WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 34 · 2 years ago

#34 Krista Best Research Scientist

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Krista Best is Research Scientist at Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation and Social Participation and she talks about her nonlinear path in her career, along with her passion to help others.   

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Welcome to why we work, with your host, Brian V as. He speaks to people like you from all over the world, as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hops, warnings and advice which would be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going and keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here is your host to why we work, Brian V. I'm Brian Vy at why we work. Today have the great pleasures beating with Christo Best. Christo best is a research scientist. She is working at the Center for Interdisciplinary Research and rehabilitation and social participation. She and I go way back, almost three decades, but she is someone that I wanted to speak with because she was in an inner circle with really cool people, but she always took it upon herself to study well and do well, and that I find amazing. So, for my listeners, when you think school is tough, you think you can't do it, you can't be something different than other people around you, have a listen to this young lady and see how she did it and find out some of her passions. Listen to Krista best. I'm Brian Vy, and this is why we work, and today I have the great pleasure speaking to you today with Krista best. Good evening, young lady. Hello, they're young man. I truly appreciate you doing this. I reached out to you a few weeks ago now and mentioned you are doing some amazing things from what I see on the outside and things knowing from US growing up together. We were just saying almost thirty years ago, no, twenty four, we said twenty four seeing one another, but growing up and all of that together. You're like this is decades ago and then coming back decades later and seeing where our paths kind of diverged, and then it's interesting to find out what you're doing. Can you give a little introduction or just tell us a little bit what you're doing now? Sure, so I am assistant professor at university level and I work in the rehabilitation department, which is in the faculty in medicine, but I'm not actually at the university that might have a very small teaching role. Most of my job is being a researcher at the Center for interdiscilinary research and rehabilitation and social integration. There's a French name for that too, but I'm not going to try to do it because I'll butcher it today. So Ninety five percent of my job as a researcher in disability, mainly mobility and adapted physical activity. I did a little introduction just before we went live, or before you and I were speaking, and I try to say your title and I had to do a few retakes. It's a mouthful, whether it's in French or English. Did you do it in French? No, okay, maybe I'll go back and try. But Kristo, thinking of where you are now as an associate professor, when did it all begin? When, so way back when? What was your first job? What was the very first thing that you did? You know, maybe in middle school or maybe even elementary. I very first job was a cashier at...

...soby's in Bedford, Bedford Nova, Scotia. How old were you? Sixteen. I needed a job so I could afford gas, to put gas in the car that my grandfather gave me. What brought you to bid first? We're from sackful, I know, I know, but that's where the job was, so I went. You'll see this as a consistent theme of my life. I follow the work and that's a good theme to now how long did you keep that job? From sixteen until Jeez, second, second year university. So that be one thousand nine hundred and ninety, the eight I would have started and so sixteen, maybe three four years for five years. So besides the money aspect, what got you out the door to get the job, to get that different job? Know in so Bey's when you were sixteen? Well, I wanted to start working. He build a reputation. You start to seek what you want to do and who you want to be, and mostly it was to get gas for the car. So that was besides like the idea of wanting to work. You and I have many similar friends, friends from Middle School, and not all of us wanted to work at sixteen. That's true. That's true. So we're in fact, my grandfather asked me not to work. He told me he could give me the allowance so I didn't have to work. He thought I was too young. It's interesting. I've done a number of these interviews and I'll say half of them. Some people don't work until they're twenty something, but more North American idealism is working when you're younger. So it's good on your grandfather to offer you the money. But where did that motivation come to? Not just the money, not just for the gas, but and not even, I guess, the idea of wanting to get out there and getting experience. Where did that push come from, especially if your grandfather's not giving it to you? That's true. Probably a lot my parents, I would say. My mom was a stay at home mom. Tell my brother and I were both in school, and then she wanted to go back from work and I could see her associate with her sense of purpose. and not that our work necessarily defines us, but I think it becomes a large part of who we are. So I think I also wanted to have that sense of autonomy and independence and sense of purpose that I was doing something and not and it's sixteen. Of course your parents provide for you, but you want to have a sense you can look after yourself. To Christ what I admire about you. One of the things I admire about you is how we did have some of the same friends and we did hang out in some of the same places, but you always kept, from my perspective looking at you, a level head about you. You were level headed in that you were able to hang out with friends, but you're always very you always did very well in school and obviously by your career that you chose or it chose you, or however where the work was, you were able to keep that level Keel, where many people that we know and that we hear about our unable. What was that driving force? Like? You did very well in from my understanding of elementary school, Middle School, high school, but you also had a social life. How did you? How did you do that? Because the listeners I have just, you know, younger high school students trying to find that balance and then wondering what the careers they can have. Some people in the career saying, well, I didn't do I mean you mentioned you're studying French, you know, at our age. So I think there's you know, it's not too late to get into a group. But how did you get in that groove so early? The start? School is always important. My grades were always important. It was an intrinsic motivation, probably something hard to explain if you don't have it, but when you have it it's if you're motivated to do...

...anything, intrinsically do it because it was fun. I enjoyed learning. I also found it easy. If I went and paid attention, I could finish most of my work in school. And, as you said, I had a social life and that was also a really important aspect of my life. And I was never the first to leave a party, that's for sure, and most often among the last. So it was just finding a balance, and I think that's something that a lot of people struggle with today, is the balance between working or school or whatever it is for your responsibilities, but then also having the social aspect of life. That's important. So I think the the school part was intrinsic in the social part, as probably my extrovertive ways. It's interesting you mentioned about, and I figured this out, I think, maybe a little later or too late in life, of just going to class, just doing what's required of you. That is seventy, maybe even eighty percent of the battle. And I can tell you I did not do homework in high school. I rarely, maybe maybe five percent of all the days we were in school I had had to do work outside of class. If you go to class, you listen, you pay attention, ask for help when you need it, you can leave and have your social life. That starts at three PM and as late as your parents let you stay it. And that's really important because I think some students, like myself, would feel discouraged well not getting it well, probably because I wasn't paying attention. And I remember when we were in high school they started the rule or where if you didn't Miss Class, then you didn't have to write your exam. I was like, okay, yeah, I forgot about that, and that was like the greatest thing since slice bread for me, as I okay, no more missing classes at that because I don't have to write exams. But the exams weren't the major problem. The problem was I wasn't paying attention or going to class. And by just going you that's half of the battle, or even more so so exact and it changes in university. Of course, then the you. Then you need to have motivation to get the greats. But when you pay for your education, it's a lot different than one's purvided. It's funny because that's where I realized actually just go to class and do was in university. So it was one step behind of what and I didn't realize, Oh yeah, I'm paying for this too. When did you? I'm living in Asia, where we have parents that kind of dictate where their kids will go, from the younger grades and then hopefully into university and even to their career. When did you start thinking about your career? Let's say, probably junior high. I remember talking to a grade nine teacher, Mrs Pattison, and interview. Remember. Yeah, Mr Master, they can't reach it, I can't reach it, but I have a stick. Who Them? I have a stick. Well, I've I'm miles and miles away for you, so I'm safe. You Fall Asleep on the table? No, but it's such a useful thing. No, no, he never. I don't think he hit anyone. Do you know? But he would hit the desk. It's so hard that everyone would wake up because he would slap the desk so hard that it makes or is or is cowboy boots or as cowboy boots and spear. Yeah, but his wife taught science, Mrs Pattison, and I remember tatting with her about science and I found signs interesting and I was curious and that's probably why I'm a researcher today, because I always had questions and at that point I thought something medical, maybe med school, maybe Physio, and so I always had that in my mind as I went through high school. So with MED school versus physio. was there a reason for choosing physio getting into that? was there an experience or just just seemed interesting at the time? And in the end I went kinnesesiology. I decided to go to Kinnesi elder it was a new program and I was interested about it, interested in justial activity. But the reason why I didn't use med school is because, based on my looking into what you needed to do,...

I realized you couldn't have a social life and that was still a really important part for me. So I felt I could do a health professional degree and still have a social life, but med school seemed like it was too much, that I wouldn't be able to maintain that, that social life that I know I love and need. So from kinesiology into rehabilitation and being a research researcher. How did that come about? I went through under rag if started off a bachelor science, still with the thinking about Physio, and learned a bit more about kinesesiology. And when the sackful supports stadium became a popular hangout place and I started going there and hanging out, I got more and more interested in exercise and physical activity, and so that's what made me choose Kinni San with a bachelor science and kinesiology. There there are, of course, some options, but not the same options that that I wanted. So the next a lot of it was chance and circumsier stance and meeting the right professors who suggested different options for me. And I was interested in helping people either preventatively avoid sickness or to get better afterwards. When I was so that's when I left my first job, it's sobs, and when I started in Kinnesseyology my second year university because I wanted to work in the gym and I worked with a man who had a spinal cord injury and that the time I had no idea what I was doing, but I learned. I learned a lot. I found the information I needed and consulted with some physios and other professionals and Rehab to be able to person be a personal trainer for him. And that's what struck the nerve for me, and Rehab that my mom had a friend who had a MS multiple score Ross when I was a kid and you still love playing with it. Inner Wheelchair when I was a kid, so it was kind of mixture of those things. So then that experience directed you towards your your graduate work exactly. So then I decided, well, I'm going to do a masters and then figured it out because there's not wasn't a lot of clinical practice options for Kinnesiology. It's not a professionally certified degree. So it's not like becoming a Notti or pt where you get a certifiable profession at the end. It's it was a lot of carving your own way as a kinesiologist twenty years ago or twenty five years ago. But as I got into research I learned that I liked it more and more. And of course the academic path is not an easy one nor a short one. So after the masters it was PhD, but I had a gap in between the two of seven years when I taught it down. One of my goals was to be a teacher, not a teacher but a professor, and teaching kinesiology and teach and rehabilitation, and there was a couple of opportunities that presented themselves. I had one professor who retired who taught the adapted physical activity course that I really was interested in and would wanted to teach and another professor, Stephen Chung, who is at Waterloo right now. I believe he unfortunately experienced a bad accident and was unable to teach his introduction to kinesiology course as I was finishing my master so it opened up a door to apply to be a sessional instructor, which I did not do for the money. I think they paid something like four thousand dollars per course that you taught. At that time wasn't for the salary. And then I gotting engaged in the university and ended up getting a teaching contract, a sessional lecturer contract for one year and then a two year contract, and then I did another year kind of filling in as a sessional and then I decided, note it's time time for a PhD. And how long did that take you to do your PhD? That's a whole the PhD. First I had to decide where I was going to go and I one day, not one day to me, a few more days, but...

...wrote a grant to the shirk. It's the Social Sciences Humanity Research Council in Canada, one of the Tri Council agencies. So I just had some ideas and I put them on paper and submitted it and ended up getting funding. I got four years of funding. I believe it was eightyzero dollars for four years to go to a PhD. I consulted with her name is is Claudia m she is a researcher and adapted Physical Activity University of Calgary. We talked about different project ideas. She accepted that I would apply. I was in the process of doing that and ran into an an old friend who was a Physio, sorry, occupational therapist at the Novascritia Rehab Center when I was doing my masters there. She said no, no, don't go to Calgary. COME TO BE SE UBC. You'll work with the supervisor that I have, Bill Miller, and you will work and he has lots of work in wheelchair research. And that was my masters. Was a wheelchair skills training program. Has a great team and it's Vancouver and the mountains are here, you can ski, there's Ocean. Forget about Calgary. So of course I chatted with him and I said I'm going to go to Calgary. I might as will go to UBC. So the PhD took four or five years. Four years, two thousand and nine to two thousand and fourteen, five years. So sorry for myself included. The may not understand for you to get grant money of Eightyzero. Does that cover even your personal expenses and everything that you need for those years living in the province of British Columbia and Vancouver specifically? Absolutely not. You're looking at rent of I don't know what it costs it. When I first moved I think it was one hundred a month for rent. So how do you? How do you manage that? What are you able to do on the side or how else? You apply for more burseries? More than how it works. That's how works. You also accrew a bit of student loans that you hope that you're going to get a good job to pay off later. Luckily for me to pand out that way that I got the good job later, but jobs aren't easy to get in academia and they're getting harder and harder. So I was really fortunate along at the job I have now. How long did you stay in BC? I stayed there until two thousand and fourteen, okay, then, and then I started a post doc. So post doc is such a weird phase in your life because you're not a student and you're not an employee, so you're kind of like this freelance researcher, which is fun because you have a lot of freedom and flexibility of where to go. And I was invited to do one year at University Laval, which is really funny because I don't speak French, but I had a colleague here, fronts wateruthier, who's still a mentor and a really close colleague today, and I worked with him since we worked on the same team. When I did my master's, he was doing his postalk. MMM, we didn't talk to each other for some years and then when I did my PhD, I invited him to be on my supervisory committee. So after the PhD, he invited me to apply for a POSTALC at Cyrus, serious as the abbreviation for the long name. I told you. So I applied, I got it, and if I tell you the salary of the first year of a post DOC, probably I'll turn everybody away from it. Ever, ever, come thirtyzero dollars was was the ER salary. After all of this, after PhD, you're talking for what's this? Fourteen, almost twenty years after High School of Education. The good thing is I was moving to Quebec City, where rent is much, much cheaper than that Vancouver. And the other good thing is with a good cv you can apply for more grants, and I did end up getting more grants. But it's a risk you take. You you don't do research for the money. As I said, along this path you've had before getting your present position, did you feel any time...

...of discouragement, uncertainty? How did you? How did you wait through that? How many times? You want to know how many times that? I could have lost count of as specifically remember twice during my PhD, googling should I quit my Pah. So that's how I waited through it. I consulted good old Google and actually I got a lot of support for quitting. You if I thought yeah, yeah, but no, quitting is never the answer. Just makes you feel good to know that you'd be supported either way. But now it's taking a step back and finding something that you love to do and chat with your friends about your colleagues. And one thing that helped me get through almost all the child challenging situations is these crazy to do list that you know you wake up in the morning and you feel like you have so much to do. It's unsurmountable. There's no way you'll ever complete it. And you write yourself at to do list and you say, okay, if I can just check a few things off, and then you do something random on the side, or maybe three things, but you add them to your to do list. Carried to here. Look at this. This is every day these notebooks. It just wrong way. Oh, you keep it in one book. That's a good idea. I usually just keep mine and I like to throw it away when it's done, say, but then I lose them. That's the problem. And important notes so in I know. So just getting that, that kind of affirmation that what you're doing is working and that you are doing a good job and that you can do it. And so when you're that's how you wait. Present position. What is it you do, or how did that come about? And what is it you do each day? Or what does your typical week look like in your work? I don't have a typical week or a typical day. It changes all the time. So research it's so it's a bunch of different things. And what's interesting about my job as a researcher now, being a new investigator, so you're considered a new investigator for five years, is that you do very little of what you've been training to do for the last ten years. So I'm not interviewing or collecting data with participants anymore, I'm not developing these cool new interventions anymore. At least I'm not doing that leg work. Now I'm helping students manage and come up with their project ideas and writing grants and finding money to support the research we want to do. And Right now I have for PhD students to Master Students and a post doc fellow and then co supervising some others with other colleagues. But what we do is help them to find success and what they want to do and help them achieve their research goals and their academic or clinical or life goals, whatever they may be. So, day the day and Covid nineteen times, it's meetings. It's way too many meetings. It's starting at shundred and thirty eight o'clock and helping students organize or meeting with research teams to either manage ongoing projects or create new project ideas that are worthy of getting more dollars from different funding organizations. Krista, what would be the reasoning for them to have you do that, opposed to what you were doing in the last ten years, to go back in to help these students? There must be a reason for it. So what would that be? It's not that they have you do it. It's when you're a student yourself, you have a research project and your project is to come up with the research question and find a way to answer that question. You know the whole scientific method and it's the same as what we learned in high school. It's all still the same, the same method, and help them get to answer their question through scientific writing. So, as a researcher, our goal is...

...to build a program of research. So I said a my program of research is and mobility and adapted physical activity. So now it's not just one project. Now we want to build a whole program so we have many projects that are related in different areas. And for me, my my goal is to improve mobility and accessibility, inclusion social participation for people, and so by having multiple students on various projects, I reach that goal, which are is my research goal. But then I also helped to train the next generation of academics or clinicians or with the different students we have come through. I guess I was wondering, does that help you in your understand and to build a solid foundation of looking at the perspective of what you were living for the last ten years as the student in the learner and then giving you the perspective of how they see as you move forward in your career? Yes, but they don't. I mean, we engage them a little bit in writing grants and helping to put together protocols, and of course they do parts of it as their own research work. But it's really interesting when you get an academic position because you all of a sudden have these new roles that you've never really been trained to do, like managing budgets and managing human resources and getting contracts organized with the research center and getting students enrolled in graduate program so it's a bit of a different role, but still to achieve the the same end, even though your role or your week is never really the same. Excuse me, what is most difficult about what you do now? Actually, one thing I didn't say was about the conferencing. That's that is a big role of a researcher disseminating your work. So it's attending conferences and writing manuscripts and and presenting, of course, in Covid nineteen times. The all of that's kind of been slowed down or even conferences have been put on hold. So what is most demanding? I don't know that. I find it demanding. I don't know that. I mean it's challenging. Well, yeah, the challenging some people say with scheduling and those sorts of things. Like it doesn't. It's not maybe taxing on you mentally, but just there's something you know in your position of so much education and then you find just this one thing is kind of maybe annoying or disheartening. I'll say that in a research center I have support that probably a lot of people don't have, like somebody who helps manage the human resources. I have people on a find three people who work in managing our financial helping mass manage our budgets. So and all the things that I said I have to do that our new roles. I have a lot of support to do them. So while they are challenging for me, I have lots to support there. So I'd say, you know, those new roles are definitely challenging. We mentioned French having to have these meetings in French eighty percent of the time. That's definitely a challenge. Sometimes, I think maybe that's it. That's probably the biggest challenge. Is sometimes not a hundred percent understanding the conversation. So it's getting better and better every day. But one of the things I look like about research, which is being able to contribute conceptually the ideas and projects grow and achieve their goals. When you do it in a different language, that's a it's difficult. It's definitely a different story. I can attest to that. I live in South Korea, where eighty percent of my life is misunderstood. Even yesterday, I think my dear wife...

...was speaking to her sister and I got part of the conversation. I said, Oh, so you guys going to do this and no, we're not even talking about you. So like it just completely over my head and it's it can be FA straight. Have you learned? I be you. I have enough to know when I'm being good. Maybe sometimes talk to or not a little bit. Well, that's get I think I'm more stubborn. It's not a requirement. So you have that other motivation for it's for your job. It would help me. I think I'm still trying to learn English. It's yeah, that's definitely a challenge. That h yeah, I knew it when I came. I accepted it. And being in a new role, in a new position and as a new investigator, part of the the stress on you is needing to succeed, because just because you get a new investigator position doesn't mean you're going to keep it. You need to secure your program of research and secure funding and secure tenure in the university, which is next step. So what is what is this something that brings you most satisfaction in what you're doing, even over the years before getting this position? What is bringing because I know you have a love for animals, you're in rehabilitation like those things. You're helping, like you're helping animals, you're helping people, and I can see there's lots of times where you can just have those. This is so if you do get discouraged, you look at some of the cases you're dealing with and you like that would give you a renews sense of hope in what you're doing. But what brings you satisfaction? What you do for me, I'm actually my colleague asked me this last year. We were in Bologna and Italy at a conference and we were talking about why, why we do this job and of course we were laughing a little bit because we were in Italy at the time and just came from a Nice Museum and had this amazing dinner. And of course that's a perk of what we do. But the side that people don't see, as you know, the number of hours that we do put in, the number of grant to apply for and and don't get. I definitely don't do it for the money. Of our research gets funded, and that's great. We have we have now the money we need to see the projects go through. But the reason I do it is at the end of a project or or the day, I'll say the day just for a overall captioned state, it's when people come to you and they say, you know, you've made a difference in my life. I have a couple of examples. I did for my PhD PEER LED Wheelchair Skills Training Program and one of the things in research, especially clinical research, is getting evidence that's robust and will be held highly in the scientific community. So a lot of times they push for a randomized control trials which are controlled trials, having two groups to make sure that what you're saying and intervene your testing whether it's effective or not, and that has a lot of weight. You're most like to get funded for those projects, but for me that's never been the importance. So what the numbers say? For me it's having that more qualitative aspect or subjective aspect of people's experiences. And so this particular project my PhDs talking about the peer led whelchur skills training program. Women came to me and she had taken the program and I did the interview with her six months or so after she finished the intervention and she said, you know, thank you so much. You gave me my life back, and for me it was just a really heartwarming feeling because I didn't care about the random as control trial of a hundred people. I cared about that one person who could then go on and she went from not being able to leave her apartment alone, that her husband was doing everything for her, to being able to go and get groceries on her own and and prepare meal for the both of them to traveling. She traveled from Canada to Europe afterwards and was teaching other people had...

...to do skills in their wheelchair. So so it's partially that I work with another peer now here in Quebec and he's involved in many projects and he always thanks me for for having confidence in him, because I ask him to get involved in a lot of our projects. But for me it's so involving the people who this work is for into the projects and then seeing that it often, sometimes most of the time, makes it a difference. So I'd say that's why I do it, and you could probably see that, even when you read other journals and stuff, how the impact is with other researchers in their work as well. So that's an encouraging way. It's like listening to teachers right who impact other students. And it may not always happen to you, but if you're looking for encouragement, you can look out in the scientific community and find all of that quite often exactly. And then there's a competitive side of me too that you know, for when you have a successful program of research that's that's funded. You didn't, it's not a sign that you're really good grant writer, it's a sign that you well, maybe that is the sign. For me, that's not necessarily it. It's that I've written so many and I revised them so many times. So for the few that I have, I've probably written fifteen, and it's that sense to competition and wanting to get it and striving to do more, and that probably speaks back to when I was in school. I always wanted the best grade. Christope, right now in your position, what would you like, because not everyone understands what you're talking about. Maybe some people are doing care and they just if they have a relative who's in a wheelchair, they just want them better. They're not really caring about the scientific portion of it or the research that goes into it or the grants. What would you like someone to understand about your role that they may not get that perspective elsewhere, just so they understand, maybe the grind of it, but just something they may not understand that you would like someone to understand about what you do. I think a lot of times people have an idea who professors are, who researchers are, and I know I hear it a lot and I used to hear it from my family. You're not like them or you don't seem like them, and them being the scientists and the the professors in the academic world. We're all just humans. We make mistakes. We make mistakes every day. Sometimes we don't do things the exact right way. I still get up and, you know, some mornings ask myself my doing it right. Should I be doing something different? And so it's just reflecting on what you've done and what you know and the resources you have, the support you have to keep going forward and I think that's the way through, if you ask me waiting through earlier. I think that's the way to wade through and and ask academics, who probably a lot of the population, from what from what I he hear from friends and colleagues sometimes think, are in this this different world, or not we're all in the same world. That shows great humility and it's a good understanding, good perspective from you to share to say we're just and because we need to be reminded. There's many things that we need. I mean we have to do lists, we know things we have to do, but it's good to be reminded that there are people out there that think that we're just the same. Opposed to what you might see in the news or on TV, this scientific research community that lives in a bubble far and beyond and untouchable. Exactly. Yeah, do you have any advice? So the listeners here, I'm talking not only in research, obviously with my limited ability and understanding, but people that you know, the high the elementary school, Middle School, high school student, the Christo looking into getting into could be science, someone that's working that's going through these times and they're looking for a new career. Is there any advice that you have for them that may help them and encourage...

...them in their work? One a piece of advice that I often give my students is to never stop asking questions, including why not you? A lot of people will say, well, I don't have this or I don't have that, or did do I? Why could be me? But the truth is no, no matter what their goals are, it can always be and I think by never stopping ask questions, which I guess is really true to my job, my role, you can always find more answers. The more answers to have, the more information you have, the more informed you are to make decisions about what is best for you. And if you go down one track and you think it's what you want to do and then you realize actually know this isn't what I want to do. Don't be afraid to just keep asking more questions and and go a different route. It's this is a bit Cliche, but life certainly not a straight trajectory. It's all over the place and you know it. In between all of this I've traveled a lot. I've chased different dreams to different continents. I've lived in during a PhD and postal lived in three countries. I was in Norway for a while, in Italy for a while and in Canada, three Canadian cities. So although you see this, a lot of people perceive this linear trajectory. For for US scientific folk, that's not the way it is. And so don't let any preconceived mold fit. Let you decide or decide for you what you want to be. Just dream big and and ask questions. That's a great point as well. It seems like just if you didn't say that, it would seem like you had that linear path. Okay, I'm going to go here and here and here and here, but you pursued other things and that's where I think some people get discouraged because they think it has to be linear, and from most people that I've met whether it's their personal lives or your professional it's never linear. It's never going point need to be and then they're all done. There's this wandering path that takes us through life and that comes from taking opportunities. Even though those opportunities and when I had an opportunity to move to Norway that was not in line with what a soon to be graduating PhD should do, thinking about a post doc and Quebec and I did it from a distance. Mostly it was personal reasons. I wanted to move there and and I just did it and found a way to make it work. So take opportunities. Chris Day, is there anything? Is there? Well, first, how can people reach you? I think you have something on Linkedin as well if people want to talk to you about you know, a young Christa wanting to get into rehabilitation and research. Is there a way that people can reach out to you? I am horrible on Linkedin. I think it probably still says I'm a post DOC. I don't know the last time I've opened it. You can reach out to me through there. I probably will check it eventually, but it won't get the quickest reply. If you type my name at university leave Al my email comes out. That's probably the safest bet. I have a little bit of a social media presence, not huge, as you said. It showcases my love for dogs and a little bit of disability advocacy. Those emails always the best way somebody wants to chat with me. I'm more of a personable person, I'd say. Then then behind a linkedin profiles, I really I don't access them, I don't use them. KRISTA, how do you rest? So you mentioned some of the divergence through your your academic career. What do you do to rest? Rest asn't sleep and it will just sleep is good, but anything. What do you do to take a break from your work? Instead of saying rest, I'll...

...call it reenergizing. Yeah, I stay active. Running is one of the things that that re energizes me, which is really contradictory to what you said rest. I've travel. I travel a lot in a year. I maybe visit five or six different countries, mostly, mostly for workmen a couple of times a year for personal reasons. I also keep in touch with my family and friends. I talk to them regularly. For me, those are really energizing and important things. Very good. Is there anything else? I have a couple more questions, but is there anything else you'd like to add? The second to last question I have is how is work shaped your character? How is it help define who you are? How has work helped defined who I am? Or did I define, yeah, who I am a crew work? It's true. Hmm, I think it's a bit of both. I think I had this always altruist Dick. Looking back to the personal trainer job that I had in this man came in with a spinal cord injury, knowing I had no idea what I was doing it. I wanted to learn, to find a way to help him be better. He's a great story. Actually. He came in quite a bit overweight. Couldn't self transfer transfer independently from bed to wheelchair, for example, or into his his car. He was mostly in a power chair because he just felt using a manual chair was too difficult, despite he had full use of his upper limbs. Through training with him eight or nine months he lost about eighty pounds ballpark and then he could use his manual chair. He get up at a bed every day independently. So for me that's the other you know, hearing seeing that you're making a different so that that wasn't research. That something totally aside. So I guess the altruism in me, that intrinsic motivation to help, probably led me down the road that I that I that I've taken. How my work is shaped me now. I say Yes to too much. That's probably why I was always at the parties and still going to school, because a person of my word, when I can be, wouldn't say no. Couldn't say no exactly. Couldn't say no. That's the problem. It's still the problem. It's why when you say Resk, I chuckle a little bit because most nights, and this is all from when I was a kid to you know, five six hours sleep the night is is what I've always lived on. So it's okay. But I guess that's it is always getting excited about new opportunities and new ideas and having the saltruistic or intrinsic motivation to help people. That's probably shape Toho I am and my job. And then that's how who I am actually led me to have a job that I have. So I guess I shaped my own role as well. You fit into it well, I mean it. I talked to some of the other day and they had a mind to do what they do, but then they realize they lacked the heart, and I think then he began to find that balance to love the people that he's doing it for, and I think that you're exemplifying what you're doing, because it's without a love for doing what you're doing, then you're going to miss the point and people will get it. And I think that you do have a love for what you're doing and I do appreciate it. In one more question, Chris the best. Why do you work? Well, that's a save the hardest question for the last. Why do I work? o? There's the obvious reasons. We all need a vocation. But do you know what? That's an obvious but that's like saying when we're younger, you know we need to get a job or but many kids, many adults, don't get that right. They think a lot of things are free...

...and to pay for these things, someone else will do it for them. So I think it's important. Even though it's obvious to those that know it, it's not so obvious to those that do. Not True. Okay, so I guess that's what drives us a good start work. That's what drives us to start. If I'm going to do something, forty percent. I don't how many hours you work in a week. Forty hours a week ever minted percent. That is your time, which isn't what you do in research. As you know, being in the academic world yourself, it's always a lot more hours than then we think it will be. So you do it for for having a means to live, I guess just start. But for me, finding work that that you love to do, that doesn't always feel like work, is the key. So why I work in general is to to be able to be independent and and have now, I guess you're right. Not Everybody does. Know I'm backing out. They don't. They don't. You're right. You're right, and it's for me. I have to. I've always for me to fulfill something that's like this innate need for me or an intrinsic motivation for myself. I need to have that for myself, for a sense of purpose. That's maybe that's it. Maybe that's a good way to say it is a sense of purpose. It's good. I mean that's why I started this podcast, because I know there are people that don't know that, and not only do people not know it, they need to be reminded of it. You know why am I doing it? And we'll look around. You have family or you have desires and needs. Well, it's not free. So you have to get up their work and hopefully you find a passion or your passion and you're able to apply it in your work. Yeah, you're right. It's a sense of purpose and to afford all the things I love to do, the traveling, the seasons, passes at whistle when I was a student out there, and those are things you can't do with it a job, having having a car, all the luxury things that I guess I I take for granted right now because because I have them. But even having dogs, dogs pass money. I want to have dogs, I need to feed them. And and, as you mentioned, when you have people come up to you and say in the work that you're doing you're changing people's lives, that, as you know, that is a side benefit. You're doing the research and hoping to get to that point, but that is an what you've you've shaped yourself into being someone that is able to help, and I'm sure that is a driving force as well. I think you're right. It's actually nice to reflect on that bad question why I work. Perfect well, Chris, the best. I think you're doing a great job in your work and I hope you all the best in your research and with your post Grad students and helping them. I'm sure you would be a great asset to have in their corner, to be an encouragement and to remind them why they're doing what they're doing, and I hope you all the best in the future. Thanks fine. Thanks for reaching out and chatting with me, and it's great to see you and catch up after this many years. So good luck with with your why we work and I look forward to listening to your future podcast, although not myself, because I still don't like listening to myself talking. Recording. Oh, I'll send it. You can listen anyway, though, just for the sake. Thank you very much, Chris, the best, and all of your work. Thanks, Brian. Have a great day. Thank you. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian Ving. Be Sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they two can be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive be a joyful day in your work.

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