted, and I was not treating it well. So, you know, I saw the A Netflix the other day. Speaking of country music, I saw what's what's his name. Oh, no, I forgot his name. Who's the country artist? Garth Garth Brooks? Garth Brooks and I knew very little of the documentary on Netflix is pretty good, I thought, but he would. He gets up on stage and just yells like, I guess you're not. You're not doing that too often I tend not to do that. No, um, I used Thio, and, um, you know, if I was out for a day, it didn't matter. You know, back when I was getting, you know, in the early days of doing this, but now I'm you know, I'm doing work almost every day of the week. I mean, I actually took a couple of days off over over the holidays, which is pretty unusual for me, but, you know, I'm doing a different level of different aspect of work these days and working with a lot more, you know, corporations. Even though I have personal relationships with the people there. Um, So I've got I've got routine work that I'm doing. And so what I found is that being in, you know, recovering from that injury and the things that I had to go through to get on the other side of that, like you're talking about. You know, I had toe basically whisper for, you know, about a six month period, and my voice wasn't even really fully back until almost two years after that. Um, it really threw me for a loop. I lost several clients You know, I informed them right away what was going on, and but I didn't know how long this was gonna be. And once, you know, the doctors after two weeks told me how long it was gonna be. I you know, I let them know and had to fire myself, which was was really tricky. But it shows the cutthroat. I mean, pun intended, I guess. Cutthroat nature of the business. There's your voice over producer, actor. You know, you're in the industry. You can't use your voice. Goodbye. Yeah, that's that's it. I mean, that's that's what I'm here to offer. And if I can't offer that, then then there's no reason, you know, toe have, ah professional relationship with me and and you know it is, um it seems cold in a way, but at the same time, you know, that's that's my service. And so what I started to think about was, what could I do if I couldn't do voice over? And...

...everything that I could think about revolved around the industry where it was, I could help teach people I could, you know, um, help people to use their equipment Better. I could write you know, e books on processes that could improve this. But everything seemed to revolve around that industry. And I realized just how entrenched I waas and I also realized that I needed to take better care of myself. It's good that you realize that anything you would want to do or be able to do is still in the industry. So it didn't mean they probably gave you a sense of security like, No, I really enjoy this. This is where my talents lie. This is where I developed my skills. And even if I couldn't use my voice, which is the main main instrument in this industry for me, that but I can still do these other things. So that must have been reassuring as well. You're not like, Wow, Now I'm done with this. What? You know, what other things should I go dio So that that's pretty good? Yeah, it was really nice to be, you know, to realize that I still had a lot to give, right? Even if it wasn't my voice. And, um so I just started developing routines and started realizing I can't I can't live the way I was, you know, I can't go to concerts and yell at the stage. I can't be on the stage yelling at the crowd, which, you know, I used to go on stage and rile uh, crowds up before things you know, before concerts, e usedto EMC comedy events and kind of the burning the candle at both ends really has defined a lot of my career in radio and why I was able to be successful because six nights a week, I would be at at bars or, you know, uh, similar type places, uh, doing live shows, doing emceeing events, getting the crowd, you know, all worked up for, you know, for an artist who is coming up, etcetera and really punishing my myself of physically and my voice as well with that and I realized, I just need to stop doing that. And, um and that was when I kind of stepped away from radio and I stepped away from some other things to focus more on voice Over started this routine of keeping myself hydrated, not pushing my voice to the point where it would become horse or I lost it. To what extent do you keep just for listeners and myself who tends to drink less water than I should. How much water do you drink a day? Uh, let's see. So you have this? Yeah, I've got this, Which holds 650 mil leaders, and I'll go through about four of those in a day. Nice. Probably. Um, probably a little bit more. And so, um, use, like, a gallon gallon and a little bit. It's quite a bit of It's quite a bit, but I tend to take sips. You know, I don't I don't down a lot of water. I do drink. Um, at least a cup, you know, Or two cups of water. Uh, when I go to bed and when I get up, I use saline sprays. You drink a cup of water before you go to bed? Yeah. Isn't that problematic? No, no, I'm, like, so scared before going to bed, I take like, a wet my whistle sort of sip. And I'm like, That's it. I don't wanna be bothered at night time. Yeah, but water man, I should try that. Yeah. When that alarm goes off, I'm ready to get up. I'll just tell you that much sometimes. I don't get up at 34 Sometimes I don't need the alarm. You know, I'll get up and I'll look at my you know, look at my watch or look at my phone and realize up my alarms about to go off. Let me just turn that off and get ready to start my day. So and that's one of the things that that I do is that, you know, because I'm kind of aware, um, I try to have that awareness of my body and the limits that I'm pushing myself to in a lot of ways. And it made me, you know, made me kind of appreciate my health. Ah, lot mawr. Um, I went to ah, personal trainer for a while, too, you know, kind of start a vocal coach? No, like a like a full, you know, workout, exercise, training, exercise. Yeah, personal trainer doing circuit training. And that was part of how I kind of turned my health around. Um, as a as a whole. It was kind of that that part of that process and really got myself into really great shape. And, um, you know, not maintain that, you know, over the years, but I still do things to keep myself in shape. I try to walk every single day. I heat my house with wood and we're here in the Northeast and you know, I'm lugging in would all the time During the summer I'm splitting and stacking wood, and that's just to me.

It's part of that whole process of, um, here's a little bit of exercise every day. It keeps, you know, me using my lungs and using that, you know, um, that cardiovascular system ready at any time for whatever it needs. And and that comes in handy in the studio. So being able to be in shape and and be in good health and have good stamina helps me in all areas of my life. There's there's not an area where it doesn't. So what would would you define keeping yourself fit or your vote voice protected? Is that the most difficult in your in your industry? Or what would be What would you define? I think a lot of people in this industry that I find personally they don't, um they don't prioritize that that physical fitness, especially people that I know in broadcasting, um you know, I see a lot of people right in broadcasting. Yeah, they're sitting all day. Uh, basically, the only time I'm sitting is when I'm doing something like this, and I actually have a sit stand desks so my desk could be in stand up mode. And if it's a shorter, what I'll I'll put it in the stand up mode. And whenever I'm at the radio station, I try to stand as much as I can. And sometimes that means for four or five hours, I'm standing almost the entire time. And, you know, there are a lot of people who don't want to do that. They're not interested in doing that. And But it is also goes beyond that. You know, I I try to eat healthy. You know, I try to eat a balanced died as well, but, you know, um, I don't, um you know don't do like diets or things as the you know, the saying goes like, I just I try to listen to what it is that my body wants, And, you know, sometimes I'll be like, I need to have salads for a couple of days or I need thio. You know, do a lot of roasted vegetables. My buddy says, Potato chips z McDonald's like Okay, let's see. Oh, it's like my seven year olds a lot like that, too. She potato chips and McDonald's is what she she would survive on if if she could. But yeah, um, I try to eat a little bit of everything on the only foods that I don't eat are basically ones that don't fit or ones that I am sensitive or allergic. Thio. What is this satisfaction you get out of the work that you dio? Um, it really, um it's hard toe put an exact point on it because sometimes you know, it's that bringing that creativity, you know, helping that person find that spark. Having that conversation with somebody who you know again doesn't think that they have a story to tell. Uh, I did a session the other day with a client where we were just talking about some of the sports work that I've done that they've heard and they're in a very corporate environment. But they want to bring that kind of sound into a couple of their, um, you know, into a couple of their videos and I was like, Hey, let's do that. Let's Zwart together on this And so we had a You know, we probably had a 40 minute chat just about how we could rearrange some of the things in in in the copyrighting that they're doing to bring that out. And, uh, you know, the time limits that I've found for you know, how long I can sustain that in copy and how long people can listen to that kind of energy and in a read and and so it's really it's really nice that I have those kind of relationships, and that's where a lot of it is. But at the same time, I'll have somebody who gives me words that you know, feel very flat and they don't think that they have much life to them. And I'll be like, You know, I disagree. Like there's a lot of life in these words. I think that I could bring that out and make this really something that, you know that doesn't sound so sterile and and that satisfaction that I hear from them from the client when I when I do that for them and I deliver that eyes always just super super satisfying. So there's a lot of levels. Is there? Ah, highlight of your career so far that you're just like you have people over your house. Like, Okay, listen to me. I was on this commercial or I did this sort of thing Or is there something that you're trying to reach and sort of a goal? Something you'd say? Oh, this is what I would really like to do. Uh huh. Um, I think in some ways, you know, we always have, you know, want Mawr, you know, like bigger, bigger, bigger. But I think the first time that I that I I hit that was when I worked with a beer company on they were doing a release and I had done some stuff for them at this small radio station. Um, and we really weren't on the map, you know, in many ways, on And, um, we happen to...

...radio stations a lot of the times. What happens is that if you buy over a certain amount of of advertising, you get what's called free production or or included production at no extra charge. And so I did something for them, and they loved it and they said, We want you to do this release for us. That's gonna be all up and down the East Coast. And it was their first time going, you know, in this kind of distribution. And it was my first time going in that kind of distribution, and it was really just fantastic toe work with them, and they allowed me a lot of license for it. And it was Otter Creek brewing there, Vermont based company and the release was White Sail Ale. And it's still just this commercial that I'm like. I kind of felt like that was when I made it, so to speak E white. It kind of rolls off your tongue. It's not about a Pilsner lager or a nail. It's about a beer that tastes good and makes you feel good. And that's how the commercial starts. And it just gets better from there. And probably this microphone isn't doing a justice that I'm using. And, um, and it really was just such a great exploration of a different aspect of my voice. You know, a lot of the times it was just this kind of, you know, either this over the top, read or their like be really, you know, conversational and and try to sound like you're this friendly person. And, you know, a lot of times it was one or the other. And this one, it was just They wanted me to sound like this wise old beer drinker that anybody who heard this guy would be like. That guy knows what he's doing. He knows what he's talking about with beer. And they sent me a case of the beer. That's what I was thinking. Are you Do you have one besides you? And you take a swig and then and then you're, like, quite pale ale way had one in Canada's Alexander Keats. Those who like it like it a lot. Yeah, yeah, I've actually unheard those e remember? Well, yeah, they they gave me the beer. They're, like, taste it kind of See what? It you know what it sparks with the, you know, whatever it invokes Onda, Uh, you know, I was kind of ah, exploring craft beer drinker at the time. So you know, just so to me, it was kind of neat that as I was starting to explore, like, here's this. Here's this client who wants me to do this? And so it's really, really very cool like that. I finally I first realized, like, Wow, I can really reach very far outside off of where I am, you know, being in a small place like Burlington, Vermont. Um, you never really. You know, it was hard to think of myself as being on the world map you mentioned. Reach so and you said, you know, we all kind of want to reach a little higher. Is there something that you and it's not? Doesn't mean Once you get there, your career is over. But the idea is you're hoping, Thio, you have us this little goal or dream or aspiration to do something in particular. Um, yeah, I think that, you know, there are those things one of my voice over heroes. And, you know, I could say Sure, um, that it's don the Fontaine or that it is. Um oh, gosh, you know James Earl Jones, or are these people? But, uh, it's this guy who I really, really enjoyed listening to, and it's Brooks more from the show, How it's made. And he is the Onley guy that I've ever written a letter to a show when they replaced him. And I wrote to the, you know, I wrote to Discovery Channel when, um when they took him often they replaced him with a younger voice. And I just said this he was the show, You know, the story as to why was it just a younger voice, or was he was just, you know, like they were like, Oh, we think that our audience wants a different sound, you know, younger sound. And he didn't have kind of like that big booming, you know, he didn't sound like an older guy. He just sounded kind of like a just a guy. And but he sounded like a guy who knew a little about a lot. And so it was, you know, I found, like, a perfect kind of voice on one of the things that the show had a lot of work, puns, and so by kind of personal goal has always been to have some sort of connection with people like that. Um, and and that's really, ultimately my goal, you know? And it doesn't, um it's not like a specific, like, I wanna be the voice of you know CBS Sports. You know, NFL. Um, that's where, like, that'd be great.

That would be fantastic. If I got a phone call, I would not turn that down. Um, but if I was the, you know, the next voice of a show, like how it's made. And, you know, I was just doing that kind of work on a regular basis. I would I would be like, That's it. That's all I needed to dio. And, you know, um, in some ways I've hit a lot of those goals. I did. I did a spot that was on ESPN. Uh, you know, for a big event that happened in 2019, and that felt really amazing. Really cool to be, you know, on ESPN all across, you know, the nation or anybody who is watching that. Who Paul Classic in 2019. Um, that was that was really, you know, again, like another, like, wow, like, that's a That's a check, you know, to one of the boxes that I didn't even really actively think about. But it was very cool to have done that. And I asked this thio the idea of goals and aspirations and listeners who you know should have a goal. So you know what you're looking for. And I like the fact that when you had difficulty with your voice, you still wanted to stay in your industry. And I think that's important for people when they come across difficulty and, you know, they're faced with this possibility of changing your career. Is this the thing I want to dio? Is this the thing that I'm cut out for? Is this the thing that I have a passion for? Speaking of changing careers, do you have some advice or Cem a tip for people thinking of, you know, selling worms or what was the first you were drawing some pictures at the beginning, people getting into work and also changing careers? Do you have any sort of tip or advice for people? I would just say, Look for something that you have, or that you can offer that somebody else can't And it doesn't have to be some ground breaking, ground shaking thing. It really unless it's worms that's breaking, word breaking, ground, chicken shaking for that. It just has to be something that you can deliver, um, quality, reliably and well and whatever that is. You know, my 12 year old daughter wants to make slime and sell it. And so we've been working on that that plan in that project, and she's still into it so much more patient man than me. We have slime and we put it high on the shelf and say We have it. Don't touch it. Yeah, yeah. So we actually buy her, you know, like kits so that she could make different types of slime and so, you know, she's still into it. So I'm like, You know what? I want to support you. Let's let's get all the pieces in place and, you know, she wants it to be a little bit of a faster process. But I'm like, Well, you know, right now with the way the world is right now, you can't just set ah, little shop up at the end of the driveway and and sell it. You know, we're gonna have toe make it in a way that that's safe and sustainable. And, um, and, you know, think about how much you need to make, like if we're going to do it that way, too. So it's a little bit of a different process than when I was a kid, you know, to just make, you know, kind of be like the kids who were making lemonade. But that's why I didn't make lemonade. I was like, What is it that I want to dio? Um I wanted to go fishing when I was a kid. I loved going fishing. I loved the fact that I could just sit there and, you know, uh, catch my dinner and I could listen to the birds, and I could, you know, paddle around in a boat while I was doing it. It was kind of combining all of these things that I love to dio and by doing a little bit of work in advance of it. I enjoyed that process a lot more because it's like, Wow, the boat that I'm in. Uh, you know, this inflatable boat that I'm paddling around was bought by selling, you know, thes earthworms and the fishing pole that I've got. My hand was bought by selling these earthworms. So I really appreciated all that that it brought me and it gave me an aspect in a an appreciation for, you know, things in general that I was doing the work to get those things, and and so I enjoyed all of it. And I think that, you know, part of me still wonders, you know, should I have kept doing that? E was making ah lot. But I also, you know, really loved it. Enjoy that. Then I I love what I'm doing now, you know, and And when I was voiceless and I kept thinking about what is the one thing that I I want to do for the rest of my life and the fact that everything revolved around, uh, you know what I am doing? It made me realize that with or without a voice, this is where I'm supposed to be in your industry mail. What do you find is a very important character trait for people tohave. Uh, Boy, I I think that it's, ah lot of, um a lot of patients Mhm. And, um, you...

...know, I've had a couple of clients where, you know, for example, I've had some billing issues with, you know, when you're working with ah, multinational corporation and, um, you you've sent an invoice and you're not getting paid if you, you know, call up in and you're, you know, blasting somebody out because that check is two days late. They're not gonna want to deal with you again. You might get it. Might be the last check might be the last last check that you get right now. It doesn't mean that, you know, somebody's trying to take advantage of you. You don't fire that client. But being being patient has always helped me, you know, being patient and being kind. Um, you know, those kind of two things together have always helped me with every client that I've that I've ever had. Um, you know, I have gone into, uh, a studio for something that was supposed to take 20 minutes and an hour and a half later. You know, I'm finally leaving, but it was worth it. Ultimately, it was worth it. That was well spent time and realizing that a zloty as you're spending that time and thinking about that, that long arc of where your time and your attention and your career is heading that it's not necessarily what you know. How is this gonna pay me off tomorrow? That's how is this gonna pay me off? Two months from now. How is this gonna pay me off two years from now and thinking about those things patiently and whether or not you're willing to invest that patients and what it is you're doing? Well, then you might not be in the right thing if it feels like you need an immediate payoff. Do you really love what you're doing That much? Yeah. And here in Korea, I I've learned the saying of Hurry up and wait because everything is everyone's in a hurry, and then you get to wherever it is and then your way, E I don't think the hurry up part is necessary, but sometimes it is, right? Like you got to get there, You gotta do this. But then you gotta wait. Yeah, yeah. And I would say that that has been any time that I've gone to somebody else's studio to record something. It's absolutely been the hurry up and wait. I get there early. I'm ready to go. You know, I'm hydrated. I've eaten so that you know, I'm not gonna have any need to step out of that studio once I step in there and then, you know, boom, like it's just we get there were waiting for one of the clients were waiting for one of the producers. Uh, they need to play it for somebody else. So I'm gonna have to go and hang Hang out. You know, back in, uh, you know, kind of the green room or the other room that you know, the outside of the studio while they make sure that everything's okay. I might have to go back in and we record something, and that's just a normal process. And that's something that I've just gotten accustomed to when I do something that somebody else's studio or I'm doing. Ah, remote session where somebody is connected to me, Uh, that I make sure that I've got plenty of time on both sides of that, so that everything is is set to go where it needs to go, because there's gonna be a lot of hurry up and wait. Absolutely. I only have a couple more questions for you. Is there anything that people may not understand about you and that if they understood this, they would have a better appreciation of you in the work that you're that you're doing? Um, yeah, I think it's One of the things that I you know I have in my about story was that I was actually a shy kid. I never, ever would have guessed that I would be behind a microphone and talking to people on any kind of a regular basis. It's one of those things that would have and did, uh, frighten me immensely, and I had anxiety about it. I still, um, you know, I still before I get on a microphone on a radio station or, you know, even on a zoom call. I have a little bit of anxiety about it, and that's one of those things that you know. People have literally shit to me. Well, why do you do it? And the answer is that it's worth it. And I've never regretted working my way through that anxiety or through that fear to get to the other side of it. And it turns for me. You know, it turns into energy, that anxiety that fear in advance turns into into into energy. And so being a kid who also the reason why is that? I stuttered, I stammered. I had a list and then my voice dropped. So add Thio, you know, a stutter or stammer list. I'm a tiny kid with this big, booming voice, uh, that I didn't even really wasn't fully able to use, and I had to learn how to use it. And once I learned how and I got behind a microphone, I just liked the feeling that I got from it and I didn't want to stop. So that's, I think, one of the reasons why I have a passion and a drive for this, because it was such the opposite of what I wanted to do in some ways. But I just I get such an appreciation out of doing it, and I love the fact that I'm...

...that I'm able to you know, that people keep putting a microphone in front of me and and asking me to share my thoughts, whether that's on a radio station, whether it's on, you know, a podcast or if it's even in a coaching session with somebody where you know they're looking for my feedback and my experience and my input on what it is that they're doing, I can't get the image, the image out of my head that, you know, whatever age but great. Two or three. Someone sat a big tuba on your lap. And you're like, What do I do with this? You can do with this bellowing noise, but then you learn to play it. And now you're blowing it out there. They're very well is is there? And I asked this next question about adversity. And it may be because you went to the speech therapy. You, As you said, you stuttered Anxiety. Is there some other adversity that you had faced in your life in? I asked that for you to be able to give advice to other people who are facing adversity. And, you know, some people are down and out and don't want to get working. They can't find work. They're not sure what their talent and interests our eyes, this adversity that you had faced that kind of helped you through that, or that you're going through now where you can relate to other people. Uh, gosh, yeah. I mean, I was just so stubborn that I, you know, I think that that that helped me through a lot of the adversity that I that I went through that, um you know, I didn't believe the bullies. You know, the people who would push me down and say that either I didn't have a voice or it wasn't important what I was saying or that, you know, my thoughts didn't matter. I didn't believe them. And and so I just those thoughts would creep in my you know, my own voice inside my head would be my my own worst critic at times, And, um and I I taught that critic had a had to think differently. And, um, it's something that I've heard Mawr of recently is talking internally, having that internal conversation with your felt with yourself in the third person saying like, Mel, you love doing this. You need to get up. You need to get out of bed. You're tired. It's early. You've got to get behind a microphone and you have no idea what you're going to say this morning. But you know that you're gonna you're gonna love it and it's gonna be worth it. And so you need to get up, Mel, get out of bed. And that's the voice I hear inside my head now. Whereas it would be like You're not worth it. Nobody wants to hear what you have to say. You know that same voice of those bellies and somehow I pushed through that. But the easier way now is when you know, retraining that voice inside my head to speak to me, not as me, but to speak. You know, speak to me as if it's a different person and, um, and it's now a cheerleader for me. And when it's criticizing me, it's doing so in a in a constructive way to help me be better. And and so I think if you can think of that voice inside your head as not being your worst critic but being your best critic and retraining that that it's gonna go far, it's really going to, uh, teach you. Well, you know, like asking yourself, Do I have everything ready for going into this day? Do I have everything ready for doing my job today? Um, and and thinking in those ways, rather than you're not good enough to do your job. Today is a way that's going to just pay back immensely. I think you even have the look. It's almost like being Quiano Reeves in The Matrix. Get up, Nero. Get up? Yeah, until we beat beat the system Because and most of times it's so true. We think we can't do it. And then we're doing it and then, like, that wasn't so bad. It wasn't so bad. Yeah, it never has been. It's never been as bad as I imagined that it would be even when it was bad. Yeah. And you know, uh, my stuttering and stammering one time really came out bad. And all I did is I was holding the microphone, you know, just a microphone just like this one. And I'm talking. And I just held it away from my voice. The stuttering ended and I brought it back in. And that's how I made it through almost an hour of my my body Just being like, Nope, we're stuttering today. And it was the last time it happened like that and, you know, But it was It was not as bad as I thought it was. And I made it through it. E mean, it's really good on you. It's really good on you. Thio have you know a difficulty like that? A challenge like that and to stay in radio to stay invoice work like this is the bread and butter and like, this is not like, Yes, I grew up my whole life and I just had a wonderful voice and...

...everything that I knew that I said it was going to be like roses and honey dripping from No, it wasn't at work, I think, I think literally one of my guidance counselors was like, You shouldn't do this. You've been in speech therapy. You've done the like. You shouldn't do this. And I'm like, But I want to. I really love doing it. He's like, Yeah, I just don't think it's a good idea And I didn't believe him and I and I and that has served me well. My just There's a guy that I know Frankie, Frankie MacDonald And he's introduced me to someone. Ah, Jack Cool. And he has autism. I'm going to interview him. But you think Okay, the person who had this baby who had autism, I mean depending on where you come from. But I believe he's from Nova Scotia, um Canada, and I think people look more favorably about people who are born differently and and arm or optimistic from the town that I grew up, but in other places of the world, like some people, I mean, some people kill babies that air not born perfectly on, let alone, you know, are. And where I come from, where I'm in this and Korea kind of shunned upon like you don't see people with disabilities. They're kind of hidden from the culture. And this guy has and does very well in his radio station. But you know, people in their whole life. And then Frankie and Dylan attack this week. This next week they start their own TV show and they both have autism. But it's just the idea, and it doesn't matter. Everyone has a problem. But I love those stories, no matter and, you know, not trying to compare us. But the idea is, we all have a story. We all have things that we're gonna pull us back. And if we listen to them and we're not getting up, we're not doing especially if we have an interest. So we have no interest in the thing. Like if you don't want to dig up earthworms, don't do it. But if you have a desire to make a buck can go do something, whatever it is, and you have the ability to work. And most people have the ability to work. They just use sometimes excuses. Sometimes they just need some time to get over some things. But go do something. And if it's something you have an interest in, get at it. Don't let these little things little bumps or whatever a warts or moles or whatever they are, hinder us from doing it. You've got a big ward on your nose coat. Be a model. Who cares? Yeah. Yeah, You will be unique. People will remember you. And it's, you know, it's just amazing that, you know, you've got yeah, people who have, you know, beauty marks where that used to be considered a flaw. Well, now that's your signature. E said that as a Crawford Crawford, right? I don't I didn't really mean, but that's what you know, Probably the kids. She was probably walking around going like this. Yeah, I'm sure that you know, somebody, somewhere made fun of her at least a couple of times because of that. You got some food on your feet. A little little something. Yeah, but, uh, yeah. I mean, if you're passionate about something. Don't let anybody stop you Don't let anybody, especially you talk you out of doing it. And it's usually you or usually. Yeah, Yeah, most people. Unless unless they're people that just have nothing better to dio. People don't care. Someone might say something, but people don't care what other people dio like. I'm a little bit shocked about how the generally speaking the world operates. And, well, this is a milestone. This is people don't care. Okay? You got a job. Good. Go do your job. I got to go to mine. I got to take care of my family. I have my own issues. I got to take care of myself. I'm getting fat. I got to stop eating chips. You know, like most people just stay in your own lane is probably best. Yeah, and I find that sometimes people will say something cold and cruel, not intending to, but it's because they're so distracted by whatever is going on in their head that they don't have the time to treat you with kindness. And we sometimes hold on to that as if it's, you know, the most important thing that's ever been said to us, and it's really a throwaway statement, and so we should do exactly that with it. We should just throw it away. It came from somebody who didn't have the time. They didn't have the energy for us. Uh, so we shouldn't have the time or energy for for those thoughts that are going to try to push us back and push us down. Isn't that in acting like a throwaway line? Just just just throw it away, just throw it away. Mel Allen. This has been a pleasure. How can people get in contact with you? Basically the real voice dot com or at the rial voicemail on most social media? I've tried to make it all work out like that. So those are the best ways to reach me. Uh, Mel, how are you with your podcast and at the end? I've been given this advice, and I'm so scared to do it by also me saying, It's funny. I'm saying it during the the show, but and also for mine subscribe share at a comment and hit the notification. But are you comfortable with saying that like you're the first person I've said it with an 83 episodes, but someone told me I better start doing it. Do you do that? I don't currently, and I've...

...been trying to find a way to kind of put that in there. Uh, it's really interesting because I've been hired by many people to do that for them and for their podcast. You know, do do an intro or doing outro because they don't want to be the one who's saying that. Um but I definitely have done it in previous ones, you know, like share subscribe comment below on. Give us some feedback. So yes, on Mel's podcast on mine, give us some feedback, get to subscribe, comment like and hit that notification button because apparently something I don't share it with your grandma and share. Yes, I'll gather around. Don't gather around. You know about it. Gather nowadays not not right now. No one. Final question, Mel. Sure. Why do you work? Why do I work? Uh, because I love what I dio. I really, really love what I do. And it really is one of those true statements where it's not that I It's not that I don't do work. It's just that I get so much out of it that at the end of the day or at the end of the week, um, well, I know that I've done work. It doesn't feel like it's been worked. And, um, I think I can describe it this way When I was doing the circuit training that I was talking about, we're working with the physical trainer. Um, I said to him, You know, the interesting thing is, the more that I do this, I find that the weights don't get any lighter. It just becomes less hard to pick them up. Mhm. And that's kind of doing what you love has that same kind of thing. It's, you know, the work is there. It's still work, but it just becomes a lot less hard to do it. So find something, you'll go do it. That's a good analogy. E. Go hiking up here. We have mountains all over the place, like I've been doing this for a while, and if I take a break and I get back to him like, oh, but then the day after next day, okay, but I'm still sweating it. Z not easy, but that's the perfect way need. I mean, we can't develop muscles. You can't learn anything if there's not some difficulty to it or some learning curve to it. Mel Allen, the rial voice Audio production. You also have any voices? Podcast. I appreciate the time that you have given me and the work that you dio. Well, I appreciate being here, Brian. Thank you so much. And, uh, I can't wait to hear more episodes of why we work. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive be a joyful day in your work.

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