WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 122 · 9 months ago

#122 Max Field - Director & Cinematographer & YouTuber -BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Max Field is a director, cinematographer, author, sound designer, screen writer, and into audio editing and mixing and music. Max also has a sizeable YouTube following who love his creative genius. Max will be directing a feature film, or ten, over the next several years.

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...welcome to why we work with your hostBrian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as wetogether dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seeminglymissteps, hopes, warnings and advice, which will be an encouragement to usall to get up, get going and keep on working. Working is tough, but workingis good. Now here's your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian V, and this iswhy we work today. I have the great pleasure speaking with Maxfield, alsoknown as S B N three Soul brother Number three Max is a directorcinematographer. He's into sound. He has much talent. He's an influentialyoutuber. But today I want to find out from Max, knowing that he wants todirect his own feature film. What is he doing? What is the process to reachthat goal, to reach that dream and what he's actively doing each day to achieveit? Join me today in my conversation with Maxfield Spn three. I'm Brian V,and this is why we work today. I had the great pleasure speaking withMaxfield a k a s B N three Good day. Find sir. How you doing? I'm doing doing well,Max. Will you do his favor? And you and I were just speaking. You justmentioned it. But tell us the industry that you're in and what you're up tonowadays. And even though there's a covid going on, maybe what you wouldnormally be doing if this wasn't the case? Generally, what I do is I work in theentertainment industry. Sometimes the video production industry I produce, uh,commercials, infomercials, documentaries. Uh, just got my firstdirected documentary distributed on Amazon Prime earlier this year or nolast year. Um, but then, uh, I sort of like half my income is my own selfproduced works which have gotten a fan base of, you know, a few 1000 people.Uh, I mean, yeah, it's sort of it's a lot of everything, but I just sayentertainment industry, because that's just like, nice blanket term. But, youknow, I do a bit of the creative end, and I also do a lot of the audio videotechnical end as well, which, as I've sort of spoken with more and morepeople who know that a V technical lend somebody who also writes and directsthat you know both of those together aren't super common. So I sort of fillthe niche where I take care of everything for a company or a client.There's no doubt that you're talented and I'd like to get into that. But canyou bring us back Max to maybe what would have been your very first jobever as a as a pre teen or teenager? Uh, first job ever. See, that's thething is that I started. I started super early. I started at 17 years old,and so, you know, I didn't really I didn't grow up in a rough enoughsituation where I had to, like, get a job as like a 16 year old. So Iimmediately went into, uh, just immediately went into video productionand and just, you know, at first, like, you know, for the first year, kind ofnot really taking it too seriously, uploading whenever I felt like it, youknow, trying to meet people emailing every now and then. But, uh, I mean, asfar in regards to to manual labor and stuff like that, because I started soearly and and I tried so hard so early because I didn't want a manual laborjob. I've never had one of those manual labor jobs in terms of wages,McDonald's and all that, and within a couple years by, you know, and I wasonly able to do that because I was a teenager with no responsibilities. Youknow, I didn't, You know, 18 19 didn't have school or I did college for asemester, and I dropped out because they were teaching me about videoproduction at all. So I had to find that education myself. And so I wentafter all that, And, um but yeah, by my early, I would say by, like, maybe 20or 21. So it took a couple of years for sure, but by 20 or 21. And also I hadthe privilege of of not needing a job as well, and that's something a lot ofpeople don't mention. But by 20 or 21 I was probably making more than a job atMcDonald's would have gotten me, which, with a high school degree, that's allyou can really get nowadays. So, uh, I was like, Well, okay, I'm already doingthis. I didn't want to spend money on all that college because I was seeinghow expensive it was, even community college, how expensive it was incomparison to what I was actually learning pertaining to what I wanted todo in life. So, um so, yeah, that's sort of that's sort of how I startedoff, and YouTube was a huge part of that. You mentioned the idea of nothaving to work having the privilege not to work. But I think there's You mayagree or disagree, but the idea of...

...having Children work at 12, whatever, Imean the legal age. But some people do a lemonade stand or sell cards or do abunch of things. There's also some value in that, regardless of whetheryou're able to do it or you need to do it or you don't need to do it, Wouldyou agree with that, like having kids start to work and understand that thevalue of a dollar, what it you know, work ethic and all that comes with it? So actually, well, then, when you putit that way, in that case, I guess I was working and doing other things asearly as maybe 14. Where a big way. I made money. Still not really working,but a big way I made money was, uh and this was before video game collectingwas huge, you know, after, like, 2014, it kind of boomed, but, uh, you know,Oh, 9, 2010. I would, uh I would go up to kids in school and, you know, likethe old Nintendo 60 four's and stuff like that, I go up to them and I'd be,you know, and these kids, you know, they want money for pot or whatever. SoI go up to him and I'm like, Hey, uh, you got in 64 with all the games. I'llgive you 20 bucks for it. And there, you know, they would, like, try to,like, you know, finance people like 25. I'm like, Okay, 25. And so they show upwith a duffel bag and 60 for 10 games. I flip that for $100 on eBay, and sothat's great. Like, that's what this is, right. That's what this is the idea ofwhat starts you, what gets you going. And some people think, Oh, my, myprofessional career job. It wasn't until I was 25 that I started. No. Whatwas the thing that started you when you were a kid? And what really got yourjuices flowing? Yeah, I mean, so it's weird. It's theconcept of Of I mean, how do I put it? The concept of, like, you said thevalue of a dollar that was that wasn't still, uh, since maybe 11. Because, uh,my dad would always show me he had a couple of basketball cards and baseballcards, and he showed me and they were in the top loader. You know, the hardplastic, Uh, and that's another thing I do are like, So, for instance, I gotone right here, like you see how the card is in the hard plastic there, so yeah, Penny sleeve. Yeah. And so, like,this is probably, like, maybe 2000 and four. My dad showing me this, uh, andand he was like, Oh, yeah, this is worth a lot of money, you know, becauseI kept it, you know? And the reality is that it was it was a Michael Jordanbasic card, not a rookie, not auto. Not not anything so it was worth like adollar. But, you know, like you sort of get tricked into it. And then, you know,as a kid, I guess the first like thing I went into in terms of money andlooking at price guides and all that was basketball cards. You get theBeckett basketball magazine, uh, and then, like you know, you get into Ugoand then all the money flip there. And so it was a lot of I mean, I'll behonest. It was a lot of not manual labor. The only time I really got intomanual labor was when I realized I needed to light properly to make goodlooking images. And then so you get into all the heavy equipment, the one ktungsten, the you know, the stuff that you'd see on like a real cinema sets.So it's It's weird. I, you know, I sort of was able to get. This is why it'sstrange is like some people would would look at that as like a very, you know,illustrious privileged lifestyle and all this and, you know, to an extent,yeah, okay. But I had plenty of friends and I knew plenty of people growing upwho were 18 19. No job not doing anything but playing video games allday. And they had the exact same time frame that I had to do what I set outto do. So you know it. It could go a million different ways, but no, justthe concept of of not showing up not, you know, waking up hitting the alarmclock at eight in the morning and you grow ogling every day to to work orschool or whatever. Like, I wanted to avoid that so much. I had cripplinginsomnia, and I missed probably 70 days, one year of high school, and then thenext year it was like, you know, another 65 60. And so, like I saw, It'snot that I thought I was above a regular job, but I thought I couldn'tdo it. I thought, like I didn't have the body do because, like, what job isgoing to keep a guy who misses 60 days, they're gonna fire your ass, you know?So I had to I had to make a living based around, you know? Okay, I'll worka lot like I was I was willing to work a lot, but I couldn't control when Iwould wake up or go to sleep because of that insomnia. And I couldn't haveaccess to sleeping pills too young for that. You know, now I can. But, uh, youknow, it's it's stuff like that, Um, where, you know, that's sort of howlife works. You know, little quirks in your life sort of put you in the pathyou're on today. There's a I was reading something the other day, andit's some sort of path that I think I appreciate the idea of just wonderinghow the school system works, the value in it and what they've been doingcompared to what has been done years ago. And I was reading someone, and youjust mentioned the value in playing,...

...which is obvious. But it's not alwaysobvious, say, in a classroom, and allowing kids to play and kids get sobusy. I live here in South Korea, where even my own Children tend to fall onmore of the work side of things, and it is in play because they have school.Then they have after school academies, then they have homework and then it'slike, where do we squeeze in playtime as a kid? Is there some sort of thingthat you enjoy doing? Was it just video games as it, like, maybe say 7 to 12 orsomething? Was there something that you played at a lot that you really enjoyedsomething that you recall 7 to 12? I mean, I was super intobasketball. Um, you know, because I was one of the taller kids. I'm 63 now, Um,and so I went to a lot of camps, like, every summer. I went to a basketballcamp for like, about a month. Um, and so yeah. So basketball idolizing, youknow, You know Michael Jordan. I'm from D. C. So? So the guy in that icon isGilbert Arenas. And so that was you know, Washington, D C. Hasn't had asports star like that in 15 years. So that's why I haven't changed it. Sobecause, you know, and it was special about Gilbert Arenas is that he wasn'tdrafted and forced to play there. He signed to us, you know? So it was likethat thing of like, wow, somebody actually chose to be in Washington d Cbecause that's where I'm from the D C Beltway area. And so and so it was. Itwas one of those things where I guess that's where you initially learn aboutwork ethic and practice and stuff like that. Maybe where you see, you know,the stories of Kobe Bryant? Uh and I thought the one silver lining of whenKobe Bryant died in the plane or no, the helicopter accident was would youknow, the average person outside of a basketball fan would start looking intothis guy and how amazing he was And like the level of preparation that wentinto everything he did. And unfortunately, that didn't reallyhappen. Uh, you know, people still, you know, like the average girl or theaverage guy who likes video games? Oh, he was a good basketball player orwhatever, but, uh, you know, so and that's and I think that's whatseparated me amongst other film people and art people and stuff like that isthat in the film and then the arts, they don't talk about, you know,working back to back 14 hour nights up till four AM But in sports they talkabout that all the time they talk about, you know, grinding your body throughthis stuff and working when sick and, you know, working, you know, regardlessof the condition. You know, you know a guy again like Kobe Bryant. This is aguy who's who's having muscle spasms in his back, and that would cripple anyother person. And he goes out there to play because there's another goodplayer on the other team and he's like, Oh, it's gonna look really bad if Idon't, You know, And and these guys are partially psychotic. Uh, you know,they're They're not like all the screws aren't there, but at the same time,like that's sometimes being crazy is what enables you to be great, you know,like and so one of my fascinations moving on it started with, you know,you know, Kobe and Jordan and guys like that and then moved on to Penn andTeller to um Oh, my God. To Tiger Woods to, uh, let's see who was another one.Damn, this is gonna kill me. Michael Jackson. Oh, my God. Michael Jackson.You know, uh, and moved on to these guys and you would see a lot ofsimilarities in the preparation they did in the creative divergence they had.Um, but yeah, I'm not sure if that answers the question or just it doeswhere you play. No, no, no. It's not at all where you played and and yourmotivation and basketball and seeing in these individuals their work ethic,which isn't always at the forefront of people's minds when they think of thatparticular craft. So when you started to get into audio and video, when didyou I know you went to college for Took a few credits When you realized thatwasn't for you, when did you realize this was for you and that you weregetting some traction? Was there You gotta pay day one day was that you gotto, like on a video. How did that transpire for you? So it's weird. Um, okay, so I mean, Iwas trying to make because I saw YouTube and I saw that other peoplewere making short films and stuff like that. You know, guys like like make mebad. 35 Like he's a throwback for anybody who was around back then, buthe was like, Oh, eight YouTube, you know, and and that's the kind of that'sthe part of YouTube that I really romanticized. Uh, and so you would seethese guys make little comedy skits. And so when I was, like 13, that's whenI first got a YouTube summer of 2000 and seven. I was, you know, I wastrying to make you know, a bunch of shorts with friends and stuff like that,and so that was like the initial sort of okay, shooting, editing. You don'tcare about exposure. You don't care about framing. You don't care aboutwhat's this shot means you don't care about. Oh, is this script going to payoff later? You're just literally just trying to be funny with a camera. Andso it's It's kind of you can make stuff very quick like that, and you know,you're able to just get something out on weekend and it's all good. Um, andthen a couple years later, I kind of, you know, I kind of lost interest in it.I would still play around, but I wasn't really doing as much as I did when Iwas in middle school, and then, um and...

...then one day I was in. I think it was amarketing class senior year. So So this is what, like maybe three or four yearslater, and they're like, Oh, everybody has to a movie trailer. And so, uh, youknow, like everyone else, you know, marketing is, like, kind of a big slackoff class, like nobody really cares. And so, uh, everyone's like, Oh, Idon't know. And there's something in me I was like, Okay, I'll do it because noone else is gonna fucking do it. So the, uh so I I do it, we shoot it, I go home,I take in the edit it because I had, like, real editing software because,you know, back in middle school, So I take it edited every other kids thingis trash. And I was the only person who actually showed up with, like,something that really resemble the movie trailer. And so, you know, youknow, like, I didn't really care about 17 like I was so disinterested ineverything you know, depression, all this and so I I specifically rememberthe marketing teacher was like, He's like, Do you do videos like, is thatwhat you do like Is that what you want to do? Like for money? And I looked andI said, I'll do anything for money, so, you know, and so they were like, Oh,you shouldn't say that. But so, you know, So that's that's when I sawWhat's that? But you mean they're saying you shouldn't say that, but Butseriously, I will do whatever, but But now So, uh, so, you know, I sort of tookthat. And then, uh, it just got to a point where, you know, it's it's one ofthose things where, uh, okay, every kid is just sort of brainwashed intothinking. Oh, well, you need to go to college. And so I'm 18 now, And I'mlike, Okay, I guess I'll do the media degree. Like like I don't know. Youknow, my dad didn't really care. Like what? He's just going to college. So SoI do that. And that mentality is screwing over so many kids today, atleast in America. And I don't know how Korea is, Um, but so Okay, so, uh, butyeah. No, No. So let's see. Yeah. So I'm doing that, And, uh, that's sort ofhow a transition uh, I remember there was there was a gap. Um, it was betweensemesters. It was between the winter and spring semester. And, you know, itwas just after the spring semester, and I finished math, and I I got another C.I had probably a 2.5 in college after three college credits. And, um, youknow, I and I wasn't gonna start again until, you know, September or wheneverthe new semester started. So it's 2013. I'm like, Okay, I'm gonna really takethis YouTube thing seriously. And it was a little like, one day I just wokeup in bed like March 2013. I was like, I'm like, Dude, if I don't do something,I'm going to turn into, like, one of these other losers I see on theInternet all day. So you know, So I'm literally producing two shorts a weekevery week. It's like 100 to 110 hours a week, not a single day off. Nothing.And I'm just working for purpose. I'm just trying to see if I can getsomething to happen because you come to that crossroads where it's like a lotof people go through this thing. I think it's interesting a lot. Mostpeople have this thing where they're like, Oh, well, me and a year. We'llfigure it out. You know me. In 10 years, we'll figure it out, you know, Andpeople, they sort of, like, you know, stumble through life like that. Um, and,you know, I made the decision that, like, 18.5 where I was like, I'm notgoing to be the guy who just stumbles into it. I'm just gonna do it, and I'mgonna I'm gonna try. And so but yeah, I probably produced man. I probablyproduced, like, 60 videos, like, you know, written, edited, shot directedvideos in in a year. And, you know, the sub count went from, you know, maybe itwasn't so big at first. It was It was, You know, the sub count was maybe 2000subs, too. I don't know, like, 4000. That's it, you know, But which is bigfor some, But in terms of making money off YouTube, that's nothing. And so ButI guess, like that's sort of the thing is like when you're really, reallytrying at something, you know, And when I teach workshops on YouTube marketing,what I tell people is it's not like, Oh, you do this, this and that it willhappen. You got to consistently produce for 2 to 3 years and you are guaranteedto see some sort of movement. You are guaranteed to have routine followingand stuff like that. But a lot of people can't get over that hump. Andagain, the only reason I was able to do that there's people with jobs, peoplewith responsibilities, people with families. The only reason. The onlyreason I could do that. I was a kid with no responsibilities, and and I saw,and I saw that I was able to do it. I didn't quit on it. I kept doing it. Andthen by the time it was time to, you know, re enroll for some credits incollege was like, Screw that. I'm done And so and that was probably like, youknow, September, October after I produced maybe 30 videos and you knowso so that's sort of that's sort of how it goes. But but it's a risk. It's amassive risk and, you know, for for a...

...good like three years, there was suchanxiety over like, did I make the right decision? And after you get over thathump where you start seeing some of the dollars rolling, you're like, Oh, thankGod I didn't go in debt for that. Thank God. You know, college or whatever. Andthen I was also realizing, as I learned more and more, and I started takingworkshops where I started teaching workshops. Um, where college is, How doI put it? Where college students, sometimes Yale graduates, Ivy leaguegraduates were showing up to learn about how to write a joke. How to, youknow, shoot. Uh, you know, this shot I would go over stuff like my professordidn't talk about this at all. They just talked about missing son, and theytalked about all this shit that nobody cares about. Uh, if you're actuallytrying to work on a film set on a film set, they want people. They wantelectricians. They want people who can move heavy things. They want the guywho can light. They want the guy who can, you know, uh, you know, accuratelyfocus the lens, you know, using the measurements and all that stuff. That'swhat they want. They don't want Mr Creative. You know, that's and what I'mwhat I'm alluding to are the blue collar jobs of cinema. Not the writer,not the director, not the producer. The guy moving the light, the guy who knowshow to organize all that stuff. That's the majority of the jobs people arelooking for, uh, in cinema, but also, you know, but so I see that these thesekids showing up, they don't know, You know, like I'm teaching all thesethings that Professor didn't teach. I did a video on a d r. And how that goes,I'm getting I'm getting d end. Uh, universities are Arizona StateUniversity. Uh, that was one specific, which is the highest attendance in theentire country. They're playing my video in their media classes. So, youknow, and that was Thank you. So So. 2017 2018. That's what I realized. Justme doing whatever like me, like grinding by myself not, you know,waiting for someone else's curriculum. I have you know, I have surpassed whatis required of a degree just on my own. But that happened because of constantinsecurity that happened because, you know, even now, like like are are youlike, Oh, you're an expert. I still I still don't think I'm an expert becauseyou always have to surround yourself with people way better than you, orelse you're never gonna get better. You know, that's kind of how it goes. Well,I said this to you before we started. You speak so clearly and listening tothat the video that you just mentioned and any of your other ones you on thereyou sound like a wise old man, right? Just bring in truth to people that isapplicable to this industry, right? And if people are not in the industry, youmay not be interested, but you may enjoy your movies, which you're funny,right? You're writing this stuff as well. You you like, you have thisability to write, to speak, to present, and obviously with your editing and allthat goes in behind the scenes, as as you mentioned about a basketball playeror singers or whatever. There's a lot of work that you put into it. So youare and and for you to be What are you? 26 20 26 right to be 26. Like I said to you awhile ago, I'm an I was an idiot. I still am an idiot. But I was an idiotat 26 for you to be thinking like I got to put in this time because I don'thave this responsibility. I don't have those things to do. And I'm going to dothis now while I can, right? Like there is a saying, I think, you know, put inwhile the I don't know that it's not raining or whatever it is. What I sayis what I say is, uh if you don't do it now, it'll never happen. That's what I say and that works. Ilike it right, and that's what you're doing. And so I commend you for whatyou're doing. And so I heard you say that your your dream, your goal. You may not haveused dreamer goal, but your aspiration is to direct your own feature film.Would that be accurate to an extent? And I do it here andthere little bits like I'm producing a video game right now. That's the lengthof two feature films. Um, but it's still not, You know, it's not thatshooting, you know. It's not, you know, it's it's not what I want to do, whichis, you know, like the classic American film, like I want to make you know, Iwant to make the next not even, like, not even like Citizen Kane. Like likeI'm not really into that stuff like I'm into, like Josie and the Pussycats thatcame out in 2000 and one. I love that movie. You know, I like not anotherteen movie like I like I like all this stuff that was on Comedy Central thateveryone said, Oh, yeah, it sucks. But me and my friends we watch and we'relike, dude, this great, you know, like, um and you know, like, you know, likeKevin Smith movies and Spike Lee movies, you know, stuff like that, Like that.Sort of the stuff I'm into. So, what does this look like for you? What doesthis look like for you to be where you are now and and to be young to, youknow, you're you're exercising your...

...working out on the side. You're doingall that you need to do to gain that experience to gain the knowledge. Yousay you're not an expert, but you're you're striving to be. What does thatprocess look like for you to get to the opportunity to direct your own featurefilm? And what are you doing to attain that, uh, talking with an investor inSingapore right now, I might get some good money to do animated pilot, um,doing animations. Okay, because I sure as hell there's no way we can get themoney together to do a live action pilot, because I was just God, there'stoo much money and too much organizing in hotels and all that, but, you know,through doing that work, you know, it got my talents out there, And so youwould meet people who would meet you through the YouTube. One time I did ananimated pilot for someone that paid, you know, a couple $1000. They put itup wherever they were trying to shop at the Netflix. Um, you know, But thereality is is that, uh, every everybody needs a big break. Everybody needs alucky break, You know that? That's just kind of how it goes. And, uh, you'reyou're waiting for that one right connection. You know, you have anetwork of people. If one of them gets a TV deal, I know that they're going tocall me to do audio. I know that they're going to call me to write jokes.They might call me to act, you know, And so that's a big thing. Likecreating this this tightly woven web of people. Um, you know, to see, you know,Okay, if one of us take off, we're all gonna take off, and, you know, it'ssort of, but but yeah, I mean, the reality is is that unless unlesssomeone comes through and, you know, gives a blank cheque or someone comesthrough and says, Hey, I spotted this and I want to put you on unlesssomebody says that I I am never going to be the star. People think this workethic would lead to, um and that's that's the unfortunate reality. Um, andso, like, I'm first generation entertainment. I don't I didn't have asingle connection in any of this when I started, and so, uh, you know, Sothat's that's kind of the thing. Nepotism has only works for me. Onetime. Uh, and that was doing an infomercial where I was underpaid, uh,to go all the way up to New Hampshire to, uh, you know, do an infomercial for,uh, and uncles geology company. But that's, you know, that that's that'spretty much the only time nepotism really worked for me. And so, you know,you kind of develop a thing against second generation entertainment people.You know, You see, people talk about how talented Billy relishes or whoever,and I'm like, Dude, like her whole family is in the music industry. Icould have easily done that. You know, I Dude, if you know, if if my dad wasHoward Stern, I would have been the next Howard Stern. You know, likethat's just that's just kind of how it goes. Um, and so but no, But you reallyrespect the first generation entertainment people. You reallyrespect Kevin Smith, who maxed out three credit cards to get 27,000 toproduce his first feature. You know, I'm that game I mentioned earlier. I'mprobably, you know, 10 12,000 in the hole for that. And, uh, you know, I'mI'm just trying to make it happen. But, you know, you gotta be. You gotta besmart with money, you know, you can't. You can't waste it on, You know, a newcar. You can't waste it on. You know, anything there is a while. I mean, Ibuy a lot of memorabilia and stuff like that, as you might have seen in some ofthe videos. Um, but there was there was a three year stretch where Ibarely spent any money. I didn't buy new clothes. I didn't buy anything forleisure at all. Uh, and I didn't I didn't start, you know, spendinganything until I was making you know, you know, not well into the fivefigures, Let's say and so, um, you know, but But that's just that's theunfortunate thing that that everyone has to know. Going into it is that, youknow, your talent might lead to a connection, But you gotta understandyou're not gonna pop off like like a superstar. You're not gonna pop offuntil the machine is behind you And a lot of your videos. You have thingsthat have personal meaning to you that other people would not reallyunderstand unless they knew you better I see you have KFC chicken in there alot. Is this a personal faith? Is I saw itwith your your Fred and Bernie The bucket? Um, no. I mean, that was justthe thing. I mean, I prefer Popeye's more. I love Popeyes. Have you evertried Korean Chicken? Do you have that? Not in your area. I'msorry. Oh, no, no, no. Korean Fried Chicken chicken is delicious. Just soyou know, they do a hot sauce. It's delicious. I am a very lower middle class,American raised sort of kid. My palate is very American. Uh, the only EastAsian food I can eat is Sarko Japan in the food court. That's all I can do.I'm sorry. I know Korean chicken,...

Korean chicken. They kind of stole theidea from North America. So it's not. It's not like Asian chicken. It's likespicy, crispy. And I think it gives a good run for the money to any otherchicken play. In my personal opinion, do you have a script that you ifsomeone offers you one day, maybe maybe give a try? It's delicious. Believe me,I've lived in Korea for 11 years. They have some pretty delicious food. Um,but also some food that I stay away very far away from. But the chicken isjust It's a fried fried chicken would become spicy or soy sauce. Uh, do youhave a script that you that you have prepared and ready for an opportunityfor a feature film for a pilot? Yes, for a feature film?No, uh, one of the dub feature thing that I made taste closed. So it's anhour long. One of the one of the things I did when writing that was I avoidedbecause it was footage used from something else. But what I avoided, Iavoided any character referring to each other by name. And so I have all theaudio and all the writing done for a project. And so if somebody came along,I could technically produced that the right way. I can produce that the rightway and have, uh, you know, completely free of copyright. You know, somebodysays, Oh, I'll put up, you know, 250,000 to get this animated. That'stechnically my first feature. Um, you know not, you know, legit like I can. Ican sell that to somebody I can distribute on Netflix. Um, I have topay for about 10 songs to be licensed to with that audio, but, uh, you know,But then I have a pilot script. That's a that's a 22 minute thing, Sort oflike a gen z Seinfeld. Um, and so I got that registered by W G A for 25 bucks,So I mean, yeah, so no one's let's hope nobody steals that when I pitch itaround. But, yeah, I know it's unfortunate. Like the only way peoplewill listen to a pitch meeting is if they're a fan of you or, you know, youhave a rich uncle, you know, but yeah. Speaking of work ethic, I think maybeyou can talk about maybe your methodology, the reason why you'redoing it. But I heard you're not. You have a good following for your YouTubechannel, but you're not making a significant amount of money in yourwords. But you mentioned a moment ago half or something, but you're makingsome money there, but that's not the sole purpose of why you're doing it.But you're you put so much time into that. So what is your reasoning forthat? So that interview was a bit dated. Itwas pre covid and pre release of the thing. The So what happened was is sothat that tastes close Feature that our long feature, it gets taken down forcopyright on YouTube. So, uh, it had to be put up on on a patreon. And, uh, andat first, like a bunch of people came on. And now the patreon numbersprobably triple overnight. And so we get that and then, you know, from from,you know, small amount, uh, you know, But it triples overnight, and now it'snow it's actually, like, you know, making a good chunk of money. It wasthe highest numbers I had in the history of the PATREON then. So acouple of months goes by. And then I was like, What if I made a trailer forthis? You know, because it's a feature, you know, because for the longest time,I was so against making a trailer for for something for like, a short,because it's it's corny. It's like just watch the short. You know, it's only,you know, it's only eight times longer than the trailer But now I had an hourlong thing. So I was like, Okay, let's make a trailer for it And I put thattrailer out and what went from tripling. So it was tripled. Then it tripledagain. And now it's making, like, some passable money. And so So that's why Isaid half now is because now it's changed the VHS tapes because becausewe had two features were produced physical VHS tapes. Uh, and, uh,initially, people would get those for 30 bucks. Can you explain 30 bucks whenthey would back? Can you explain your reasoning for the VHS tapes as well? Bootleg culture, VHS tapes? You know,it's initially we did the VHS tape because, uh, we first did Pokemon, uh,one of those movies, and initially, uh, we would we would take scenes ofPokemon. We put in modern hip hop and modern R and B, and we had we knew aguy who could who could convert things to VHS, get them recorded on VHS, putit in a tape player and bring it back with all the coloration, and I firstdid it with the credit sequence of the first Pokemon movie. We were like, Thisis a vibe. We were like, Oh, my God, this is cool. Then I'm talking to acouple people, and they're like, we should get some money together and dothe whole thing. And so So we did that. We got I mean, we only got, like, 1000bucks together just to produce not, you...

...know, nonprofit. Uh, but we said as anincentive, So if you give this much, you'll get a VHS tape mail to you whenit's out. And so we produced VHS tape to the whole cover, and then we alsodid that, you know, keeping tradition. We did that with the other one tasteclothes, which came out three years later. And so now on the second handmarket, Uh, because his clothes got so big, people initially got those for 30.Uh, I was seeing people sell them for 120 152 100. And so it became It becamethis thing where it was for the longest time, I was so into collectibles I wasinto, you know, Ugo and Christine Aguilera and Michael Jordan and allthis stuff and all this, So keep the condition good. And and now I'm makingthe things where people are like, Oh, yeah, I gotta drop 200 on that. It's aninvestment, you know? And so so that was really interesting people. Peoplewanted me to sign it. And it was a thing where it was like it was a thingwhere it was like, how do I put it? I never practiced my signature as a kid.You know, I I knew all these kids in school who would practice theirsignature. And I'm like, you were a pretentious asshole. What are you doing?Nobody wants that. And so I never did it. But now, uh, like my signaturelooks hideous when I do so now, like I I have to start thinking about that.And so it's It's weird how stuff like that comes full circle, but yeah, I hadto sign a couple. The sign ones are worth more obviously than the regularones. But now, like I had a couple of friends, and they're like, damn this,You know, I paid 30. It was $100. This is this is the best return I ever goton backing a project. You know, So, um yeah, that's what I liked. Well, no,that's what I liked about what you said. And what was true for you is fromYouTube itself. You weren't making as much money as you were with your bluecollar job or working in the lights and editing and all the other work that youwere doing, which but you were still putting in the effort, which I thoughtthat was analogous to people who want to follow a dream, want to followsomething. They want to do something, and they might have to put in that timeand not get See that return right away. And for you, it seems like you'regetting your name out there. There was there was a purpose behind. It wasn't.I'm not going to make money, and I'm happy with that. But you're gettingyour product out there. But at the same time, you were getting exposure, and Ijust the idea of people putting in that effort even though they may not see thefruits of their labor right away. Yeah, that's a hump. A lot of peoplecan't get over creatively, and it's kind of sad. Uh, you know, it's youknow you have to work a lot of people. You've got to work for free and cheapsometimes you know, especially for your own stuff. And, you know, people. I seeso many people just talk themselves out of it constantly, and it's just like,Okay, well, I guess you don't want to do it then, Like, you know, it's notlike, Oh, we lost a great talent. It's like, No, like you gotta have If you'regonna be a great talent, you've got to have that mentality of like, I'm gonnawork, you know? I'm going to work for it was a business day one for me. A lotof people stumble into it. A lot of people just make something randomly. Oh,it's a viral thing. You know, I had made so many hours of content beforestuff I was doing was getting clipped out, going viral, instagram, Facebook,all that stuff. It was it was a multi year process. And, uh, you know, uh, 76years had to trust the process where they're tanking and everything's goinghorribly, and they're not winning, But they're trying to get those draft picks.And now they're like a really good team because they trusted the process. Samething with this. You got to trust the process. You have to You have to be,you know, working like it's the most important thing in the world. If youwant it to be the most important thing in the world, regardless of who'swatching, regardless of who's seeing it. And so that's the thing a lot of peopledon't see. Um, you know, even people with production budgets, you run intosome lucky stuff like, I'll explain to other people who are trying to do music,stuff or whatever I'm like. You gotta upload three mixtapes a year, dude.Three, which is, you know, about maybe 40 songs, even that, you know, I sawthere was a There was a There was a hip hop artist, uh, named XV, and he wasreally big in the, you know, the late two thousands early 20 tens. He had aproject called 40 Days, 40 nights, where he uploaded to songs a day, everyday for 40 days. And so I saw that at, like, 18. I'm like, Well, damn, I gotto try to do something like that. And so, uh, you know it's stuff like that.And, uh, but yeah. What? What is your Your hand in music? I went on soundsoundcloud, And, uh, some of that music is great. I mean, all that I heard wasgreat. What? What is your hand in that? Are you writing? You're producing? Uh, I mean, sometimes, you know, hiphop. Gonna take some beets a couple of times. Some stuff I produce myself interms of just the instrumental. Some stuff a friend will show up. A lot ofit is pretty much sampling. Uh, it...

...depends on the track, but but as far asrecording and writing and mixing doing the final mix and master, that's all me. You're multitalented. Do you have anyadvice for people thinking of you buying games from kids for 2025 buckswhen you're in middle school or even changing your job? Right when you got alittle older, you're changing positions, doing different jobs. Do you have anyadvice for people who are getting into work one way or another, their firstjob or their second job? No, I mean what Sorry. I mean, it'sgood word it Sorry. I know it's That's good. No, I don't have anybody. Go. Goget a job if you want. I mean again. I mean, you know, thereare a lot of people again, I I need to reiterate this. It's not I didn't wastemy privilege. That's the way I look at it. It's not like I came fromabsolutely nothing. And, oh, I pulled myself up by my bootstraps like I can'tthat's that's not honest. Like I can't project this reality that like, Oh, Iwas working two jobs and I did YouTube on the side. But, you know, I was awake,you know? You know, 20 hours a day. I can't I don't want to sell anyone thatfantasy. You know? There are people where, you know, you know, they'reThey're I don't know, they're in a poverty situation and they have to worktwo jobs. Since they're 16, they have to drop out of high school. Ifsomeone's in that situation, they probably can't do what I did, you know?And so, uh, that's what I but at the same time, like I know so many richkids who, you know, just screw around all the time, you know, and then theyhit you up, like, you know, 10 years later, after high school. Oh, bro, Howdid you do that? You know, And it's like like, Dude, you wasted yourprivilege. Your parents had more money than mine, you know? And so that's kindof the thing. Like like I saw and recognized the opportunity and theprivilege at a very young age. I recognize a lot of things at a veryyoung age. When I was when I was 14 or 15, I realized I'm never going to seeany of these kids in high school again. I will. After graduation, I will neversee these kids. So all I did was screw with people for the last three yearshigh school because I knew it wouldn't matter. None of it would matter not itstill hasn't still hasn't come back to me. And so I was. I was always sort of,uh, you know, like it's whatever. Like, you gotta you gotta see stuff beforeeverybody else does. Saying with the video game stuff, you know, I was doingthat in 2010, collecting video games and flipping them, you know, and 60 forstuff that didn't become a concept until, you know, like a widespreadconcept until maybe 2013. 14 once. Remember the nineties and all thatstuff started happening. You mentioned that you're not an expert, but what isa skill that you are working on to help you become the director that you hopeto be? And also what sort of skill is absolutely necessary in theentertainment industry that you've seen so far? There's a lot of skills necessary. Um,uh, to rail off a couple. Um, communication is key adaptability. Andjust like the the work ethic to block out pain and block out annoyance andblock out this and that, uh, persistence. One thing I heard wasemotional. Self empathy. That was another thing I heard in terms of. Evenif something isn't so good, you can't beat yourself. You have to have shortterm memory loss of all the bad stuff. And you gotta keep going. Um, and thenBut the thing is, what's unique about me is there are a lot of guys who are,you know, writer director people. Uh, it's it's hard to find a writerdirector guy who knows more about the technical end of cinema than me. Andthat's sort of that's where I was able to separate myself and really, you know,and be able to make high quality content and be able to teach others isbecause I just wanted to learn all of filmmaking, like so you want to be adirector? You know, it's not just Oh, I'm gonna learn how to write and directand, like, think up scenes and all that. I learned every part of the process. Soanother part is like never thinking you're above learning something. Neverthinking, you know. So I wanted to learn. How do they do Audio. I wantedto learn. Um, what kind of lights are they using? Not even how do I lightsomething? What kind of lights are they using? That was impossible to figureout, you know, five years ago, because there wasn't, like, a million YouTubevideos on it. You know how to, uh, not five years ago, I'd say more like sevenyears ago. But like, you know, there was a million. I was trying to figureout what light stands do they use? What's the real stuff? How do we getoverhead lights? What's the speed rail. What's, um, you know, you know what aresandbags for Apple box? How do we get, you know, a camera angle low? How doHow do they get the camera to move so smoothly? How do they, uh, you know,like, how do they make that like, right...

...here? Someone might ask, How does heget the light to look like that? You know, like, just just all this stuff.And a lot of it is, uh, it's kind of like mock apprenticeship Where, um, Igot to knowing how to find the information yourself. I'd say that'sanother big skill. Um, but in terms of what I'm trying to you figure out, I don't know, like, it's it's it's beensuch a grind and you start, you know, a lot. So many people tell you you'reready. You're ready over and over and over again, to the point where it'slike, you know, I know there's still a lot I don't know, but it's it's tryingto get up to that level. In 2016. All I knew how to do was maybe shoot with theDSLR, use a couple of led lights, kind of, you know, kind of okay, kind oflame. You know, it wasn't It wasn't so great. I didn't really know a lot aboutcoloring and stuff like that. And I hit a wall where I would try to hit uppeople who were in film school. Hey, do you know this? They didn't know it. Uh,you know what cameras are they using? You know, what is Hollywood? All thisstuff. And then I joined a cinematography for him that had peoplewho made movies I had actually heard of. Think about that. I think of how manypeople say they're in film. Oh, the only thing you know. So But I wasencountering people who made movies that I had heard of that had a listtalent, you know? And so I had this new knowledge or restore or this newresource of knowledge and the big thing that prevented a lot of people fromalso pursuing that in my age group. Nobody wants to use a forum anymore. Aforum is old. School forum is lame. I want to watch a YouTube video. A lot ofthe guys busy and working, don't have time to make YouTube videos. You gottago where it's convenient for them to express their thoughts and ideologiesand stuff like that. And then from 2016 to 2018, that was a boom of knowledgethat that's where, like I, I learned more in that phase than any other partof the point of time. And, uh, you know, you I would call up guys. I wanted tolearn about the Sony City Alta cameras, which were the cameras. They shot SpyKids and Star Wars, Episode two and Episode three and, uh, and some otherearly 2000 films. And there was a guy in Latvia and I was like, Hey, you know,you wanna can you get on Skype and and explain this to me and he's like, Okay,and so you know, you talk to this guy and you really try to focus and youknow, he has maybe a thick accent, but he's really taking the time. So you'rereally trying to learn. And that's kind of the problem is like a lot of people.Lot of people say they want it. Lot of people say they want to do X, y and Z,but your knowledge really shows how much you actually want it to me. Uh andso it's, you know, And people are like, Oh, why are you so mean? People arestarting out blah, blah, blah. I'm like I'm seeing people who are doing thislonger than I have that don't know X, y and Z. So don't don't tell me I'm beingmean, you know, like it's it's just one of those things is that and I'm notsaying you seem like this is for you. But patience is a patience for you.Something that you need to work on because you're young and people areEven though people are telling you you're ready. But you're not given thatchance yet. Is patients one of those things that are kind of gnawing at you? Maybe I'm trying to. I guess the bigthing I'm trying to do is I'm trying two. Not I don't want to turn 30without a single big credit to my name. I don't want to do that. And so notonly was success big, I wanted success. Young and I still want success Young. Iwant to be a young, successful guy. I want to stand out in that way and, uhbecause I thought about I don't know, like I like, I think about like LeBronJames and how he came out of. He came out of, uh, to the NBA in high schoolwhen he's 18 years old. He's like getting triple doubles and all thiswild stuff, and he's like, immediately the biggest star ever. I saw that at 10,and I was like, Wow, you know, I want to try to do something like that And sobut what I'm learning now is that you can't be a 20 year old entertainerwithout a rich family member without someone in the industry already, youknow, kind of moving you along unless it's, you know, maybe unless it's maybehip hop or something like that, where you know, there's always peoplescouting and so on and so forth. But, uh, even though there's a lot ofnepotism in hip hop, Uh, but, uh but yeah, you mentioned by 30 you know, havingyour your name somewhere on a feature of some sort. What is your overarchinggoal? What would you like? Would you like an Academy Award? Would you What?What are you hoping for? I mean, the funny thing is, and I heard this set ofyou. Is that your I've found it very difficult to find a picture of you letalone to see you on video. Right. So it doesn't seem like you're looking forthe spotlight, But you also want the recognition like anyone else, for thehard work they put in. So to say, you...

...know, I want an award. I want to be upthere. So I don't think that's really your cup of tea. I think you're you'rewanting to do the work and for people to appreciate what you do. So do youhave an overarching goal? It might be a feature film, but it might be 10 ofthem. It might be a whole series of things. It's, you know, at first it wasfilmmaking. That's what I knew. I had a skill in. And, you know, I didn't dowhat I loved. I did what I was good at, uh, you know, going all the way back tothat marketing class. And, you know, I don't really put my face out there.Well, one, because, uh, no one else knows how to work the camera, so I'malways behind it. So you know you can't really And I'm a perfectionist. Ialways have to be in the viewfinder. I need to know what's happening at alltimes. You know, like I'll make videos where I'm on camera for my friends andthe framing is kind of bad, but you know, that's not going out public. Soit's fine. Um, but in terms of, uh, I mean, it's It's not that I'm, like,worried about you're the first person ever asked to show on camera You're thefirst person asked Honestly, So So that's why I show it up, you know? Andso like No, it's OK. Blur my face out anyway.So So there's that, um But what I would say is, let's see the overarching goal.I mean, like, I don't This is another part of the reason I don't put my faceon camera. Don't take selfies and all that, like I have a very low sense ofvanity. Like, I don't think I'm just like, attractive guy. I think thatpeople should only you know, not to put a slide on anybody, but, like, I onlythink people like you gotta be really photogenic to always put yourself oncamera. That's just me. I'm not trying to project that onto anyone else. Um,you know, like so. So So you work. You know, you look like you work with acouple models, and, uh, it's like, Yeah, well, that's your job. You're supposedto be on camera. I'm not supposed to be on camera, you know, it's like thatseparation. Um, but in terms of, you know, in terms of overarching goal, Imean, like, I don't want to get recognized in the street for someYouTube videos. That's just not, you know, that's that's not lame. It's like,Oh, hey, you did this niche thing and everyone's around like, What the hellis he talking about? You know, like like, if I'm gonna be, if I'm gonnapeople are gonna come up to me. I wanted to be for something that's like,actually oh, Netflix Oh, Fox. Oh, ABC. You know something for real? Not like,you know, a dinky YouTube video with, like, 100,000 hits. You know, that'sthat's whatever it may, um and so, but the overarching goal is pretty muchwhat I'm doing right now. But with with more money to play with, uh, and moreand more connections and and more, I guess. More recognition. Um, you know,as time goes on, I realize how rare it is to be a multimedia artist andactually get money doing it. Uh, you know, you know, not a youtuber, not Oh,hey, I'm gonna vlog today. Hey, I'm gonna scream today. You know, likelegitimately like doing a craft and having a bunch of people on it anddoing a multifaceted craft, not a one trick pony. I'm. The more I see it, themore I realize how hard that is. Um, you know, and it's always just comenaturally to me. I've always wanted to do everything but the reason why I putso much stuff out there, I don't know what's going to pop off. And so it'sjust, you know, think about Howard Stern. Howard Stern, uh, everythingthat he was the king of all media, right? Like that was that was histagline. And he made a movie. It did Well, he did a book. It was the bestpreordered book in history. Obviously, his radio show, he did a T V show thateverybody liked you know, King of all media. And so like like I I see thatit's like, Well, let's try to be the king of new media. Let's try to begreat on YouTube. Be great in video games. Be great in, you know,podcasting be great in Twitter and all this stuff. And so that's sort of whatI, um how do I put it that that's sort of what I, uh, I look at their but yeah,what you're striving for. But, I mean, it's it's admirable. I mean, it's not.You don't want to be a one shot sensation. You want to be recognized,and it's not for something frivolous. It's for the hard work that you'reobviously doing and what you will do in the future. Max. Is there anythingpeople may not understand about you, or or the entertainment industry inparticular, that if they understood this, they would have a betterappreciation of you and the work that you do? An entertainment, I would say, And it's not. I like howyou ordered that, because I would say whether it's me, you know, sometimespeople don't like, you know, the way that I go about things or the way thatI talk, whether it's me or whether it's Kanye West, whether it's Howard Stern,whether it's like any, whether it's Michael Jackson, whether it's any bigentertainer like you got to understand that the guy who can go up on stage andevery have all the eyes on them and be able to constantly produce and stay intheir mindset and stay in their...

...workflow and and be able to handle that.You have to be different. You can't. You can't be like everybody else. Youcannot be like everybody. Michael Jackson definitely was like everybodyelse. You know, you cannot be like everyone else and and that's, you know,and some people appreciate that, but But most people do not. Most peopledon't, you know, like that's that's what sort of annoys me and sort of Iget into little people say I'm very competitive for for no good reason withcertain things. But they're like, you know, you know, I'll say like like dude,I work in entertainment like I'm kind of like this and some people roll theireyes like, Oh yeah, and it's like, I mean, you could do that if I only had,like, two viewers a video and nobody cared who the hell I was like Lot ofpeople care who I am, you know? And, you know, it wasn't like that when Ifirst started, and a lot of people can't see the light at the end of thetunnel. And so it's just one of those things. Um, you've got to accept thatentertainers are going to be different And entertainers are, I should say,successful entertainers, maybe somebody who's seen some success, seen somemoney, some recognition. But entertainers got to be, uh, you know,you gotta understand that they're wired differently. And there was anotherthing with that Damn hold on. Sorry. Having a bad day? No, no, I'm draggingyou on to know it's as you think about it. Just it's right, right. Like evenan athlete has to be different people that are doing these particularindustries, no matter what job it is, right? If you're talking about thegarbage man, if you're talking about the president of the United States,these people are doing these jobs are different than most other peoplebecause most other people aren't doing those particular jobs, and it's nodifferent than it is for the entertainment industry. Uh, it might be a little different fromits like makeup of who that person is and what they're doing. But theindividual skills and talents, the personality, whatever goes in, only noteveryone can do this job or that job. It doesn't matter what job it is is.There's different skill sets that don't match other peoples, and for otherpeople to understand it, you would have to have an appreciation that they aresuited for that particular job. The more you refine it and define it,there's there's sharp contrast in with these different industries. But noteveryone can do these jobs. And for what you're doing, not everyone can dowhat you can do. And to appreciate what you do is what you're asking becauseyou're there to entertain, to write. You look at athletes as well. It's yourthere to entertain. It's like comedy. I've gained a great appreciation ofcomedy because comedians are going up there to make you laugh. So try not tobe the fool in the back who is criticizing the guy who's up there.He's laying everything out, a girl laying everything out there toentertain you and putting hours and hours and years decades of work intothis particular act. So have an appreciation The just listen to theshow. That's no. Yeah, that's well, no, that's a big thing. Uh, in terms of,you know, it's the let's see you do it mentality. It's like, Oh, you think I'mso bad? Let's see you do it, you know? And that's something I've always goneby The thing I just remembered, um, that I messed up last time is that thereason why I made the differentiation between something like a garbage manand an entertainer is there is such a low success rate for entertainment? Andso I'd say the big thing that people gotta understand when, when, like, youknow, an entertainer tweets about something, it's like, Oh, that's weird.That's different, you know? Well, you're not considering numbers andstatistics and all this stuff, and it's like you got to think there was lessthan a 1% chance that I would do this. So if you're that person who managed tobeat those odds, other statistics don't they mean less to you? You know what Imean? And so, if you know, it's like, Oh, well, there's only a 20% chancethat a lot of people are telling me with the game I'm producing thatthere's only a 20% chance that will take off less than a 5% chance. And I'mlike there was less than a 1% chance that that, you know 110,000 peoplewould would would look at what I do. You know, you think about you thinkabout Kanye West, where it's like, you know, 10 different record labels turnedhim down. Then the first album he gets, it's a huge hit, and he's like a bigstar now and, like, you know, four or five. And so you got to think like likeI don't when Kanye West goes off on on some things some wild Tansi in I don'tI don't blame him like Dude like everybody told this guy like or when hehas the bravado or the ego or whatever. Everybody told this guy who wouldn't beanything. And you know, I can understand how somebody has this sortof, you know, borderline god complex, because it's like, you know, peopletold you for so long, it would be nothing. And then you show up, youprove everybody wrong. And so now it's...

...like, kind of you go through life like,you know, fuck everybody. You know, it's one of those things. Did you see that the other day? RussellWestbrook. When, uh, was it Adam Smith? Steve Steven. StevenA. Smith commented on him, and he said, I'm not in it for the championships. Doyou know my life? You have no idea. That's why I stay quiet about them andjust stay in my lane and do my job because I know what I'm doing. No, absolutely. Um, I think part of itgot lost in translation a little bit between Steven and Russell Westbrookbecause it's, uh, you know, he was strictly talking basketball. I feellike Stephen a agrees with everything, Westbrook said. From the standpoint oflike, you know, these guys do need to be appreciated that they were able tocome. Some of them came from very rough neighborhoods, and they were able togenerate this multi generational wealth. And so uh so, yeah, that thatabsolutely has to be acknowledged. I think about it more in terms of, youknow, not just athletes, but I think about it in terms of pop stars I thinkabout in terms of, like, you know, you're you're taking, you know, 17 yearold girls, and now they are the main breadwinner of their family, and theydo 20 million in one year and and and all this stuff and so appreciating thatin any facet, not just what you're into, You know what I mean? Like, Iappreciate it. If a game developer does that, I appreciate it. If a singer doesthat, I appreciate it. You know, for anything. As long as you're notscamming, people are doing anything like that. You know, I appreciate it onall facets. If you were able to to be the guy to break the hump, You know,first Generation, first Generation, I want to make that very clear. Uh, haveyou are first generation person and you were able to do that? Yeah. I have acouple more questions for you, Max. And this one in terms of adversity, youmentioned that you had a pretty good growing up, but you you suffered fromsleep. Insomnia. Is there any adversity that you have faced that you use toencourage you in your work. It might hinder you at times, but it motivatesyou as well. And how would you motivate other people in the adversity that theyface are you can't. You can't use thingslike you can't find excuses, I guess, like or if something bad happens to you,you can't use it as an excuse. You've got to use it as some form of a fuel, Iguess, or criticism, you know. And that's a big thing. Like sports, too,Like using You know, one time I saw a guy I don't know, they were like theysaid, Oh, you should never pursue success out of spite That's just wrong.And I'm like, literally Shaquille O'Neal, Russell Westbrook. All theseguys have always said that. They've always said, Oh, I'm gonna rememberthis guy's name, That guy's name. Okay, let's prove all these people wrong, andthat was sort of like me, you know, like I can't tell you how many peoplepersonally said to my face, This is gonna be nothing. You know I had anaunt. Well, she's divorced now. She's not in the family anymore. She's not myaunt fucker, but I remember we're in the car. She was She was a professor atuniversities and all that. I don't know. She did some major that nobody caresabout. And so she stops me in the car, and she's like, Oh, hey, Max, I got agreat idea, Uh, you know, because she knew I was trying to do the video thing.And it was, you know, it was I don't know. It was maybe a couple of monthsinto my YouTube tear, and she's like, I have a great what if you got a computerscience degree and you do the video thing for fun and I looked at her, Isaid, I don't want to be a computer scientist. I'm not some nerds throughthat, you know, It was you know, not not to say no. I think computer scienceis important programming and all that. I think that's very important, but itjust wasn't for me. That's the point. And so you know, and so it's stuff like that,Uh, the writing on the wall, they tell me, Oh, well, well, my family member Ohmy God. It was so many things that they would talk to some random producer.That's the other thing colleges meaning has entirely evaporated from what itwas in 1981. Um, And so it's It's this thing where oh, well, I was talking tothis this producer, and this is gonna go back into the adversity thing yousaid. But they'll be like, I was talking to this producer who producednothing you've ever heard of. And hey, um, she said that the four yearexperience for a filmmaker is very important in college, and and, uh,because it gives you it makes you well rounded, gives you life experience andand all this stuff. And it's like, Dude, I saw like, I can't tell you how muchlife experience you have, just like just watching a homeless guy smokedcrack that dude, that is like a world of what the hell is going on? You know,you know, you know, a couple months ago I was on, I was on the New York Citysubway and there was a homeless woman just pissing on the train. Dude, thatis more experience than any college will ever give you for real, like likethat that is it. And so you know the well rounded thing. Like I get it. Iget why they say it. Okay, you got to...

...experience a lot of arts. You've got todevelop yourself and they think that college is going to curate that for you.That's what she meant by that. That's what I know now. But I was able tocurate that for myself. Maybe other people aren't. And so the thing withadversity, especially with comedy, because we were talking about comedyearlier. Is that all the weird shit that happens to you? You know, that'sthat's where a lot of your jokes trying to come from your brain has to bebroken. To be funny. You have to be. You have to be so like, mashed in thehead with awful experiences and wild things. Dude, the police showed up tomy house at least 10 times when I was growing up over some domestic dispute.I saw so much crazy shit, you know? And so it was. I remember one time I was 12years old down the street, the cold attack, playing with a friend and hiscousin shows up. He's like, Oh, yeah, my cousins in the N s 13. It's this guy,like, covered in tattoos and, you know, like I'm like, 12 years old, like thisdoughy 12 year old kid I'm like, Oh, I hope I don't do too well. He might getmad at me and shoot me, you know, like like all this stuff, you know? And itwas, uh, like, I saw a lot of stuff growing up and a lot of people who tryto pursue the arts who came from, you know, middle class to upper middleclass neighborhood. They didn't see any wild stuff and and, you know, to yourpoint, with adversity, adversity, uh, seeing that wild stuff, let's saythat's the adversity. That's what really fuels you. You know, that'swhat's going to, you know, make your creative juices work. Um, and so youknow, But that's that's just kinda don't use the mistakes I've seen. Likelike I don't Yeah, don't use it. Excuses, you know,use it, use it as fuel. The reality is like, I can't think of a single funnycomedian who didn't have, uh, an insane weird, you know, left up childhood. Ican't think of one because I look at all these guys stories. It wassomething strange. It was something where they're experiencing the worlddifferent from other people, you know? You know, all this stuff, you know,like I had a one time I put a poll on Twitter. That was when you were a kid.Did Child Protective Services show up to your house? More than twice. 90% ofpeople said no. I was like, Damn, that happened, like, four times for me. Whatthe hell, you know. So it's it's all this stuff, But, you know, we're inthis. We're definitely in this Twitter instagram self psychology era where wetell that we tell ourselves so if bad things happen to your childhood, you'rehelpless. Oh, you're helpless, you can't do And it's like, Dude, that's sosoft especially, you know, not to get too racial, but like, you know, likelike you know, I talked to you know, I'll say like it is. I talked to a lotof white kids from really nice neighborhoods, and these are thesaddest people I know. These are the saddest, most unambitious people that Imeet. You know, kids. I don't know how older generations are but like thesejeans ears and like Oh, well, well, I read. I read a post on Instagram thatsaid, because this happened to me. I have I have bpd and depression, blah,blah, blah. And so I can, you know, it's like we were in this era for Jen'sears of like self diagnosing your problems and and finding confirmationbias for why you're a quitter. And and that's what I That's what I hate.That's what I absolutely hate. And it's, you know, and that's what I say. Like Ihave a diverse audience and and that's what you see, like when I, um you know,when I go on a stream and I say I'm trying to be a millionaire, you know,the white kids are like, Oh, that's weird. He's arrogant, He's this, andthe black and Mexican kids are like, Yeah, me too. So it's You start withless, you pursue more, start with less, pursue more. So, um but yeah, that'ssort of how I've seen it broken down. Well, it's funny because I think a lotof people would say that they're seeing that sort of occurrence with youngerpeople. But hearing you at 26 I think there's a There is a glimmer of hopefor our future knowing that not all kids are thinking like that. Not thatyour kid at 26 but being young enough to realize and having your hand not toofar away from your teens and almost into your thirties. Knowing you have areally good perspective on life is what I believe. Thank you. Therapist would disagree,but you know, that's how you like. The other thing is that therapist. I mean Imean, well, no see, it's interesting because a couple years ago I wasgetting really into psychology and I was trying to talk to, not therapists,psychologists, and I was trying to talk to them, You know, people that I knewthrough university connections, and I would try to talk to them aboutmotivating other people. That's huge. You think about Michael Jordan? Thething they said is he made everyone around them better. So I was trying tolearn is you know, it might seem a tad manipulative, but I was trying to seehow do I manage talent? How do I get people to do the right thing for themand do the right thing for the greater good of the group, you know? And, uhand you look into a lot of that, but on And so I would say, some theories.Sometimes they confirm them. Sometimes they deny them. Like I talked to, youknow, professors to They're like, I...

...don't talk out of my ass like I go topeople and talk and ask before I say things publicly And, uh, one time Imade a mistake before I got the psychologist connection. I just talkedto a therapist and I was like, Hey, I'll give you 50 bucks. I'll give you50 bucks. Just don't talk to me like a patient. Just I have these questionsabout how the human mind works. Talk to me immediately there in their playbook.Oh, how does that make you feel? I'm like, I'm asking you, like, you know,like like it's the whole thing where it's like it's like Dude, just likeDon't talk like And I knew what she was doing, you know? But 11 thing a guysaid to me was, remember, therapists aren't doctors, Therapists are notscientists, so that was a big thing, but now, but now, this lady, uh, shewas trying to say, Oh, Oh, there's this this and this wrong with you. Uh, youknow, um, there was a We had a big disagreement on what makes a humanbeing matter. And she's like, Oh, so so you work so hard while I'm like, I workhard because that's what you have to do. Like you have to work. We've beenworking since the beginning of time, and and, like I say to her, I'm likesome some guy who, you know, just like, lives off his parents money, you know,sits in a bed all day playing video games, consuming, consuming, consuming,consuming, not doing anything, not impacting anyone else's life. Like I'msorry. Explain to me how he matters. Explain to me, you know, And so becauseit's like I'm busting my ass here trying to do this. You're trying totell me that this guy is on the same level of me like sorry. Like, andthat's where the competitive sort of you know, thing comes out and a lot ofpeople consider that screwed up. But I'm just like like, dude, like I'mbusting my ass, and you're gonna tell me? Oh, yeah. He's just as good as youknow. Sorry like that. That's not how it works to me. Anyway. Um, and so,yeah, I think as you will make a good director, because that's like a manager,right? Is in my wrong and kind of understanding what a director does thatbe similar to a business manager of source. So a manager. Okay, so and I triedmanagement. I I attempted management, but it was hard to find people becausethey got them today. When you're a manager, you work for them. When youwere director, they work for you. That's kind of the core differencethere. And so, you know, when you're a director, they're only there for aproject for a manager. You're there for their whole career. And so I you know,I could have all the great advice and all that, but not at the end of the day.You know, there are similar skills. Absolutely. You'd be right. Um, butsort of with the management thing. And again, that's that's why I said thesuburban kids, you know, you'd find, you know, you find a girl who getslikes, and she's inconsistent and all this stuff. And I'm like, Dude, I couldI could get you to quit your day job in 18 months. If you listen to everythingI say and you could you could be a model or an actor or whatever. I knowthat you have everything that you need. Just just give me 18 months. But theynever do it because they have a safety net. They had their parents. They have,you know, they have, uh, you know, boyfriends, letting them live rent free.They have. You know, you know all this stuff, and so sometimes, uh, sometimesI will get in the way. A director is kind of, uh, being a director. It's more intense inthe moment. But once you're done, you're done with the manager. It's lessintense in the moment, but it's just a consistent sort of grind. Um, that'ssort of how I've seen it. And when it comes to a manager, you have toconvince, you know, you have to convince what's in their best interestfor a director. You're just trying to get the shot done. You know, you'rejust trying to get the project done so it's I could talk about it more indetail if you like. Well, it's what I like about what you're saying that youdo is you're trying to help people be the best that they can be and so thatthey and it's not. You don't feel threatened by that. You don't feel likethey're trying to take over your position. You're trying to help themstrive where they are. Uh, it's because I know they will takeover my position. Um, it's sort of, you know, like some people would say, Oh,that's very, very arrogant All this stuff. But it's just, Look, I've met.I've met thousands of people all trying to, you know, do this, do that,whatever. And it gets to a point where okay, I am different, Okay? There issomething that sets me apart, and you know, a lot of people, a lot of peopleare really scared to verbalize it to themselves because they were afraid ofthe criticism that comes with that. I don't really care because, you know, ifI know that I'm busting my ass, that's all that matters. If I know that I'mworking as hard as I possibly could. That's all that matters. And so, uh,you know, it becomes a thing. Where and again, like I'm not. It's It's reallyhard to find multi talented people, like when I'm hiring people like Idon't know how to program. It's really hard to find a programmer who's just,you know, it has problem solving ability and will consistently show up.That's really hard to find. It's really hard to find an artist who can do acertain art style and can show up for a...

...decent amount of money and and bang out100 drawings. You know, like stuff like this like, and so and so what? I Youknow, I do. I do sound design. I do. I do writing. I do. You know, all thisstuff that, you know, sort of gives me a footing where if I'm doing enoughjobs, I can just pretty much say, Okay, I'm the director, too. I just don'tmeet people that can do multiple things, and it's It's like a thing. Where andyou know the big thing is, oh, well, why are some people more successfulthan you? Because they have connections, and so would you say one of thosethings. Would you say that those people don't exist or those people exist? Butthey're not willing to put in that work at all. They they have those rawtalents. They have those skills they can program they can draw, but they'renot willing to sit down. I was watching a drawing video yesterday with my sonand then the guys, just just draw, keep drawing, keep doodling, keep doing. Yougot to keep doing it. And these people are just not willing to put that work.And you know what? I appreciate what you about you is the work ethic thatyou have. I think that's the core of what what drives you is yourwillingness to work. And not all people have that. Most people don't have thelevel. Some people do it for survival. Some people will work to survive, butthey don't have that level to succeed and to excel. A lot of people don't have, I guess,sort like entrepreneurial mindsets, I guess where where a lot of people don'tlike that, it's all on them. It's all on their shoulders. People, you know,people really shy away from that and you know, it's people are too afraid ofcriticism in the moment, especially if they have friends with big followingswhere they're making good stuff. You know, they don't want to try to. Toyour question on, Do those people not exist? I mean, those people exist.Those I like I said, Those people are Howard Stern. Those people are KanyeWest. Those people are our Jamie Foxx. Those people are, um you know, Penn andTeller like that's those people, are we? We see these people all the time. Um,and and are there other people who are multi talented? Really good Thathaven't been discovered yet? Yes, Absolutely. I'm just not running intothem. I'm not saying that I know the world, but in my network of people, Ihaven't ran into that yet. Um, you know, to say that that I am I am the greatesttalent ever. You know, like, again, I I think there are plenty of people whoare more talent. We're not getting another Michael Jackson for another 150years. I guarantee you, I am not the next Michael Jackson, you know, Youknow, and again, he was multi talented, but like you take out dancing and maybeit's it's sound design or something like that, you know? And so it's, uh Iwasn't insanely talented like I The only thing that I showed any talent forwas, you know, I could be funny. I could keep her room going for, like, 30minutes. And I, you know, I could sort of, like, I knew how to, you know, editand, you know, direct the scene. Those are the only two skills that I hadgoing for me when I when I came out of high school, I had no idea about audio.I had no idea about direction I had. No, I didn't really have a big idea onacting. Um, I didn't know anything about lighting. I didn't know aboutcinematography or lenses or how how lenses work or aperture or shutterspeed. I didn't I didn't know any of this. Like you could. You could namesomething that you saw. And I tell you when I started picking that up, um, youknow, it's the majority of what I do. What people follow me for was not stuffthat I knew out of the gate. So, you know, in terms of in terms of latenttalent and what brought that out. The work brought that out. I'm against.Yeah, the grind. Absolutely. And so it's It's repetition. The biggest keyto success is the ability and desire to practice. And so, God, you know, like II had I did some stat. I was counting through my videos of of sound designand putting effects and mixing and stuff like that. And it took me 100 andthree shorts to finally have a level of sound design that one would consider,like professional, like Hollywood, standard professional. And so, you know,I don't do like I don't meet a lot of people who make 100 and three shortswith variety. I can't I can't meet those people, you know, not to say thatthere's other people again, like like I'm not. I'm not the richest guy I know.I'm not the guy making all the money. I know like there's people with morefollowers than me, of course. Um, but it's sort of I don't know, like like Ijust really have the desire. Um, but, you know, sometimes we're also seeinggenerationally like people don't like the guy who works really hard. A lot ofpeople find that intimidating and they don't want to hire that guy. I'm sureI've missed out on, you know, jobs here...

...and there where people were too afraidof, of working with a guy who's like, I'll take over you know, I have noproblem doing that. And so a lot of people feel, you know, I I guess a lotof people feel challenged in that sense or they feel awkward and all this stuff.And that's just not the Hollywood that I witnessed growing up where you'reafraid to. That's another big thing. People are so afraid to work withstrangers. People are so people feel like they have to be friends to workwith people. What is that? You know, it's so many times, like like I hit upso many people. I I didn't know it all. I hit a guy who produced for MissyElliott, you know, a couple years ago, and, uh, to score a piece of my game,and I worked with him and I didn't know him at all. But now I do and you know,is it awkward to work with people the first time when you don't know him?Yeah, sure, But you know, that's what separates, uh, what separates the menfrom the boys? Let's say, Have you tried LinkedIn? Are you on LinkedIn? No, it's not really it's. It's not a badplace. It's a good place to make connect, I'll tell you you could easilyas as as you Maxfield making connection as a cinnamon photographer director.It's a place you'll see. So I mean, it doesn't take any effort, right? Youjust put your thing up there and check it out and make connections becauseI've met some pretty interesting people that way, and connections do come thatway. It's It's a free resource, and you don't have to pay for it. You can getthe premium package and stuff, but it it's a way. It's another way, right? I mean, I I haven't run into asituation usually like when a client wants me like I got Zoom because of aclient, like three years ago. Usually when a client tells me, Okay, get this.That's how I usually get into something. It was the same with Facebook. It wasthe same with with a lot of stuff, but but yeah, I mean I mean, I'm sure I'mnot counting it out, but it's just, you know, I've tried a multitude ofplatforms for work, and it's just the YouTube staff is what brings in all thetraffic. It's what brings in all the people to me. And so So it's like whenyou have one thing that works, you know, you're you're less interested in tryingthe things that might work. I like what you said. It's we'll just go ahead. No, go ahead. Sorry the what you said.And I think it's universe for any job. And you tried a 103 times right before you made something thatyou thought was professional. And if you take that for any sort of job, ifyou're willing to do something 100 times before, you're going to get itright, you know, throwing out a resume 100 times. Most people won't do that. Iknow people that throw one or two and think, Oh, this is the end of it. I getrejected, I'm done. Try 100. I mean, try 1000. I'd like to even know howmany videos you've made because all of these are steps towards youaccomplishing your goal, right? So they're all they're all steps. How manyI've written. Probably 500 scripts, right? 500 scripts? Probably. Um, youknow, And that was another thing. Like Like it's annoying when people thinkthey're working hard, but they're not. That pisses me off so much when I'mlike I'm like, Oh, yeah, he's a good writer. He writes a lot about how manyscripts is your right here. 33 You gotta be kidding me. I write three in aweek like Well, you know, And so, uh, you. But But that's the thing, like youget annoyed when people give you similar. When people give someone elseagain, it's a competitive thing. It's It's a sports raised thing. You getannoyed when when people who you know are not putting in even a quarter ofthe work are getting equal or higher recognition. That that you know, that'swhat I don't like. Like if there's somebody working just as hard andgetting more recognition, okay, that's that's connections. That's the luck ofthe draw. That's fine, but when it's I mean, it's still connections you know,for the other thing, but it's a you know, it's it's one of those things interms of, uh but yeah, I mean, I mean making shorts. And And here's anotherthing about so let's say that number is 100 right of sound design mixwhatever's. So that number is 100 after 20. In the moment. I think this isprofessional, and that gets into that self empathy. You always have to thinkthat you are doing your best shit. Always. You always have to believe that.And so it's, um you know, and so but but again with the knowledge I know nowI look back and, uh but yeah, at about 100 which was and I hit 100. Maybe maybe, like three years ago. Now that'swhen I started noticing. Okay, Like like this is I found my standards. Ihave found what I do. I have compared it with Hollywood features. This isthis is this is where I sit. And that's another thing. Like people, people. Iwas always holding myself to the...

...standard of Hollywood movies that Igrew up watching. That's what I help myself to the standard of and a lot ofpeople would hold herself to. Oh, I just want to be okay. You know, our, uh,was aimed for the stars laying on the clouds. That's sort of saying I guessthat's the kind of philosophy, but you know, it is what it is, Max. How canpeople reach you? How can they get in touch with you besides linked in?Obviously, uh, let's see. Uh SP on three onTwitter Spn three on Twitter Spn three on YouTube The end of that. Come on,Instagram. What s B n three? Uh, it was I had a channel called Therewas a Pete Rock song called Soul Brother Number one. And so I got bannedtwice for copyright stuff. So it ended up being sober. The number three and Iwas like, Well, that's a mouthful. So it became Spn three. Uh, and and Andnow people can actually find me through Google that that wasn't happening fouryears ago. So, um but yeah, no. So 244 characters a lot easier to rememberthan than 15, but yeah, One final question, Max. Yeah? Why do you work to get rich? Yeah, I don't doubt that you will be. I mean,you have the work ethic, you're young and you have You have whatever it seemsto take to do what is necessary to to achieve those dreams and and thosegoals however you want to put it. But with the work that you put in just towatch your videos to know, you know, a little bit behind the scenes of whatyou're actually putting in, there's no doubt that you can do that. Maxfield Sb n three Director Cinematographer Youtuber soon to be director of afeature film near you I appreciate your time and I appreciate the work that youdo. Thank you. Hopefully an agent sees the same way. Thank you for listeningto this episode of why we work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe, followand share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. I hopethat you have yourself a productive yet joyful day in your work.

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