WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 91 · 1 year ago

#91 Kyle Grappone - Career Clarity Coach - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Kyle Grappone is a career clarity coach who brings clarity, direction, and accountability to people's lives. His focus is on 1) career change, 2) starting side hustles, and 3) launching a business. Kyle also helps market businesses, as he isa branding strategist and published author (To the Next Step).

Contact Info

Kyle’s Profile
linkedin.com/in/kylegrappone

Website
kyleg.journoportfolio.com (Company Website)

Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/ClarityCoachKyle/?ref=py_c&__xts__

Instagram
https://www.instagram.com/kylegspeaks/?hl=en

Twitter
https://twitter.com/kylegspeaks?lang=en

Email
kgrappone@gmail.com

About

"My mission is to inspire people to find clarity in their careers and purpose in life. I help them cut through the crap and gain true clarity about what they are supposed to be doing and the steps they need to take to get there. Too many people hate what they do for a living and that needs to change." (LinkedIn, 2021)

...welcome to why we work with your host Brian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which would be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going on and keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here is your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian V, and this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure of speaking with Kyle Groupon. Kyle is a clarity coach who brings clarity, direction and accountability to people's lives. He focuses on career changes, side hustles and starting new businesses. He's also a branding strategist and author. Today I want to find out from Kyle what hinders people from finding the career that suits them best. Join me in my conversation today with Kyle Groupon. I'm Brian V, and this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure speaking with Kyle Groupon. Good evening, young man. Thank you, Kyle. Thank you for coming on. We were just having a little chat about our points of reference. The the podcast, your book knowing that there's some similarities. Can you give us an idea of what you're doing now? And then I'd like to bring you back, Sure. So basically what I'm doing now is I'm working with entrepreneurs and small business owners, and I work with them on what's called branding, strategy, content, strategy and really just acting as their creative director. And what I mean by that is there are a number of people who have some sort of idea that they want to launch. They want to start their own business because they have a product or service they want to sell. Or perhaps they wanna be their own boss. They're dissatisfied with corporate America. They're dissatisfied with their job, and they've decided that they want to be a business owner, be an entrepreneur, whatever you wanna call it, and what I've learned and who I help is the people who know what they want to do. But they don't know what their messaging is. They don't know what their value is. They don't know how to come up with the constant funnel of social media posts or block posts, or how to basically take this product and create a full marketing campaign behind it because you could sell, you know, water bottles, and they could be great water bottles. But how do you create content? How do you find out who's gonna buy that water bottle? How do you figure out? You know, where do they get their information? Um, and a lot of clients I work with there also, some type of coaches are individuals who, you know, want to help people with a certain idea. So they coach. But then what about a subscription service? What about courses? What about content? What about, you know, free content versus paid content? So that's basically what I dio. And as I mentioned, you know, offline with you earlier. This really all started when I wanted to help students. I want to help students live. Ah, more fulfilling and satisfactory life and career and future. So now I'm working with a group of people who have taken that first step to do that and are now trying to explore. You know what it really looks like? And what do they have to do next, Kyle, in my limited experience, whether my own life or with this podcast, I found people with a drive similar to you had a pretty good upbringing in that they were entrepreneurial or they started work a little early. What was what would have been your very first job? And how old were you when you may be first got out of the house to make some money? So my first job was at 15. I worked in McDonald's, and it did not...

...last very long because I was the low man on the totem pole, so I didn't get a lot of hours. Eso I quickly moved on to a job where I was a bus boy at a Greek restaurant on Long Island, and I worked there for a while. Um, and then eventually I went to work for a supermarket for a number of years, and e I like the supermarket because I had a lot of co workers, and you also had a consistent, you know, batch of hours every week. Why did you get out of the house at 15 to work at McDonald's? Honestly, I think you know, it was because I was reaching a point where I wanted to make my own money. Um, you know where I came you know, the house I came from, we weren't. We were certainly not poor, not even remotely close to that. But we weren't. I didn't grow up super wealthy. So you know, when you reach the age of 15, some people, you know, some kids of 15 16, they just get money from their parents. And that's how they live. And I think that kind of could be crippling. Um, but with me, you know, my parents were like, you know, it wasn't like I had to go work, but it was like, Listen, like your 15. Now it's time for you to get a job, to have your own money, to spend on things you're not asking us for money. So that's really kind of how it started was just, you know, wanting to have my own money and not wanting to depend on my parents. Can you speak of it? I'm sure that you've done some research and especially with your book that you had. But although you have pivoted to the next step about what you just mentioned of giving money, two Children or your Children can be a little crippling. Yeah, I think it's a really interesting. Um, interesting point that I think we see a lot and it's it's money. But it's also, um, objects that we give our give our Children. It's I don't know exactly what I'm looking for. I'm thinking, like I'm thinking, like, cars and vacations. Things you mean, like a 505 $100,000 telephone cell phone? Yeah, like a cell phone and then paying for their cell phone bill and they drop it on, and then they just give me a new one. Exactly. Or, you know, getting a car. Um, you know, I I knew a guy who was He's older now. I won't go too much into it, but he got to a car, and he's my age. Got to a car accident. Um, you know, because he was, you know, intoxicated and his dad, even at my age, his dad bought him a brand new car afterwards, and I was just like to me. I was like, This is a problem that obviously for him has gone on for generations. But to go back to your original point, it's a problem, because they're not understanding consequence. If you've always had money given to you If you've always had a full bank account, then you don't appreciate what it's like to earn. I mean, I grew up. I mean again, I always had the always had the inception. Essentials always had healthy food. I always had clean clothes. I always had ah, loving home. But I remember when I was younger. You know, payday was every Thursday and every Wednesday I was broke because I didn't make a lot of money and I spent it. So now that I run my own business, I can appreciate the fact that hey, money might be flowing now. But let's calm down, because money is not always gonna be flowing. And what happens is is that you have kids who spend their whole lives getting all of this money. All of these tangible items getting a brand new car. I mean, if you the only thing you've ever known is a brand new car, why would you ever appreciate, you know, having a car because you think that that's just how life iss like. I remember when I worked in a very glamorous advertising agency in New York City, and I came from a couple of pretty crappy jobs. So every day was like, you know, heaven for me because I was like, Wow, I really appreciate this. But then there was a batch of kids who grew straight out of college, went straight into this job, and they bitch and moan because I didn't know any better, you know, they didn't know like that. This is not how it is everywhere. Like you guys should go like this should not be your first job like you should. Everybody's first job should be a shitty job because then you appreciate what you have. And, you know,...

...like you said, I mean, these kids who grow up and never have a job during high school and always have money all of a sudden they go out into the real world. And I mean, I see a lot of what the problem with a lot of twentysomethings is. They live at home. Their parents pay all their bills, so they have no motivation to do well. It works, and it's like, Why do I have to be here? I don't need this money like I worked with somebody who, you know, her parents paid all of her bills, and she just had no motivation. You saw it because she's like, Why am I? Why am I doing this? Why should I do this? Kyle? Do you have ah solution or some tips for parents on a better way than just giving, giving giving to their Children? I think you have to think about what you're giving them because if you give them everything, you're also giving them a very difficult future. You're giving them a lot of heartache and a lot of stress, because what you're doing is you're crippling them. You're doing it for life. Um, there was a very famous scene that I talked about from the movie. Remember the Titans, where basically it was, as you know, the movie. There's Herman Boone, who was the white coach, and Joost Herman was the black coach. Yost was the white coach, and yours basically pulled one of the black players aside and told them, Everything's gonna be okay. You're all right. Don't worry about it. And afterwards, Herman Boone said to him goes, Listen, you can't coddle these kids regardless of race. You can't coddle them because if you do that because the world doesn't care how sensitive they are the world's gonna come crashing down on them, so you think you're helping them, but you're crippling them for life. And that's what I would say to parents like If you truly love your kids, you have to withhold some of that. You can't give them everything, because if you give them everything now, you're giving them a very hard time later on. So when they hit 15 or 16 years old, that's when the time is to start to get a job. When they when it's time to get a car, absolutely give them something safe and reliable. But if you're gonna buy a new car buying for yourself and give them the older car, don't buy your kid a new car. Like if you have the money to buy a new car, buy it for yourself because, first of all, you deserve it. You're the adult. You're the one that works and makes the money, you know, and give them the older car and make them Do you know their chores and earning allowance and make them have a job and make them, you know, understand what it's like to drive, You know, my first car was an 18 year old car. So when I bought my brand new car two years ago, I appreciate it, you know? So that's my My suggestion of parents is really kind of think about the long term, because I think a lot of parents grew up with very strict parents, and now they've gone the opposite way. And the problem is you're creating kids that have no idea how to operate in the real world. They don't know conflict resolution. They don't know how to communicate with people, you know. And there's a whole other avenue about social media I could go into about that. But I think that's my biggest suggestion of parents is just think about what you're doing, because if you coddle them now, you're really hurting them like it reminds me of. When I was home in Canada, I worked for a company, and then we had We dealt with a lot of university students and there was an international student, and he had a Mercedes Benz, and somehow some way he went home to his home country and came back and couldn't find his car. So he went to the dealership where he just bought this car not too long before. And like, Yeah, I want another one of those Mercedes Benz and they're like and his English was just a little bit off like Whoa, explain. Where's your other car? I went home. I came back. It was gone. So the guy was kind enough. The dealer Thio. Try to do some research and find out where his car went. And what happened was he parked in a no parking zone and it got towed away. So they went and found his car. But the kid was Oh, I lost my Mercedes. I'll just go by. Bye. And that's insane because it doesn't work...

...like that. That's a crazy story. But I believe it. I absolutely believe, um, Kyle for you. And I guess moving into the supermarket that got you maybe into high school. What were you thinking for? Your education and how are you tryingto map out your career? So I will tell you I'm a very cautionary tale because I didn't really think about any of that in high school. Um, I was very much the class clown. I told a lot of jokes, never really took anything too seriously. I think part of me knew that a lot of what I was learning in high school. I was never going to use again. And I am correct on that. Um, but I don't think I understood that you have to play the game a little bit on, but you do have to build the habit of studying and getting good grades. So for me, I always did. Okay, Got some seasons and bees, but I never really thought about what I wanted to do When I grew up And had I thought about it, I would have realized that, you know, I shouldn't be in office. I shouldn't be in a cubicle I should be working with, um, you know, basically working in a creative environment. And I always tell people that if I had realized that, I probably would have, you know, been a journalism major, and I'll probably be working, you know, as a producer on the show or something, because those guys are always creating and moving around. But I never really took high school very seriously. I never really took college very seriously. And the end result was I got thrown into a world that I knew nothing about and my resume sucked, and I cover a lot of stock that I had no experience. Um, I found my way out of it. But the version of me that's talking to you today is a complete 1 80 from 20 years ago, 15 years ago, even 10 years ago and even even five years ago. I mean version I am now is very different because I finally a little later on in life, realized what I should be doing. It was something that took me a while to figure out. Maybe everyone knows it in the back of their mind, but you mentioned learning to play the game more the educational gain. Can you speak about that? Because I think it's important for people to understand. You know, a lot of people are doing something. Some people are envious of other people going to school on how well they're doing. But some of those people just figured out it is a game. You got to check these boxes if you want to get to some other place, and it's not for everyone, but a lot of people don't realize it really is a game. I think It's a game, in a sense that a lot of what you are, you're in high school. A lot of what you learn. You may never really use again. But if you get a D in science, then you might not get into the college you want. And if you don't get into the college you want, then you might not be able to pursue the career that you want. So it's kind of like these building blocks of even though you're not interested in certain subjects even though you know you're never gonna use them. You have to get those good grades because those good grades will get you into the college that you want. But I'm gonna stop you right there, Kyle, because I'm thinking of myself who is an idiot is an idiot was an idiot. And someone here's you saying, Get good grades. Okay, I'm done. I gotta cover my ears. But what I realized it took until university is getting good grades basically consists of just going to class and doing the bare minimum which are will end up being pretty good grades. Some people, I mean, we're talking about how about a whole spectrum of people. But generally speaking, if you go to class, don't miss class and do the bare minimum of the homework. You're going to get a B. You're going to get a B plus. Maybe right, you could do that. So the idea of getting a good grade for some people it's like, Oh, well, off course, Kyle, If I just get the good grade, I'll be good. But it's not that hard if you just put in the bare minimum of effort.

Yeah, but the bare minimum of effort is still effort, right? Because if you go, you know if you go to class, but you don't pay attention and you don't do the homework if you don't pay attention, you don't do well on the test like you're not gonna get a good grade. So it's not incredibly difficult to get good grades. But I think some people think that if I just sit here, that's enough, and you actually do have to do something. Um, and I think the other thing is that, you know, we could. This is not why I come on the show but you. There's a There's a systemic issue with the education system and we all see it and we all know it and there's nothing we can really do about it. And I'm not gonna I'm not going to die. That's not my hill to die on. I'm not going to try to change the education system in this country. But there is that issue of, you know, taking classes that maybe you don't necessarily need going to college. Maybe you don't necessarily need to go. Um, you know, I don't know. One of the hip things to do now is people, especially as influencers in these big time entrepreneurs, kind of tend to shit on college and say, Um, you don't need it. It's a waste of time. It's a waste of money and I think that that's a very oversimplification of the of the idea. I think what we need to do is we need to kind of rethink the way we approach the idea of college and realize that it's for some people and it can be incredibly valuable. But it's not for everyone. You don't necessarily need to go to ah, high priced school. You don't necessarily need to go to college. There are a lot of other avenues to go down because the problem is like everybody's in high school is being told you have to go to college, you have to get a good degree to get a good job, and that's that doesn't work like that anymore. So I think that we need to say like college is a option, and for some people, it's very valuable auction. But for some people, it's it's not the right option at all. What did you take in college? I don't know if I got that. So I was a public relations major. Okay? Onda again. You know, I didn't really never thought about the long term. And that's one of the reasons I started talking to students was to help them realize that everything you do needs to be pivoted towards the type of person you want to become the type of future that you want because otherwise you're gonna end up like a lot of these people who you know, became adults and got jobs they didn't like. And now all of a sudden, they don't really know what they want to dio. When Kyle did your each developed for being a clarity coach and helping people because you wrote a book. So you're looking at a few years ago. You're not that old. So where did that start? So I would say it probably started. There's a couple of piphany moments that I talk about. So I think one of them was back in 2013. I graduated college in 2010. I spent a graduated in a in a recession. Nobody was hiring entry level people. I knocked around a few random talking for a PR job. I was looking for PR job. I was also looking for a marketing job, something entry level to kind of learn that skill. Uh, nobody's really hiring anybody. An entry level, Everything I was seeing, they wanted to three years experience just because they didn't have the money to really hire a lot of people. So I spent a few years, you know, bouncing around different jobs. Um, that didn't have to do with my major. And then in 2013, I got a marketing job and I didn't like it, and I was very deflated because I was like, I spent so long trying to get this job, and now I don't like it so that was kind of the first one. I was like, you know, maybe something's wrong, And then I would have these moments where I would sit in a cubicle, especially during the summer when things were going on and whether it's so beautiful outside, I'd be saying to myself, You know, this isn't right. I shouldn't be sitting in this cubicle. I shouldn't be working in an office like this is not what I should be doing. And I remember distinctly back in 2015, uh, coworker...

...of mine. We were so fed up with just everything going on in our company that we walked out now. Granted, we walked out around lunchtime, so it wasn't that dramatic. It just looked like two people going to lunch. But we walked out in New York City. We walked down the street to a rooftop bar and, like two o'clock in the afternoon, we were drinking beers on. And because we just we got to remember that day we had just had it, and I remember sitting on that rooftop. I remember looking up. I know exactly where I was. Remember the building I was looking at? I remember saying there has to be more to life than this. Um, and she kind of agree with me, but I don't think she really knew what I was talking about. And I was like, There has to For me, there has to be more to life. There has to be something else that I'm not doing. I don't know what that is. And basically, I had There's epiphany back in 2017 where I was like, you know what one I needed. I can't I don't wanna work a job anymore. I don't wanna work in corporate America. I don't wanna work for one person. I wanna work for myself. I want to create things. I want to sell things. I want to help people. I want my days to be impactful. I don't wanna be stuck in meetings I don't wanna be doing, you know, stupid assignments for the sake of doing them. And that's really when I started doing the public speaking, talking to students because I wanted students to not repeat the mistakes that I made. And then when that wasn't working, I wrote the book. And then when that wasn't working, I did the coaching. So what? I was doing was I was learning a lot about speaking and learning a lot about running a business or you're saying you're saying when that wasn't working. But really, it's I mean, depending, if you're optimistic or pessimistic, is, is as you're growing going along, you're getting that experience and you're writing a book, and that's sort of way rather than well that didn't work and that didn't work and that didn't work. Would you not look at it a little bit more optimistically and say, Well, then I did this one after another. I think, yes, I think there is the way of looking at it that everything I've done has led me to this point. But I think that the the way I'm trying to explain it is that the reason I wrote the book originally was because I wasn't getting speaking engagements and I thought a book would be a great way to introduce myself to decision makers. And then the reason I started coaching was because it was difficult to get booked as a speaker. But as a coach I could go directly to a parent and get booked and kind of cut out that you know middleman and reach a decision maker. So long term. I think all of that brought me to where I am today. But every step I've made is because I've had to I've learned and then I've kind of pivoted. And then I moved on. And then, like I said, I believe it was offline. Before we started recording Waas, I was finding I was getting a lot of positive feedback from people in their twenties and thirties who are basically saying like, Hey, can you create some content for me? Um, you know, for people who are in the real world. And now that I wanna make a course correction, I want to make a career change. So that's when I kind of found myself leaving the education space and talking more to people in their twenties and thirties and forties about starting a side hustle about starting your own business. And at the same time, I was discovering that I was really good at branding and being creative, and I was making a lot of connections with entrepreneurs and small business owners, and I found that there was this market of people who, you know, had kind of taken my advice that I've been hearing from me. They basically decided that they wanted more in life. They wanted to start their own business, and now they needed that help to kind of take it to that next level. So it's kind of been this journey which is now brought me to, you know, the current iteration of my company. So in your company now what is what is a process that you go through for a week? Say, on what is it you do in your work? So my process is we have different types of clients. Eso basically what we're always trying to do is we're trying to work with the entrepreneur, the small business owner, Onda help...

...them basically craft their message through content through branding strategies and basically helped them build their business to the point where they're making consistent income and consistent revenue and eventually put them on a path where they can leave their full time job someday, um or or if there or if they I've already done that, they can build their business and they can expand their business so my clients can vary. You know, I have clients that all we do right now is right to block posts a month. Onda. We write those block posts, we talk about what the topics and what's the call to action. And who are we writing for but where we really are? Ex selling right now is working with larger entities, orm or established. You know, entrepreneurs were either coaches or teachers Onda helping them take their idea and kind of spread it out where they are. You know, they have their sales funnel set up. They have their video set up, but they're content is better than everybody else's. Because instead of just, you know, throwing something that's the wall and hoping it sticks, we built out. You know, their buyer personal their target audience there, what's called a messaging matrix. So every single thing they create is based on this matrix off. What pain points you solving? What problems are you solving? Who were you speaking? Thio. So that's really kind of what I dio and then occasion. I still do some speaking here there. Um but you know, one of the things I would say to anybody who's thinking about starting a business is you can offer a number of different things. But you can have a website. You can offer different things, like I offer coaching courses speaking. But you need to focus on one thing. What is the one thing you're doing right? And then when that gets up and running and that kind of runs on its own, then you can pivot to another thing. So, like, do I still speak? Yes. Do I put any kind of time and effort around it? No. What happens is that somebody finds me. Um, it says, Hey, there's an event I'd like you to speak at. You're in a position where you're able to help people who have made that decision. But you also have enough experience to help those people get over making a decision, whether it's starting a career, starting a side hustle or getting that new small business going. What hinders people in in your view to make those decisions? So there, as you were on a patio in a bar, thinking there's more to life than this and then making the decision toe transition into something else, what hinders people to do that one of the main things that hinders people is mindset and the way their brain is wired and the way we as human as our brain is wired. And I tell my clients that your brain is there and exists to keep you safe. So whenever it sees a threat, it immediately tries to drag you away from that. And when I say the word threat, we think of the extreme example. But in reality, starting your own businesses me there's a threat because you could fail, you could get hurt. Not physically, but emotionally. You could be ridiculed. Um, it's unknown, you know, just the idea of starting a business as a lot of unknown tasks. This is why people stay at jobs for so long, even though they're miserable, because they know exactly what they have to dio. It's comfortable you could be comfortable in miserable at the same time, you know doesn't make a lot of sense, but you could absolutely be very comfortable and be unhappy at the same time. And that's what happens. That's what hinders people from taking that jump because they have to rewire their brain and they have toe, you know, say I'm uncomfortable. I'm scared. I'm going to do it anyway. I mean, I even trying to myself Sometimes if I have a lengthy to do list for the day and there's five or six things that even there's five or six things I've done before and then there's two things I've never done...

...before. Like I take those two things and I tryto rationalize why I don't have to do them today because they're unknown, you know? And I think that's something that even I still try to get over, because if I look at something, I say, Oh, I have I have to write three block posts today And there were all four clients I've been working with for a year. Oh, no sweat. But if I have a brand new website for a brand new client and I have to go through their documents and I have to figure out what they want that to me, can you get overwhelming because you don't already know what the outcome is? That's why people don't always make that change to start their own business, because with a job, you know what the outcome is. You know, you know how much money you're getting paid, you know, when you're getting paid and you really don't have to make a lot of difficult decisions. You know, like a lot of times the buck stops with somebody else. So you can, you know, maybe slack off a little bit. Or maybe take some time off or whatever you know. But when you start your own business, you're the one that has to make the final decision. You can consult other people, but you have to make the final decision when something goes wrong. You can't just go home at five o'clock and email and give it to somebody else. It's you. It's your problem. And I think people have this mindset of, you know, being being scared of failing. And I think the other problem is that if you're if you wanna leave a 9 to 5 job to start your own business, you have to do both of them at the same time for a while. So that means working your 99 to 5 job coming home, eating dinner and then taking that 7 to 10 or 7 to 11 block that you've spent the last 10 years in that block watching Netflix. Now, all of a sudden you're gonna open up the laptop and work mawr for no money. That's a big thing to get over. And I don't think people realize that because you're going home and your significant other is like, Hey, I haven't seen you all day. And now all of a sudden you're gonna be on your laptop and your doing work. You're not making any money, But you have a good job. Why are you doing that? And I think that those are all things that kind of swirl around that people don't understand. Like I think that I think that I think that the big thing is you do a lot of work and you're not getting paid for it right away. And I think some people are just like, Well, wait a minute. I'm doing a lot of work. I'm not getting paid. I mean, I almost I think I worked for two years straight on this business and probably didn't make any money. Um, but I knew what I wanted to do. And the fear for me. The fear of working in a cubicle for the next 40 years was 10 times greater than failing at anything. I do not fear failing. I fear having to go back and work jobs that I don't like. And I think if you can develop that type of mindset and you can look at your life and say I'm afraid of not changing more than I'm afraid of changing and, you know, get ready to be uncomfortable because it's a It's a wild ride being an entrepreneur, starting your own business or even people who want to change career paths like even people again, because you may have to go back to school and or you may have to buy a course and take the course at night. Or you may need to take a pay cut or something to change careers and kind of pivot. And I think for a lot of people, it's it's too uncomfortable and it's to unknown, and that's why people stick. You know, A few years ago I worked at the company and I told people out loud, It's the worst company I ever worked for. Um, and I looked and there's people there that were miserable. This was four years ago. I worked with this company, were absolutely miserable when I was there, and they're still there at the same position, and it just blows my mind that these people who I know you're miserable. But it's comfortable and they don't ever want to leave. And I just I don't know. I don't I get it to an extent, but after a while it's like, you know, shit or get off the pot. It's funny. I interviewed uh, Jeff Deskovic yesterday who spent 16 years in prison for wrongful conviction, and that man worked in prison. Thio release...

...himself to keep his mind, saying, and then he mentioned the dismay he has with people who do some of these things having same job, finding excuses, not doing the work because he worked while in prison. And then he got out. I mean, in prison. He got his G d got his associates. He did a one year of college. He learned about plumbing and electrical in all this got out, did his bachelor masters, and now he's a lawyer. He's like time is of the essence. Don't waste your time because you never know. In his point is for being in prison as you. It could happen to you, but the idea is he would never want to go back to that, and with you with your cubicle, you would never want to go back to that. So take you know, the bull by the horns and get going with your job. Is there a tip that you have for people who like yourself? Maybe going to McDonald's for the first time, going to a job, a small job or changing careers? Do you have a tip for people who are just starting work one way or another? So I would say for somebody who's just starting work like a teenager, for example, who maybe is getting their first job. I think the important thing to remember is that whatever you're doing is not gonna be that glamorous. It is probably not gonna be a lot of fun, but you're there to make money. We're also there to gain experience because the more you work, the more you prove to other people that you could be trusted. You know, some people see being a cashier at McDonalds is, you know, ah, low, lowly job, but it's really about how you approach it, you know? Do you approach it as oh, I'm just a cashier or do you approach it as I'm trusted to handle money. I'm trusted to be the face of this franchise because being a cashier you know, is maybe not difficulty. But if you're if you could say always a cashier McDonald's for five years at the same place, then that proves that you're a outgoing person. You're a friendly person. You could be trusted because if you weren't those things, they would have stuck you somewhere else. So it's really all about gaining perspectives, about just gaining experience. It's about also developing a work ethic, you know, because it's gonna be days where you don't want to goto work. But you do anyway, because that's what you have to dio. And that's what happens in the real world. We don't always get to do the things that we want to do. Sometimes we do the things we have to do. So I would say that to anybody who's starting kind of their their first job. If somebody is out there and they're starting their first full time job after college, I would tell them again to be patient. Um, your first job, Ah, lot of times will include things that you think an intern should be doing? Um, you're the low man on the totem pole, so you're kind of a catch all. But it's really about figuring out Where could I go? You know, if I stay here year, where could I go after this? Is there a different department I could go into? What can I learn? What skills kind of pick up Is there someone here that impresses me? Maybe I could kind of, you know, be mentored by them, but just be, you know, positive. But also be realistic in a sense that if you're in a company and you're not learning and you're not growing, you do have a right to leave. You know, a lot of people will say, Well, you got to say it a job for a year when I don't agree with that. Um, I think you should aim to stay for at least a year, but it's very reasonable to understand that you might You might get the wrong job, you know? I mean, companies will will say they're one thing and say This is the job. This is the company. And then you get through the door and it's a nightmare. I mean, I've gone through that a number of time, and you can always you know, I I wouldn't tell that person. Oh, even though it's a nightmare even though you're miserable. And even though you're not growing, you're not learning. Just stay for a year like I don't agree with that at all. So if you get a job and you're not growing, I'm not talking about you're not happy. But if you're not growing and you're not learning and you're just doing menial work every day, then you have the right to move on, you...

...know? So you gotta be very careful about, you know, Are you growing? And maybe you know, every six months kind of taking your temperature and doing that type of internal audit where you're saying, what have I learned? Where am I going? What am I doing? Like that job? I talked about that terrible, terrible company. They were paying me a lot of money, but the job waas, you know, very high volume, because I was a project manager. So it's very high volume, but it was very, very basic stuff. Now a college kid couldn't handle it because it wouldn't be able to handle the volume. So I was. That's why I was hired. But I wasn't. I wasn't learning anything. I wasn't growing at all. I was after a week. I was like, This is already stale And that's why I only worked there for seven months. What about a tip for people changing careers a little bit older? I would say that changing careers is not as difficulties. People make it out to pay and that if you really have the right mindset, your skill set can translate, uh, easier than you think. Because I know people who are like, Oh, you know, I've been insurance my whole life and I don't wanna be in, but it's the only thing I know. So I can't get a job outside of insurance. Well, wait a minute. Take a step back. What do you do every day? Do you manage projects? Do you communicate with clients? Communicate with customers? Do you manage numbers? Do you put together reports? What do you do? Because that skill is needed in other industries, you know, So even if you've been in account manager in the health care industry, you could be an account manager at an advertising agency Because you still have to deal with clients, you still have to organize and manage and monitor. So it's really about, you know, taking your skills and showing people that they can translate, and I can do that job. And the second half of that is also finding what's missing and learning it on your own. So, for example, if you're an account manager and health care and you want to be a an ad exec at an ad agency, you have some of those skills. But then it's also up to you to one. Familiarize yourself with the world of marketing with the world, that branding, but also and this is something that gets lost is that if you wanna change careers, you can volunteer in some aspect to learn those skills. There's a great website called Catch a Fire that basically is nonprofits looking for volunteers, and I tell people the time if you want, you know you want to do social media marketing. Go on this website and start doing social media nonprofit catch, catch a fire, catch on fire, catch a fire. Um, and I tell people I said you could do social media for these nonprofits because one any kind of help is great. And you you can kind of use them kind of as a, you know, a test project, you know, and learn. And you can take a free course on social media marketing and then take what you learned immediately put it towards the nonprofits. Not nonprofit, is getting some help you're getting somehow. So it's really about just being creative, um, and changing careers. But I will say that the older you get, the more difficult it's going to be because you have more responsibilities. Um, you know, if you're 25 years old and you have a girlfriend and you don't think you like your career change now because five years from now you're gonna be married with a house and kids and now all of a sudden it's gonna be a lot more difficult, you know? And I think that's what some people don't realize is like They almost like society, almost treats life of a grocery grocery list where, like you're supposed Thio graduate college, get married, buy a house, have a kid. Well, that's what you're supposed to dio. And the problem is, is that you blink, and in five years you've done all that. And now you have all these people that air relying on you and it's not impossible. But now you can take a pay cut. So, like when you're 25 years old, if you're making 50 K and you find a job that you love, but it's gonna be 40 k or 38 K or...

...whatever, you probably take a pay cut. You might have to sacrifice some things that you probably didn't need in the first place, but by the time it's time to buy that out, you'll be back up to that number. But if you're like me, I mean, I'm 33 years old. I have a house, a kid, You know what I mean? Like I couldn't I couldn't take a 20 K pay cut. So I don't want to say certain people are stuck, but the older you get against a little bit more difficult. You mentioned skill. Is there a skill? Is a clarity coach and a branding strategist, or even as an author that you had to develop and to improve? What would that be? So I think one of the skills Waas learning why people buy products, why people purchase, um, and understanding kind of consumer behaviors. So I think that's something that I had to learn did by learning that Did that change your own behavior or give you a better idea as to why you make the decisions you do? It definitely did. It definitely did, because I can see through Ah, lot of BS. Um, you know, as an entrepreneur, as a business owner, there's a lot of people out there that are trying to sell me their services, and a lot of times I read it and I go, Yeah, that's because what I can pick on is like they'll say something that's not true. Like they'll say, You know, um, email marketing is dead. So you have to do this and I'm like, No, it's not like that's not true But you're hoping that I don't know that where they'll say, You know, in 2000, You know, if Koven taught us anything, it's that you have to be on the Internet. Well, well, Kobe didn't teach us that, like we've always known that. You know, I I see a lot. I really want to think of what I saw the other day and I was just like, That's not true, But it's like, you know, something like, um, you know, if you want to start a side hustle, then you have to have video mark videos, video block, and it's like, No, you don't like you want us to because then go buy your product. But I was like, That's not really true, Like they say these things to kind of hook you And I'm like, Well, wait a minute, like I had a call with somebody who wanted to sell me their services, expensive service, and it would kind of be me learning how to do something and then adding that to my company. And afterwards I was like, There's something missing here. I was like, because what you're saying you could do for me? I was like, It's not that easy So I could see through a lot of things that other people can't necessarily see through. Um, you know, like my dad, for example. Always hear from my dad. He goes, I don't understand why they give so much stuff away for free. Why do all these platforms have free versions? And I'm like Dad. I'm like, everybody's got a free version because you get into it. You like it And then what happens? What you really need isn't free. I was like So then you have to buy that. I also told him I said the reason that you're you're able to download that book for free is because now they have your email address and they don't know that you, joker pone is never gonna buy anything from them. I was like, You're not their target audience. You're just something like you're lost to them. Like when you get a free item from somebody like they lost money on you because you're not gonna buy anything but everybody else. They're hoping that they buy something down the road. You know, like that's why I see, like, a lot of times I'll purchase like, Well, I get a free book and I know they're like, Okay, I got to go through eight up cells and I know the reason I got the book is because they do all this stuff. But the other day I bought, like, three or four things that were like, four or five bucks, and now I'm just getting bombarded with these automated sales emails, you know? And I know it because I do it myself. So it's kind of like, you know, I read through it, Yeah, yeah, yeah, You know, everybody's got, you know, and I try to read it and I try to be different. I try to look at them and say, What are they doing on how Doe? I make a change? Because everybody's doing. Everybody has the same formula. Um, and it becomes white...

...noise after a while, So I try Thio. That's why I don't subscribe those emails. I read them and I try to figure out how could mind be different. Yeah, those air. It's a good skill to develop the three awareness sensitivity What's really going on? I think of there was an ad I saw which they did a good job. It was for a dental company, a dentist, and it showed a person wearing a mask like a covert mask. And I said, Now is the best time, isn't it? I saw that exact I know exactly. So that exact same ad that has never been a better time to get never been a better time to embrace is like. That's good. That's clever. You gotta give. Yeah, I like that. I like that one a lot. There's definitely a few one. The other day I saw that I really enjoy Oh, you know what? It waas I was explaining this to my Oh, this is what I was trying to explain this to my wife the other day. She's in a group chat. Um, long story. She's in a group chat, so she actually just gave birth. Um, like a week ago. Thank you. Eso She was in a group chat with a bunch of other women who were giving birth in January, and one of the women runs her own business and she creates these hand crafted like wooden signs. And she gave everybody in the group a free sign on that said Hello. My name is and whatever the baby's name is and my wife was like, blown away by this and she was like, She won't let us pay for shipping. She has spent all his money in shipping. She's giving him pretty free. I can't believe it. And I said, First of all I said is still like it. Extremely nice offer to do that. I'm not taking anything away. I said There's a couple things you need to understand, E said. It was the foremost. I said Those shipping costs now become a loss. She can write that off as a loss and your taxes. Your taxes are low. I was like, So even though that's nice of her to cover the shipping, I think not to mention people who do a lot of shipping also have a deal with ups. Where they're shipping is lost. I learned that from Corporate, E said. The second thing is, is that every single one of you? What did you dio You posted a picture on it. You posted the announcement photo on Instagram with that thing, and now she's going to get sales through that. I was like So it was an incredibly nice offer, But it was also a marketing tactic. I was like, and once you understand that, you know, then you understand what you understand that everybody has not everybody, but there's always that are ulterior motive because she was like, I can't believe she gave it away for free. I was like, It's not free. I was like because She's getting a lot of free marketing from Yeah, and it's hard Thio. It's not hard. You can appreciate what people are trying to do. But you do have to have your defenses up to be aware of what's really going on. And you can't blame people because their businesses and people out there making money as well. So it Z and and on that same vein, what is a character trait that you hold in highest regard in your industry and maybe even for people in general, in work, I think being transparent and being authentic, um, to me, I think being transparent is all about you know, if I can help you, I'll help you. But if I can help you, I'm gonna tell you that I think there's too many people who sell services and don't care if they can actually help the person. Um, you know, they'll anybody? They talked Thio like I remember I was trying. Somebody's trying to sell me a service and I was like this too expensive, and he was like, Well, let me go talk to my boss and see what I could Dio. I'm like you're not talking to your boss or following a script. I was like, You're not authentic at all. I was. And then he came back. Those my boss is really impressed with your business. I was like, He does no idea who I I was like, This is what you do. I was like When somebody says no, you call him back two days later. So I was like, You're not offense that's not being transferred. And the I talked to somebody who's trying to sell me his service, and then he was like, Listen, he goes, if you're doing this, you won't have time to do what I what I want you to dio and I was like, Well, I appreciate that because now I mean, you're not gonna make the sale, but at least you didn't sell something to somebody who, you know, wasn't a good fit. Um, and I think also being authentic because my problem nowadays is that I feel like a lot of...

...people are playing a role. They're they're playing some sort of character. Like I always say that my problem with cable news is I don't know who's who like I don't know who is actually a real person because I think all of these people on cable news just play a role that's going to get them Thio, you know, get them viewers like Tucker Carlson is a great great example of this. I was like, I don't get mad at the guy because I have no idea what Tucker Carlson actually believes. I just know that he has found a character to play that is going to bring in a lot of things, and the same thing goes through the guys on CNN, you know, the guys on on MSNBC. They don't know what they believe, but I do know that they know that if I hit thes points that I'm going to make a lot of money and they're basically actors, you know. It's like if if Denzel Washington plays the villain and kill somebody, we don't all get up in arms and say, I got Denzel Washington's a murderer. No, you played a murderer like Tucker. Carlson's an idiot. No, he just plays an idiot. They mean that's all it is. They put on their costumes before, before the cameras roll. Exactly. So I think it's about being, you know, authentic and a lot of times I can see people who are not, you know, authentic who were trying to play a role or put something out there. Um, there really just isn't isn't true. And I think you have to be your authentic self, especially if you're gonna help people. But, you know, there's only one you. I mean, I always tell people I have no desire to be anybody else to be like anybody else to emulate anybody else. I'm trying to be the first Me I'm not trying to be the next this person in the next to that person. Um, you know, somebody told me once they're like, Well, you just need to figure out what somebody else is doing and just copy that. I was like, Well, no, because then you're then, you know, then your second, your poor man's them your cheap them. You know, I'm I'm me. You know, I have a friend who says to me a lot of times Well, you know, most people do this, And I was like, Dude, I'm not most people. I was like, That's why I do what I do. And you do what you dio because I'm not most people I don't care like if you tell me like, Oh, nobody does it that way. Okay, cool. That means that I could probably make money because nobody else is doing that. Speaking of you, Kyle, do you have an overarching goal for your coaching business or your your strategy brand building business. So my goal, I think ah, personal goal of mine is to build this business to a point where we are running. I don't want to say autopilot, cause I'll always be involved. Forget it to a point where we're creating these assets, whether they be mostly good courses or documents, templates that entrepreneurs come by and they can fully understand what they need to dio. And they could be sold kind of in the background could sell them through the different ways we sell things through Facebook. As to organic outreach. Onda, allow me to really take a step back and maybe not do so much of the one on one work but more of the promoting my courses promoting Excuse me these other things, and then have the time to maybe write another book. Um, but also kind of get myself to a point where I can take a break and we're still making money. And the perfect example of this was, you know, last Friday on I think it was the eighth. My wife came home from the doctor and was like, We're going to the hospital because they wanna, you know, monitor me, and then we're gonna have a baby a few days. So all of last week, I was in the hospital with her, and I didn't get any work done. I mean, the business almost came to a halt because, ah, lot of what I do requires me to actually do work. So it's all about kind of building up a business where if that ever happened again, we'd still be we'd still be in good shape. Was in that your motto. The part of life you don't see coming Exactly. It's, you know, that's that's definitely part of it is I think, that...

I didn't really realize that is much successes I've had. There's still a ways to go cause I had to get myself to a point where it's more, you know, creating one thing that can reach 1000 people rather than just creating one thing for one person. Kyle, is there anything people may not understand about you so that if they're considering getting you as a coach and getting some advice from you that if they understood this, they would have a better appreciation and understanding of you and the work that you're accomplishing? I think one thing people have to understand when they work with me is my coaching program with you is incredibly specific to you. So when they go to my website or they see what I talk about, I don't know. I can't necessarily tell you what we're gonna work on because I don't know you yet. I don't have a set template for somebody to change careers, and the reason I don't have that is because everyone is different. I have to understand where you are. I have to understand where you wanna go. I have to understand who you are as a person, because the game plan for a 22 year old that still lives at home is totally different than the game plan. For the 45 year old were two kids the game plan for the guy who wants to Can you help me with my game plan. I'm not a ladder, and it's but it's it's, you know, and that's my whole thing is like sometimes people will say, like, you know, Well, what's your you know, whats your template? What are we gonna work on? Like it's a six week program. What we work on each week, I'm like, I won't know that until I get to know you. And I'm also not gonna know that until, you know, we get going because we don't know what what roadblocks are we gonna hit? Where we gonna go? You know, I have a client who is a police officer right now, and he wanted originally wanted to completely law enforcement. And his problem was he was making a lot of money. And a lot of these other avenues really aren't gonna give him a lot of money. So he actually left being one type of police officer, and now he's still in law enforcement, but doing something a little different. And we reached that when we realized that one would have to stay in law enforcement to continue the salary he wanted. But two, we discovered that the problem was not I don't wanna be a cop anymore. It was I don't wanna be a cop for this entity anymore. So and I never would have discovered that if we didn't go through the process that we go through. So we have a very thorough process, and it's it's specific to the people. As you say that I'm thinking sometimes I'm at the airport and I'm thinking, isn't it funny how people are? So it is? I guess it's not negative, but people are so discontent because this person is going wants to go to the same place I just left, you know, and the same thing with jobs thinking of. Well, what do you mean? A police officer doesn't want to be a police officer. You know how many people want to be a police officers? So all these people are going from job to job, like, Hey, I'm leaving that job. Hey, I'm going to that job just like at an airport. Is there thinking of in your own life? Uh, is there any adversity that you have faced that either positively or negatively affect your work? But also as a point of encouragement for others who are facing adversity? I mean, I think one of the things that I'm always trying to get over is you know, I didn't come from from money. Um, and the fact that I kind of was so lost in the beginning of my career that I didn't make a much money as I probably could have. Can I stop you right there, Kyle? Because I think it's It's a good point Thio to ponder in that I think there's a I didn't come from money either. But I know there's this this group a club, it's kind of like a competition like how poor were you Really? Right. You're you weren't as poor as me. And but to say I haven't I didn't come from money and it was a struggle and I was lost. So if we can...

...agree, that's a big segment of the population. So right there What you're saying is applicable to most people is not well. Come on, Kyle. You had no money. Do you know how poor I waas? I hate you know that same box that can every day, you know? So just saying that what you're saying is applicable to most people. No, you're absolutely right, because it's like you said it's not when we say not money. We don't necessarily mean being pour, not poor. But there's that threshold that most people don't hit because there are people who you know are in their twenties and their parents can give them $200,000 to start a business because they've made all of this money and makes life a lot easier because you could buy any service you want. You could hire anybody you want. Um, but for me, I never had that. So I had to learn a lot of things on my own. Um, I had to, you know, pick and choose. And any time I wanna there's a number of things I would love to dio for my business. But I can't do it right now because you know, every dollar is associated with something or goes towards something. So I think it's about staying true to your vision and doing what you can with what you've got improving while you go. Um, he has a lot of things I want to do. Right now. I'm focused on one or two things because that will generate income. Part of that income will go towards the next thing. And then part of that income will go towards the next thing, and things will never move as fast as I want. Um, but that's just something you have to accept on diapers. Ain't cheap. That's also true. Kyle, how can people reach you? How What is your point of contact? So I would say you go straight to my website, which is to the next step, or G, and you could fill out a form and you can get me there. Or very simply, you can follow me on Instagram, which is at Kyle G speaks. So that's Kyle G speaks. Andi, you could always message me on Instagram. Um, you know, starting to post more content on there. So it's a great way to kind of get in touch with me. But either way, and then I offer everybody a free coaching session to start. Uh, and that's where we talk about your goals and whether or not I can help you. And you're just trying to wheel them in, though, you know, you know, and but that's how it is, right? You know, you you know, we talk and I've I've had some people that at the end of it, I said, Listen, I can't help you. You know, you're not my ideal client. I've kind of pointed them in the right direction. But you know, most people, if you're committed to it, you know, we can help you find that clarity that you seek. Um, it's just about being committed. Do it. One final question, Kyle. And that is why do you work? I work to help people. My work to help people be happier toe lead, better lives to follow their visions in their dreams. Andi, that's kind of the legacy that I'm working on, you know, 30 years from now, people may not. No 1 may ever remember to the next step, but people will remember all the businesses that I helped create. And I don't really care if people remember Kyle Group own. I want people to, you know, be impacted by the work that I did. Kyle Capone, Clarity. Coach, branding strategist, author of To the Next Step. I appreciate your time that you've given me and I appreciate the work that you dio No, thank you having me on this great time. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we Work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they to be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive be a joyful day in your work.

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