WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 64 · 1 year ago

#64 Liz Atherton - Founder of CASTVOICES.com - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Liz Atherton is a passionate and enthusiastic entrepreneur and the founder of CASTVOICES.com, which is the home base for VO talent, Agents, and Casting Directors. Today she talks about the importance of resumes, character and passion.

Contact Info

Liz’s Profile
linkedin.com/in/liz-atherton-2a49858

Website
CastVoices.com (Company Website)

Email
Liz@CastVoices.com

Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/liz.l.athertonhttps://www.facebook.com/CastVoices-277980116016731


About

"Liz Atherton is a veteran of the talent business with more than thirty years experience as the founder of one of the top talent agencies in the industry, as well as a tech entrepreneur.

Liz started her professional career as a project manager for a Fortune 10 company with world-wide engineering and product reach. However, she was always drawn to the entertainment industry having been raised by arguably the top jingle producer ever, Jodie Lyons. And while her dad would pull her into the studio now and again, Liz's real interest was in streamlining the business behind the business.

Living in Austin during the heyday of Texas TV and Film production, Liz took her love of talent and technology and founded The Atherton Group (TAG) Talent Agency. TAG grew into one of the top boutique agencies in the U.S. (and one of the first in the world with an online presence). With operations in California, Texas, and Louisiana, and bookings worldwide, TAG consistently appeared in the top 1% list of IMDB’s "power" talent agencies.

Liz sold her interests in TAG in 2018 and founded EANK, Inc., an enterprise business-to-business system comprised of CastVoices, CastActors and ProductionJunction – soon to become the trifecta for securing work in the Film/TV and VO industries. CastVoices, the first vertical, is set to launch this summer as the new “home base” for VO talent, Agents, and Casting Directors.

Liz attended the University of North Texas graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Management with a major in Personnel Management and Organization Behavior, and minors in Math and Psychology. She currently lives in Austin, Texas, and is the proudest mom of 4 amazing children who have grown up into successful, philanthropic adults, and a dog named Fish!" (LinkedIn, 2020)

...welcome to why we work with your host Brian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice, which would be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going on and keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here's your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian V, and this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure of speaking with Liz Atherton. She is the founder of cast voices dot com, which is a talent agency. She has had great success in entertainment, but I want to find out her experience with people who are building a resume, maybe even some things regarding ethics in the acting industry. Also, how people who have these high expectations of themselves are faced with the reality when maybe the position is not for them. I believe with her experience and her insight, we can translate that into other jobs, other sorts of forms of employment, and we can use this advice that she gives us in everyday life into why we work so join me with my conversation today with Liz Atherton. I'm Brian V, and this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure of speaking with Liz Atherton. Good evening, young lady. That's certainly made that young. I'll take it. Good evening, if not at heart at the very, very low, For certain for certain. Thank you. I I know. I just gave you a brief introduction a moment ago. I know you are the most enthusiastic and passionate person in showbiz, so maybe maybe you could fill us in a little bit better just to give us a nice idea who I am. I am Liz, mother of four amazing kids and an entrepreneur. God help me. You know, I started. I was kind of raised in the music industry. My dad was a big time jungle dude. Then I ventured off into college and doing things like getting a degree in business. And, uh, I had cute kids and I put him with a talent agency. They did amazing things I bought. The talent agency is a silent partner, continued to work in high tech, And then, uh, one day decided I was kind of done with high Tech and came home and took over the agency full time and branched out into voice over. And I've never turned back. Voiceover is just such a lovely place to be. I enjoy the people. I enjoyed the camaraderie. I enjoy the support of everybody but kind of one that tail up. I am the talent agency for 25 plus years, and I sold it a couple of years ago to to great guys or three guys two guys on one side and one on the other. Jimmy Cobb about the voiceover business, and Jorge Elizondo and Tony What Watson brought about the on camera and that gave me the opportunity to jump headlong into cast voices. And that's kind of where I'm at now. Cast voices is our answer to bridging talent with work. I'm extraordinarily, uh, you know, qualified. My business partner is extraordinarily qualified. My two other business partners are. I mean, we just have this amazing team of qualified people, and I'm really excited. That's me. Is that too much? Know that Z Well, I hope to get into more of it in a moment, especially what you're doing with cast voices. But you also mentioned. So your dad was pretty well known in jingles. But what would have been well, maybe get into him is well, but what was your very first jobless Even if it had nothing to do with anything that we're talking about? Lemonade stand? Actually, my first job is I sang it Commercial True Story. Yeah, back in the day used to sing my dad since he was in the business, you know? And he was the number one jingle writer Anytime there were opportunities for That's such an interesting question. Nobody's asked me that, uh, for kids. I sang and so we make men or bread like we're making it so I can still remember it. I was six pretty young, pretty young. Can you, in some way vivid to see the studio where you went and probably was so I could see the whole thing, right? I can see the whole thing. I can I know where I was standing. I know who the other I can't really see...

...the other kids per se, but I knew the studio was it. Pam's in Dallas and Pam's was is infamous. And then I also saying that TM studios in Dallas, which is another infamous Um, you know, my dad was just a jingle rock star. You know, he's probably the father of radio imaging. He's certainly the father. You know, I'm pretty sure he is the father of radio imaging, which is just, you know, and then commercials and stuff. But that was probably my Well, that was my first job. My first time we've trying to find a job. Wolf. Uh huh. Are you hesitating because you are able to get more? Were you? Oh, yeah. But were you also able to get more work through your dad as well? And other sorts of commercials along the way? Or, you know, I was so timid in singing. I mean, I took piano for seven years. I could read music. But let me tell you, I remember my first payment when it was my second. My first was very quick. My second was singing in the bar. What was the first one? What was the first one very queen? Well, it's actually sonic. I got fired after a week. And then same thing. Experience, experience. You know everyone. Everyone should be a waiter. Everyone, you have such an appreciation for what they wo job that issue go through? Yeah. Yeah, Just the people are so interesting and sometimes shit. Eso uh what was the question you're gonna mention your second job after what you remembered was your That was it. It was a very queen, but oh, after that, I am. Well, I don't remember. Well, it's funny you mentioned you mentioned the jingle. No, it's funny you mentioned the jingle because I too I must have been great seven, though I was the people that I was living with which were not my parents at the time, and they worked or the lady of the house worked in radio station. So I got a radio commercial. They gave me two. I think the intent was one. But then they gave me two. And it was like Happy Father's Day, Dad for Father's Day that was coming up. E Oh, yeah, that was Q 104 and one for the daily newspaper. I think it was It was, or even an advertisement for the radio station itself. Just me and the person who was living with Sun. And it's I think that's the thing that started me with the interest with radio and and voice over and all of those I'm not in voiceover, but just a Really? Yeah, but your same kind of thing, you know? I mean, you're still part of the the talk on air community. It's interesting, like, and I have a few questions that will get us to it. But I guess maybe even now with thinking of people that you work with and building up a resume and the influences that you have that help you, how can you comment on how important is it to get that resume built up? And how do people do it? And and also listeners may not be in voice over. It could be any sort of work. It could be the oil Well, okay, so tech. That's two different answers. Because in voiceover work, your resume is not I mean, how your bookings and all the bookings that you have done is not as important as having had them. You know, putting them on a resume is certainly impressive. But the reality is in the voiceover business. They're hiring your voice and you had Yeah, big, strong resume doesn't necessarily get you in that door, right? And sometimes it can keep you out of the door because of conflicts. So if you've done a Starbucks commercial and they want t audition you for a community coffee commercial Well, in my humble opinion, if you've got a Starbucks voice and you've got a completely different under Sir Nable Community Coffee voice, I don't find that as a conflict. I mean, you need to talk with your agent you need to talk with, but I don't see that as a conflict because it's not your face. It is a voice. It is a voice. I'm so voiceover, but you know, so that's my humble opinion. And the more data you put on your resume, the more that could potentially hurt. Now what? I think it's important or would be very, very impressive on a resume for a voiceover challenges, but list all the production houses you've worked with that to me. It's so much more important than saying I was the voice of a B C D E f G. Because now now you're sitting there and you're an engineer, and for some reason you do go look at the Sometimes they'll go look at your social media footprint and things like that. It's depending on what the job is, because they might want you to have a big following right, or they might look at your resume for that. But unless...

...you're like some really like an animated character, that's kind of an on camera of your voice or stuff like that that you certainly want to brag about. If you just listen those production companies and you open it up and you're producing, you're like Oh, my gosh, they've worked with so and so so so so on so on. So they liked or shoot I like to, you know, s Oh, that's different in the resume world as opposed to people that air, not in voiceover. The thing about building Internet resume is it. It shows that somebody thought you were capable for a while, right? And you can change those jobs a lot. I mean, I don't know that people care about that as much as they did in my day or, you know, you didn't want to change job in under two years or whatever the case may be. Um, I would just tell you. Don't lie. Wow, Your resume ever just just don't do it. And people dio So just just don't you know, just get there on your own merit And that job will be really awesome for you. Well, it's funny, because I'd really like to get into some of the jobs you have done to this point, which some of you mentioned. But I also had the question of ethics in the entertainment industry, and you're saying that by not lying. So how important or how much do you play that tune for people to understand that your integrity is of utmost importance. But I think that's just a human trait hunt more so than a worked right e. It's a human one. And you, you know, everybody makes mistakes. It's the intentional ones that are unethical. Alright, so you know, if you if you make a mistake and you know it or you don't know it but figured out right, you're missed aches. But if you're doing things intentionally that are dishonest or unethical or pick whatever icky buzzword you want then that just makes you questionable is a human. You know I want to preface. All of this was right now we're in the middle of a pandemic. And people are in such dar strikes. Um, yeah, yeah, I just You know, I just It's hard and stuff Times I don't want to judge anybody. Yeah, it seems more people would be maybe desperate and then maybe stretching Just stretching shit. You know, I'm sorry. I'm trying not toe to us. It's kind of part of who I am. I don't know if you've watched me on Facebook. You're free, you're free. So after your jobs and maybe high school, how did you start Thio? Find your niche. I mean, I have an idea that you didn't really pursue voiceover you were more interested in. I've never a voiceover talent. I mean, to an agency. No, no, no. I was on the 47 year plan, and not really, but I When I first went to college, my intent was to be a doctor. I but I could not master a foreign language to save my life. And you needed a foreign language. So instead, I got a bachelor of science instead of bachelor parts. But I I kept going to school and I was getting a degree or miss that. What did your dad think of that. So if your dad is so well, I put myself through school but the good on you. But the idea of someone you know from the outside looking in for someone doing jingles would be a jolly good fellow. And then his daughter's going daughter daughter going into wanting to go into medical school in science, which seems, you know, the other spectrum of how you know, not the entertainment side, was he My parents honestly and I raised my kids same way My parents never challenged a journey decision of mine ever. So it happened. A lot of parents dio I know they dio, but I didn't. The closest I came even in raising my own Children is my fourth daughter. I'm fourth daughter, my fourth child. My only daughter. She, uh, got apart when she was going into her undergraduate. She's now in her fourth year of med school, but when she was an undergraduate are graduating high school. She got a partial scholarship to USC and a full scholarship to the University of Houston. She got other things, too, but those were the two in the top of her. Yeah, and I really felt like she should go to USC for a host of reasons. And I had this discussion with her. It lasted a while, and it was kind of intense, and she said no. And she took you in verse of Houston. She was so right. You know, she was so right. And how silly of me Thio even do that. I mean,...

I don't know I with me, you know, Onley thing my mother did was say you're going to college. Okay, I got that. And that's what I did. I hauled off to college, but my grades were never a discussion point. I I put myself through any time I didn't have money. We're pretty poor. Qualified for a Pell grant, you know? And, uh, yeah, I graduated from college with $1250 in debt, and I paid it off and I got married toward the end. Um, had babies went Thio went to work for Texas Instruments. I had I was working for them as a nonexempt. Graduated when I could six months before graduation. I could petition to be go ahead and made exempt, and the only job I could get was in finance. So that's that's the round I went. You know, it speaks volumes of you for because you're in Texas, I believe. Austin, Texas. Were you there at the same time when your daughter was going off or deciding upon a university? We're still in Texas because that speaks volumes for most parents. They want to keep their kids closer. So you, in some ways you won over in the end to because you've got to keep your daughter in the same state for for certain. But the reason USC just to kind of maybe clarify that a little bit is that her very best friend in the world at that time it well still is. Her brother and her brother lived lives in Los Angeles. And so, by going to U. S. C. I felt like she was going to be there with someone she loved dearly. And so it's kind of like, you know, if that's mostly the reason. Plus, she had been an actor, and at this time I knew she wanted to go to med school. But she had been an actor as a kid, and she was still expressing an interest in acting and opportunities in Southern California are much better than universities to. But Kate knew better than me, you know. She was just she knew better. And she thrived at that school, thriving. And she got offered when she graduated with her undergraduate degree in something like Biomedical by love book mathematics e way up here. Uh, she had scholarship offers for med school. I mean, you know, and I remember talking to a friend of mine has a doctor saying, Where did she get her undergraduate? And I said, University of Houston, he's like, Hey, paid all this money to send his kid Thio, you know? Sorry. And I'm often No, it's not. No, it's really for why we work and why we do the things that I actually want to even speak. Mawr asked more about your Children because you had mentioned that when they were young, they were cute. So you put them into something and you probably have had lots of experience, and I think that you had a good foundation assuming in your presentation of your Children to a talent agency and you might be able to comment on other parents who strive very hard to get their kids into these sorts of things. And yeah, when I when I first put my Children with a talent agency, they were young. There were two and then four, but the business relationship with that agency that very sour. So I started an agency and put my kids with me. And then I began. But I could answer the questions because I was the number one kid agent. For a long time you've seen the kids that I discovered in blockbuster movies, so I had a great deal of success as an agent for Children. I mean, one of my kids start and Super 81 of my kids start not my personal kids. Well, my personal kid was one of them, but and in the descendants heroes, I just had people do some really great things. So I was. I was really keen at picking out kids, but if there's a parent out there trying to get their child representation, it has to come from the child and not come from the parent. It just can't and agents see through it a mile long and listen. Beautiful Children are really cute in print, and there can be a beautiful child that can also act. But I will tell you acting Children present themselves. It's not something. Appearances e want you to be an actor. You know, it just doesn't work that way. Yeah. Do you set yourself self up as the gatekeeper of sorts when you see these types of parents come o e I was an agent. Yeah, absolutely. And I would tell them e I would say your child doesn't want to do this. You might get representation...

...elsewhere, but no. And I would turn them down and any time I would quiver. I mean, we were a team of agents, right? And lay it later in the game. I primarily focused on voice over, But up until that time, you know, for 20 years, I was it or 15 or so. But anyway, um, I would tell parents, Don't don't do this. And I would have some parents Oh, come in. I got stories, but they would come in and they would want me to rep their child who could give a respite tooty about being there, and they would say, Well, but would you represent me? The parent would ask for representation. I'm just like thistle is not the way to get an agent. This will not be well because, you know, ultimately, I work for the talent. You know, I did. I worked for the talent, but the talent have Thio impress me to allow me to work for them. But once there's a contract signed, I'm indebted to the talent that I signed. And I don't want to be indebted to somebody that I don't think and work. And it's not about making money. It's about being doing it and getting there to the auditions and doing your homework and training and being really good at it. Because if I'm gonna put my name behind yours and you know the name was good, I'm gonna put my name behind yours when I send you into an audition. I don't want to think twice that you're not gonna hit your mark. You may not get the role and you can have a bad day for sure. You know, we're all human, but I want to make sure that when you walk in and that only comes with the level of confidence. So when maybe I missed it. But what triggered you to get into this line? of work because you didn't. Your degree was not in this. Well, no, my degree is perfect for it. E have a degree management with a minor in my math and a minor in psychology. I said what I dio I can calculate a percentage like that and I could talk to you about your dead day. Yeah, I'm dead day. But anyway, you know your bad day. Um but what got me into it? Waas I I quit my job. Suddenly I did quit, but I quit my job. Suddenly my day job And I had been the silent partner in the talent agency for three years on, and my partner, most awesome human, was done. She don't want to do it anymore. So pick myself up. After I got over my anger and stepped in and jumped in full time from there forward. I had a one year old child, and yeah, I was I was all in your on a mission, and it was well, and it was the agency. We had owned it together for several years and it was an established agency. But by the time I stepped in, it had gone through some rough times, and there was a lot of rebuilding to do. And, you know, I was technical office. The first agency I believe in the world to have a web page first or second in the world because I came from a technical background. I had people that wanted to help me put together a web page. Um, you know, jump forward to today. We'll talk about that later. But, you know, I was very technically and productivity oriented, and I love that kind of work. I couldn't imagine a company now, without a Web page, right? You're not a company, know? Much less I mean, much less the talent agency. I mean, I know some of them still don't. They're expensive, you know? They're they're expensive, you know? You can get something out there you can kind of hybridize and plug in data from other sites, but ours was, you know, our talent, but the resumes in on the back end, they could update him at any time. Uh, it was it was the talent was responsible for the data. I wasn't having a scan in P. D s. You know, it was all real stuff and really gave a lot of information for how we could manage our talent. You know, I have stats and stuff. So you had this company for a couple of decades, and then you sold it? I would. I believe I did. What? Why, when did you first think this would be a good idea to sell? And what was the motivation behind that? And then were you thinking you were gonna jump into cast voices right away? I was doing cast voices. Already had the I reserved casting com in 1995. Nice. I didn't I don't still have it. Somehow or another. It slipped through the cracks, regrettably. But, uh, I started the genesis of developing a back in software. Gosh, 20 years ago, more than 20 years ago. And then we, um I had a guy that helped...

...develop tag the tag site. Um, he didn't want to do it anymore. And so I reached out to my son Nick and my son Nick in his day job. At the time, he had just come off a huge movie. They got five Oscar nods and he was a co star alongside George Clooney. E mean he was in, you know, he was doing the whole movie star thing. And I was like, Hey, Nick, help me. Hey, said such help me? Well, it didn't hurt that he went to college at 10. And he's a brilliant guy, and he got in there and he taught himself out a program, and he started rewriting the back end of of tag. And then and with the intent he know what? Talk about this. We're going to do this. We're gonna build this, we're gonna build this. Uh, And it was gonna be this one way and that my kid is so smart in he convinced me that it should be this other way, which is now the business model we have now and so smart. But in order to do all that, we needed money. Eso because I put every penny I had into it every penny. And but we still needed to eat eso. I tried to get funding, tried to get funding, tried to get funding, and it just it was just wasn't happening. And then August of 2018 happened 2017. And that's when, uh, voices purchase voice bank. You know, that whole controversy? Well, I was on Lee because I was watching an interview with you. But at the time, it was kind of a little hush hush, and people are quite quite bitter. It seemed, and they still are. But, I mean, I'm not gonna knock any of that. I'm just going to say, But because of that, we we were already developing that. And in that very same month, our system, which we had built 20/25 years ago, member I was one of the first talent agencies, and the whole program that had been built like 10 years ago or 15, was crashing because it used such old band aided data points that are server was deciding not to support it anymore. So we were having to make a decision. Well, do we completely rebuild the site, or do we jump in and start over and and then the whole thing the tsunami happened and we said, Let's jump in and start over and let's go make cast voices happy. Okay? And so that's kind of how it started. And we started down that path in 2017. And it wasn't, though, until at the beginning of this year, 2028 the year of everybody's greatness that we actually got the two most incredible people to join our team as investors and part of our team. And that's Bobby and Elizabeth Alcott and all right, that just started a whole series of events. Um, including a pandemic. They didn't start that. But, you know, that kind of has affected our timeline. Unfortunately, like everybody else. So, um, it's Ah, yeah, that's cast voices. I'm so proud of it. I'm so excited about it. It's interesting. Is is that Is this not true with the pandemic in 2020 that there's a surge of people getting into voiceover work? It's huge. Are you kidding? Listen, when we were putting together a business case at the beginning of the year because, you know, you always still want to get additional funding, no matter what, you always kinda wanna have some in your back. And so we're always on the lookout. But we were putting together documentation, and the number one search was how do I get in? Voiceover number one search. Okay. There, Ugo? No, But what I've really seen in voiceover is a surge of work, everything, every commercial, everything had to be redone, and not only that on camera was at a standstill, because it's still kind of is. I mean, they've come up with some agreements and stuff, but it's still at a standstill because it's human to human interaction. So animations up the learning is a corporate narration. It's all up. Commercials air up because voice over, you know you can run a commercial, but you gotta update, you know, we're friendly for covered 19 or this This this. I mean, everybody was redoing everything in our whole world economic but changed and all that got recorded. I mean, everything talks to you, so I don't know if I really answered your question in terms of its Yeah, surging definitely is. What is it you do? Maybe 2020 is a little bit different, but what is it you specifically do? You know, in a day or over a week? What takes up your time in the work that you do well right now, helping with cast voices. We are doing the back end and...

...front end. So we spent a great deal of time doing code review and page setups. And you know, we have We've hired a software studio to do this for us. But, you know, they don't necessarily understand the voiceover business. And I know it like the back of my hand, for the most part. But we have a new agents panel. So on agency consign on and they can manage their talent. It's in very, very involved process. Then we have the talent and they have their talent profile, and they linked all their agencies websites through there that are on cast voices. And then there's the producer of project manager interface, which is who are they going to invite? What does that mean when they invite people how we're gonna archive all of that data? What are we going to keep? What are we gonna keep for the talent? Uh, it's that's just the the programming. I'll program it. I'm But I'm the, you know, I'm one of the experts, and then there's the other side, which is kind of on hold right now until we get ready. But thank goodness for Elizabeth. She is a marketing with She works in some top firms, but I still get to work with her and what's gonna be our marketing strategy. How are we gonna launch. What are we going to do? How are we gonna make this? That and the other thing. And then there's me. Mostly right now, I'm just trying to find additional funding. Um, we're good. We're gonna be good without it would be better with more. And so I've spent my last couple of weeks just trying to make concerted, you know, knowledgeable reach outs to people. Um, it's very interesting. A lot of the wealthy got wealthier. You know, during this pandemic, many of the people who invest at the price point that we're looking at, which is way down here, comparatively speaking, still have jobs. You know, those people that are making three and $400,000 a year still banking. You know, to me, the people that just got racked are the 50,000 year and unders, you know? I mean, it's terrible, You know, the people that are, you know, working at the service industries, you know, that just got halted Or the musicians or the arts are the actors. You know, our people, people in the middle of an entrepreneurial push. You know, a lot of us just got whacked a lot of 10 9 owners just got Slade and yeah, and still are, and still are. If do talents contact you directly and the agencies or is that are you asking if somebody's trying to get representation? Yes. If someone's trying to get representation, do they contact you or your company, or do they go through it and Oh, no, no, My company is Yeah. No, I dont get help. People get representation. I help people get work. So, you know, Starbucks are the producers would publish that job. But if somebody is looking for representation from for voiceover are on camera first and foremost go to their website and see what their procedures are. Someone in one way, someone another. You don't follow the procedures. They're not gonna waste their time with somebody who can't do that. Rules. Um, yeah, in voice over. I mean, it's extraordinarily competitive, but a lot of the agency's represent the same people, so they're always gonna look for a fresh new voice that isn't overrepresented by everyone else. Um, but they but people should get lots of representation. That's it's kind of this mixed no more. But, um, if you know somebody within the agency that is on good relations with the agency. Oftentimes that's the best way to get in. And they recommend you. They send you forward to their agents. No, I mean, that's just the way that the way it is. I think I heard you say that in another interview of You know, it's good to have a resume, but networking is e Think that's known is key, Yes, and especially this. Our voice over community is so kind. I mean, everybody helps everybody. I've just never seen anything like it. I've just a Z human being. I'm drawn to the giving nature of the whole horse of a community. I think we met through Well, we're connected through Roy Yockelson. Is that Is that Uncle Roy? I mean, what was one of my favorite people in the world? I believe he gave me your contact. That's how we are now. Today, Um, I speak about a lot right community and his His barbecue is annual barbecue and having people together, and it seems like a great community to be involved in. It's totally agree. I mean, I just Yeah, I just feel very, very fortunate to be part of it and have friends. I mean, friends in it. And, you know, I love the community. True story from the...

...heart. What is difficult about even though it is a good community, You know, when you see people's names, you know, on the big lights and everything seems to be going well. But for you maybe even seeking money or donations, um, you know, investment, investment, investment What is difficult about what you do on a daily basis? Um, within the community right now, the only thing I'm doing is just being funny, you know? So I'm not having That's why I I post the most irreverent stuff, and sometimes I even get a little embarrassed for me. But I'm not trying. Thio necessarily approach anybody within the community to to be part of cast voices per se. I mean, I'd welcome them because they would understand that and all that like, But I'm just not I am E no, I don't I'm not I mean, when we launched, um, I'm gonna Is it gonna be everywhere? Of course we're we're finally here, but I I don't want to course anybody, and I don't know that it would be coursing but I want I want to give people a product that they want to use because it's a good product, not because they knew me, um, in terms of other people that I see. And I observed in the voice of our community that I think is a little It's just it just because there's a lot of announcing of bookings. Bragging is kind of the word, maybe, I don't know. And I am so proud for people when they book a lot of stuff I am, But you're you're telling that within your community and listen. We're all rooting for everybody, but it's also there's a lot of people right now that, you know that is discouraging. Yeah, your own horns. And then other people have nothing to to so and you know, And if I'm gonna take my own horn, it is it is not. My responsibility of somebody over there isn't happy it's not, but it just I guess it was, and it's not happening so much now. But it became almost overwhelming with I booked this. I booked that I booked this and you know, in a traditional corporation you don't do that. You're like I had a great day today. I you know, and maybe even in your salesforce you might ring the bell at the end of the day. But, you know, you're just doing your job. And then at a corporation, you you root people for whatever is going on in their personal lives. You're, like, way to go. You know, you had a baby. Oh, my God, that's fabulous. Let's throw you a shower. I don't know, keeping the idea of community always at the forefront and that you're in it together. Yeah. Sorry for me around so much. Yeah, that's good. What is it? You think people may not understand whether it's entertainment industry itself, voiceovers or even you in particular, what you're doing? What people may not understand that you can shed some light on, so they have a better appreciation of either the industry Or I mean, what you're saying is, you know, you're just trying to promote everyone doing well. So since the beginning of that again, I was all by trying to thought so. Theo idea of people missing something. They're lacking the intelligence or the understanding of what the industry that you represent does. And if they knew this nugget, then it would. They would appreciate it better. Even the work that you're doing. I mean, what I would tell you in the community is that voiceovers really work. I think it's really work. It's really work. I mean, I am in awe of people that are recording their voice and doing 10 or 20 auditions a day or three. It doesn't matter, and they're using these audacity and pro tools, and they know their mix to A T and their voice integrated with their machine with their computer with their skill set is a well oiled machine. It doesn't just happen with somebody plugging down a mic and reading some copy and sending it off. That is not the way it works these days. I mean, they people who are doing voiceover and are successful at it are extraordinarily, you know, talented and have worked really hard to get there. And that's before they ever opened their mouth, you know? I mean, get their understanding noise floors and hold that stuff and then they open their mouth and it doesn't just come with Hey, I've got a Texas accent. I'm Liz. I can sell you anything I can't but a real voice actor can you know they're selling through their voice whether they're a character, they're...

...selling you on believing that it's a character. Ah, car une learning experience. It's all coming through this voice and the way they deliver that is so difficult. You know, it doesn't just happen, people. You can get better with training and sometimes you can just you are natural born actor. But the reality is is that that is becomes part of your well oiled machine like any actor. So you know, I don't think people really understand just how much work goes into it. I to be honest, I'd see on linked in a lot of people voiceover work. And and I think, uh, even with this podcast of why we work, I probably thought, What are these? Voiceover? There's so many of them. They're all over the place. This I don't think I thought it was not really work, but not taking it as seriously and understanding how much effort and talent goes into it. And it truly is work. Right? Someone, my gosh! Uh huh. Oh, my gosh! It is so much more. It is. It's so much work, and then the tool set, right? Your studio e mean not just the mic and the computer and the things you're doing there. But the room that you're recording in and all the factors you have to take into consideration there's some hub that it's not discernible by the human ear. But you're you're seeing it, you know? So you got to go fix. I just It's a lot of emotion. The promotion behind this yeah, is yes. I mean, you're you're one man stands So you're out there 24 7 trying to drum up new work. I mean, that's why you get an agent to help you reduce how much you're drumming up new work. But you're drumming up new work and you're trying thio your marketing out on linked in or some mailer or some you know, email or whatever, and you're always trying to do something that makes you stand out ahead of a crowd. And so you gotta be upon what those trends are. So when you go to these conferences and stuff, not all, not only are you learning what casting is looking for, what agents are looking for, what swag is popular. I know we're not doing this right now, but you really are attending this. How did this person take their job? Their role to the next level through marketing are conference. You know, other conferences, air training. Who's got the best gift for all that? It's this big work I had. This question is your leading right into it is the idea of people that you meet and you mentioned this with Children or the parents for the Children. Theis expectations that people have with the reality of the talent they may or may not have. Do you see that as a problem where people may have higher expectations in the reality of the talent? And is this something that is usually, um, something that can overcome or to a lot of people leave disappointed and not being able to be? Oh, well, maybe the worker, the worker that in this case, the voiceover artist that is trying, because I'm thinking of the listeners who really need to take a good assessment of their talents to see if what they're pursuing. Oh, you're talking about If someone thinks that they're better than they are. Well, okay, here's the deal. I think it's incumbent upon every coach in every listener, to be honest. Unfortunately, not everybody is. But wouldn't it be nice if they said e don't know, you know? But if that person is out there trying and trying and trying and you might not like their voice and I might not like their voice, but somebody who's hiring might. I mean, there are 1000 opinions, but if they really suck at it, you know, I would I would tell your coach upfront and you step into a coaching role, I'll pay you extra. To be honest, e mean, I would because a coach knows, you know, a coach knows, Um, but in reality, if you it zits, really, it's some of it is about your tonal quality and how that's different. But mostly I think me it's about delivery. I mean, I honestly believe right now that you know, accents are gonna be crazy important jingles. We're gonna be in crazy important. I think off the wall readings are gonna be crazy, something that's different because we are all so in. We don't hit up with voiceover right now because everything is talking to you and we're all home. Supposedly. Um, there needs to be differentiation. So, yes, you could have a sucky voice,...

...but if you are, you've got a studio, and you you've done all the work. Then if you it'll be you need to pay attention. If you're booking. Do you think that translates is well for people in any other industry or type of employment where their dream or desires to be the CEO of this company or they wanna be the manager here or the the difference there? I mean, we work for ourselves. So the only you know, we're 10 90 Niners and it really doesn't matter what anybody else says because we're 10, 99 hours And if we want to keep throwing money at ourselves and that's our passion, Harvey, it for me to tell you not Thio. I just won't hire you if you don't fit what I'm looking for. However, in in other roles other other. Yeah, places outside of the community. You know, there's, there's you get reviews and you get standard raises and you people talk and you plan and you you know, you progress based on your skill set and how your you know, it's all kind of it's laid out. If you are good at what you do, barring some kind of other, you know, factor on, then you get to move up. You know it's and it's a choice. Or you can change companies in voiceover. Yeah, you change companies every day. Just want one of the higher U. S. So there's just a completely different thing. You're obviously pretty good at what you're doing because you've been doing it for a number of years. I'm really good at being an entrepreneur. Lord, help me. How do you stay productive? I mean, especially with things you know, a a change of career, you know, a mishap or something that doesn't go so well. Lose a talent. How do you stay productive? Thio. Keep on going. What? Get your feet on the ground, Sam. Sickness. You think I'm kidding? E think ah, 100% entrepreneurs should be on the spectrum. You were just where our own little great a special e Yeah. Um when you are impact passionate about what you're doing, there's no stopping you. I've gone without food. E have I have spent my last dime and then some. You know. Was it wise? Insert huge expletive. No, but was I able to stop myself? No, because I'm so passionate and absolutely convinced that what we're doing, Yeah, it's going to benefit the community and benefit us, or we wouldn't do it. I don't know. We probably still do it if it if it wasn't. But, you know, it's just been, uh it's just been what I'm gonna do. I don't know how to explain it. And I mean, I think if if if you wanna be a voice over artist and you wanna, you know, really enjoy it, then it's just gotta be what you gotta do, You know? I mean, other people could be a voiceover artists and not really enjoy it. But for those in passion, that doesn't mean you're gonna work. Sometimes you just gotta do what you gotta do, Liz. In in what you do do what is something that you use each day that keeps you efficient. Something that you can't do without. Maybe what? Your notebook. Oh, my word. And it's not even you could turn to any page and it's got stuff on it. It's not even in riel order, you know, today is use a green beans and bacon instead of meetings to discuss terms and conditions. Yep, that was today, you know, but my notebook keep, uh, it keeps you on track. It's more like I have a thought. If I don't write it down so that I could refer back to it, then I'm gonna be mad that I can't remember what it was. I thought of e mean and it could be anything from a feature. You know, I have written down features. I don't want to text Nick in the middle of the night because he's in comfort. Until I write it down in the next morning. I formulated and send it. It's just my notebook is my and I have my computer, of course, on my phone. But the thing that really is this notebook and I don't even necessarily go back to other pages. But I knew I needed to talk to us A my insurance company this morning, so I wrote it on three pages. E turned the page. I'm like, Wait a minute. There was something back there, you know? And you know it is well, or do you just move on? Well, it depends if it's a list for the day. Is it the list for a day? I put circles. Yeah, and I check them when they're e. Check them when they're done. I wanted to dio there's this, uh, organizational thing I've never really done. But you put stickies up, Bond. It's actually there's a name for it is what we use with cast voices. We have what we call us. The TV and the TV is full of stickies, and it's things that we want to be on our future features.

But we can't put them now because we can't afford to put him in our current feature set. So it goes on the TV. Or if it's a future discussion, it goes on the TV. And eventually one of these days we're gonna pull those stickers off that TV, which is just, you know, thick so stickies in my notebook. No, it's great advice for people. Just thio keep things on track to keep. I mean, because we don't remember everything. It doesn't matter what we're doing, how one we are. Things come to us, which are great ideas, and some may fall off on the wayside. But it's still it's still a great thing to dio thing. I text myself a lot. Yeah, I do that or I take text text my dear wife like this and she said, What is this? And I'm like, Well, it's for me thinking of other people, people getting into work for the first time, Maybe you is a six year old doing voice over work about even changing your career. What advice do you have for people who just getting into something, whether it's for the first time or again for the second time or third time into a new career? You know, I'm gonna sound all philosophical, but if it is not your joy, don't do it. I mean, barring from needing to eat or feature family, you know, sometimes we have to do work, and the best thing you could do when you have to do work is just lean into it. But if you have an opportunity and it's your first time, and it's a path you're choosing by Choi, and you can if it's not what you love se lovey and find something you love, listen, we don't know how we're gonna be here tomorrow and I'm not like that. I'm not fatalistic. And I don't think fate has determined. What if I get to breathe in the morning? If we if we find joy in our work, then it's not work. And as a 60 year old woman has raised four babies and had careers and all that other kind of stuff, I could tell you hands down. My work right now is my hardest and my most beloved. And it doesn't feel like work. It just doesn't. And that is, I would tell you, even if you went to it for a degree in mathematics and you've got a job in mathematics. But theater is calling. Find a way to do the theater. Make sure you can eat. You gotta eat. You gotta feel yourself. But, you know, we were talking earlier about my mom and dad about helping me choose my path. I didn't even do that with my Children. One of my Children, two of my Children, now have degrees. My first one went to become a chef after a first year school, you know, they did their own thing, and I can't imagine trying to tell somebody how to live their life. I just can't. I can't imagine it. I guess I'm different that way. I don't know. Um, same thing with your work, man. He just don't know what tomorrow holds. So why not enjoy what you're doing? That's great advice. One. You're doing well for 60 a. Zay said the beginning. The good evening, young lady. So that was the case. But I interviewed a few people where they said, you know, follow your dreams, but they're not mentioning Feed yourself, you know they're not. And that's important to to work whatever you have to dio but also on the side. Or, you know, in a future plan of following that passion. And I think that's a better balance of responsibilities and understanding what you have to do versus something that you dream or want to dio. Absolutely e u you know that I would even have my talent that I would rip even within their work. You know, sometimes the work didn't pay like you would want it to and all this other kind of stuff, and I would always preface it If you need to eat, do it. Go try to get the work. Because, listen. If we don't all especially understand that for our fellow man and ourselves this past year, I don't know when we will. You know, I don't know when we will because this is thes air crazy times, and they have effect affected the best of us in the worst of us in a e can imagine where your your job could take up all of your time if you allow it. Or it could have been the previously So how do you balance that? Or make those work life choices to turn off? You know, work or turn off the phone? I'm getting better at it. Enjoy. I'm getting better at it. Um, you know, again, self care self care is one of the most empowering things you can do for yourself. And self care is knowing when to say, I have to stop now and you'll be OK. In...

...my career with corporate world, I wouldn't stop. But, you know, I just wouldn't like sometimes we work 20 hours with babies at home, and nobody was asking that if me, that's just the way I needed to get things done. Um, but here of late I've really learned, and fortunately I worked with a team. I mean, between Bobby and Elizabeth and Nick and myself, we absolutely honor self care. And matter of fact, we encourage it because it's just so important. If you're not taking care of yourself, then you can't be enjoying your work because you're too not taking care of yourself. I mean, maybe you can, but what is something you love to dio? Something you enjoy doing me gardening. I like to garden. I love to go fishing. I'm trying to plan a cross country RV trip. I've never RV in my life, but I, uh, somehow another ended up with an RV. So it's this little 12 ft things. So my son offered to help me fix it up, so I think I maybe I really want to avoid Cedar. Cedar here in Texas is outrageous to me. It just makes me sick, sick, sick, e I don't have to see what the pandemics gonna dio, you know, But I live at the bottom of the hill and all that cedar just comes and sits on top, and it's I can't breathe for 3.5 months. It's terrible. Um, so I don't know that I have a dog named fish I decorate. I painted on my walls black. You know, I'm a creative girl. Just, you know, anything like that. I wish I could say I love to run. I don't Hi, I like that. Well, that's funny. I love running, but recently, because I live in South Korea and I'm surrounded by mountains and I've always kind of like trail running as well, but getting older and I don't wanna twist an ankle or anything, but I just started toe hike in this last two weeks and wanted to work out. Yeah, yeah, it's very enjoyable, right? It's just nice Thio, you know, and you don't see any buildings or cars or anything like that and just, you know, it's a beaten down path, but it's a nice beaten down path, so it's safe. And then you see other people out there just and these people look like they're in good shape and they're not running, they're just walking. So I strongly, uh, encourage. It is very. It's a wonderful, relaxing sort of thing. And I don't if I go running, I feel okay. But this hiking, Yeah. Now, yeah, I trained a couple of years back for a half marathon walking, half marathon. And I really enjoyed, you know, the training because most of it was on a treadmill, But I would also get out. And it was very different walking outside and on the treadmill. Whoa. Big difference. But, you know, I It was fun. I was I felt good. I live out on the lake. I should hike more than I am, but it's Texas and were either hot or not. You know, hotter, hotter, hotter. I Although right now it is absolutely beautiful weather. So I've been outside working. I had trimmed on my rose bushes and, you know, so that kind of your making their life choices in tow balance now? Yeah, for for sure. You must. You must. What do you think, Liz? Maybe thinking back of whether it was a mistake or something you didn't know or someone was saying something to you that you didn't listen to growing up something that you look back now and could give advice based on your own experience to people that would help them not, you know, miss that opportunity or make that same mistake. Yeah. Hmm. Then You don't have to divulge a mistake or oh, my life is full of them. Um, human, Um you know, I think that that comes with himself. I think we're much more harder on ourselves, and we don't make choices out of fear, you know, and are okay, e I think that if you don't be hard on yourself, you are going to mess up. You are. You're also gonna look back when you thought you knew it all and go Dang, I didn't know it all you are. You're going to do that. You're gonna look back at your 22 year old self when you thought you were rocket and then you're 26 you went Oh, God. You know, Whoops. Um, everybody makes mistakes. Everybody. And if we bought ourselves up...

...forever, we're living in such a a non existence, you know, I cannot repeat 10 minutes ago. I can't. Well, it's funny. It's the world that I mean, you mentioned being on the forefront of website. And now, with technology or social media, people are they live or die by their tweet where they live or die by this post. I mean, I'm sorry, but I should follow me 20 years ago, they would have hung me out. You know, fear, fear, fear. Everybody's so afraid. And you just got I'm I'm the queen and for a while, of being afraid of taking a risk. And yet I look back on my life and I took a lot of really good risks. Bond. I may not have singing them in a risk at the time, but I made some bold choices that I'm proud of myself. Where I'm at now, not not in career Justin choices that I did stand up for a this or that, Um, the fair paralyzes us. You know, we don't reach out to the boy because we're afraid we don't, you know, call our mom because we're afraid way don't try for the job because we're afraid we don't. There's so much fear. There's safety. Don't be stupid, Science Israel. But then there's just, you know, fear of trying, and again, if you're joy is your job. If your job brings you joy, that fear really loses its impact. You know, I cannot tell you how important it is to be true to yourself as a human being on I don't know if that's work related or not. But if you cannot feel what you're doing from here, I love what you're doing. Your work doesn't matter. My goodness, when you hate to wake up a 58 and go back and say, Oh, I hated my job for 40 years So I'm 58 now. Good. Eat me. I got some arthritis in this joint. I got a little diabetes over here and I my high blood pressure and I can't because I'm too fat, you know? Don't do that. I had a conversation with someone just the other day two days ago, and he had mentioned he and his father were not very close, but he his father is still alive. And I and I kind of suggested, just based on my own experience with my own family is and because I interviewed someone recently in one of their biggest regrets was not phoning someone more often who had since passed away because they just didn't know there's was just neglect, but not out of resentment or anything. But where this conversation, the other gentleman I was talking Thio. There's resentment, just some hard things going on. The family and, like, you never know when his father is a little older. And I'm like, just, you know, talk. I mean, I couldn't imagine, as you speak very highly of your Children, of our Children going a long time without speaking to us. Like how heartbreaking it even. And it happens, you know, even the best of relationships. A week goes by two weeks, go by. Oh, I better for longer than that. You know, like any of those things. And I just think, you know, no matter what the relationship is, if you have some sort of talking relationship and if you don't try to do your best, But if you have something, just a call, a chat, I would love. Like what my Children are, you know, in their twenties and thirties, just a You know, Papa, You okay? Yep. Okay, good. And just something simple. And I think that speaks to the true character of people in in being true to yourself. But also not neglecting other people in your Oh, for sure. You know, if you could be nothing else, be kind. We're human beings, you know. We are not. Some of us are living in a reclusive life right now, but by nature, that's not typically the way it is. Um, and I'm not. You know, I wouldn't necessarily ask somebody to go out and forgive a horrible thing. Just just be a good human man. Speak of human, whether it's with your family, with your friends within. God, sorry, someone gave me this advice. If you don't agree with something that kind of speak up on it, do you agree with not forgiving? Ah, horrible thing in the sense that whatever a horrible thing could be, they have to deal with the consequences of it. You know, whatever. Whatever horror, like whatever realm it's on, but personally forgiving so that you're not holding, not you, but just generally, you holding onto resentment...

...and anger because that is something that we're going to carry if we we have not released them. Whoever it may be of the wrong that they have done to us, do not, do not. I mean, having experienced something like that. Is there any truth? I mean, it z hard. It's easier said than done one. But the idea of just like letting it go forgiving and saying, you know, I wash my hands of it. I'm OK to live my life and not allow that. We're talking about people Thio to take up residence in my own heart or my own mind, would you not? I think that I find it extraordinarily helpful. I mean, I've experienced it. Maybe you have. But I will tell you that being able to get to that place is a level of enlightenment that's important. You know, it releases. You don't have to forget. You don't have to say it didn't happen. You don't have to pretend it didn't. Carrying the anchor continues to give it life. Yeah, continuing to talk about it continues to give it life. Will you be able to undo what the wrong that someone did to you? You won't. You know, Do you sometimes bring it back to life unintentionally or because you're going a little bit? You gotta let go? Sure. But I mean, living your life in Yeah, and, you know, and a lot of it's circumstantial, you know? I don't know that I could I don't know what I would do if it was something like, like, terrible, like rape or murder. I I incredibly admire people that can release it. Zbig job. And I hope you can manage to do it if that's where you are again. If you do not feel this vessel yours with some kind of joy and holding onto a situation and reliving it and all that I mean, you know, anybody has gone through a break up has done that 1000 times. You know it. You know, you need to learn to manage that emotion. Yeah, I agree with all of that. Yeah. I mean, I just You just need to manage it so that you can not let it suck your joy. It would be nice if we could forget things better. I'm really good at it. Well, I'm gonna forget. Probably shouldn't forget. But although I think I've got that diseases says if something really bad happened, who we won't put over here in this drawer and look it up well, my my dear wife says, like, don't you remember? Like if we fought about something right? No, wait. You're talking about waken plan our trips based on fights that we had, and I'm like, I don't I don't remember that one. Sorry about that, honey. So some things I do forget kind of my perspective. You mentioned this, and I only have a few more questions for you. But you mentioned this right off the offset about integrity. Do you? Maybe commenting on other people that you see is putting their character before their career Because I think you're one that puts your character first. And then career follows along wherever you may go. Um, but it's a temptation. Yeah, here's the thing. I mean, I could tell you like examples. Like people weren't truthful on their acting resumes, Remember, I kind of acting resume from this person, which was the next can rest, you know? Yeah, it was actually acting resume of someone else. I read. They just changed their name. You're like, you know, it's like I've been doing this a long time. You think I don't know about this or that? The other thing? Um, yeah. Again. Integrity and career. Yeah, uh, people do it. They they first, and then they think that, you know, people will forgive me later, but I'm going to get my career first. And maybe my character would drag along with a piece of string or something. you know, I can tell you is karma's bitch, you know, and I don't actually believe that karma is going to come out and get you. And I could, you know, decide all sorts of you surely would get rejected by a lot of people if they found out eventually down there. Well, sometimes, you know, sometimes it's what really happens. Is that someone that's important to you that's not important to you. But you're gonna meet somebody along the way that it's important to you, and they're gonna find that out, and they're gonna leave. Or, you know, a job is gonna fire you, or, you know, you're gonna do something really egregious in the world's gonna know, Um and then you have the...

...consequences. Or maybe you get away with it. Or maybe you try to get away with it or all. Um, unfortunately, I think that matters more to you and me than it does to the person doing it. You know, we can extol what? It's not a good idea that people excuse me, that will put something in front of integrity. You and I talking to them won't change their mind, you know, I wish we could. I wish we could be like all good people. But I need to be honest to write, like, years ago. I'm sure I put job or money in front of any sort of idea of being 100%. That's the problem with E mean, you know, my babies. If I could do something, you asked earlier what I would do differently. I wouldn't work so many hours, I'd be home with my babies. You know, I was such a driven and career oriented human being that, you know, I let the rearing of a lot of their precious time be done by a nanny or be done by daycare or something along those lines. You know, that's certainly not important. And I, you know, with with the agency, I work from home on day when my babies were young and so my I could be there. But still, even then, you're in the middle of a project. Some things you can't help it, but well, way put that pressure on ourselves. And also, I think the world puts that pressure like, Oh, you need to have two incomes or you, you know, you need to make this amount of money you need to do this. Or, um well, you need to have your kids in this sort of school, so well, in order to do that, you need to make this much money. You're saved this much money. And then there's our own pressure upon ourselves to get the career. But also, there's that added pressure. Of what? You're what? You're only staying home and looking after your kids, right? Why don't you know? Do you think that's changing? I do think it's changing. I hope it is changing. I hope it is. You know, I was part of the Gloria Steinem generation, you know, Women worked, and I ran into a glass ceiling and fought it, you know, fought it because I was a woman in a mostly male world. And, um yeah, and I ran up into it, and that was corporate world, and then my own business. I haven't felt anything about being a woman That was detrimental to me. You know, a case. You didn't mention it in particular. But I don't know if you were a single mom or not, but my mom was, and she just passed away this this February at 66 all. I mean, I never thought a woman I only knew women shouldn't work or shouldn't be doing this because you hear people saying that this is happening. But I grew up my whole life. My mom always had three jobs, right? Two or three jobs, and I never knew, right? Like you working like I e couldn't I didn't even see it as a bad thing. I mean, looking back to your kids at the time, probably like, this is just what Mom does and then you learn. Oh, well, maybe she should have been here. Maybe, but you couldn't have been also, you know, you know it, Z uh, in my own family, it's both ways. My older boys really resented the fact that I wasn't at home. My younger Children just need that to be now. I made almost all the soccer games and the weekend stuff, but, you know, I don't know. We kind of went into the family thing versus the integrity thing. Ultimately, you know, mine. I was just absolutely driven in my work and, you know, and I still and driven to my work, but I do do a lot of self care. I think it's just important. E just wanted to say it. Thio commend you because we're doing it to take care of your family. And as I saw with trying, you know, and this is what you have a talented like whatever. The job is inconsequential. It just happened that you get to do something that you love. I wouldn't say my mom got to do something she loved because of the nature of the work. But she loved the people, right? This is something that she strived in being, and that's part of it. That's part of it. Bravo to your mother. Yeah, So I mean, what you did and what you know you're continuing to dio shows, you know, your commitment, your dedication to work. And I think that zits important. So the idea of women in work it's something I never, ever thought off. You know, you hear about it now, like Oh, there's glass ceilings and stuff. But I'm like my mom went and got a job. And if she never if she lost her job or she changed, she went out and got another one. There was nothing stopping her from getting the employment that she felt she needed to...

...take care of me and to take care of herself. So I'm sure a part of that was Yuhas. Well, you had to drive for this type of industry, but also to support your family. And I think that should be commended. Thank you. And I say that also to lead not away from integrity and into family. But the idea of education, Where did you where because you went on to university. Your kids went to do different things. Where do you value and for the listeners education in the sense that formal education is good but also hands on experience. You mention your other child is a chef, right? In that, um, I think there are certain there are certain jobs that require that you have a degree. And so if you want to be an electrical engineer, for example, more than likely, you're gonna have to get a degree in electrical engineering. If you want to be a software developer, you don't necessarily have to get a degree in software development. But you do have to train yourself how to code the software. Um, so there are some jobs that require a practical education. You know, uh, becoming an actor. I think training is incredibly important. But getting a college degree and acting is that going to make you a better actor? I get you hired. It doesn't matter. You know, if you're the right person for the role and you actually you're in the right place at the right time and all the stars aligned, you got really lucky. And that's really all that you can get the role whether you have a degree or not. But I do think continuing in education, no matter what you do, is very important. Whether you're a voice over artist, whether you are, uh, the president of a company, we're never too too grown up or old to continue to learn how to be better at what we do or how to be better around people, or how to be better with trends or any of that. We can always continue to learn. And I didn't press for my kids to get a college degree. I wanted them to go to college, and I thought it was important. I'm really glad my first son went to a year of college and then he went on to color academy. He doesn't even do that at all. Now he's a senior director of a big company. He worked himself up through just hard work. My second son got his MBA, and now you know, he makes a heck of a living at 34 years of age. You know, it's amazing. My third son, um, is my partner in my company. He's a movie star. He has no formal post high school graduation, but yet he taught himself how to code and became a senior Steck developer a month after he tried to find his first job and then my daughter decided it. Nine. She wanted to become a doctor, and that's what she's doing. She's in her fourth year of med school, and she's now interviewing um, colleges for her residency. She's, like, Blows me away. She literally would for 8.5 hours a day study, even at Christmas, you know, open up our presence. We, you know, And there she and that's for her. She had to do the formal education, you know, So I didn't require it of any of them, But I also wouldn't gonna pay for their phone bill for the rest of lives, either. Now they pay much. E think education is important. I only ask that because I find there's a push with some people that say education is not important or formal, and they leave out the part of, you know, the hands on the trades and all of that other stuff that is possible. And I think it's vital for people to realize, especially for us. We get into forties and fifties and sixties, and it's good to keep learning. You know, we shouldn't We shouldn't stop Even if we did to college education, you don't just stop there. Know what a waste of this beautiful thing called the brain? So, Liz, do you have any words of encouragement? I mean, now 2020. You know, I said, I'm going to write it, make a T shirt if you know I survived 2020 or something along those lines, and I only yeah, it's not over yet. And words of encouragement for people that have been through a lot. Even knowing your own life, my life, things before 2020 you know, people lose people, people lose their jobs and they need to put their foot, take their feet off their bed, put him on the floor and get toe work. Do you have any words of encouragement for them? Thio For the ideas I mentioned to you in the beginning that, you know, work is good, but work can be tough. Um, I would validate you first if you're having a difficult time and you keep hitting getting hit with one thing after the other, Um, it's okay to cry. It's okay to freak out. It's okay to stop It is okay. It's okay to process...

...it any way you want to process it. But at some point, you you have to keep taking a step forward. Otherwise, you become somebody else is concerned and you know it. So maybe that's your choice. But listen, I know people who have had probably the worst year ever, and you can wallow in it. Or you could just figure out some way to get yourself some joy. Keep using that word. And I mean, that's not to say there aren't people out there who are suffering depression and mental illness. Mental illness is really And if you have that kind of path and your You're really in that kind of state of anxiety or depression. Seek help. Let me tell you, you know, therapy is good, but if you're doing what you love and if you are really in a bad way, go be in the service of others. Go serving me you'll to somebody you know, Go to your neighbor and just pull tin weeds. Do something for someone else. You are not so important as to let yourself wall. Oh, that's not good for you. Remember, I talked to a few minutes ago about the most empowering thing ever with self care self care. It is absolutely okay for you to say no. It is okay to say yes. And if you practice self care, you can get through this hellacious year we got going on. We're not even done yet, but practicing self care, saying okay today really sucked is a pandemic. You know, my best friend has co vid there in the hospital. I broke my toe. I don't have any food, you know. What can I do that makes me better? I could breathe. E can go outside and look around me and be thankful for something something. Get your mind off of the bad. Um, but the two words I will tell you more than anything is self care. It is okay to be you anyway. You are. I like what you said about. If you're not moving forward, you know you're becoming someone else's responsibility. And I think that's I mean, I don't think I've ever heard it said like that. And it's so true. And often or most times missed, missed right or even people as we talked earlier about not caring. It's just people don't care if they're someone else's responsibility. And that is a big thing that's going on. Yeah, I think you're right there. You know, I don't wanna be somebody else's responsibility. And I mean, maybe that somebody doesn't care through my responsibility, but yeah, yeah, Not a good place. Responsibility. Your responsibility? Yeah. Not really. They're going a safety net. No, no, no, no, no. My own Children. I'll be here. But, you know, go along, little birdie. Love. You mean it? How, Liz, can people reach you? How? What is the best way in your line of business and looking for investments as well? And you're not touting it. I'm mentioning it. Oh, thank you. God. Love, please. We'll make you some money. Uh, lizard cast voices is my email address. I'm also on linked in, and I typically respond when people message me on LinkedIn. Um, e don't give anybody myself. I'm not happening. Not happening. Car. If you want a good laugh every once in a while, you can follow me on Facebook. I'm Liz L. Atherton on Facebook. Cast voices on Facebook. Uh, if you do go, if you are a voice over and you're looking for a platform to help bring you work, you can pre sign up. Podcast voice is calm. And, uh, you know, we're gonna send coupons to people that have and kind of get my head's up when we go live so they could get ahead of the launch. And yeah, that's how you can reach me this. Atherton, I have one more question for you. And that is why do you work? Because I love it. E I love what I need to eat. E need to eat. But I, uh I absolutely love my work right now. I absolutely love it. Inside out. Upside down, Right side, forward. I love it and I'm not afraid. Liz Atherton, founder of Cast Voices, Tech Entrepreneur and the Queen of Risks Thank you kindly. I appreciate your time and all the best to you and what's to thank you after 2020. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others...

...so they to be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive be a joyful day in your work.

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