WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 68 · 1 year ago

#68 Jay Jermo - Founder of Hey Honey - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Jay Jermo is the founder and honey man of Hey Honey! He has a great product with lots of potential. With an increasing online presence and expanding product line, it will be interesting to see what Jay does with his company. Listen to how it all began.

Contact Info

Jay’s Profile
linkedin.com/in/jayjermo

Website
https://heyhoney.biz/
kdmailing.com (Company Website)

Twitter
jayjermo

Instagram
https://www.instagram.com/jayheyhoney/

About

"I'm Jay. I know honey.

My family has been raising clover and wildflower honey in Michigan for nearly a century. I used to work for a bank. When the Summer of 2012 rolled around, I decided to take a week off and take a tour of the state. During my drive, I stopped off at the family farm to see my cousin Ned and have a cup of tea. Ned gave me a tour of the honey shop and showed me something he had been experimenting with, flavored honey. We hatched a plan for me to sell some of it down in my part of the state and BAM! In three years, 3 flavors turned into 25!

Why would I stop there? Then I found out about specialty mono-floral honey – different floral types raised all over the world.

I bought some plane tickets, started globe trotting, honey hunting and importing the finest, rarest, most spectacular honey from around the world to be able to sell direct to you." (
https://heyhoney.biz/, 2020)

...welcome to why we work with your host, Brian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which will be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going on and keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now, here is your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian V, and this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure of speaking with Jay Ramon. He is the founder and CEO of Hey, Honey, which is a honey and bee product production and distribution company. I want to find out how he got into it. His journey so far in any words of encouragement that he can have for us, no matter what type of business or company that we work for. Join me in my conversation today with J. J. Mo. I'm Brian V and this is why we work today. I have the great pleasure of speaking with Jay Jermell. Good evening. Find, sir. How are you? I'm doing well. Thank you for coming on here. I You and I were just speaking a moment ago, talking about how we got connected and I think it was through in anyone else that has podcasts or whatever is e think it was podcast guests or something? Someone, a couple of different services, like help a reporter out is one. And then podcast guests is another one. A good resource, right? Really help love and useful. And rather than trying to scamper around trying to find people you can kind of filter through who who may be good for you and and you are of the most recent kind of batch of people that I received. You are the second person that I reached, and it wasn't out of preference because the other one just scheduled in faster or sooner or something. But I was interested because, as you said a moment ago, you the Honeyman and I find honey fascinating, right? I find bees fascinating and the work that they dio So can you give us a little brief introduction of yourself? And then we'll get into it? Sure. Well, just so you know, Brian, like, people who know may know that I give, like, very long winded answers for very simple questions. So I'll try and try and keep it entertaining for you. If you If you know me, my dear wife might say that I'm probably want to interrupt. Oh, that's fine. Um, my background is in finance and mass marketing, and I worked in Los Angeles and Chicago for a number of years. Chicago? A lot longer. I worked in, uh, direct print sales and print marketing. And I did that for about 12 years and got I have to say that working in Chicago under the both unionized and non unionized printing industry, I learned Mawr Farm or about business and about interacting with customers and pricing products and managing workflow and I ever, ever did in four years of college. Um, it was kind of selling. Direct ad agency was tough because you had a cold column directly. Well, Jay, we'll get into the specifics of what you did, but right now you are. You are the Honeyman. But just even a brief, brief overview of what it is your company is or what? Sure. Uh, I got started. Uh, probably around 10 years ago, my family was in, uh uh, commercial honey production on my step mother's side. But they sold very to kind of just smaller retail outlets like farmers Markets. But they only had one or two that they were working with. And I stopped in one day to get to just kind of visit everybody. And their cousin, who managed the A theory, said, You know, if you wanted to, you could probably take our stuff down to the Detroit area and do okay with it. At the time, he had just gotten married and they had created a couple of flavored honeys, and we're doing all right with it. Um, all right. And I guess long, long and short of it. They consigned me a lot. Probably $1000 worth of different honey...

...products. I took it down thio my neck of the woods, and it's all pretty immediately, Um and E. I guess I was just really surprised by how fast it happened. And, uh, I came back up to the farm and said, All right, you need to make me. We had, like, four flavors, and I said, They have to make me about 15 different flavor. There is not the time they were like, you know, no one's gonna want group your flavored honey or chocolate honey or coconut, honey. And yes, I You know, Brian, I couldn't even tell you how much thought I put into it at just e considered the food pairings for some of these different flavors. And they took off. They took off right away. I've been doing it for 10 years now, and we started out with four flavors, and I think we're up to, like, 70 70 players. So then thus became Hey, honey. Yeah, Jay, can you do me a favor and bring us back like, Okay, you're in finance. But what was your very first job as a kid? So I'm thinking, you know, selling flipping hockey cards or you know what? Europe in Michigan. So it's cold. So you get hockey up there or, you know, letting your and what was that? I'm betting you're Canadian. Mhm. A okay. Half Canadian so we could smell our own. What was your very first job to get you out of the house to make a dollar if you made one? Yeah. The very first job was at a local restaurant called Little Chef. Um, and then very quickly, I went over to my got picked up by McDonald's for a couple of months. You got traded, E. Yeah, but, I mean, they were They were just grunt jobs. They weren't selling. Yeah. E mean, think this is why we work in any work to me is good work. That's why, like, I'm fascinated by bees, while you may not be as fascinated other but you, you know, you're working because you work in it. So you don't you kind of Okay, I gotta go to work. But other people may not be fascinated, but I'm fascinated by all the whole spectrum of employment. So whether it's little chef or McDonald's, I think it's great. Especially for listeners who are wondering how you know a person like yourself who has your own company, how you started, how it all began. Well, you you had a little job, you know? How old were you at a little chef? I think I started. I got in early because I fibbed about my age. I think it was, like, 14. 15. Yeah. Yeah. You mean Donald begin, though I didn't I really didn't like work. It was I really associate it with kind of a drudgery already at 14. Oh, it just it wasn't the idea of having a job that you enjoyed or doing something that you like doing and getting paid for. It was so for a lien to make and it we would stay that way for many years. Eso Why did you goto little chef? What? You know, just, you know, parents kick you out of house and say, You know, you gotta fight. You gotta get some work. You're gonna gonna be driving soon. You're gonna have to pay for insurance and gas and, um, looking back then thinking, thinking of that and this is not a knock on your parents, but, I mean for myself, who's, um, apparent. And how do you think someone could have done it better for you to give you the idea off the importance of work, even though there's some drudgery And it may be, you know, because while you enjoy what you're doing now, where you are the boss, you didn't need those jobs along the way to get you to where you were One way or another. It gave you some experience. How do you think someone in your life could have done it or how we can do it better for, ah, younger generation to kind of paint that picture. It's funny you say this because I've been thinking about that a lot lately. Like if you've ever read the book. Rich Dad, Poor Dad. I think I vaguely once heard about it, but I did not. It's by a guy named Robert Kiyosaki, And he is, um, he's essentially raised by two different parents, his parents and his best friends, parents and his parents. Um, they focus on the importance of working for working sake so you can have an income and pay for things and have a home and his buddies Father teaches him. You know, if you're going to have an income, it's better to make things work for you on get paid of the results of assets that you own because you can multiply those...

...income streams on. And I don't think that and this isn't a knock on my folks, but like it would have been, it would have been so helpful toe have a different perspective on what money is and how it could work for you instead of the idea of working for it because I met a lot of people, especially just doing this. Just having this little shop of mine. I've met so many people who are independent farmers or independent food producers who got out there and hustle from a really, really early age just selling knickknacks on the street. And at the time when I was a kid, I would have thought that was kind of like, you know, a stone's throw away from begging. But now I Now I get it. It totally makes sense. That kid who I saw him in Grand Central Central, who was shining shoes, he was taking home more money. Then, you know, I did in my thirties in cash. Um, so I think Thio, answer your question. If I would have had, um if I would have had a different perspective and a different education on, um, the way money works and how it can work for you as opposed to trading your time for it. Yeah, I think I heard a podcast not long ago. Owners. What's the owner of Amazon Bentos? Those those And they were just talking about the amount of money he has. And just in a quit. It just kind of mentioned. Yeah, you know, it probably has this much money in the bank. And the guy replied, No, he probably has no money in the bank and because it's all being invested because his money is working for him and then we'll probably have some cash, but yeah, yeah, he might have some cash, but all the money he has is continually working for him. And I think that's what you're kind of You're driving at the importance of knowing that rather than okay, I'm gonna work. And at the end of you know, a teenager, whatever. I'm going to get a couple 100 bucks in my hand. And then now I go spend it and then next week I got in. I remember I remember very succinctly my very first paycheck and the because I put in, like, a month's worth of ours. We got eight months and like this was this was in the days of, like, $3 an hour was minimum wage. And I think after taxes and fighting and Social Security and everything, I think it was like 68 bucks. I remember just being like horrified. I'm like that was four weekends. It was four weekends of my life like that was not even $70. I mean, I was like, and this is kind of This is kind of where I kicked myself. I'm like I should have learned at that moment there's a better way to make money. But where did McDonald's take you, or how long? I was only there for a couple of months, but honestly, the third job was the one that, um, it's going to sound out. It was It was left the impression on me because it was I should have gleaned more from it than I did at the time. But I worked for a local grocery store called Cephas, and I work. They needed somebody in the back to clean up after the butchers. And it was It wasn't for you. It was probably 16 at that point. Did you? I mean, I could only imagine, did you deal with any sort of firm work? But prior to that, no. So you imagine having to clean up after a butcher? Well, here's the thing, like, I really it didn't bother me in the slightest. He was kind of messy, but like what I loved about it, and I didn't realize that at the time is that I was completely left alone. Bond, I I can work in a group. I don't like it, but I really Except when I could just be When I'm just If I have to work for somebody, if I'm given a set of tasks on guy could be left alone. Um, that that's where I really excel. You can I can listen to music. Um, e can plan out my day. I can I can just be in my head and not interrupted. And I tend to be more efficient that way. I'm wondering thinking of being in helping a butcher them clean up. In hindsight, I'm thinking that you would be able to realize, like, just in the say, the meat that comes how a butcher uses a ZMA each Aziz they can and not wasting much. Would that be? Would that be...

...accurate and just crossing out for a time? There wasn't like, I mean, I don't I don't want to paint the picture that there was like, you know, New York strips half a New York Strip hanging from the ceiling or anything. Um, it was really just, you know, you had to hose down a couple of rooms and, you know, there's a lot of ground ground beef, you know, you had to take care of it, but they're they're a pretty efficient bunch. Yeah, I was thinking efficiency. Like you at a young age of 16, thinking, learning about efficiency. Well, wow, you can get all of this stuff that you can sell Onda turn a profit for for this animal What little would be left over. And me, as I mentioned to you a little bit ago. I mean, South Korea and in some other countries, are sure to use most not leave anything Thio to go to the garbage. So this is bringing you into high school. And are you thinking about a career? Are you thinking about school? Um, I gotta I gotta say, I'm just, um Our conversation comes at a time when I've been doing a lot of introspective thinking about the trajectory of my career. Honestly, I studied finance simply because I had always been an airplane nut. When you say you studied finance, you mean you went into university studied, studied fine, but in in high school, you know, they were just They were just kind of, you know, the job of the grocery store was just in. It was a weekly job, but it was an odd job. And then, um, college was I really just kind of studied finance because I thought it's what my parents would have wanted. And I was told repeatedly that was really good at math. That's not really true. I just kind of forced myself to be good at it, so I didn't get Yeah, I didn't I didn't want to get reamed out at home for for having bad grades. So I just, uh I got really high grades, but I didn't I didn't love math or anything. I just if you force yourself to do anything you can, if not excel at it, you can be passable at it. So as you lack the interest in it during college, did you find it was just a grind all the way through for you? A long time? It took me probably 20 years toe figure out that I needed to do something on my own. Um, yeah, I'd say for most of my twenties and thirties. I was pretty dispassionate about about work I looked at like investment banks. I looked at working for the government. Um um for like, the State Department, like overseas, Which is how how hard is it? And I haven't idea of being in, you know, finance. So you're maybe a shirt and tie briefcase. You're kind of with all the other ones and while not liking it, not enjoying it, finding it a grind. How difficult is it Toe even contemplate stepping out of this entirely because it's almost not like an addiction, but it's you become so accustomed to it, it's almost like it's very hard to imagine doing something completely different of which you did. But e you know what? I honestly, I don't mean to interrupt your good. Um, I've heard these stories a lot, and they always they this this transition always happens more or less by accident. Um, I wasn't even I was in banking towards the end of my working for somebody else career. Most of it was business to business advertising sales, but it was the same student I type of environment. Um, I was actually just on vacation and stopped in tow talk to a cousin. And I guess in one conversation everything just kind of clicked together from the previous 20 years. Like and the idea of working for myself was always very daunting because I didn't know where to start. I didn't know what to sell. I didn't know who to sell to or how to engage the market. And in one conversation, this relative just kind of collapsed everything for me. He just said, You know, you go there's tons of farmers markets just goto farmers market like, is it Is it easy? So yeah, I just apply and they'll let you right in and a Z, long as you You have...

...something that you make, which we dio, um and then I really, really quickly saw cost of goods and what the market will bear. And then once you figure out that disparity or that that gap, it becomes really, really easy, like all right, if I just do the work to put these things together and then it becomes a kind of an automatic when you do X, Y and Z, and then you have this finished product and then present it to people and have a good conversation makes people laugh and money changes hands. So just for 20 years, up to that 20 years up to that, it had been getting preached to by sales managers them like dissecting the sales process and making it very technical. And that's what I always had a problem with it up until that moment when I was just let go to do my own thing. And I think that's like a light bulb moment for you. How much, though, did your experience or some of the things you learned in university? What have you was that able to transfer over into your Hey, honey, now into your business? Now that's the guy I wish you could have, like, seen my face during this conversation because literally 20 years plus my school, it all came together in, like, half a now, er like everything just totally compressed. It's kind of meshed, all in tow. Now I can use it because everything in at least my university, my school of finance, was my concentration, and my papers were on, uh um, Bond valuation and asset valuation. How to look at something and say All right, it's it costs this to produce or but the value of the cumulative is acts, and you drive that from these elements. But that's all very, um, it's theoretical. It's intangible e. And then when you're actually selling it, um, you don't see very slowly you see the theory materialize. You see little bits and pieces of it along the way, like and what some someone is willing to pay for any given product. That's a conversation that is driven by limitations from that customer. You know, whatever their their budget is or they're embedded nous with their current supplier and those things aren't really addressed in the theoretical space in university. So when you're interacting with people, they kind of flow together. But they are different for every particular customer, and I think that's why it's so. And I don't wanna, you know, shit on any universities out there because they definitely provide a service. But when you when you're actually in the field doing the thing, you learn so much faster and you learn, um, execute herbal intelligence, which isn't necessarily what you what university is teaching right now. Well, it wasn't it wasn't what I learned at back in the nineties, That's not what I learned. And also in your sales job, you're as you mentioned. And I read something about you. You have a boss over your shoulder, just trying to get sales. You're you're not paid to ask the person's story, you know? What is your budget? You know, you're just trying to make the sale, get it done and move on to the next person. I can see how that for myself, also in university, I remember, you know, they're talking about widgets or supply and demand, like Okay, what does this mean to someone who, in my experience, didn't have, you know, the family background of some extra insight or it wasn't really explained how, you know an idea or there is no family business to at least supply it too. So I think what you're touching on, and then I can imagine like, Oh, like, this is how it all applies. And this is how you bring true value to your customer? Yeah, I think the I'm like, I loved my university experience. I think of it often very fondly. But, um, I don't want to tell you. It didn't prepare me.

But what the knowledge it gave me, I wouldn't eat. I wouldn't know that it was a clickable to my job for many years. Um, even though it may have been applicable right when I started my career, I couldn't have the I'd have to look backwards to see Oh, I learned, um, I learned how to be technical on how to break out a problem piece by piece. I knew I had the muscle memory to do it, but I didn't have the foresight to be ableto look backwards and say, Oh, this is where I developed that skill. Did you ever have that opportunity prior to this to get into the family business? Did your cousin approach? You know, for that? No. Well, it was funny. Was like we would we would we would spend weekends up. My, uh this is on my step mother's side, her aunt's place and everybody up in this chunk of the woods is they're all involved with be business. And when I was a kid like I never wanted to be around it like ever, because, you know, I was afraid to get stung or and I didn't really see. I'll tell you what I always fascinated me that I never I never asked the question at the time growing up was we had a cousin Bob. It was an Aunt Emma. It's really her name. Emma, Bob and Joe and I'll live together and they kept pretty sizable colonies. But they would get up and they leave the house around. I don't know, 9, 30 10 o'clock. They'll be back at one o'clock for, like, a two hour lunch, and then they go out for another couple hours. And that was their day. Mhm. And at the time, I didn't have the foresight to say, like, How was your day? How is your work date? So relaxed and lax? A daisy Coleman. My parents are so like their go go go from, like, 7. 30 in the morning till, like, seven o'clock at night. And, you know, the truth is, they just produced all this inventory and they like they weren't even really good at marketing or selling it to make a lot of money. And they're more religious people. And, um, it would sell what they needed Thio cover their their bills, and that was about it. But, um, you know, once I once I kind of got my big wet to the business. I'm like there's a zillion different things we could do with this. And there's 20 different platforms that you can sell it through. Um, and that's the nice thing about being able to do. What I do now is the distribution channels are controllable by three individual entrepreneur. We don't necessarily have to goto big businesses or try to crack into that big retailer to sell it for us. Do you remember your first farm market farmers market? Do you recall the, you know, trail? That's that's one of my favorite stories. I'll squeeze it down for you so I don't I don't chew up all the all your bandwidth, but, um, when I bought the I bought a table and they a tent. At the time, I worked in options for a, uh for the Bank of New York, but we didn't get comped on the options. We just had a salary, and it wasn't that much. And so after my bills and rent, I really did not have much money. In fact, after I bought the table in the tent and a chair and a little banner, I think I had, like, 38 bucks to my name. And I had this table, honey, And I remember I was like, I have a college degree in finance. I had a long career. I'm selling honey out of the booth. I'd like to have seen her taking a picture of you just before the farmer market open. Although I know they open early, You know, there with your hands on your head Of what, Exactly how that is. Exactly how I look. That, like, that's exactly how I looked at. Like, what am I doing? It's ridiculous. And then, Ah, lady, a white haired, short haired lady came by with her husband and they bought a jar. Uh huh. And I was like, money changed hands. I'm like, Okay, that was good. And then another lady and her husband butter jar like, I don't know, five or 10 minutes later, I'm like, Okay, there could be something here by the third one. Like, and this is how I apply things now, when I introduced a new product, by the time I get the third sale, I'm like, Okay, there is a market, and then the fourth person, this is where everything changed was the fourth customer. Now you're standing on the chairs. Come get it. Well, kind of because this lady came by and she tried all for and I just kind of ad hoc. Told her what the food pairings were for...

...each flavor. And she got really excited. And she says, What else do you have? What other flavors do you have? So I just started making shit up like, Oh, we've got a plum and and root beer and she's like, This is fantastic. I'm gonna bring the women's group by next week. We're gonna coming out. So after the market finished, I packed everything up. I drove back up to the farm and I'm like, Okay, you gotta figure out Palm and Coconut and Root beer and all this other crazy shit. My cousin's wife way eventually had a falling out, But at the time, she's like, That's ridiculous. No one's gonna buy that. I'm like they're gonna buy it. You watch and e think she made up two of each on day were gone, and then two turned into four the following week and after that, turned into, like, 11, and it just it just kept getting bigger and bigger. Um, so, yeah, that that was the story of the first market. But you're right head in hands like, where is your life gone wrong? Definitely conversation I've had with myself. At which point did you decide? Ok, this is it. As in you put all of your your chips in and said, I'm done done with the corporate world or that other life. Um, how long did that take? Well, it's funny because when I took this job, they took it under the knowledge that they were being acquired by another business. So they're like, You could have this job for six months, Could go for four years, We don't know. And I started this about one year after about one year after I started working there. And throughout that summer and fall, I just remember feeling I didn't know that this was going to become a career. I just remember feeling comfortable that I had this thing in my hip pocket that I did on the weekends for extra money, and it went for about a year. And to answer your question, I got laid off like just out of the blue like my boss came around, hold me into an office and said Okay, we're cutting out pretty much everybody. You're the first to go. And I remember being furious. I didn't even like that job. And I just remember being furious that was getting let go. I'm gonna leave on my terms. You know what I'm like. I gotta go. I'm like, I'm like, I'm not finishing up today. I'm just believing he's like, Yeah, okay, I get it. You're damn right. You get it on E called. I was in the car and I called a friend of mine from one of the farmers markets Him and his wife made and sold. Um, uh, salad dressing. And I'm like, Can you believe this shit? Do you believe I got? You know I got if I can't like, I'm a good worker. I got let go from this thing and I moved back here. I lived in Chicago, and he's like, What are you worried about? And I'm like, Well, I don't know. I'm not gonna have a job in three weeks. He's like, Dude, why don't you just, like, go to more farmers markets? And I remember like I was at a stop sign and I was just like, Jesus said, That's a great idea. But why didn't I think of this? And yeah, in like, three days. I had my entire week filled up. I had, like, I think it was working five markets. And by the end of the week, um, Ato that point I was just taking cash. I think I made, like, 2.5 times what, in five days? What? It took me two weeks to make, uh, in the job. Uh, that was a light bulb moment. I was like, This is freaking in this. Uh huh. I'm not gonna I'm not gonna take crap off anybody ever again and like that, That kind of wasn't true in that. Like, because when winter rolls around, I still have to take side jobs here and there. But e only do it because I don't want it to eat into my production capital. I wanna have that to start up when season begins in the spring. So are you still taking jobs on the side as well? Which is probably a very common thing in farming as well. I mean, this sort of agricultural Actually, I'm I work for a now outfit right now that e had such crazy jobs. Now, when I look at it, um, I worked for Amazon for maybe two months. Just I just needed something for two months on, but it was That was probably the worst job I ever had. Just doing their deliveries and no, no, no offensive Amazon. But it is. It's kind of a meat grinder. And it's a...

...tough job. And the money, like, was not what I was accustomed to is very, very low. And a good friend of mine called me up and says, Come on over and work for us And he works for a company that does they service funeral homes. Eso pick up the deceased and, you know, they could be long drives, but, you know, for, you know, a couple days a week, especially in the winter, it's nice to have but, um, Thio kind of transition out of that Not this is this is one outfit that I really it's gonna sound morbid. But I really do like working for him simply because, um, back to what I said about the grocery store I get to be completely independent. Autonomous Yeah, Yeah, I think what what will end up happening is I'll open another LLC and dio notary for loan signings in the winter because the demand for that is really strong, especially in Michigan. Here, what is the difficulty with with not Amazon but delivery is that Were you physically delivering packages? Is that Yeah, I just there. I mean, they have a very efficient workflow, which I'll give them all kinds of credit for that. But like the farmers markets, the bigger ones I do. I do one that I got up at 4 a.m. And it's a full day. But then, you know, it's cash in hand. It's my own business. Amazon was same thing up at four AM down there. You got to pick up the truck, you gotta take it to a distribution facility. You gotta load the whole thing, which is? It's pretty back breaking. And Amazon clocks you everywhere you go like and one of their mandates is they don't want you to back the truck up because that's where most of the accidents happen. And I was on a route that waas in the country with a lot of dirt roads. And they don't want you going up people's driveways either. And where I live, there's It's very common to find, like quarter mile or half mile long driveways. You can run these things in the ice. It's 20 degrees outside. Um, you know, So it brought me back after I finished, you know, 2.5 months of that. It brought me back to that. That dish washing job. A little chef. I'm like, I'm pulling these crazy hours and getting paid nothing for my stop doing that. No, it's tough. And not only that, I have a brother, he works for UPS and I'm here in Korea and they have something called Coupon, which is like, Yeah, and it's huge. And I see the same guys in my area and day after day, that truck is full to the brim just full. And I mean it is It's backbreaking. It's, you know, not very forgiving. I'm sure the companies you know, they have their mandates. But, you know, if you're late and I worked for DHL for a bit when I was younger and it is tough, Jay, what are you doing? What? Not what do you do now? But what specifically takes up your time with your work? Maybe more so in a busy season. Um, with your hey, honey company, Um, how do you go about your process? I'm lucky in that. Raising the bees isn't really a big chore. For May. I've got I've got some hired help, but yeah, Just how were you? How sorry. How were you? Did you start by raising the bees or at least getting some experience with that? Yeah. I have premised with my with my cousin for a while, but then, um, once I kind of broke off on my own. I leased my own hives and, uh, got some help out in the field. I mean, I I still go on the field and and check on my boxes and decide when you know we're going to stack them and put on more hives. But, um, yeah, I have a company. Do the extraction for me. Really? That the back? I don't want to call it backbreaking, but it's kind of laborious. Is the bottling, the flavoring and the bottling that that could take a little bit of time and then just running around to the different farmers markets. Um, I guess in order of labor, probably bottling, going to markets, and then whatever time is left over working on a blogged social media, Um, are you bottling everything yourself or with some help? Yeah. No, I don't have any help. I don't have any help. The money is still really, really good. But honey bottling is like, if I If I was really smart, Brian, I'd, uh I'd have a...

...company doing the bottling for May I use what's called a co packer. Yeah, but the They have to be specific to honey. And they have to do volumes that I can manage. Which my areas. I'm not quite to the area. I'm not quite to the level where I would could utilize a specialty. Honey. Co Packer Thio Are you hoping to get to that level? What are your restrictions? Which I wish I was there five years ago. Yeah, um, to get to that level thistles. What I really struggle with is that I don't wanna put my product in stores because stores they're going to chop off 40% off the top, and then they end buyback provision if they can't sell it, and they won't be able to sell as fast as I can. So while there's there's a little bit of a golden handcuffing me distributing it myself, because I do keep all the money, which is nice. But I'm limited to the volume that I can send out. Um, would this also be by the land that you have or the amount of college? I don't have a problem, right? Like if I want to raise more, I could just leased more hives. And you can do that? Yeah, that that's not really there's. There's plenty of places where I could go to put up hides. That's not really the issue. The issue is, um, bottling and controlling distribution. Um, and I know there's plenty of there's plenty of business pros out there that would tell me to relinquish Cem control of that, but I've always been told it's better toe own something 100% and only sell 10% of what you're capacity is than to give away half of your thing and then, you know they sell 40 million units. I know you have an online store. Hey, you'll promote this in a bit But hey, honey, DUP is Yeah. How much are you promoting or hoping that? Because I think I saw What was it? The profit. You ever see that show the prophet? Yeah, Like I have a couple of mentors who talked to me about that show all the time. There's, uh they did. There was, Ah, honey, a small honey shop that he was looking about. And I forget the outcome whether he invested in them. But I could picture them now. They were bottling it, you know, one at a time. And it was a really hard process. But getting online, how much are you trying to push? Because cuts. I mean, I think you have a heart now, based on your experience of well, a knowledge of how important it is to do customer, you know, person to person sales. But also, you're wise enough to know that there's emerging out there that you can grasp just through online without undercutting yourself to go through these other distribution chains. So how much are you hoping Thio, you know, in marketing or whatever it is that you're going to do is to throw, um, a bone toward of your effort towards online distribution or online sales. That's why I love living in the information age, because I could just access metrics as we're talking, I utilize the Shopify store. And, um, the nice thing about Shopify is it'll break down for you. You know where you were at a year ago as to where you're at now. Um, And when I first started, I did a combination of, you know, blogged posts and Pinterest and my mailing list. My mailing list wasn't that big. I get in order every couple, 34 weeks. Okay. And now, this year, I think I'm up like 40%. So I'm seeing my, um or 41 per 42%. Somewhere in there, three orders air now, maybe space three days apart and back in when Corona first hit, maybe a week, week and a half apart. So the gap is shortening and the volume is picking up. So the trend, the trend is definitely upward. Trend is definitely there. Um, but, you know, in the next 6 to 12 months, I'm gonna be in a space where I'm like I don't like I need some kind of help, which which is a problem that have. It's the problem you want. Absolutely because that the problem where you could take I could basically just pull my metrics off of Shopify and...

...say, This is where it's going This is how much I need to put in a machine or have somebody else who already has a machine, inject my product line and push forward. Yeah, and then just the idea. I think I watched enough of the prophet toe. Think I know what I'm talking, but I don't. But just if you're able to free up some of your time thio limiting your actual bottle production, then you could spend more time with you know, things on LinkedIn or social media. And that's and that's part of your forte of some of your experience you had through that last 20 years. Marketing, print, marketing and all those things. It kind of gets away. But if you're if you're the man of integrity, if you're the man of character, it's going to show no matter what way you do, Those sales and it would be nice to do the farmers market. But if you have another untapped market up there that you can get and people like your product and they they're not in Michigan and they can't go to a farmers market. You know, in Korea just wherever, because I think you have. You're distributing, you know, to other countries as well. Um, what what's on your site on your website? You can order it anywhere as long as you're someone's willing to pay for the fee. So it's It's just America that I think you have. That 20 years of experience is given you while staying true to what you know to be a good asset, and that is your character in your ability to be personable and caring for the customer and keeping that their budget and their circumstances in mind. I'll tell you what, especially in the about the past 3 to 6 months. I've thought about this a lot in that, like what you're doing right now. Hosting a podcast is an excellent add on to what I dio, and I wouldn't do any kind of a podcast on honey. That's kind of bland, but it would be on the customer engagement for, um, component of what I do because I mean like, I'm abrupt, you know, im I think I'm fairly funny and I I mean, my job is really to just crack jokes and feed people. Bond, I say obnoxious things. I hit on, uh, guys, wives all the time and like, make them look good. And, um, it's fun to It's just fun to play off people's insecurities and, um, trepidations about trying something new. And when you kind of break down those walls with people and they open up a little bit, that becomes the the way by what you sell to somebody on did tell. Like when a couple comes up to my booth, um, you know, I can tell. I could tell the lady she looks good and then you turn over the guy I'm like, What is she doing with you? I don't know how this happened, and, you know, they relax a little bit and it's fun. Um, but there's one or two markets that I'd really have a hard time departing from, but you're right. I would. The whole reason I started the website is so I can take that interaction. There's two. There's two things that happened at the booth. I have the product and I have interacting with me for the product. E can take both of those things and put them virtual. Part of what I do with my own personality is just through the blogged e. Don't know if you read any of that, but a big travel travel buff on Nice thing about honey is depending on where you go. The bees pollinate different flowers and produce a honey that tastes different just depending on where you are. And if you merge the conversation between traveling to a new locale and a new flavor and then wrap somewhere in the end of that conversation and a recipe for local fair to that destination, Um, it makes for it makes for a good conversation on the blog's. So I'd like to extend that with either a podcast. Um, that's what you just said. Having a honey production podcast or be podcast wouldn't be. It would be bland, but what was blog's, which people still do? Blog's, obviously is podcast is podcast now, right by. Yeah, it's the conversation. People want the story a zoo, much as they want the product they want, they want, they want that they want. They want to know that there's a person at the other end who is doing doing this endeavor. That's why I tell people all the time that the corporate model is really e. I don't...

...want to say in jeopardy, but it's I think it's kind of run its course. It's slowly disintegrating because there, if you have the time I'm to be. You said the beginning when I first start talking with you, is the B guy right? Or hey, honey, like if you are the podcast, be guy, right? You're just all be all honey, all honey products, you know, e. I don't know if I could get a P in their thio. We could figure it out together, I guess. But But that's you're just the guy to go to. And then by putting yourself on every podcast possible as a guest, like you're just getting yourself out there and talk, I can imagine right talking about the flowers of the world's in the different tastes of those things. There is a market that's interested in even even if it's not a market, a huge market, but significant. There's going to be people that say, Hey, you want a guy who knows about bees. What guy knows about honey? One guy who knows about flowers and different countries and all this thing is the guy. And guess what? Then they're going to try your product. They're gonna buy it. I'll tell you, what's interesting is one of my biggest markets. Like I'm just your run of the mill half polish, half Native American white guy. But one of my biggest markets is in Dearborn, which is heavily Lebanese and Arabic, population. And, um, what I have found is that especially the ladies down there. I've kind of gotten, uh I made a name for myself is being the go to because every I don't want to say every ethnic group or every nationality has a bond to honey because that every group that I have coming into contact with thinks that their unique and that they, um they consume honey. And they have, like, a religious tie to it. And, uh, the Arabic population that I sell to, um, they're very, very loyal and very specific about what they expect from a food product. Particularly mind, um, and just having the knowledge base to be able to say, um, this has helped me a lot. There's there's been a number of ladies from Yemen. Bond. There is Ah, there's a couple of particular flowers that grow in Yemen that are hard to find outside of the country. And just in conversation, Aiken reference them. A lot of these a lot of these folks have come over here their second generation of their first generation. Or maybe they spent just a few years in their childhood back in their home country. And then they came over here and to be able to reference this little sliver of their morning at breakfast. Um, what that with these flavors were on the table when they were growing up. I can transport them back to their childhood, even just for a moment. I know it might sound a little contrived, but it's happened so many times at the booth that these customers have become, um, they they just become bonded to you. And what I like most about my job now is that there is no in between, um, assed faras representing a company. It's just me. And And you could do that online, though, to it's still just you you mentioned, um, foreigners or what have you, my dear wife, is Korean, and so I don't think I'm not even sure how much are growing up. Eight honey or knew the differences. So, I mean, you have a market there, just thinking of my ignorance of educating people and understand. I mean, even if you had little knowledge about the industry itself and how much you've learned in such a short period of time and how much you know that your fellow friends or people down the road, they have no idea. But what you know, the health benefits to it and you know, the different flavors. And my I'm not joking. I can go in our kitchen right now. And we have, um big, I don't know. That's or something. Two or three of No. Three. Definitely three huge containers of honey, Um, and probably two or three other smaller ones, along with some, like more liquid. We 56 containers like we have a lot of honey and Koreans, right? So find this is another demographic Koreans generally love honey to. And in Korea they have the B man who one time years ago he went into a beehive or and he smothered himself...

...with bees and they took a picture. And that's his. That's his like character chur or that's, you know, he's known as the B guy and in Korea, not anywhere else in the world. But you have this ability. I think just if you took the bull by the horns and just said Listen, I have this product I know it's good people of it. I'm doing well locally and to take my my marketing savvy What I know Thio how to sell a product and just focus it online, even if you don't wanna ever go into another store. And then you might even go into another store just to get a presence there, right, a small little presence or whatever, if if whatever. But I think you have something and toe have a podcast. The B man. I've never heard of any be man, but there is podcast about every single thing under the sun, and if you had the time, why not? But you buy a microphone computer that's really the That's everybody's challenge in life is just to find the time right, and I like again This is why I love living in the Information Age is like it's really becoming. The problem is, how do you sandwich all the things that you want to do in this life? Oh, are you know, into a week or like how do you fill up your day with things that you wanna dio? Maybe once again, Yeah, like it's fine. It's fine being left alone. But like, that's not I don't want to do that. I wanna have MAWR. I like having having the product that I wanna be able to do this. You know, you could easily thank you and it really it's just it's just a workflow issue and you have. The funny thing is, you have so many articles, blogged posts, you already have the information to go by. Yeah, a lot of research help on a lot of that, Brian. I mean, like, I get a lot. I'm not. I'm not the greatest writer, So I don't know if you've ever read Tim Ferris's book for Hour Work week. He's a big proponent of outsourcing Your life, especially if you have an online business, is really any entrepreneurs. Job who has an online business is to figure out how to take all the things that you do have somebody else do. So all the travel that I've done, I can relay that to a writer and to an artist to make images for me and say, Look, I want you to touch on these topics E want you talk about this destination I went to and I want to talk about this food and this recipe Go and that's just freed up Nine hours of my of my week and, uh, just continuing to do that. You're young enough. You got a good product. There's no reason why with help, I mean, you mentioned in humility. That you need some help with some things is to maximize whatever it is and just ride ride the rails with it. How are you staying productive? I mean, you're it's not an easy job. No job is easy. Even if it's too easy. I think they become difficult. But you also have part time jobs or seasonal other seasonal jobs during the winter time. What's driving you? What's keeping you going? You know, as we were talking, I was wondering if you were gonna ask something like this. Um uh, Well, there's a two part answer to this like up until this point, I've been writing on the experience that I have worked for other people, and I've been miserable for 20 years doing it. Now I have my own thing. I can't get fired from it. I own it. And I'm just I don't want to say I'm coasting on that, but it feels really good. And it felt really good for 10 years. Um, what it has its afforded me a lot more money than I ever made working for somebody else. So what's driving me is, if I'm going to be perfectly honest, a desire to diversify, I don't want to be. I think it took me about 20 years to figure out I don't want to be just one thing. E want to do a number of different things. And while I love this business and I wanted to continue to move forward, I don't want it to be the only thing that defines MM. So whether that being learning to fly or to produce concerts or to get involved in other businesses and invest, um, I like staying busy and things that interest me is I think most people do. But again,...

...took me 20 years to get to a point where, like all right, how do I do that? First you got to get money out of the way. So money is slowly getting pushed out of the way. Um, how can I use having money to give myself the opportunity to do other to get involved in other interests? I have. I want to do a bunch of things. What is what is something that you use, Whether it's in the honey business or not, that helps you stay efficient. What makes you keep you productive? What is without it? You wouldn't be able to do the work that you do in terms of what, like software, tools or any anything you want, Whatever it is for you that it's the first thing that pops to your mind. Like without my phone without my computer without my bottles, whatever it is, what is it for you that keeps you efficient? Keeps me efficient. Um, I always have that phone on me. I mean, like it. This phone is really amazing. It does everything for me. It's got my square on it. So I run transactions off it. Shopify eyes on it. So when in order comes through, I noticed I don't have to be in my laptop. Um, it's got my mileage tracker on it. So everywhere I go, actually, that's one of the bigger tools as, um, you know, being incorporated. I'm sure it's it's pretty similar in Canada. Um, all the things for your businesses that you can write off for me because I travel to so many different markets. I accumulated a ton of mileage and I have to be able to isolate that and a t end of the year. It's a big right off it. Z huge right off. Um, that's That's a pretty good one. If I was like, I don't even get comped by this software company. But there's a mileage tracker out there called My Like You, which has It's just saved me so much Money. Yeah, yeah, very efficient thinking of my listeners and people getting into work, thinking of you getting into a little chef for changing your job, to McDonald, to the grocery store or from the corporate world to your own job wherever people are in getting into work. Do you have a tip for them? Some advice for them. That's tough because you're crossing like, you know, whether you're if you're in, it's beginning or if you've been in it for a while. Don't kid yourself that, um, it's too late to do something else if you're unsatisfied. Andi, I know that's I know that is easier said than done. Um may come back to that, But if you're young, Yeah, I would say, Don't let anybody under value or, um under value you, but undercut the idea that working for yourself and doing something that you enjoy is unattainable. Don't let them dismiss your ideas. Yeah, like just the idea of getting a job. Yes, there's necessity to that. But start Ah, hustle early. That's that's I think that's what I would say is learn how to hustle and just something that you enjoy beyond there again. Like when you and I were kids we didn't have. I mean, there's whole podcast just, you know, um, dedicated to learning how to do a side business or do a side hustle eso You can access that stuff immediately. And like when we were kids that, like just if you didn't trip into it, you just went out and got a job like there wasn't access to information for people to guide you to do things that you might want to do. Um, but if you're, you know, when your forties or thirties, forties or fifties and you're doing a job that you don't necessarily like, um, this is my tip. Start small. The idea that you have to start, you have to completely leave a company and dump all your eggs into one basket. Start your own thing. Um, with your family, all your family's resource is you don't have to do that, find something that you can do or market and do. Do just something little small and develop a market. Um, because when you do that, the risk is a lot lower and you can test things out. I think a lot of...

...people, when they get the business on their own, they think they gotta throw all this money at it. You really, really don't. You can test it out slowly until it starts performing for you. I think that's a common misconception. I hear you that one the most. Yeah, I get nervous when I hear people say Just follow your dreams and just go do it. Uh, that's spoken by somebody who's like they two things that's spoken by somebody who didn't follow theirs, and they don't have any direction. So like figuring out what your dreamers like. I thought I wanted to be a producer when I was in high school, and then I've realized I didn't really know what that WAAS. And now, yeah, that whole industry is evolving and changing. Um, and what I do now it's based. It's basically the same thing as being a movie producer. Producers outsource all their work. They find teams of people who do the things they need to have done, which is essentially what I'm doing. I'm just doing it for a different product. Um, yeah, Don't get mired down in this idea that you have. There's only one way to skin a cat. There's not. But figuring out what you're gonna like doing. You don't have to have that figured out. 18. But you should be trying things. When you try things, you figure out what you do and what you don't like. You have to stick with it. If you don't like it, you learned. Yeah, I don't like that for whatever reason, try this other thing. If you wanted to produce movies, you can produce little videos on how to produce honey. Oh, I mean, those that was that I might start with that, but I wouldn't stay with that no more about I think mine would be just more, you know, traveling the world and talking about eating well. And And it would be this, honestly, to be some form of this talking about traveling the world. How do you keep your work Life choices in check. How do you turn it off? Stop working. Well, how you You put some free time for yourself, Or how do you enjoy without the pressure of work? Are you able to turn it off? Or is it 24 7? Three 100? Well, like this is kind of a seasonal. Get so, um, when it's not the season when it's not in season, are you? Is it still on your mind? Is do you worry about the upcoming season? Is, um Are you pretty? No, because a lot of my like in the past 10 years, I've just I've for the first seven years. I worried about that on DNA Now it's like I have people toe help May and you know, if I need If I need to change locations or after that, if I have to change suppliers for Queens that z pretty easy to dio Um ah, lot of this stuff that you see in the news Not that it's not relevant or that's not important about bee die off. A lot of news is it's like anything else. It's just a product that has to get sold. If you work in the industry like Oh, yeah, I mean, everybody has losses. You just have to know how to mitigate them. We have to employ proper risk Management s Oh, I don't have only one field where I keep everything anymore. I have a couple of different fields. I have contingency plans, have people to help me or in backup people to help me if if they're not able to Um, so. But I mean, that took time to develop and to figure out. But, um, yeah, that's not that's not really what I worry about. And the people are always gonna be hungry. People always want food. So that's the nice thing about this Business is they're always going to eat. And if you can figure out a way, E guess, here's another tip. If you're gonna be involved in something that where the demand is high for it, whatever it ISS and you can find a supplier or a group of suppliers to make. The thing that feeds that demand your entire job in life is to get in the middle of that relationship. However you dio with like whatever it ISS may like. I brought flavors to something that already taste good, and I brought an attitude with it. When I talk about it, that's it. That's what I did. And so people identify the product with my attitude, and that's my industry. I don't even think I heard until looking up you of flavored honey like we have a lot of honey and it probably has some sort of difference to it, But I've never heard of flavored honey, we have, yeah, you,...

...your wife probably has because, especially outside of the U. S. There's what's called Monta floral Honey. The bees goto one particular flower, or if they go to multiple flowers, that's called Polly Floor. But you know, we mix flavorings and steep fruits and do it to get a particular flavor. Um, but I also sell single pollen honeys. So depending on who you're selling to, everybody wants something different. There is no one uniforms. Some people want the regular thing. And, um, some of the Lebanese grandmothers, they want sitter honey from Yemen, and that's all they want. And if you can, If you could be the guy that gets them that, then you know you will make a comfortable living. What? I tell you what in Korea and Japan, Um, I service you and other farmers market, which is the big farmers market on University of Michigan, which is huge school. Um, we have a lot of international students. And for the flavored honeys, any of the people from France kind of tough to sell to. They like they tend to like more savory flavors. Um, but Japan, Philippines, Malaysia, Korea, biggest customers for my flavored honeys. I mean, they didn't snatch it up like I've had, uh, Korean and Japanese and Chinese students just take my entire table. It's a huge honeys. You just I can figure out how to get it over to your neck of the woods. I'll let you know you could send me a box. I'll take a few percentage points. Okay? Yes. What about your products? I know you have a couple. What? What is it In the lines that you might do outside of honey itself for the B products. So what I do with a couple of other beekeepers is I'll underwrite their hives so that, like, they'll produce X amount of a particular, um, product and like something I don't necessarily grow. So I'll be like, I'll tell you what, Elise. 10 hives from you, and you charge me whatever you want for those hives. Um, and then you tell me what split you wanna have on the output. So there's no there's no up front cost for you to put up the hives. I'll pay for the box pay for the Queen's. You just got to go do the labor and set it up in a particular area if I want a particular flower type, and then I give them a favorable split on the outcome of the product. So let's say it's 60 40 their favor, and they they give me the, uh, 40% of the the output, honey. And then I'd bottle it and sell it. What are the But are you're making soap? Is it not like bees wax? What do you think? So we did. But we dio bees way. I do a little bit of bees wax and bees wax looks like so because it's we sell it as an Inga It like as a bar. Some people do soaps. I mean, there's so many soap maker, especially at the markets, that I do it. I didn't really want to get into that. I did it for a little bit. But it's not, is there but is at the end of the day, do you have the byproduct and you your your choice just to do something with it or not? Or is it take a whole other process and a lot more expenses to do so? Um, Wax is nice because, like, once you spin out the honey, you're just left with the wax and like residual honey so you can melt the wax down and just make bars of it. And people will just buy the wax for any number of D I Y projects. Um, but if I was to go through just to make soap or some of the other things you can make from it. Candles? Yeah, candles. That's so many other steps. And then like bottling the honey that I mean, after I'm done bottling. Honey, that's enough. Like E should be there. Yeah. I mean, like like, do you wanna be a specialty producer and distributor, or do you want to try to be have your hands in 20 different baskets? I don't necessarily want to do that. I want to excel at one or two things. And then j looking back, is there something that you wish you would have known, or was there a mistake that you made that you learn from? Is there a lesson that you learned through this process that you look back or you're like, Oh, that was that was that was not too wise of me. But now I know better, and I'll try not to do that again, or I'll learn from...

...what I've learned. I mean, my I liked working with my cousin. Um, he passed away, but e think that I thought at the time, like he was going to be the end all be all of my, um yeah, of my involvement in this operation. Andi, really? It just took me having a falling out with his wife to be We like you know what? This is not is complexes. You're making it. I had maybe one week there, or I had I was scrambling to get things like situated, and once they were situated like I. And then I looked at the numbers, Brian, as far as like what I was the money that was going out for for my cousins end as opposed to what I was keeping. I'm doing, you know, almost three times as well. Now do like doing a little bit more labor on my end. Um, I don't know. E think things kind of went the way they did. Um, purposefully, um, And But once I looked at the numbers, how much I was going to be making doing it all on my own, that was kinda like I should have done this a while ago. But, um, you know, the situation didn't warrant it, and it wasn't right. So are you hinting at that? You wish the falling out didn't happen, But you have learned from any kind of, You know, I'm glad that did happen, because there was, um, you know, without getting into the nuts and bolts of, uh, you know, into into the weeds here of what happened with the relationship. I think it happened when it needed to happen. Um, I think if it was just my cousin, it would have been a lot easier t manage. Um, but, you know, whenever you start involving more than more than yourself in the operation, um, if you can get a little dicey and can get a little bit complicated, especially when you're working with family Um, no, it does. Yeah. No, it is. But it is an experience that happened in business, and it was related to family. And although it was difficult at at the time, it turned out to be okay, and it's, you know, it's, uh, it's a learning experience that you could take forward and any other endeavors that you venture on this. This next question is mawr mhm more for your view of it and looking forward of, and maybe even a suggestion for people listening of where you suggest people put their character versus their career. So I'm sure, in the corporate world there's that drive for the career, dr for the title Drive for the Money and as you even said the pressure just to put the sale and not to be personable but knowing a little different now from your experience of how important it is for people Thio really consider, As you said when you're younger, figure out something small from the beginning, and I think something small like although very important, is putting something small putting your character first before you go get that job at McDonald's or something, wherever it is, you go, I think is is vital that carries over into our generation's like just as we get older, Where do you put career and character? How do you advise people? Would you advise people on how they put that right foot forward and their progress? Well, um, this is going to fly in the face of a lot of sales training. Um, below. I never liked any of that stuff anyway and think it was all that helpful. Um, I have had customers come to the booth and they're very descriptive of what they want, and I've said to them, Look I can tell you what attributes X, y and z my this product of this product of this product could be used best for. But if that's not exactly your particular brand of vodka, then maybe I'm not the best guy for you. And if you're looking for this specific recipe for something to spit, fit this specific recipe like I have a savory...

...honey, a buckwheat honey that fits a very particular type of food, and I've had people ask for a substitute when I'm out of it, because I don't always have it. Look, you could buy just the regular clover and wildflowers, but you're not going to get the same effect. I don't want you disappointed, so even buy it if you want. But just know that it's not what you want, so you can either weight or find it from somebody else. And what I have found is that when you lead with you, just if you're just genuine yeah, in a conversation, you're not always going to get the sale at that moment. But people remember that, and it's not. It's not lip service. They really remember. E can't even I've had countless times where people come back. You know, you were so nice to me. I didn't end up getting that thing. But now we're having people over, and I'm doing this fruit salad and I want a raspberry and strawberry And what? And that it happens all the time. Um, and I think that is avoided. It's not even considered, or at least for it wasn't for me In the corporate world when I was selling in the corporate world, they my bosses would say things like, You got to develop the relationship. But get him to sign on. The dotted line is like, Well, part of developing the relationship may be saying, Hey, I can't help you with this, but try somebody else and it really sucks when you're looking at your you're like, if I make this sale, I could make read this week. That's where that's where it becomes. I see so difficulty. And so I like so much better, um, selling for myself and having, um, the direct result of the I don't wait on money. I get paid at the moment of sale, and when you're working for a company, you might not see that money for a month, three months, six months. And so it becomes really hard to put the value your boss may say exist between you and the customer to actual, like for that to actually imprint. I'm sure that all the time, but I wouldn't really know what it meant because I wouldn't see. I wouldn't see the benefit for months. Um, but once, like when someone is dealing with you direct, it's and there's no boss or company getting in the way of that. It just becomes a completely human interaction, which is, I think, which is what everybody wants. They don't want this. They want posturing. They don't want, you know, angling for what's best for the company, just like Tell me what you can do or what you can't do. And when you do that, like people remember that and you just have to do it enough because, okay, this guy, the first guy we're talking about, he may not buy from you right now, but let's say you have another customer in a similar predicament in three hours, and he does buy from you. He's like, Yeah, you're more expensive and it's not exactly what I want, but I like talking. That totally happens. It happens all the time. And, um, this goes back to what I was saying earlier. Put yourself in between the demand and production and what you can do that you'll be five. Yeah, I agree. Putting character first And even when in your corporate job, you may not see the fruits of your labor for some time, but it's not even all of the fruits of your labor because somebody else is taking it. Thio theme company may see it. I'll tell you one thing that I'm not going to call out the name of the company, but, like the, um, one of the places I worked for in Chicago. I worked for them for about six years. Um, the deal we made when I was hired, Just like you get 50 you get 50 cents on every dollar of profit for everything, and I've been there for, like, three or four years. And I had this client who at a giant print run but their agency it was it was another printer on the agency they represented wanted a very specific paper type that, and they wanted this thing turned around immediately. So I and this was just a Herculean task. I couldn't believe I pulled it off because we I had to charter two jumbo jets out of Canada overnight to fly this paper and print it because we made direct mail envelopes like four color envelopes,...

...fly it in, print it, cut it and send it tow our customer in Ohio in, like, five days and spy some miracle. I pulled this off and all the other suppliers they had talked to have told them anywhere from 4 to 6 weeks and we didn't less than a week. But the freight bill, you know, because you know, we have to put something on it. It was very, very high. It was a lot of money because we were up basically five days with no sleep to make this happen. So we charged accordingly. It was a lot of money. And after the the bill went out, I remember my boss said to me, It's like you made around e made around 80 $85,000 just on that freight I'm like, Don't you mean 45 thistles? The thing I'm like, Don't you mean like, 40? Because I get half of that. He's like, You don't get half like What are you talking about? It's like I made 50 cents on every dollar of profit. He's like, man, not afraid like since when he's, like, ask. It's about five minutes ago. And I'm just like, whoa, that, like, at that moment? Honestly, Brian, I'm like, I gotta figure out how to get out of here this whole because when you for a long time I've had I've just been irked by the way mhm companies handle sales people because I hear story after story about how they you know, if you find a good sales person, they make something happen for a customer. Um, and the company they represent just kind of screws them out of, uh, a deal. Uh, I've just always had a chip on my shoulder about that. That's why I'm such a big proponent of people finding their own, their own thing, whatever it ISS and building their own little enterprise. J thinking you mentioned at the education that you received, and I agree that, you know, our educations could have been tweaked to help us prepare better. But you didn't knock education. Just it could have been done. How? Enlist in considering listeners. Where do you value education? I'm thinking off all that you have learned over the last 12 years, and it obviously doesn't have to be formal education, but just the learning process and having listeners understand how valuable it is to keep on learning. Oh, God, like like Brian like never stops. And honestly, I have. I think I didn't have a really affinity for learning because it wasn't paired appropriately with the application. It's a good statement. Um, it would have been great toe have mawr. I don't want to call them internships or like work study because, like for in the film business, I live in Michigan And, like the film business is on the other side of the country for May. Um, but whatever it is, if you have an idea idea for something you want to dio, I think it would be great if there was a conduit within university or more. There were more, and maybe they are now more promoted or amped up than when I was in school. But the conduit between what happens in the classroom and how it gets applied on either the shop floor or in the production facility or at the bargaining table. But like she's wherever you see your path going, what you want to try out once your class work for the day is done having I'm gonna call it Like it. I don't know what you call it, something like a academic slash um workflow adviser. Stay okay, you use work done accounting and finance and marketing for the past two semesters. What would you like to try out? And how can we? What questions do you have from your course work? And how would it apply to ex business? What questions do you, as the student want to see, answered and how? How can we make those things pair up again? It's a Herculean task for all the different students who are in university. But if it was some kind of a service that was available to people who because I mean...

...let's let's be honest, there's lots of kids who are in university and they don't have a ton of direction. They have an idea, or, you know, maybe I'll trip into this, but I can only speak from my own perspective. I knew pretty much where I wanted to go. But I didn't have the tools to help me. Direct, direct how to get there. And if there was, um, if there was some kind of, um, facilitator for yeah, mentored be great. I mean, like, I have been dancing around the verb ege for a while, but really, that's what it is. So, like, an assigned mentor, like, you know, one industry. Do you want to be in? What questions do you have? How do I get there? I think you tapped on this in the beginning of it. Just we're in a different age where the information is available. So if if students don't have this, which I don't as I think you're saying it's not predominant around the world in most school systems, it would be nice for kids to have it, but also to encourage students also are people, doesn't they don't be students or just people who are looking, um, to further their education. Learn more is don't be afraid to ask, right, because there's some people with a lot of a lot of experience, a lot amount of information that if approach with, as you said, someone with integrity coming up to you being sincere of asking questions. How How is this? How does this apply to my life? How would I apply this in this situation? Or I have this idea. And I think there's a lot of people out there that are willing to help if people get the gumption toe ask. Yeah, I think, um, I've had this conversation a couple of times. There was one guy who came up to my table a couple of years ago. Him and his young wife. He was a god. He must have been like 24 at the time. He was going toe to U of M for a MBA, but he had just come out of the Marines and he was a C one. Or maybe the army. It was a C 1 30 pilot was very young. And, you know, we got to talking about flying because I love flying or I love you know, it's something I wanted to dio and I was congratulate. I was kind of stroking his head a little bit to say, You know what? When I was your age, if you wanted to be a pilot, um, you could have gone to the local, um, airstrip toe, learn how to fly. But there weren't like to find a mentor to someone like Coach you on how to get into the appropriate track within the military without getting sidelined and ending up as a cook. Um, it was just kind of luck of the draw. But like your generation, you can get on YouTube and find 20 different stories about guys who became fighter pilots and who they talked to once they enlisted Bond. You know what they signed up for, like what their core curriculum was and how to drive in a very particular direction. And like when we were growing up, that wasn't Ralph. Um, so I like This is this is why I love again. This is why I love the information because you can find it right away. Yeah, there's very few excuses people can have if they're willing to look. But I like what you said that the learning never stops. There's there's so much to continue to learn and because I don't want people to think. And I think there's this push. There's this dichotomy between people who have had formal education. People don't so they start looking down or up at people and they don't feel is adequate or they feel overly qualified. But return this well, like some people, Very generally using a bit broad brush. Think if you they have formal education, they're better than someone who has not received it or someone who has not received formal education. Think, Look, they think they're special because they have this. But I'm trying to even out the field and saying regardless of what former work you so choose to Dio, you're gonna require some sort of learning some sort of education, and it doesn't matter what that person did or what you didn't do. Both are equal in my eyes to say that you're gonna have to learn, and it could be two totally different fields, but they're equally valuable for those particular jobs. Yeah, I actually a friend of mine. Her husband was always kind of sensitive about the fact that it didn't go to college and it would come up a lot. And...

I would always tell him like you make 2.5 times what like he works on. What do you call him? Um, windmills, like he's an engineer. He ended up being like a mechanical person for for windmills. He's like, Yeah, I never wanted college. I really feel like I missed out like that, Really. I mean, it's I think that's all in your mind. You know, I spent a lot of money for a very general, uh, knowledge base and every job I've had in finance or in advertising, like I learned 98% of what I had to know at the company. I didn't I didn't import. I didn't walk in with all these spreadsheets and, you know, from class. And, you know, I think I was going to change the way the company did things, E. I mean that that's not how it iss like. If anything you saved, you know, $70,000. Intuition. Yeah. And friends who don't like that. And I don't know why I've had this conversation with many times. Yeah, I have some friends who went to trade school right out of the right out of the gate of high school, and they were making a very good, consistent living ever since. And I was not. This is like, Oh, good for them. Is there anything else J that thinking of people who, you know, like the guy you just mentioned who may feel a little discouraged about their their flight, their plight in life or because of this year, things were not going as well as planned. They're a little discouraged thinking of you when you first started your job, you didn't really like it when you did your 20 years. It was kind of a grind. But just people who are discouraged and need just a little bit of a word of encouragement for just where they are and they just feel like there's no end and they're banging, you know, as you had your hands in your your head in your hands when you first started with the farmer's market and not really sure if this decision is right, maybe there's some family difficulty. What have you but some encouragement for people in their work. Well, I gotta hand it to you. These air really good questions. And I just because I don't want to dumb it down to something I say all the time. Um, Okay, well, a don't be stagnant just because and I don't don't listen to the news. That's number one. I never listen to the news because Z it's usually they're just selling bad news, and it does not. It is not designed to help you or further your career or your bliss or happiness or any of those things, so utilize common sense and good judgment. And most people know what those things are. But they let all this outside stimulus interfere with just making intelligent choices. Um, as's faras work goes, I can't say it just for your own mental health and for your long term investment, Um, profitability start something. Even if you work for somebody else starts something on your own that you can do on the side or at night or on weekends and, um, invest your money. E don't don't blow it. I mean, yeah, like cars and close air fun. But there's something about like, you know, when you just make a little bit of effort and you you know, you've got 100 bucks here, 300 bucks there, 200 bucks there. And don't look at it for a while. You put it into something that's working for you. You look back at it two years, you're like I've got you know, 40 grand that's doing something for me now, And it was just passive. That's an amazing feel I'd like. There's not a word in the English language that, uh, compresses. What that feeling is It's very unique to say once you look back on something from your own efforts that is now performing for you, Um, I would say, Do that avoid the news. And, um, don't you know what? If it feels good in here and you're not hurting anybody, that's all you need. It doesn't matter if somebody says, Yeah, I don't think your thing, whatever this is, whatever you're making, whatever you're selling, I don't like it because there's always going to be negative.

All what? And you know what? Like those people don't serve any function to you. The ones that do serve a function are the ones who tell you positive things about your widget or your service. Um, people who want to help you people who direct you to new customers. Those are the relationships that you want. All the other ones air crap. They don't. They don't. They don't improve you. They don't build you up. So I could be a little, a little bit abrasive on this point. But, like cut those people out of your life, just remove them and focus on finding people who push you up because otherwise they're not. It's not. It's not a life worth living toe have, ah, balance of people who are both negative and positive. That doesn't help. It just keeps it. That keeps you at neutral. And nobody wants to be a neutral. They wanna be going forward. I need more negativity in my life. You know what? I met people like that like it's good to be a little grounded. I'm like, I don't who wants to be grounded? I wanna have people who say, You know what? You should shoot fricking stars. What? I'll help you build a rocket ship. Those are the people you want, not the other ones. And again, like the news, it's all for the most part, it's all bad. I don't I would say Don't worry about Corona. It will eventually take care of itself. It's like candy for your teeth is rotten. Your brain. Yeah, it's It's not good, it's rot. J. J Mo. How can people reach you? How can people go to your site. How can they buy your product? How can they help increase the sales and see and show you that you have a market outside of your local area? Hey, honey dot biz. That's h e. As in Edward. Why, honey dot b i z ready to come from? Hey, honey, I want people not to forget, because I I call my dear wife. Honey, honey, I also say, honey Hey, just like, hey, uh, I don't know you're gonna feel about this, but s o I actually said that to somebody in a market. There was somebody was true girl who was walking by and I said that and her gorilla of a boyfriend, this is like on my second day before I even had a name. Her gorilla of a boyfriend was behind me. He's like, What are you doing? I'm like, that's the name of the company. And I made it up on the spot, and he's like, All right, I was gonna have to pound you. I'm like, Yeah, I don't I don't want that, but, you know, pretty good looking. And so we had a laugh about it. He was all right, but um, I thought about it. I was I was back at the bank, The following damn. Like I should use that name. That's a good name. Hey, honey, And is that B I Z? It's not dot com that Hey, honey dot com is a cosmetics company. I'm sure they have great stuff, but it's not the same, honey, and you can message me. You can message me through the through the website. Um, I'm always looking for help with bottling. So if any. If there's any co packers out there who we're looking for an additional injection into the product line, let me let me know. Well, I know you're also on LinkedIn, Aziz. Well, and I think that's a good resource for people in business looking for help, looking for advice, and you never know you might find some I do. You know what? I don't use Lincoln Aziz, often as I probably should. Um, they say it's one of the most underrated free sources out their resources out there, I believe you know what I think I stopped not stopped using because I'll check it every once in a while, but I get a little trepidatious because it pings you when you are looking at someone's profile. E. I understand why they do it. It's just it's a little big brother for me, but I still do using. I understand the Big Brother thing. I understand that, and I was. That's one of the first things that a or someone's viewed my thing. But I think if you grew up like I did with Facebook, I think you don't wanna look at people's thing. And if you had another, an idea like, Well, who's why are you looking at someone's profile or something if you know them or something? And in some ways it's kind of strange or someone's looking at you. But this linked in hopefully because some people would suggest that it's kind of skewing a little bit with becoming mawr Facebook light, but because it's business like it's just a business contact. And, of course, like I have people looking at me all the time in not the sense of look, everyone's looking at me, but they're looking because they're seeing my posts, you know, made some connections, and I'm...

...like, Okay, well, someone's interested enough to know that I have a podcast. It's about work, and they want to promote themselves or for whatever reasons, they're curious, and I'm not taking it personal, like like a Facebook. Like if someone I knew was trying, because that is more for me. I have two pages, but my Facebook page, like my kids pictures or something like that. But the business aspect look away because everybody wants you to look at them because they have something to provide in its business oriented. Which is why they say it's one of the the most underrated free reason even you can pay for some services and stuff but free resources out there where you can connect specifically in Michigan. Um, you know wherever you want and they're all business oriented people. I'll tell you, my I would bet you dollars for donuts. That's probably where I'm gonna find my co packing help. Probably I I would I would I might even be interested to check in a moment when we're done and I'll just co packers in Michigan or something like just certain. Well, I I know all of them and they're like, there's one in particular who could help. Um, I guess more on that later But it is a good reason. Yeah, it is for sure. So that's how people can reach you at. Hey, honey. J J mo. I have one final question for you. Go ahead. And that is why do you work? Mhm. Um well, I'd hate to tell you, it's It's only for the money, because it's not. I really tripped into something here where I get to connect, uh, with everybody around me in a completely natural way, and I don't have to feel anxious about it. Um, honey kind of provides a delicate introduction. So all the people around May and I Honestly, bro, I'm kind of discovering this as I say it as I talking to you right now, um, Honey has become my conduit for meeting the world. It's kind of like a it's kind of like a wing man that just introduces me, toe everybody. And quite honestly, I don't really care where anybody's from my but I just want to hear their story. And, um, my work, by its very nature, just very gently guides me into that. I think. I think that's why it opens doors for May. Sure, and they're they're amazing. Doors to be to be opened up into or areas to be opened up into. And I was thinking, As you said, co pilot, maybe it's your pilot. I mean, you love honey is your pilots is taking you whoever it is that it's going to take you. And I think being so young having a knowledge that you do about honey, the opportunities, especially as you way said numerous times so young you're so kind is with technology the ability you have with online marketing and all these sorts of things Facebook you can advertise and all that within your own community. I have not done these things, but I just I've heard of a lot of people who have products to sell that they're viable option to promote and to distribute and sell their products that you you have. I mean, you may not be flying physically yet, but you have you're taking off with Hey, honey. And I appreciate you, J. J mo, and all of the work that you're doing. I appreciate your humility of knowing where you were in life and the company that you worked in, or the business that you're in. And then you stumbled as you said, fell into this and it's starting. Thio Help form your character and J J mo. I thank you for what you're doing. And Hey, honey. Brian, I thank you for the conversation. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe, Follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. E hope that you have yourself a productive be a joyful day in your work.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (123)