WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 30 · 1 year ago

#29 Leroy Washington CEO Quest Nation FM & Music Producer and Artist BrianVee Whywework

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The Final Ingredient: Releasing September 14, 2020

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"I am a former rap artist and soldier. I have spent ten years working in our public school system, and I've become a mentor to many young people. I am dedicated to doing what I can for the generations coming up, and give them the support we never had back then. I am currently the host of Quest radio & I still make music & support young musical artists. I'm a writer & big brother in the BIIS (Brother To Sister) fraternity. May God bless & keep us all. Listen to Power Play by TheNovelist #np on #SoundCloud https://soundcloud.com/thenovelist/po...This is a 2006 remake if a 1991 inspirational song we recorded to inspire people to turn their lives around. Listen to Inspiration by TheNovelist #np on #SoundCloud https://soundcloud.com/thenovelist/in...This song was featured in the classic documentary film, "Perspectives On Steppin'." "

Welcome to why we work with your hostin Brianvi as he speaks to meedle like you from all over the world, as wetogether, Ding dive neeber into our motivations struggles, joys, ND,seemingly misstepe warnings and advice, which will be an encouragement to usall to get um get going and keep on workingworking, stoworking g. Now here's your house why we wereinrind me. I am Brian VII hy we working today. I have the pleasure of speakingto you: Mister Vbroy, Washington, the CEO, a mestnation and them radiopersonality, USIC, Gruser, an artist Se, a mentor and podcast host known as thenovelist he's, an army veteran, and he has a passion and his passion not onlyin music for himself but to shine light on those up and coming in the industry.Listen to him as he explains his idea and work ethic as he goes through thisjourney. I'm Brinvy, and this is why we work- and I have the great pleasurespeaking to you with Mr Leeroy Washington good day. Fine, Sir O, youdoing I'm doing well, you- and I have been playing tag here, the last fewweeks, because I think, first and foremost you're a busy man pretty busy. You gotto, think you gotthings going on. Can you can you give us a little introduction to yourself, but also thenwe're going to go back and and talk a little bit about your first work?Experiences military vet, so th t've been out in the military,just been Um Jus, this working Pi cast in twothousand and fifteen, a questionation, oh, which I spot light, O o artists,underground and um underground artists and been working as a mentor to youngpeople for maybe the last fifteen twenty years you mentioned work. What was your first job Liroy,your very first job. The summer before my senior year, Iworked had a job as a a janitor owas doing like Genatoriowork,with this j junior he senior year of high schoolokay hm was this. You said senior Yearis this of high school, yes, thesummer before my singior summer, before you see and why? Why did you like? Coming from Canada? I was Canada abt,the US her similar right, like I spoke to a guy the other day. He said well,my first official job was jumping in the pond and grabbing balls from a golfcourse and sell imright a I spoke to someone else the other day and he waslike five ten hustling on the street, just playing some music on the street.So some people make some money, earle you're, looking at into high school,that is' tnot a little bit late later than what most North American peopleexperience. Or was there a reason for that or you doing something else aswell? Wel made money, I mean best, makeshustle, but I mean, as far as when you say my job Yah, I'm thinking you meantu well. I got a paycheck but yeah of course, growing up. You know shovel snow for the neighbors made somoney or cook grass, no stuff like that yeah th. That's aw, important rightlike this. This show is talking about you know, especially if it comes uponthe years of kids, who are wondering how they cand make that same guy saidabout getting golf balls. He was also making lemonade right. That's not anofficial paycheck, but you know standing on the street corner playing aviolin. That's not an official pay check either, but it shows that there'san initiative that there's a desire to work. So when you start shoveling whatwas what was some of your desire? What was your motivation to get out theremake your own money. I don't think I thought of it that Beep,you know just ove, my neighbors o o just have a little money for pocket. chanks, you know O, so it wastit wasn't that beep for me. So when you got into just your summer before yoursenior year, what was the motivation then? To there was a reason you were getting a areal job. What was what Wure you do en him? That's when I was starting tounderstand money a little bit more, so I want a comput buy my own schoolclothes, yeah, N, myown back to school...

...clothes, and things like that. Sothat's why I got a job. You know I my friend G me up, so I was workingwith one of my best friends so that that was a extra bonus. How long did you Li? Did you work inthat job just just the summer to e summer wise?Did you get any more jobs before Youre finished high school? No, what did you do after High School Wen into the military? Now Yeah, you said Youwere a militaryveteran and I thank you for your service. I said this is someone nd,it's true we're from Canada and we owe a lot to American military soldiers.Beho you guys. We don't have a big brother. Why do you did you have someone in yourfamily? That pointed you towards that? Or you saw that as a good opportunity.What what reason did you choose to go to the military? Think I jusaw that's a good opportunityto get out. You know experience the world, so I I actually signed up the senior thsummer before my senior year, so my whole senior year. I was alreadycommitted to go Wi, I'm in Korea- and I have Iexperience. The boys or the men have to do two years military service,and I you know I've taught students who are you know, looking not um in a positive light towards going tothe military, but they know they have to do it if you're signing up in yoursenior year. How did you feel about like was this? Was this glimmering hopeto something new or ere you a little bitapprehensive or scared and nervous about going into it? No, I wasn't nervous ECAUS I signed upon my Oln free. Will we no? We did't have to sign up, you know, but I guessI signed up to go. Hes One go ges, get the kick start after afterforgraduation get out tesperience life and Il experience new things so and in itit definitely helped. Did you have any friends also sign up to at the sametime? Or are you just so Lo Youe, like I'm, going to go? Do this NAT Afrena signed up as well? He Wentn't go ing to buddy system, but he wanted to go into the marine, so Wi din't wantto do marines. So what did sign up too well when it's the army and what was your position that youwere signing up for? I M I'm a little ignorant to the military, but what wereyou you aiming to be? As you signed up, I went in as a patrolur supplyspecialist, so I was able to learn how to few aircrafts and allmantor vehiclesin a wartime situation. Ou know breakdown, no camouflage ourselves. You knowebuild up O fuel station, a review, tanks, O jeeps helicopters, everythingand Theu ow break it down and move on. You know so that was my my job. I look Gow. I look now at people who joined themilitary out of high school with great admiration, not only because they're inthe military, but when I, but when I was in high school, I was an idiot. I had no focus. I hadno direction. I didn't know what I was going to do, but, looking back like, Iknow, there's some people who join the military and they're retired. Now you know- and I you know I'm Oh, Ishould have done that Ho. Could you so for me? I still was all over the mapafter high school for many years. So could you see the difference of how youmay have thought in high school versus getting from what I understand from themilitary's? A rude awakening to real life. was that a shock for you? wasthat difficult or were you able to? As they say, you know, fall in line andand D do whatever needs to be done to get your job? Do there was a shock going into boot CAPand Hav people yelling next in Hor Renk stick wthat was that was on Colturstrock out there I mean as soon as we got off the bus,so mean a and some people was able to deal withit. Some people work, you know H, so I mean I. I got men Toris from boot capalone before we even graduated and went offintoor into our professions in themilitary. You know, I'm glad I did a dog. Was it tough, like t a you just Wantahaul off and cracks so right, the nose. I had a Cru Sade name ihaer. He was ashort guy and oh his drill, sergeant EO...

...be pressed up against my nose. She wasyelling cussing me out and I wanted to. I wanted to cry way.You know and H. I really did e later on. You know onknow: 'CAUSE WHOO CA is eight weeks. You know an so I mean te t. The first sit weeks aretough, so you know later on, maybe like in the ORT Weeka. We were Wi down,weting ready for graduate and everything a kind of meddles out alittle bit. I couldn't understood why e Homme so tough, but he he was on my youknow, but I appreciatit that her all you did did you say thank you to 'em. After maybe yeah see I an yeah. He was Chirgeto car. I evereo something else. So was a black guy, but he looked likea Chinese eat. The real thought: Fine Eyes. He was just not letting you in he hadthe real thin eyes like thatbut KINDOF, looked like a Chinese guy, but he washos. It was on my bud all the time o know yeah th, those sergeonts. Theydon't lot of people, don't appreciate themduring the. I couldn't imagine especially right out of high schoolright like yeah, and then all you know where we'rein for Minerwood Missouri, which they called that Basefort lost n the wood'cause. It was like a I H, a wilderness somewhere, and you know when we'redoing pushups. You know the ground, it's Li. It was like so hot there. Thegroundess feel like as a hundred degrees you you're doing pushups and do 'emclimbers and everything El Yeah. We Te Wawel, do aspretty pretty good experience. Man. It was ee, Nice, okay. What what did you do? What didyou do, but, as you got your job after the eight weeks, did you start to enjoyit at all like? Was it like this? Am We had had a ball yeah yeah near I went toFort Leave Virginia, which was a party time and o that's that's. He way you gobasically for school. So now you're doing it like another AC learning, moreof your craft and you Goino like like classroom setting you knowand and doinghands on learning your craft and everything eut know that was that waspretty cool. You know, and so I mean you get to do whatever you want to doafter flack, just like a regular just like civilian life weekhends off, so Ihad a pretty good time in fort leg once so we graduated from there I went to myMai. My main duty stations for Toa, Texas, HM and for Ho attaches wasunbelievable experience. For me, I've been there actually, my family. In Texa,we went to Fortheden, I'm post there. What what do you take out of themilitary experience? What is what is one kind of nugget you can take out ofthere that Youve? You would even pass on to other people to say why you knowit would be good for someone to Joi that law. Everybody talks about, youknow, gives you a it gives you a te Bodus escaping meright now: Discipline Discipline, yeah, ous discipline, e n. You Di that for me,but for me also a big thing was it helped me to be able to get along witheverybody MHM. You know all all races, people you know who who Woren'? Don'tjust look like me, no woman I got to for tot o two of my best friends thatbecame my best. Friends was wite guy named Ericson and uh t puato Brican guy named Sanchi. Weall room together. So as we uh as we went through oseriou experience,you know I'd be playing, run, DMC and t e. Lo Cuj d sachas was a bond July. Youknow and a probably be playing some some deaf leopard or something all thedifferent kind of views. Everything we all start to take from each other and hreally opened my mind up and then help me now. So I cannot continuebody I Ilove and work with anybody. No, I don't have no prejudice like that and that'sw one thing that the military helped help for me, because the guy who had your back nocerly wasn't the same color you you know, but we were all brothers y andthat that's a big thing for me. Yeah, that's what I hear about the militaryand that's that's a thing that should be praised. More often, when did music,when did music become a main stay in your life ecause. Iwould say that knowing a little bit about you in your background and as youmentioned producer and you make music, you havesome of your own albums Um. When did music become apart, I'm sureit wasn't just after the military, but when did music become sentral to your life or a major part,...

...probably like my second yearn young mannamed Tony Barwas from New York t was a wrapper. He came into the came to the base and became part of OCompany and UH. So we became bed hands, you know and Um. No, he was he was retty. I wasn't. Iwasn't wrapping time. It really know how but I'll eat, writher, MHM and Umhanging around. I got into Ra and I remember we we used to go in to thecaptains or so ther's to little little skits wir him rassed off the captainloved it. So he signed us up big its big UM, some some big Estrami UH program thatwas having itwas the Christmas time, MHM, nothing but captains majors. Allthe HIG reaking people there with the with their family, Um and Martley, had a we wew supposed toperform together. He Ha something happened at home to go home or wantework, so leave or something so that left me there myself, he pulled heshoei and UH. You know I performed that and I did a great job T. that's, Ithink that's when I got per as as the MC THAs uh being scared with that manypeople in the room and we was am iito Barroom and but you know being up thereby myself having having to do mying up that really Kinda burth me. And U I've been going ever since you said y?U You were writing before you began. Wrapping, when did you start writingand how t was always a great writer, YEA Wenwen, Sir in school. When did youstart writing and what were you writing at that time? I was writing bean raps and rimes andiceix stories. All the time lit runne. You know us so yeah is like shortstories. I love to write whowho as some of your biggestinfluences when you first start writing rap. When you were younger or even someof your short stories, my influences growing up, I used toread a lot of. I love shirtlike homes Te. We O Arthur Cunlin door, Um Nancy drew mysteries. No, I used to always retemisbooks little mnovels Oso yeah yeah identisfi. As with the rappers H, youknow, of course, Ik Kim C J RUNDMC. You know those arethe. Thepeople who change my life is also coming up. You Know Soi starting tofall in love with rapus. I knowing I was going to talk to you.This always comes up to me when I was hos must have been nineteen. Eightyeight I was in a little town. Myra got Nova, Scotia, Canada, almostas Far East as you can get besides Newfoundland and I wasn't playing- andI was only what maybe ten- and there was this- This family there with a bigWinna Bagol like wh. I don't know if you even calld Winte Bagos, but thethings that you connect under the back, I'm pretty sore O connectit, but it washuge and we must have been playing and this kid he must have been a little bitolder than me handed me a tape like aset tape, and it was it was a n'what. Did we call them whenwe recorded over them. He recorded it. He s downloaded, remember what we wasto do with them, but it was a m. What is it called when you'd recordthe tape off of another tape copy yeah? He copied the tape, it was a copy.I forget what the word is Um, but it was N wa. My whole life changed it just just the way I lived, and thenthat became my like, as you mentioned, the guys that you hung ou with the guyslwas hanging ou with in that small little town, they were listening tolike a Bon Jovi or maybe a Mialica, or any of that nd that I was given thattape and then that changed my course of music taste for the rest of my life ogoes youlike it right away. Oh I'm Easyet what you talk about ors! Isit but no it it certainly didpt? U It just it just certainly in a gate. I hadthat same like I would say, attitude. You know, I'mjust a little man and I just wollow Um and it just changed the course of mylife, and it gave me a different perspective of music and how you canexpress yourself any of those wraps that you first wroteor short stories. Did you carry into recording? Did you you bring themforward or edit them forward and 'cause now out of the military, or even did youwrap them in the military? Did you bring them forward? An you know makethem find tune them.

No! No! This a the the rhyme that I performed atthe. TheBig Galo thing H, it was T, was rap called golden at night, so this haingto do with Christmas or anything it was Gol Bot, Erie, Oh h, walking, dead, ty,O a story I did, but I did't have. That was all I Hade Arn Recti went on.That's all I had so I had to. I just had to do it but know everybody lovedit. You know everybody loved it. So I seen people geting up dancing andeverything. So it was great and here was some extra pressurebecause the young ladythat went on before me. I closed the holder, but theyoung lady, a goone before she sang up where to Houston. You give Glo. Sowitning was just emout. You know, and this young lady did a great job. I MikMaow Puo Fiol, her ut did it. It was pretty good after you have finished the military.How did your career start to change? Well, H, my best friend at home. He wasa. He was a good Dj. You know he's still scratching me and everything, sowe started wecalle ourself to demolition, Passi and UH. We starteddoing rhymes and everything and wasperforming and we were verysuccessful underground, uh circuit. You know, because Milwaukee wasn't known atthe time. wwell no time like that, acinis now with music, and we didn'thave the Internet and everything where we you know showcase. On music. Youknow we hade to go to the race station and radio thing, especially inMilwaukee theyall. I weldnt hire to Wat these get et themusic play. You know you have to know somebody and all that so uh we h Wewedi secular, music thwe had our Mostseccess doing our gospel. I myGoscel, maybe a around nineteen. Ninety yeah. We callourself forgiving and that's whet. We selling out places H Cathedrals y mcas, just o doing music that willthat aspire of the young people mhm and we had no e' had Hav a great time doingthat. So so are you still? You are still making Youus, but did youcontinue with that for a while and then started into producing and then you'rementoring? How did that become more prevalent in your life whyum? I started driving a school bus inthousand and Watto. They art working in the public school otwo thousand around two thousand and five. So I wasn't doing music anymore.Oh, but you know I was Metorin people when I was coach and basketball. And- U I? U Hav. I started a couple: a youngyoung singing groups, while wh I was in school Whi I was working in the school.A group called driven was thos like six young Ladis. I had six young men, I wasbe in a group, but they all got cold feet. So I stuck with youngle, so they,ah they they. They had the timeivs. Youknow you know had them set up towhere. They were going to be doing big things,but you're talking about Middle School, a d young ladies. They just reallycouldn't grasp what what they could ave been. You know and-and it seemed like every year a group of kids will come up to me and IstoWashnton. We want to rnew music o have another group and it just became ayearly thing. UH, two thousand and fifteen: that's when Istarted questionation H, because I know how hard it is in a city and wer notlike somebody W O as well known, no, not of people you may not get looked atso is stopped just for music iws for just any young person who who did havea opportunity to to have the spotlike shoun shine on them. Where there wasmusic wher, there was system being great in school or athletics orwhatever. So I started questonation at two Os fateens. I osmalihe anybody whowas Oo posiive it the city. So I wonderle you said you before you gotyour job at the school board. You stopped music and then you jumped intostarting questnation what what made you stop initially, what was the reason? SoI guess you guys were busy doing it and then for some reason, you stope whatwhat was the the main reason why you stopd being andproducing music? Well, my Dj who, as Wedn Mise with allmy life, es Kindo, slowed down. No, nobody really worked harder thanhim, but he kind of slowed down. So I didn't really uh. I never really workedwith nobody else before until ow, but um when he slowed down and everythingslowed down on adiand. I have to stop. Is it a hard grind too, though? Is thatis that part of the reason like not...

...just slowing down for no reason? Butit's it's it's a hard hole to try to make it it is, but when it's h something youlove O, I don't think it's that hard, becausethere's there's people who are underground, who still make a goodLiv ing doing it Yo still make a good living. Do a music Youd'n'l have to bea somebody who's on the top fortyup. You know somebody w was well known, but Um, maybe the's other reasons. Youknow he he still hasn't come around. Really, you know he's he's a firin.What I'm doing, but you know I guess, O when somethinghappens with inside when you just want to go a different direction. That's: UExcess! What it is. So what is questination then? What is it youprovide or what is it? You do a spot light artist, O snotlike people?WHO's? U, who got something to say who, like I say, whether you're a singer or somebody from from a smalltown, and you want to get hurt interview on spolight to music and I've,had people who who've gotten record deals because of me, oh or I talk to college professors, I doparanormal shows I do questations everything ow we just we just have agreat conversation and uh know I have a pretty good following. SoI'm having no time with my life doing with new artists that you experience.What is some of the difficulties? Maybe they should maybe work out before theycome to you or something they should consider before coming to you so thatyou too, or if it's a group, the group of you, can work together and make itsuccessful for them. How? What is something that it's difficult for theseartists to initially deal with almost like goingsay in the military meeting, not that you're the sergeant, but just likethere's a brutal wakeup call to when they start taking this more seriously.What what is something that they should probably know before getting into music?More seriously this I they have to work hard to goperfecte craft. You know I'm just here to I'm just here: Shina s spotlight on Hem yeah, you know,so I'm not they're, not necessarily under my Brela. You know haveSomedestin, that's in my hometown that I work with more closely then there'ssome uh nationwide, like my man, Gripfos, I'mTrono, Canada. I work with real close we've done three songs together, butfor most parts you know, I'm just here to give Um Giv give some of these young people achance that I never had. You know when we were hig back in the eighties. Wedidn't know it was hard for the world to hear ushear what we could do. We were doing stufft. That was just as hot as a k wason the radio yeah. So I said I would do my Partte Yeu. These young people are,you know, uh a platform that people can hear Thei Eir music and it's worked outfor a lot of you said the work is what they have to put in what is the hardestpart about being a musician? What is what is the hardest thing that you know? Maybe it's not the singing, maybe youknow it's the promoting, or what is it hard for them to do t to step up to maybe right now is, would be just thebusiness side of it. You know finding you know, making the right choices,finding record labor or somebody to work with manager, management. Stuff,like that, you have to make the right choices. You know w. We made a bad choice. Um We signed with a with a label that Umkind of drainn the years out o out of wash. You know e, where we were aon top.We were hot and we could have been a mainstream name by now, but we made the mistake of seeing Tis allthis record label n. They had all the they had, th all the big equipment andeverything o, but the personalities and the People Wen that in in thatrecalabeled is wasn't Myntphos. You know- and we made a mistake so hopefully a lot of young people don'tmake that same mistake and you spend a lot of time with them so that took thatdrained away where you could have been putting your energy somewhere else, yeah yeah they they wanted to do um the the owner of that label really wasinto into Gospel Music and iter singing. Youknow, wasn't really too much. Uh iterap to my song, but one thing thatuh my my Gu j could do. Nooe was a DJ, buthe could be could play music by year, so he became very popular with that Uh. With that record label 'cause he couldplay music mm, and so he they used him alot. As far as with subsinging artistsand everything like that, so thiat kind of left me in a cold, uh uh, but Um mebeing a song ride o. They brought me in...

...on some lot of projects as well,because they knew nobody could write like, but as far as our projects,together, what we were doing as as forgiven and deescribn hisapple lateron Um, the record label didn't really have anyplans on. We were Kindo on the on the back of the BAGBA, so I would know I wish we wouldave uh, maybe did a little more research andand and got with a Labor who would have understood the power of hip hopand thanwhat we what we wourd bring in to the table. Ou ow, it couldhave been adifferent outoutcome. I think that's good advice, you'd, give there just inpassing, is do some ofthe research, because, probably when we were younger, this sort ofability to research was not available to it. I E wecan. Wehave Google right without having to beat thestreets and to you know, find outwho's who and not really know who they arelike. We have reviews and people have linked in and they have all sorts ofthings to find out who they are. We can probably for your artists to or anyoneelse listening is to do some of that research right and there's a lot of it.That's free and, unfortunately I think you make a really good point for amentoard who you're mentoring is we didn't have this information aseasily right? It was kind o held for n upper echelont of people who probablyhad people working for them to get the information and for up and comingperson. T makes it nowadays much more easy to to not have to. You know,reinvent the wheel right. What are you doing nowleroy?What is what takes up your time? What besides questination? What else is onyour plate? IHAV EPTIS, coming out from SeptemberFifteenth September, fourteenth that's my birthday tinext month and when Dithey call on find a wingredient final ingredient yeah. So itwas like a sit.Seven so EP got some great music on there future I'm ficturing some greatyoung artists, almost alns with me and uh S, international talent. I got someof Dam Adina WHO's lead rock esing, srock man called gravity, HeuseoPack, O Pola, he's doing a couple of solons. My Guy grew from Toronto,Canada, who used to be down with Drake Um. So I got it's a lot of flavor on thissowl on the CPS it' going to be nice. How does it feel, like you think, you're back in the military up? There P,you know wraping a song, because you got your friend pulled shoot on you, soscared, and now you got a EP coming out aftereven stopping quitting, maybe what you fhounht, initially stopping music andthen now you got something coming out on your birthday. It's good. The field feels real good and Hewasn't his fault that he had toleave, but Thu sesal, O bad timing, and but you know, Mead T O. I made the mostout of it. I remember somebody gave me a good advice. Sai, don't look at no,don't look at anybody. So when I' on stage, I'm looking atlooking what lookang nobody in ther face, ut just focused on something in theback of the in the back of the ballroom. But then,in my peryperal vision I could see people getting up dancing and thatlosome Meu and then ah so then, after that we justsipped Tis thishad had a great time. How long does that process take ofmaking a EP fro so yo it's coming out in a couple of weeks? How long for the beginning of that thatprocess, I started onl AAT last summer, yeah summer, two thousand and NTEEN. Istarted it. Yeah Yeah, two thousand N Nineteen. Istarted probably about maybe five six months, O maybe a little longer, but you know ththe process that stopped o litle books had stopped. So as lately the last Ah,I mean I do like the last three songs and like maybe little for a month, soan you pickd up, really quick in this process of making any P,especially you're. Getting other artists, you e getting other things inline. What is most difficult doing that? What is hard is that 'cause within thelast year you've been doing it. You had some stop, which is probably Crownididn't help, but but O did it. What what is most difficult about?Putting this together and Ha, you know putting a bow on it and ready todistribute it to people. What is the hardest process in this? Well Um, just getting anybody in the studio, butbut me Persnal, I didn't experience...

...anything ar everybody wanted just wontto really was decided to get on with me. You know 'cause they date. I have alittle reputation so uh everybody showed up everything.Everything was good, th the hardest part which Wa Really Wan hard. Was thislast three songs so talked about me: Sinting, a beet through the evemail to Toronto, Canadathrough them, and me just u send in my vocals and I'm not in the studio withthem, I'm telling them what I want done anduh and having the weights on the day that they're doing it for them to sendme a sample back. So he know that is all good wel. That could be a littlestress. You know I'm used to being in the studio, so the first three songsthat we've got completed. I was in the stuier with everybody here in Milwaukeewhise last three songs was done in in another country, so I have to know I'mkindo after waiting to see I if my wishes was taken care of and sometimestere wasn't and then we have to go. Do it again, so that was the tough part you know,and then this last song, if I do it o this is all United Kingdom. A for the United Kingdom. Also hello, I've learned a lot you know and andthis just a lot about technolicy. Nowadays, too hat you don't even haveto be in the same country. You can steal uh tecor together, jus sound likeyou all, Deyre the same studiel together Yeah I've been listening tosome things about music and it's. The idea of that is becoming more a realitylike you could lay down something and never see the person Ri that that's pretty int Ika. It'sit's efficient too right. You don't have, but, as you said, it's probablyreally nice to be in TA studio with people t's like a different sort ofatmosphere, but it comes down to trusting that process, and that must bedifficult right. You do your part now you're waiting for someone you can'teven seed to to put their part in, and you have to trust that process. Yeah like as like a griff. I know whathe looks like we. You know. We'e come become really good friends now, buthe's engineer that has that's engineered these last thee songs. Iwouldn't know him if you walked in here right now. You know, I wouldn't knowhim from h from from a can ofpaint o Eno yeah. That is but he's the guy whoI lastes Ol. I put my trust ind to make sure that he puts me and griffed stuff to wait onthere. Everway we're supposed to have it and anextra sounds or any extrainstruments on one on the track. He's done that, but I don't know how helooks ITIT's, inter its probably, I think,even maybe advantage to do some work withsomeone you haven't met before and then you can see their product and then youcan know them by their work that they do opposed to meeting someone and- andsometimes we have this- you know maybe Misha of well- let's see if we can worktogether and getting used to each other, but you guys have you got a job to doit. You got work to do, do the work and then you have the product and you cansee their their ability and thir their talents right away. No one thing about the questionation thing that that is that that's really brought it tolikefor me was that all I look at a lot of Artistsermik in myown city and you have a lot of people here whowho re in your own town in your own city, who may have prejudices againstyou whatever, because they know you, because maybe something happened yearsago, maybe Um you took a girl to the PROMIS, do wantet to take oever, butwhen you dealitg with people that from other states other countriesthat' from outside of your area, they just see they just see your heart. Theysee the work that you do and if it's good, they gravitate to itand there's no extra prejudice, there's no extra dirt in there. No and andthat's a great thing about the questonation that Otoutcomingo love,you know the wards, I've won have been from other other cities. Californialoves me, you know, you know. I've got offerus togo to Australia and Holand and P places like that. No people out there love meecause. They see what I what I do w e they see. It comes from y heart where,as somebody here in my own city may have mad look at me through a dirtyland. You know what I'm saying, even though I don't t's kind ofsidious. It's unfortunate, Imean there's lots of historical things that say about being hated in your ownland. You talk about being forgiven. That's biblical Tomethat's Gibiculithat', referring to, but it's horrible righ like? U O, I lot of love here inMilwaukee, but some of the other people who's Kindo, like you, considered someof the movers of shakers like me, and...

...this heartas to get together and dosomething and I've noticed that you know, but Ican get the other other movers of shakers an doin great things in ircities, and they want me to come an fly me out everything. So it is what it is,I'm good with it. It's unfortunate right, like I, don't want to dwell onit but, like you can just say, you're from this town and people like ohyou're from that town, but people outside of the state or oothe kind of H,no idea ight Li may not have anything to do with you, but you're from thistown. Oh Yeah. I know where you're like no, you don't oright, really nice to beable to show your work and it's just your work. And then you can get rid ofall that noise off to the side is rigt in your mentering. What what is the youknow, the beautiful thing that you're able totake from you're mentoring, that you're doing through your questionation andall around I'm sure you're you're, not one! That only does it for this. If yousee someone that you're able to mentor you', you take them under your wing.What is the beautiful thing that you can you're taking from this experienceof mentoring? Knowing you know, when you came out of high school and in themilitary, both of us we've grown up, we've learned a lot of things andyou're able to impart some wisdom and experience to these kids. What is itthat you're, taking from this most of all lets think that making everybody feel important andpeople know that you know your voice o hear matters o know youryoung, your music Mata long as it's coming from the heart, Oh, and evensome who I may have on, who I don't think uh their sound, is really ready. Really I've had people onwho. I didn'treally think that musicreally that great or whatever, but they believe in it, so if they believeit, I'm go bin it with you, because I do 'T. I don't know where God will takeyou over a year from now you now you may be so somebody totally on anotherlevel. Oh like this one young, lady Um. She she h, hit me up and saying thatshe cried as she listened int Wen. When I finished it with it. She listened toit. She cried the whole way through because it it really gave her it reallyroose to her spirits and Um. If I could do that for te, so at one person it it's worth it, you know because she was down in tedumks aboutabout her music and everything at Ougavee. Nobody else would give herchance and I gave her a chance to put ir on and Itmit so much to her th thatsomething that stays with me definitely e. So you can't judge peopleno they might. They may not be that great in your opinion, but never know what they what they can. Ohwher. They can go a year from now and they will look, and I learntd that youknow I learned that a Yo go. I was at a Workat, a job yehand, a young lady. Was: U O. She was a selling t e cassette tape of a husbandand wife Tdoel who, where was at or church, had their first stapeout and uhshe'd. Let me take it home. I didn money at the time only I said I'llbring it work tomorrow, say: Okay, you just take it home d. If you want it buyit tomorrow took a home. There was nothing that I like to me. The whole thing was just lookmhm, but I I brougkt the money back to Nex TAand Te ASETIC. You know, and this long storys short H, I run into the guy o. It was part ofthat husband, wife, duel years ago years later, when I'm working in theMoki public school system O it's it's that guy. You know- and I hear someof his music, theirmusic now and it's much better Tanso, to show me that you knowyou never how God'll take you. You might not bethere today, but tomorrow you may be something special, so I'm not GOINGTOTURNA any artacy. It's not only that too, I think,there's a deeper thing going on when some of these kids may not be gettingsome attention and you're showing them. You know giving them an year listeningto that they may not even get at home and while they may pursue a path andmusic is just givin listening to them and giving them a chance. And then youknow, as you said, the girl that was crying listening to something that sheshe did, that you gave her that opportunity and she that might give hersome a boost of confidence for something else. Rightits N, pretty amazing. I thinkit's really good that we need more mentors like yourself and we should allstep up and mentorom. Whatever way we have a capacity to do so. I I appreciate what you're doing asess right it. Thank you for that Lik. So, in what you're doing now?...

How would you say that from your first job to now, how haswork brought you through your life, even when you're getting yelled at inthe face n in the military, or you know a buddy saying no, I I can't be in thegroup anymore, but you're willing to work 'cause, you even stop music, andthen you started to back up you're mentoring. When you don't have tomentor, you can be just selfish and do it all for yourself and not try to helpother people. How has work to helpd you, and how did you see this as a a silverlining through your life? o workers helped me us. So if you have a job you just you justhave to do with your Beci Billy. That's what whet my parents broke it to do.Weal, do your best at it. Whatever job you have Nodo you best be on time, bepontual and UH. No, you drive so that'. That's!Basically how me I'M UN! When I do when I do quest, I I do it Um, whether I'm tired or whatever I I do myjob and I give these uh. These people, whoam interviewing it hem all that same thing, I would do at a jobsame thing. I would do when I was in the military and then, like I said, with themilitary, it helped me to be able to deal with a lot of people, so I mean a lot of peop. A lot of people I dealtwith ah like ere, was a wrapper from in. Inever heard wrap like that. India rap I've never heard it like that.It just it sounded like a a cobear was going to coll up at some point, so Rabin, a Onason, you know woul. I helpme to be able to deal with Y KNOWTO deal with that. You know and H tounderstand that everybody's not the same, but you know at the same timegrow Ot Chi. So that's that's! That's where no a it makes so yeah. I think if you you have a respectfor music. You can. You can appreciate any music 'cause, I'm in Korea, and youhear a lot of rap that you know I think growing upsay with N W A or Lo Cooljwe're thinking a little bit more harder core than whatyou might be hering coming out of India or, but that that's their rap right.That's their poem, that's their poetry! That's they're! Writing that they sitdown and they're putting a track to it, and for them that's what it is N. Ithink we can appreciate what they're they're trying to accomplish and at theend it is music yeah. That's that's! What they'rebringing to the table? That's how they that's out feel rap, a an no Comoiculture. So that's a beautiful thing about it. CAUSI was over there yeahtere, bringing hat to the table so canappreciate that you can't Bac. I canappreciate that Y h. You Know Leer I had. I got him. somesome greatuh hip hop artists, who uh well some great hiphop artist, who I'velistened to like Medlin Ace and those guys who they they wrappin Spanish, andI don't understand the word same, but I love their solgs yeah when Ymak, no, it does. When youhear good, beat you hear a good Ho sit em right, you hear good, beat ofcourse.I can understand a couple of words MHM, but during during the Birst I can'tunderstand T B ut during the course I could understand a couple of words andsomebody O D. I love it ith. Then I playlist you can appreciate right. We canappreciate it because you know it makes sense to someone and if it sounds goodthey're hitting it right, the other Hini Liroy. How? How do you rest? How do you rest? Besides your I meanyou are busy. I know you're busy, a E. I have you up late at night and youshould be going to bed b t how do y? U Wo rest ill. Do a rest. What do you do to resthere? OWR UNWIND I like to like listen, listen, ow, some music orwatch a movie. I'm a movie person like to watch a good movie and Um. Then I'mreally UTTO. Now I'm really into Um PIECASS. So I have my favorite pot castl like tolisten to the they. They take me to sleep. You KNOWI'M, a I'm, a bigparanormal guy and some of my paranobal shows are just as popular to musicls.So I have some some people I like to listen to and their shows as jus Wutbeing in in a zone whereacting to secuafver short tis rest o Egesi atsleep theig. Before we go. How can how canpeople find you 'cause? I know you got your newl pcoming out how CANP SS I won't ontuter UMSMOOTHnovelist. All One were smooth Noveists, AI, Oinstrogram, O novelists, two thousand...

...and Nineteen Olentan Leroy Washington on a facebook on Washiton, which I Iuse Roy Thealement Y. my dad he's calling woy all the time. So that'sthat's my busand's dame too! So? U So I'm w Washington, I'm facebok and UmYeah, just so hit me up in boxme. If you see eybodywho's, doing something n h, Ye spotlightid owe'll talk Wen, U EPcoming out again in the name of it. The final ingredient comes outSeptember fourtieth, which is my birthday, and also my email is op dotwash atYahoo, dacop well, happy birthday! Imagine we had this stuff growing up.You just named like five to ten different things away to get contactyou we had like call my mom's phone number like when we get a little olr. You gotTa Paie Right, but like that's all what do you mean? We had nothing call my friend I'll meet you on thecorner like totally didn't ilike and then there'snext week, there'll be some new. We add to it Lero. I truly appreciate whenwatching this please subscribe to my channel Click on the no vacations. Getme why we work teroy. I truly appreciate it this timeand I would like to speak to you again E. I was great conversation. I Iappreciate Mister Leeroy Washington s coming out September. Fourteen be thankyou for listening to this episode. Why we werk with Brin, be sure to subscribeand follow and share with other MES, so they to CN encourage ther wer. I hopethat you have yourself iproductive, enjoyful Dayngin, your work.

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