WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 30 · 2 years ago

#29 Leroy Washington CEO Quest Nation FM & Music Producer and Artist BrianVee Whywework

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The Final Ingredient: Releasing September 14, 2020

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About 

"I am a former rap artist and soldier. I have spent ten years working in our public school system, and I've become a mentor to many young people. I am dedicated to doing what I can for the generations coming up, and give them the support we never had back then. I am currently the host of Quest radio & I still make music & support young musical artists. I'm a writer & big brother in the BIIS (Brother To Sister) fraternity. May God bless & keep us all. Listen to Power Play by TheNovelist #np on #SoundCloud https://soundcloud.com/thenovelist/po...This is a 2006 remake if a 1991 inspirational song we recorded to inspire people to turn their lives around. Listen to Inspiration by TheNovelist #np on #SoundCloud https://soundcloud.com/thenovelist/in...This song was featured in the classic documentary film, "Perspectives On Steppin'." "

Welcome to why we work, with your host, Brian V as he speaks to people like you from all over the world, as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which will be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going and keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here's your host to why we work, Brian V. I am Brian V at why we work. Today I have the pleasure of speaking to you with Mr Le Roy Washington, the CEO of Quest Nation FM radio, personality, music producer and artist, is a mentor and podcast host known as the novelist. He's an army veteran and he has a passion, and his passion not only in music for himself, but to shine like on those up and coming in the industry. Listen to him as he explains his idea and work ethic as he goes through this journey. I'm Brian V and this is why we work and I have the great pleasure speaking to you with Mr Leroy Washington. Good day, find sir. Are you doing? I'm doing well. You and I I've been playing tag here at the last few weeks because I think first and foremost you're a busy man, pretty busy. You got think you got things going on. Can you, can you give us a little introduction to yourself, but also then we're going to go back and talk a little bit about your first work experiences, military vet S. it's I've been out of the military, just been just just saw working stop of the podcast in two thousand and fifteen quest nation, which I spotlight oh artists, underground and underground artists, and been working as a mentor to young people for maybe the last fifteen, twenty years. You mentioned work. What was your first job, Leroy? Your very first job the summer before my senior year. I worked, had a job as a janitor, knows, doing like genitorial work with this high junior here at senior year of high school. Okay, excuse was this? You said senior year as this of high school. Yes, the summer before my senior year, summer before you see. And why did why did you? They coming from Canada's Canada, and you the US her similar right like I spoke to a guy the other day. He said, well, my first official job was jumping in the pond and grabbing balls from a golf course and sell them them. Right. And I spoke to someone else the other day and he was like five hundred and ten hustling on the street, just playing some music on the street. So some people make some money early. You're looking at in the high school. That is not a little bit late later than what most North American people experience? Or was there a reason for that? Are you doing something else as well? Well? Made Money? I mean not. That's basically hustle B I mean, as far as when you say what job? Yeah, yeah, I'm thinking you meant though, well, I got a paycheck, but yeah, of course, growing up. No, I well, shovel snow for the neighbors, make some money, or quick grass, no, stuff like that. Yeah, yeah, that that's all important. Right, like this this show is talking about, you know, especially if it comes upon the ears of kids who are wondering how they can make that same guy said about getting golf balls. He was also making lemonade. Right. That's not an official paycheck, but you know, standing on the street corner playing a violin, that's not an official paycheck either, but it shows that there's an initiative, that there's a desire to work. So when you start shoveling, what was what was some of your desire? What was your motivation to get out there make your own money? I don't think I fought off with that beat, you know, just was my neighbors on. Just have a little money for I could change, you know. So it wouldn't it wasn't that deep for me. So when you got into just your summer before your senior year, what was the motivation? Then too, there was a reason. You're getting a real job. What was what were you doing? That's when I was starting to understand money a little bit more. So I want to be to buy my own school closed. Yeah, my own back to school clothes and things like...

...that. So that's why I got a job. You know, how long? For help me up. So I was working with one of my best friends, so that that was an extra bonus. How long did you live? Did you work in that job? Just just a summer, just summer months. Did you get any more jobs before you're finished high school? No. What did you do after high school? One, into the military. Now, yeah, you said you're a military veteran and I thank you for your service. I said this is someone and it's true. We're from Canada and we owe a lot to American military soldiers because, though you guys, we don't have a big brother. Why did you did you have someone in your family that pointed you towards that, or you saw that as a good opportunity? But what reason did you choose to go to the military? Think I just saw it as a good opportunity to get out the no experience the world. So may actually signed up the singer summer before my senior year, so my whole senior year I was already committed to go. I'm in Korea and I have I experienced the boys or the men have to do two years military service and I, you know, I've taught students who are, you know, looking not in a positive light towards going to the military, but they know they have to do it. If you're signing up in your senior year, how did you feel about like was this was this a glimmering hope to something new, or were you a little bit apprehensive or scared or nervous about going into it? No, I wasn't nervous because I signed up on my own free will. We didn't know, we didn't have to sign up, but obvious I signed up to go. Just wanted to just get the kickstart after graduation, get out experienced life and experienced new things. So and it definitely helped. Did you have any friends also sign up to at the same time where you just so low, you like, I'm going to go do this. Not a friend of signed up as well. He Wan't going to buddy system, but he wanted to go into the marines. That what that didn't want to do marines. So what did you sign up to when went in to the army, and what was your position that you were signing up for? I'm a little ignorant to the military, but what were you you aiming to be as you signed up? I went in as a patroleum supply specialist, so I was able to learn how to few aircrafts and all manner of vehicles in a wartime situation. No breakdown, no camouflage, our sales, build up a fuel station, refew tanks, jeeps, helicopters, everything and, you know, break it down and move on, you know. So that was my job. I look down, I look now at people who joined the military out of high school with great admiration, not only because they're in the military. But when I but when I was nigh school, I was an idiot. I had no focus, I had no direction, I didn't know what I was going to do. But looking back, like, I know there's some people who joined the military and they're retired now. Yeah, you know, and I you know. I'm like, Oh, I should have done that. How could you? So for me, I still was all over the map after high school for many years. So could you see the difference of how you may have thought in high school versus getting, from what I understand, from the military's are rude awakening to real life? was that a shock for you? Is that difficult, or were you able to, as they say, you know, fall in line and do whatever needs to be done to get your job done? It was a shot going into boot camp and have people yelling act in your face. You know, that was all that was a culture's shop Rut there. I mean soon as we got off the bus. I'm going to start. Yeah, and some people was able to deal with it, some people weren't, you know. So I mean I'm I got many stories from boot camp alone before we even graduated and went off into our it to our professions. In the military. You know, I'm glad I did it, though. Was it tough? Like you just want to haul off and cracks on right the nose is had. I had a drill sergeant named harder, Short Guy, and his drill sergeants be pressed up against my nose as he was yelling, cussing...

...me out. You know, I wanted to got, wanted to crack one, you know, and I really did. But later on, you know what's know, because boo camp is eight weeks. You know when as the first six weeks are tough. So you know, the later on, maybe like another weeks. We were one down, looking ready for graduate. Everything kind of metals out of a little bit. I kind of understood why hold me so tough, but he was, he was on. But I appreciate it. There own he did. You did? Did you say thank you to him after? Maybe? Yeah, fairly. Yeah, he was started to card ever tell you was something else. So a black guy, but he looked like a Chinese have the real fine fine eyes. He was just not letting me in there there he had the real thin eyes. But you like that, but I don't know. That kind of look like a Chinese guy. But he was this was all my butt all the time. Yeah, the sergeants, they don't. A lot of people don't appreciate them during the time. I couldn't imagine, especially right at a high school. Right. Thank you. Yeah, then a you know, we're we're in for Leonard Wood, Missouri, which they called that base fort lost in the world, as it was like the wilderness somewhere. And you know, when we're doing push ups, you know, the ground is like it was like sue hot there. The ground is feel like a hundred degrees that you're you doing push ups and do them climbers and everything. Oh yeah, we will do it was pretty pretty experience. Man, it was nice. Okay, what did you do? What did you do? But as you got your job after the eight weeks, did you start to enjoy it at all, like was it you like this ain't way. We had had a ball. Yeah, from there I went to Fort Leave, Virginia, which was a party time, and know, that's what that's where you go basically for school. So now you're doing it like another eighth learning more of your craft and you going or like classroom setting, you know, and and doing hands on learning your craft everything. Know, that was that was pretty cool, you know, and so I mean you get to do whatever you want to do after flock, just like a regular just like in civilian life, weekends off. So I had a pretty good time and Fort Lee once. So we graduated from there. I went to my my mains duty stations, for who a Texas, and for too. Texas was unbelievable experience for me. I've been there actually, my family and texts you into Ford heard and I'm post there. What do you take out of the military experience? What is what is one kind of nugget you can take out of there that you've you would even pass on to other people to say why? You know, it would be good for someone to enjoy that. Everybody talks about, you know, gives you it gives you the words escape with me right now. Discipline, discipline, yeah, uh, discipline, and you did that for me, but for me also a big thing. While so he'll me to be able to get along with everybody, you know, all races, people know who weren't, didn't just look like me. Know what I got the forth hood. Two of my best friends that became my best friends was a white guy named Ericsson and Puerto Rican guy named Santry. We all room together. So as we that's we went through. I'm serious experience. You know, I'll be playing run DMC and Lael COOJ, theyd be Sanchiez was a bomb, Julie, you know, and they're probably be playing some some death leppard or something. But all the different kind of Muse everything. We all start to take from each other and it really opened my mind up and help me now so I can. I can tell me, buddy, I love it and work with anybody know and don't have no prejudice like that. And that's what one thing that the military help help for me, because the guy who had your back, no, cerrely was it the same color, you know, but we were all brothers. Yeah, and that's the big thing for me. Yeah, that's what I hear about the military and that's that's a thing that should be praised more often. When did music, when did music become a mainstay in your life, because I would say that knowing a little bit about you and your background and, as you mentioned, producer and you make music. You have some of your own albums. When did music become a part? I'm sure it wasn't just after the military, but when did music become central to your life or a major part, probably like my second year young...

...man named Tony Barks from New York. It was a rapper. He came into the he came to the base and became part of our company and so we became best hands, you know, and he was used pretty I wasn't. I wasn't rapping time it really know how, but I was writer, HMM, and hanging around. I got into RAPP and I remember we said we used to go in into the captain's Orson this do little little skits for him or wrapt up. The captain loved it, so he signed us a big his big so some big extrafag program it was having. It was the Christmas time, nothing but captains, majors, all the Kirache and people there with them with their family, and Bartley had a we supposed to perform together. We had something happened at home to go home on a mercy Y for something. So that left me there myself. He pulls shoes and you know, I performed. Ay I did a great job, but that's I think that's when I got birth as a MC. This a being scared with that many people in the room. It was. It was a huge ball room and but you know, being up there by myself having a heaven to do Myn that really kind of birth me and I've been going ever since. You said you you were writing before you began rapping. When did you start writing and how it was always a great writer. Yeah, when? When you sure it in school? When did you start writing and what were you writing at that time? So I was writing, being wrapped and rhymes and ICIC stories all the time, right, just so, yeah, just like short stories. I love to write. Who is some of the your biggest influences when you first start writing rap when you were younger, or even some of your short stories? My influences growing up, I used to read a lot of I love Sherlock Holmes, so you should read Arthur conn and doyer, Nancy drew mysteries. All. I used always read of Miss Books, little the little Miss Novels and stuff. Yeah, they didn't as far as with the rappers all, you know, of course, there you're like Kim Yo Cooj run dem see. You know, those are the people who changed my life as also coming up. You know, started to fall in love with rappids knowing I was going to talk to you. This always comes up to me. When I was his mustly been one thousand nine hundred and eighty eight. I was in a little town, Myrick got Nova, Scotia, can at the almost as far east as you can get besides Newfoundland, and I was playing and I was only what, maybe ten, and there is this this family there with a big Winnebago, like what I don't think even called Winnibagos, but the things that you connect under the back. I'm pretty sure it connected. But it was huge and we must have been playing and this kid, he must have been a little bit older than me, handed me a tape, a cassette tape, and it was it was an what do we call them when we record it? The over them. He recorded it. He would say downloaded and remember what used to do with them. But it was a what is it called when you'd record the tape off of another tape? Copy? Yeah, you copied the tape. It is copies, I forget, but where it is. But it was Nwa. My whole life changed. It just it just the way I lived and then that became my like, as you mentioned, the guys that you hung out with, the guys I was hanging out with in that small little town. They were listening to like a Bon Jovi or maybe a bit Alec or any of that, and that I was given that tape and then that changed my course of music taste for the rest of my life. Well, just those those left right away. Oh, I'm easy. What you talking about? So easy? It is it? But it no, it is certainly. Did it just it just, certainly in the gate I had that same like I would say, attitude. You know, I'm just a little man. It is followed and it just changed the course of my life and it gave me a different perspective of music and how you can express yourself. Any of those raps that you first wrote or short stories, did you carry into recording? Did you you bring them forward or edit them forward? And because now out of the military, or even did you wrap them in the military? Did you bring them forward and, you know, make them fine, tune them?...

No, no, just the rhyme that I performed night at the at the big gala thing. What's a rap called? Goes in at night. So this is having to do with Christmas or anything. It was going to Goll Eerie, walking dead of all story. I did, but I did have that was all I had, my partner, he went home. That's all I had. So I had to had to do it. Let's know, everybody loved it, you know, everybody loved it. So I seen people get no dance and then everything. So it was great and it was some extra pressure because of the young lady. All that went on before me. I closed the whole but the young lady that went all before you saying with the Houston you give the love as so Whitney was just the mounch, you know, and this young lady did a great job. I like Man Hump to follow her, but did it. It was pretty good. After you finish the military, how did your career start to change? Well, my best friend at home, he was a he was a good Dj, you know, he's the scratch and make everything. So we started, we called uself to demolition posse and we started doing rhymes and everything and we performing and we were very successful underground circuits, you know, because Milwaukee wasn't known at the time. Well, no time like that, like it is now with music, and we didn't have the Internet and everything where we, you know, showcase our music. You know, we had to go to the race station and radio stinking, especially in Milwaukee they are. When harder with these get get your music played. You know, you have to know somebody know that. So we are. We did secular music. Then we had a most success doing a Gospel when Gospel maybe a around one thousand nine hundred and ninety. We call ourself forgiving and that's when we selling out places, cathedrals. Why? MCA's just doing music that will that aspired of the young people, HMM, and we had a had a great time doing that show. So are you still? If you are still making use it. But did you continue with that for a while and then started into producing and then your mentoring? How did that become more prevalent in your life? Well, I started driving a school busing thousand and two this ot working in the public school. So two thousand, around two thousand and five. So I wasn't doing music anymore. But you know, I was a mentoring people when I was coaching basketball, and I have I started a couple of young, young singing groups while allows in school, while I was working in the school group called driven those. Those like six young lady. I had six young men. I was getting the group but they all got cold feet. So I just stuck with young lestle they they they had a time by you know. You know, I had them set up to where they were going to be doing big things, but you're talking about middle school young ladies. They just really couldn't grasp what, what they could have all been, you know. And and they seemed like every year a group of kids have come up to me and Mr Washington. We want to do music. So I'd have another group and it just became a yearly thing. Two Thousand and fifteen, that's when I started questination because I know how hard it is in a city and about like somebody who's well known. Don't know a lot of people. You may not get looked at. So just stop just for music is for just any young person who did have an opportunity to have the spotlight, shound shine on them, where there was a music for those system being great in school or athletics or whatever. So I started questionation in two thousand and four tunes, like spot like anybody who was doing something positive with the city. So I wonder they where? You said you before you got your job at the school board, you stopped music and then you jumped into starting quest nation. What made you stop? Initially? What was the reason? So I guess you guys were busy doing it and then for some reason you stop. What was the main reason why you stop being in producing music? Well, my Dj, who was a well done music with all my life, just kind of slow down. No, nobody really worked harder to him, but he kind of slowed down. So I didn't really. I never really work with nobody else before until now, but when he slowed down and everything slow down on any and I just stopped. Is it a hard grind to though? Is...

...that? Is that part of the reason? Like not just slowing down for no reason, but it's it's it's a hard haul to try to make it. It is, but when it's something you love. But I don't think it's that hard because there's people who our underground who still make a good living doing it. We can still make a good living doing music. You don't have to be a somebody who's on the top forty of you know, somebody who's well known, but maybe it's other reasons. You know, he still hasn't come around really. You know he's a firing what I'm doing, but you know, I guess something happens on inside when you just want to go a different direction. That's a access what it is. So what is quest nation that? What is it you provide or what is it you do a spotlight artists or spout like people who's who got something to say who, like I said, whether you're singer, somebody from from a small town and you want to get her interview you and the spotlights of music, and I've had people who who've gotten record deals because of me. Or I'll talk to college professors, I thought do paranormal shows, I do questionations, everything that we just we just have a great conversation and you know, I have a pretty good following, so I'm having no time with my life doing it. With new artists that you experience, what is some of the difficulties maybe they should maybe work out before they come to you, or something they should consider before coming to you so that you too, or if it's a group, the group of you can work together and make it successful for them. How? What is something that it's difficult for these artists to initially deal with, almost like going, say in the military, of meeting, not that you're the sergeant, but just like there's a brutal wake up call to when they start taking this more seriously. What is something that they should probably know before getting into music more seriously? That's so they have to work harder though perfect a craft. You know, I'm just here to I'm just here to shine a spotlight on them. Yeah, you know, so I'm not. They're not necessarily under my own brother, you know, have some destine that's in my hometown that I work with more closely. Then there's some nationwide, like my man griffos on Toronto, Canada, who work with real close we've done three songs together, but for the most parts, no, no, I'm just here to give all you give some of these other people a chance that I never had. Know what we were high back in the s. We didn't know. It was hard for the world to hear us, hear what we could do, and we were doing stuff that that was just as hot as on books on the radio. Yeah, so I said I would do my part to still give these young people are, you know, a platform that people can hear. They music, and it's worked out for a lot of you said, the work is what they have to put in. What is the hardest part? Of a being a musician. What is what is the hardest thing that you know? Maybe it's not the singing. Maybe you know it's the promoting or what is it hard for them to do, to step up to? Maybe right now is a would be just a business side of it, you know, finding a making the right choices, finding a record label or somebody to work with, manager, management, stuff like that. You have to make the right choices. You know, we made a bad choice. We signed with a with a label that kind of drained the years out of out of us. You know, we were we were on top, we were hot and we could have been a mainstream name by now, but we made the mistake of seeing us all this record label. They had all they had all the big equipment and everything, but the personalities and the people in that in that record labeled this wasn't meant for us, you know, and we made a mistake. So hopefully a lot of young people don't make the same mistake. You spend a lot of time with them. So that took that drained away where you could have been putting your energy somewhere else. Yeah, yeah, they wanted to do the the owner of that label really was into into Gospel music and it's a singing you know, wasn't really too much. It's a wrap too month. So but one thing that my guy Jay could do, know I told you, was a DJ, but he could pick a play a music by ear. So he became very popular with that with that record label because it could play music. MMM. And so he they used him a lot. As far us with all some singing artists and everything like that. So that kind of left me in a cold...

...what may, being a songwriter, they brought me in on some a lot of projects as well, because they knew nobody can write like but as far as our projects together, we were doing as all forgiving and then we just prime example, later on the record label didn't really have any plans on we were kind of on the on the back of the backburn so I would know, I wish we would have maybe did a little more researching and and got would a label who would have understood the power of hiphop and then what we were bring into the table and it could have been a different outcome. I think that's good advice she give there, just in passing, is do some of the research because probably when we were younger, this sort of ability to research was not available to it. I we can. We have Google right, without having to beat the streets and, you know, find out who's who and not really know who they are. Like we have reviews and people have linkedin and they have all sorts of things to find out who they are. We can probably for that. Your artist is to or anyone else listening is to do some of that research right, and there's a lot of it that's free. And unfortunately, I think you make a really good point for mentor the WHO you're mentoring is we didn't have this information as easily right. It was kind of held for an upper echelon of people who probably had people working for them to get the information and for, I know, upandcoming person. It makes it nowadays much more easy to not have to, you know, reinvent the wheel. Right. What are you doing now, Lee Roy? What is what takes up your time? What, besides quest nation, what else is on your plate? I HAVE EP this coming out from September fifteen. September fourteen, that's my birthday, so next month. And what is it called? Final Way Ingredient. Final Ingredient. Yeah, so it's like a six seven song. AP got some great music on their feature. I'm featuring some great young artists on the songs with me, and so international talent. I got some damn. But Dinah, who's a lead rock least singer of this rock band called gravity. He's from crack out POLA. He's doing a couple songs. My Guy grow from Toronto, Canada, who's to be done with drake. So I got it's a lot of flavor on this. So on the CEP is going to be nice. How does it feel like? You think you're back in the military up there, you know, wrapping a song because you got your friend pulled shot on you so scared, and now you got to epe coming out after even stopping, quitting, maybe what you thought initially, stopping music, and then now you got something coming out on your birthday. It was good. It feels real good. And when his fault that he had to leave. But all this, this was all bad timing. And what you're not made I made the most out of it. I remember somebody gave me good advice it don't look at no, don't look at anybody. So when I'm on stage I'm but we're looking at look what? Look at? Nobody in the face. I just focused on something in the back of the the back of the ball room. But then in my peripheral vision I can see people getting up dancing and that looso beer and then so then after that we just was fun this had it, had a great time. How long does that process take? And making an EP from so your it's coming out in a couple weeks. How long for the beginning of that, that process? I started all that last summer. Yeah, summer twomo and nineteen I started it. Yeah, two thousand nineteen I started. So probably about a maybe five, six months, maybe a little longer. But you know, the process is stopped a little. Books get stopped. So as of lately, the last well, I mean I don't I've ended up like the last three songs and like maybe a little for a month. So in you pick up really quick in this process of making any piece, specially you getting other artists, you getting other things in line. What is most difficult doing that? What is hardist that, because within the last year you've been doing it you had some stoppage. Is Probably crowned. It didn't help right, but what did? What? What is most difficult about putting this together and have, you know, putting a bow on it and ready to distribute it to people. What is the hardest process in this? Well, let's get anybody in the studio, but I, but me...

...personally, I didn't experience anything. Our everybody wanted just want to really was decided to get on with me, you know, because they they have a little reputation. So everybody showed up, everything, everything was good. The hardest part, which were really what hard, was the last three songs. So you talked about me sitting a beat through the email to Toronto Canada, to them and me to as in in my vocals, and I'm not in the studio with them, I'm telling them what I want done and in having a weight on the day that they're doing it, for them to send me a sample back so that I know that it's all good. Well, that could be a little stress. You know, I'm used to being in the studio. So the first three songs that we've got completed, I was in the studio with everybody here in Milwaukee whose last three songs was done in another country. So I have to I'm kind of have to wait and see if all my wishes was taken care of and sometimes to what and we have to go do it again. So that was a tough part, you know. And then this last song, if I do it, this is all United Kingdom. Definite, the United Kingdom also. Well, I've learned a lot, you know, and this is a lot about technology. Now they's too that you don't even have to be in the same country. You can steal record together to sound like you all there in the same studio together. Yeah, I've been listening to some things about music and it's the idea of that is becoming more a reality. Like you could lay down something and never see the person right that that's pretty interest I get it's efficient to write you don't have but, as you said, it's probably really nice to be in the studio with people. It's like a different sort of atmosphere. But it's comes down to trusting that process and that must be difficult, right, you do your partner, you're waiting for someone you can't even seed to put their part in and you have to trust that process. Yeah, like, because like a Griff, I know what he looks like. We're know, we come come, really good friends now, but it's in engineer that has that's engineered these last three songs. I would norm if you walked in here right now, you know I wouldn't know him from well, from from a can of paint. So what's yeah, that is but he's a guy who out last Tho songs. I put my trust and to make sure that he puts me and griff stuffed away on their way. We're supposed to have it and any extra sounds or any extra instruments on one on the track. He's done that, but I don't know how he looks it's into. It's probably, I think, even maybe advantage to do some work with someone you haven't met before and then you can see their product and then you can know them by their work that they do, opposed to meeting someone and and sometimes we have this you know, maybe mishap of well, let's see if we can work together and getting used to each other. But you guys have you got a job to do, you got work to do, do the work and then you have the product and you can see their their ability and their their talents right away. You know, one thing about the questination, thing that that is that's really brought it to like for me, was that I look at a lot of artists here, Morek in my own city, and you have a lot of people here who in your own town and your city who may have prejudices against you or whatever because they know you because maybe something happened years ago, maybe you took a girl to the promise do wanted to take whatever. But when you're dealing with people that from other states of the countries, that's from outside of your area, they just see, they just see your heart, they see the work that you do and if it's good, they gravitate to it and there's no extra prejudice, is no extra dirt in there, you know, and that's the great thing about the questation that I'll come of love. You know. The words I want have been from other other cities. California loves me, you know. You know I've got offers to go to Australia and Poland and play places like that. Know, people are care let me because they see what I what I do, what they see, it comes from the heart, where as somebody here in my own city may have made look at me through a dirty land. So you know what I'm saying, even though I don't it's kind of swear it is. It's that unfortunate. I mean there's lots of historical things that say about being heeded in your own land. You talk about being forgiving. That's Biblical to me. That's Biblical Bible said referring to. But it's horrible, right. They you have a lot of love here in Milwaukee, but that some of the other people who's kind of like you're considered some of the movers of shakers. Like...

...me, it's hard for us to get together and do something and I've noticed that, you know. But I the other movers of shakers who's doing for things in their cities. They want me to come or fly me out everything. So it is what it is, mom. I'm good with it. It's unfortunate, right, like I don't want to dwell on it, but like you can just say you're from this town and people like, Oh, you're from that town, but people outside of the state or outside the kind of have no idea. Right, like it may not have anything to do with you, but you're from this town. Oh Yeah, I know, you're like, now you don't right. Really Nice to be able to show your work and it's just your work and then you can get rid of all that noise off to the side that's right in your mentoring. What it? What is the you know, the beautiful thing that you're able to take from your mentoring that you're doing through your quest nation and all around. I'm sure you're not one that only does it for this. If you see someone that you're able to mentor your you take them under your wing. What is the beautiful thing that you can you're taking from this experience of mentoring? Knowing you know when you came out of high school and in the military, both of us, we've grown up, we've learned a lot of things and you're able to impart some wisdom and experience to these kids. What is it that you're taking from this post of all laps? Think that making everybody feeling important and people know that you know your voice at here matters. Know Your your your music matter. All is coming from a heart. Oh, and even some who want may have on who I don't think their sound is really ready. I really I've had people on who I didn't really think that music really that great or whatever, but they believe in it. So if they believe in I'm a blute with you, because I don't. I don't know where God will take you a year from now, you now you may beat somebody totally on another level. Like it's one young lady, she cheat hit me up and said that she cried as she listened to interview when I when I finished with it and she listened to it, she cried the whole way through because it it really gave her really whoost to her spirits. And if I could do that for their so that one person it's worth it, you know, because she was down in the dumps about about her music and everything, and I gave her. Nobody else would give her a chance and I gave her a chance to put it on and admit so much to her. That something that stays with me definitely. So you can't judge people. You know they might be, they may not be that great in your opinion, but you never know where they where they can where they can go a year from now and they will look and I learned that, you know, I learned that allays ago. I was at a work, every job, and a young lady was all she was selling a cassette tape of a husband and wife to do a who were at was at her church had their first tapile and she let me take it home. I didn't money at the time on me. I say I'll bring it to work tomorrow. So okay, just take it home. If you want it, buy it tomorrow. Took it home. There was nothing that I like to meet the whole thing with just look. But I brought the money back. To this day, not not bought the cassette. You know, and this long story short, I'll run into the guy. It was part of that husband wife duel years ago. Years later, when I'm working in a Molukei public school system, it's just a guy, you know, and not hear some of his music. Their music now and this much better. So I'll have to show be that. You know, you never how God will take you. You might not be there today, but tomorrow you may be something special. So I'm not going to turn any any artistic. It's not only that too. I think there's a deeper thing going on when some of these kids may not be getting some attention and you're showing them, you know, giving them an year listening to that they may not even get at home and while they made pursue a path and music, it's just given listening to them and giving them a chance, and then you know, as you said, the girl that was crying listening to something that she did, that you gave her that opportunity and she that might give her some boost of confidence for something else. It right. It's in pretty amazing. I think it's really good that we need more mentors like yourself and we should all step up and mentor and whatever way we have a capacity to do so. I appreciate what you're doing. It's right. Thank you for that. Thank you so in what you're doing now. How would you say...

...that, from your first job to now, how has work brought you through your life, even when you're getting yelled at in the face in the military or you know, a buddy saying no, I can't be in the group anymore, but you're willing to work, because you even stop music. And then you started to back up your mentoring when you don't have to mentor you could be just selfish and do it all for yourself and not try to help other people. How is worked helped you and how did you see this as a silver lining through your life? Work is helping as this slow if you have a job, you just just have to do it to your best your billy. That's what my parents broke to do. You know, do your best at it. Whatever job you have, well, do your best, be on time, be punctual. Then, know, do your job. So that's that's basically how me I'm when I do what I do, quests, I'll do it all. Well, I'm tired or whatever, I do my job and I give these little these people who want to interview on you, to mall the same thing I would do at a job, same thing I would do when I was in the military and then, like I said, with the military. It helped me to be able to be with a lot of people. So I mean a lot of people, a lot of people who've dealt with like a it was a rapper from in I never heard rap like that, India rap. I've never heard of it like that. That this it sounded like a Cobra was going to come up at some points. Know they would. The rapping like got a sound, you know, but it helped me to be able to deal with, you know, to deal with that, you know, when the understand that everybody's got the same but you know, at the same time we all God's true. Well, that's that's that's where no me. So yeah, I think if you have a respect from music, you can you can appreciate any music, because I'm in Korea and you hear a lot of rap that you know, I think growing up to say with Nwa or cool J, we're thinking a little bit more harder core than what you might be here and coming out of India or but that that's their rap right, that's their poem, that's their poetry, that's their writing that they sat down and they're putting a track to it and for them that's what it is and I think we can appreciate what they're they're trying to accomplish and at the end it is music. Yeah, that's that's what they're bringing to the table. That's how they they saw feel rap, you know, coming for your culture. So that's a beautiful thing about it smels over there there they're bringing that to the table. So you appreciate that. You can't. So I can appreciate that. You know, Levro, I had AH, I've got some great hip hop artists who some grid hip hop artists who I've listened to, like metal and ace and those guys who they rapping Spanish and I don't understand a word saying, but I love their songs. Yeah, when you makes a listense, though, it does, when you hear good beat. You here good beats. It's right here, a good beat. Of course I can understand a coup words, HMM, but during the during the verse, I can't understand it, but during the course I can understand a couple words, and so I love it. It's in my playlist. You can appreciate right. We can appreciate it because it, you know, it makes sense to someone and if it sounds good, they're hitting it right. Yeah, you're hitting it, Leroy, how how do you rest? How do you rest besides your I mean, you are busy. I know you're busy. I have I have you up late at night. You should be going to bed. But how do you rest? How do I rest? What do you do? The rest? Yeah, power unwind. I like the like listen Tom let's know, some music, or watch movie on a movie person like to watch a good movie and I'm then. I'm really into now I'm really into podcasts. So I have my favorite podcast I like to listen to. Me They they take me to sleep. You know, I'm about a big paranormal guy and some of my paranormal shows are just as popular to musics. So I have some some people I like to listen to and their shows as put being in a zone where I can just lected this. So after the short dis rest and get some good sleep there right before we go. How can? How can people find you, because I know you got your new help EP coming out? How can PSA? On twitter, I'm smooth novelist. All one word smooth novelists. On instagram, I'm novelist two thousand and nineteen on Linkedin, Leroy Washington on...

Facebook, on Washington, which I use Roy my dad. He's calling me Roy all the time. So that's that's my business thing too. So so I'm worry Washington on facebook and yeah, just so hit me up. Well, in Bots me if you see your money. Who's doing something new? We spotlighted and we talked when GEP coming out again, and then name of it. Well, the final ingredient comes out September fourteen, which is my birthday, and also my email alp dot wash at yahoocom. Well, happy birthday. Imagine we had this stuff growing up. You just named like five to ten different things away. To get in contact you, we had like call my mom's phone number, like when we get a little you got a page right, but like that's all. What do you mean? That nothing? Call my friend, I'll meet you on the corner. Totally different, is like. And then, and then there's next week. They'll be something new. We add to it. Leroy, I truly appreciate it. When watching this, please subscribe to my channel. Click on the notfications get me a why we work the Roy. I truly appreciate it. It's time and I would like to speak to you again it. See, I was a great conversation. I appreciate you, Mr Leroy. Washington. Hit him up. He's coming out September. Fourteen new VP. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive, be a joyful day in your work.

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