WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 29 · 1 year ago

#28 Jaime Jay Bottleneck Virtual Assistants

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Jaime’s Profile linkedin.com/in/jaimejay 

Website bottleneck.online/inquiry (Company Website) 

Phone +1 (844) 376-9410 (Work) 

Email info@bottleneck.online 

Twitter slapshotstudio  

Jamie's Company: 

 "I'm proud to say that I'm committed to ‘The Ripple Effect' of giving. I love supporting ideas, bravery and collaboration with entrepreneurs who want to grow their business. Enter Bottleneck Virtual Assistants, an outsourcing agency founded to help ambitious leaders identify, hire and cultivate a strong and authentic team through a carefully designed systematic approach to growth. Virtual assistant services: + Personal Assistants Integrated Services Program, ("ISP") + Graphic design + Web development + Administrative assistance Learn more by visiting: https://bottleneck.online/ISP" We are more than just a staffing agency; we are teachers, with an authentic desire to transfer our collective wisdom to our clients as we journey together through the hiring process.   

Partner with us today at bottleneck.online

Welcome to why we work, with your host, Brian V as. He speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which would be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going and keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here's your host to why we work, Brian v I'm Brian V at why we work. Today at the great pleasure of speaking of Mr Jmi J. He's the owner of bottleneck virtual assistance. He helps companies not bottle neck themselves doing the daily tasks that other companies will do for them. He's been through a lot and he does a lot. Not only that, the way that he presents himself is of joy, out of gratitude, knowing what he has gone through. But what impressed me most was after the camera was off, he poured into me, offering to me anything that he could do for me, which I just thought was wonderful. I was speechless. I didn't even know what the ask. What you see on the camera is what came after as well. So sit back and have a listen to Mr Jamie Jay at bottleneck virtual assistance and listen about his ripple effect. I'm Brian V and this is why we work and I have the wonderful pleasure of speaking today with Jamie Jay. Good day, fine, sir. Hello, nice to meet you, Bray V, and Nice to thank you so much for having me on. I'm yeah, I'm excited to chat with you. I'm excited too, because I had, because of what just happened a moment ago we were trying to get connected, I had the opportunity again to watch you and your own podcast, and you have this energy about you. It's very contagious and it's really exciting. I know we don't always have it, but you seem like a very pleasant guy to speak with and I know the work, some of the work of which you're doing. That I hope to get into in the introduction. I added that, but now can you, can you bring us back into because this is why we work. So it all starts from somewhere. What was your first job, Jamie? Your very first job? First job I hired my little brother and with no money down and we lived on a golf course. How we went and jumped in the lake, got a whole much of golf balls. We sold golf balls with a hack in the side of them for a twenty five cents and ones with no hacks we sold for fifty cents to a dollar. And then we found that we were on the exact opposite end of the clubhouse. So people were thirsty and we decided to implement a secondary stream of income. So we added fresh made lemonade, so we had lemonade that they could purchase while they looked at the balls, and our sales actually increased. So my brother and I brought him in and we did a seven and twenty five split first and then we ended up doing a fifty because my brother loved getting in hunting of the balls leave a little bit more. So he needed a raise. How old were you? I think I was twelve and my brother was ten. What made you like? I mean thinking now and when I was twenty thirty, I see a lot of my balls go into there. I'm like, Hey, there's a good business, but at twelve, what would what would make you want to do that? Right? They what was your desire? Motivation? Just to make some money? Well, I think it was funny. gave us something to do it was during the summer. We had just relocated to Colorado from Alaska...

...and we were just we kind of didn't know what we were doing and one day golfer came by when we were sitting right by the fence and I said, did you see a ball? Come over here? And we're like no, and I went to go help and look and I found like three or four and he goes here you go, here's a dollar and and I said, Whoa, he gave me a dollar for finding for golf balls. Cool. How do I find more? What did your parents think of you doing that? Just I mean with the lemon of it and is my mom was right there helping us make the lemonade and she'd bring fresh batch almonade out and and yeah, she absolutely loved it. She thought it was she thought we are great. Do you think, like I speak to my kids, and I have some students that I speak to about this, of encouraging kids to start something like that, to be innovative? I mean the lemonade stand is one of the oldest things for kids to do, or anyone to do, but for kids to do. Would you encourage kids to think of ways to learn the value of work at a young age, or would you allow them, for their own motivation reasons, to do something like that? Yes, and yes. And if you think about it, if we in our ripe old young age, whatever we consider our age to be, we know the lemonade stand has been around while, but if you put yourself in the shoes of a six year old, a ten year old and eleven year old, this is brand new. They're cutting edge. They are starting a business in a lemonade stand. And and and for that reason, whether I see someone outside group of kids, usually it's two or three kids. The friends get together and Oh, we want to get the latest, you know, video games. Let's you know, let's go earn some or hopefully their parents will push them in that direction. I'm a big proponent of entrepreneurial spirit and and that starts from a young age. So every time I pass a lemonade stand, I wouldn't say every time, quite a bit. Or if they're on our road, my wife and I may walk down and will pay for it because I like I like rewarding kids that that try to do something creative, whatever that may be. I think it's fantastic. We're a sucker for the girl scout cookies, you know, and you know. So we want to make sure that we make them feel good and hope that, hey, they feel like they've done something successful and we'll continue to do that. I think it's just a really positive way to help kids out these days because of what I think one of the biggest challenges it is giving your kids everything. You're setting them up for failure, in my opinion. In my opinion you're setting them up for failure because if one doesn't understand the value of a dollar, I don't care if you're six or sixteen or twenty six, it's going to be a struggle. It's strongly it's very value. That's great advice to when you see these kids selling product, you know, to the best of your ability at that time you might be in a hurry, but throw them the dollar, throw them whatever it is, five dollars, whatever it may be, may fourages them, encourages them to keep on going. Yeah, yeah, and it's and kids get real creative. Sometimes they'll do small, medium and large. You know, I will always take the larger. I always take the up cell if they offer. You know, I love asking what else do you have for do you have anything else, if anything that goes with us. Well, no, we don't, and sometimes something will snap. It's the craziest things could come up with, but it's like that's a great idea, yes, I'll have that too, and it just makes them feel really, really good and I just think it's it's a lot of fun. It's neat see in the smile come on their face and then they take that money that they work really hard with, either creatively speaking, with the signs that they drew or all that, and they get to go out and they get to purch something on their own. I member when I did it,...

I bought a little model airplane that I was looking at and I felt like wow, this is the best toy ever because I earned this. It was fantastic. It's a great way. I mean it, I can't get out of my head. This weekend we had some friends over and they had children. They have children and they were playing with our children and we weren't really paying attention to them because they were playing and we were talking, and then they said, okay, mom, Dad, come to our cozy cafe. So we have a tent in the living room, just like a little sort of fun tent and they built this cozy cafe, they put the sign up the open they put the menu on it and they gave us coupons to come to buy and they've had the little t set and they were so happy of doing it and I was just I was quite because they know what I'm doing and promoting work and I'm like, yes, that's a little like kids to do, but I think we should encourage them more right and we don't always do it the right way, but hoping that they will get something and then start their own thing at a very young age. Yeah, it's all about rewarding them. I remember my brother and I'm making up tickets and giving them to our parents and they came and watched our little play. You know, it was the goofiest, probably dorkiest thing in the world. That didn't make any sense to them, but you know, it was neat. We you know, we had them get the tickets, they sat down, they had their popcorn, they were ready to go and we just had a lot of fun. That was one of the benefits of growing up the S, you know, is there's it was just it was just really neat and I think a lot of us get sidetracked with all the distractions in the twenty one century, ie screens and and it in alleviates a lot of that family time. And I really believe that close knit families really help and preparing someone for the world, because my wife's daughter, my stepdaughter, this our first year in college. She's out of the House. Wow, our her eyes going to be open. No, it's a completely different world from, you know, coming home, opening up the cabinet or the cupboards and you know there's there's some potato chips they can grow out a grab, or there's a there's a drink they can grab and they don't have to pay for it. Now the sudden it's a different world. Nobody is going to give them that anymore. It's good like the lessons that we've learned along the way, like in hard ways of like when you go off on your first day, you know, to college or university and you open your cupboards. Well, these cupboards are very big and bar it's not wrong, and it is when you were not jumping in the drink or stirring one with lemonade. What what type of jobs did you find yourself getting into as you got older and in your teenage years? Yeah, well, it's life got really tough. We were homeless twice. Why? I was a kid once, followed as a dope as an adult, homeless meaning living in a one thousand nine hundred and seventy nine brown suburban, Che really suburban, and I got a job at sixteen at McDonald's and I remember still to this day, clear as a bell, my mom and my brother coming through the drive through ordering my twenty piece Jacken mcnugget and I think one time I got thirty one pieces in there. Now I stole and and I know that that's wrong. Definitely understand that. At the time I didn't quite realize what that meant. I never got in trouble, I never got caught for anything like that, but I I knew that that was wrong and looking back on it, it my family having a little bit extra to eat trumped that, and I try to justify theft in that way. I Bet I have a hard time with it, but I still did because I know that's all it is. And then you know, if you work at McDonald's, especially back in one thousand nine hundred and eighty six,...

...you are making that much money. And so we would save up enough to where we could get a hotel about one and two days a week and then off your living, off, off, off of the off of my living. And then my dad finally got a job, and actually really good job, and we moved to hunting to Beach California and live right by the beach and had a great time. But that was a really big lesson for me understanding the importance of work and even though I couldn't afford house or anything like that, it made me feel good the value of contribution and working hard. And many people may not. I mean I respect to live in day. lets go through a McDonald's or well, I don't really go to McDonald's anymore, but if I were to go to a McDonald's, I'm so nice to the person. I don't care who it is that drive through or there. I respect to live in daylights out of them because I've been there. I understand. You know how challenging it is and for them to take the time to work in a job, work hard, support their family, maybe their single mother, single father, who knows what their story is, but I think if you can just give them a couple seconds of a of a smile or thank you so much for helping me out, anything you do to brighten their day, because they could be going out and doing something else, selling drugs or doing something crazy, getting in trouble, and and to value what they do for a living and why they work. They have some motivation for it. I just love being able to be there and saying hey, thank you for doing what you're doing. It's it's I don't care. I don't care if you're working in McDonald's, I don't care if you're a CEO of a fortune, five hundred coming, it doesn't matter to me, as long as, in my opinion, you're good person and hey, it's worth a smile. Yeah, break it up and forty years ago or more, a McDonald's opened in my hometown and then, when I was a little older, I went to McDonald's and I still go to McDonald's sign. I have a weakness for it, and I happen to go visit my mom and South Korea now and I went to go visit my mom. She was in the hospital in February and I went through the same McDonald's and went through the the first part, which is the cash part, and the lady that was there was the same lady that worked there when I went when I was a little kid, and I remember my mom would give me like ten, twenty bucks and like okay, you know, my single mom would give me twenty bucks and and go get some McDonald's, so I'll get some for her and some for me. And I said to the lady, I'm like don't please, please. Are you not the same lady? Because I know it was, but I was just trying to get around of you know, the timeline. I mean, yeah, you were here when I was a kid. She goes, yeah, I probably was, and I go how long ago is that? You well, how long do you think it was? I said, you know, I'll calculate and I want to be conservative and I'm like maybe thirty years. She goes, no, dear, I was here when it opened and there's a few weather of us here, a couple managers, and we were here when it first open, so almost forty years ago. And Wow, I said, how do you do it? She goes, we love our job. Yeah, and I said well, I even said thank you for your service, like it's almost like feel like they are dedicated and I, and you know McDonald's is. would be tough and you know it's they're not salads. They're not eating salads there. So it does take a toll on you. But yeah, I appreciate everyone's work who does something that is is for the benefit of other people one way or another. Serving. Hey Man, I'm helping with food, so after you help. I mean that's an amazing story in and of itself of you at sixteen working to support...

...your family and then you guys had a break and went out to California. And did that bring you into high school? Yeah, that brought me into high school. I actually lost a year of high school because of us being homeless. I wasn't able to attend school my in between my freshman and sophomore years, so I had to Redo my sophomore years I didn't have enough credits and we moved to the new location in Huntington. I you know, I didn't know anybody in my mom tried to get me on the football team. They wouldn't take me because my eligibility being one year removed. MMM. So I joined joined the SURF team because it wasn't, you know, the traditional sport and that was a lot of fun. So I got to paddle around the pier for pe class in the morning and then go to school. That was neat. I met a couple good friends that way and then, yeah, from from there it was it was a while before I worked again. I went and I got into race and and stuff like that, and that was kind of my work and my my dad was doing really well at the time. And then, yeah, then all of a sudden I found myself in a position. My Dad went to jail for embezzelment and we lost everything again. And so at the age of I think eighteen and a half and my brother sixteen and a half, two years younger than me, we found herself homeless again and like what the heck? We were going to a race in Oklahoma City, Punkus city as a matter of fact, Oklahoma, and I got a call for my dad said we had to turn around and come back all the way back to California. So we did and we came back and he kind of told us what happened and we were like what I ac so within three days we got back to California, moved out of our house and we didn't we didn't have anywhere to go again. So try to sell everything we could, our motorcycles and whatever we could fit into the trailer and the truck and the car, and finally my mom finally got a someone to rent her a small home and that's where we stayed. And I stayed for about another six months because I got a job as a Lineman, which is really hard work, and I didn't really like it because I had to drive about two hours back and forth to work each way. But I felt bad because I didn't want to be there and not contribute to my mom because she was working. She's got a job with how is how is your mom doing at this point? I know my dear life. We've moved country to country a few times and been in between jobs and my life is rest. Yeah, she wouldn't have it any other way. She loved us, you know, she did everything for us. So I went and join the army because I felt guilty being at the house and so I came and told her one day. I said, Ay, my I just signed up for the army, and she broke down and she did not like that at one bit. But you know what, though, you know you're going through so much, and that is, you know, a secure job by joining the military, and that can give you the billy and your mom probably knows that and recognizes that, but not my baby. No, no, no, it wasn't. Actually, wouldn't she heard I was signed up with the infantry? No, I'll be well protected, mom. Yeah, yeah, it was a challenge. Yeah, I'm thank you for your service. How long did you stay in the military? Three years to the day? Yeah, three years today, Ninety Ninety to ninety three, no, ninety one, January, Ninety one to January ninety four, and all those ways, because I know it's going to lead into what you're doing now. But all of those ways shows that you're learning to appreciate service. Yeah, from the in the people who like the military, whether McDonald's, even appreciating the struggles of coming from...

...nothing, going, you know, from something to nothing to something to nothing again, and understanding and not not being prideful and arrogance saying, you know, I deserve this position or I have all that I ever need and I don't need to remember the people that are on the bottom. That seemed to develop very early with you and it, I think, probably led you into what you're doing now. Yeah, I would I would say that that would be a good assumption, except for the fact that I deal not this. Still did not understand the value of a dollar. Believe it or not, from from when, when I was into the racing and all that, we were really spoiled. We didn't pay for anything. All we did was race and have fun and our food was always there. We were never told we needed to get a job and that was a big deal. Well, I went into the army. I didn't manage my money very well. I got out of the army went back home. The day I got out, my wife told me she wanted a divorce and I had plans to move in with their family and get a job and everything was lined up with her dad's company. I don't remember exactly what it was, but then there was no place to go, no vehicle, nothing. Called one of my friends and stayed in the back of his dueli truck. It was kind enough to let me do that for a couple days and I felt so guilty because he's going around to his job. He were instruction and I'm like, I just can't do this and they weren't hiring. So I couldn't get a job there. And I said you know what, Eric, thanks you so much. My buddies name is Eric Amazing friend of mine since ninth grade, Eric, Eric Lawns where we are. We talked every now and then, but you were he was a big impact in my life. So I had my army rucksack. I said I'm just gonna, I'm just going to go, and he tried to stop me, invited me to stay with them and I said absolutely not. My pride was too big. So I walked around for a while then I realized, well, crap, I don't have money. So there I am, out of all places, on McDonald's, baking people to buy me a hamburger so I could eat. Wow, you want to talk about something that's hard to do, you gotta really check your pride and do that. unbeknownst to me, my good Buddy Eric had put sixty dollars in my rucksack and he didn't tell me because he knew I wouldn't have accepted it. So here I am begging people like for two days to get a little bite to eat, and I remember finally getting a cheeseburger something like that, and taking a bite and just kind of savoring it because I was so hungry, and then I wrap it back up and put it in my ruck. And Walk a little bit longer and taken another bite like like wow, I get really got to take this slow because I do not want to bag again. So I ended up making my way down to hunting to beach where I had some friends from when I lived there before the army, and they they were kind enough to take me in. I got a couch, I got a job at a Bennigan's and finally found my way out of the predicament I was in and got myself an apartment and thanks to thanks to those guys there for letting me crash on my couch for three months. They finally said, Jamie, you got to go. So, yeah, I got my own place and yeah, that was about that's about the time when I made enough, got my apartment and then it entered into corporate America. There so you said you didn't really it value the dollar. When did that start to gain some traction for you? You don't know. This is crazy. I worked in corporate America, made some decent money and actually made really good money, but I always never seem to be able to save any of it and it just kept going and going and going and took me. I was in corporate MAREICA for...

...about twelve years. Took me eleven years to get out, go out of my own. Here you have here. I was on my own starting in two thousand and six, started my own agency and made decent money, and then two thousand and eight hit. I lost everything and I didn't save. I was going out, I was having fun, I was doing all that stuff and we lost virtually all of our clients in the span of about three months because we were a real estate based AD agency. When the when, the when, the real estate market just crashed, literally crashed, and I was living in Stockton, California at the time and if you I don't know how many people remember how hard it hit, but stockton was the number three city in the entire nation to hit for closures. One and three homes out of went into foreclosure. So, needless to say, reality hit me and I vowed from that moment on in two thousand and six, the next fincher I get into, I had to work a couple jobs and that stuff to get back on track, but I when next venture I do, I'm going to make it as recession proof as possible, because I learned in a down economy the number one thing that company stopped doing is marketing and advertising. Those budgets are gone. And the second thing is staffing. They lay start laying people off. So I wanted to come up with a way that I could thrive in a down economy and loan behold, here I am. I run a virtual staffing agency that survives. Explain that. That's bottle neck virtual asust. So can you explain what it is that you do for clients? Yeah, sure so. A lot of entrepreneurs, team leaders, business owners, business leaders, see level executives are extremely busy throughout the day, extremely busy as some of them are missing work, are missing family time. You know, maybe they have to call and say, Hey, I can't go out on date night, I got to work late this weekend, I got to work. I'm sorry, we got to post that off. They're missing the kids soccer games or, you know, the sporting events or, you know, go into the recitals, whatever that may be. And what we've found is the reason, the reason they're doing this is there so entrenched in the mundane details of their work that they can't really focus on the high level activity that would make them more successful. I don't know how many people are listening, are you, Brian? How many times you've gotten back home or if you work at home and you're done working for the Oh, I forgot to send that email. I got to runnen too good do just that little act of sending an email is probably going to take someone thirty minutes. And it may be a two minute email, but you have to switch your mindset, you have to leave what you were doing, you have to tell your better half or whomever it is that you're around. Or maybe you're alone and you don't need to do that, but you got to say it to yourself. Hey, excuse me, I got I forgot to do something. I'm going to go do this and maybe we stop another activity. Then you sit down, you got to fire up the computer, you got to do all the stuff, you got to remember what it was, read through it, then you got to send it and then you got to make sure you did it. Then you got to update your notes or whatever it is, and for a two minute email, you spend a half hour of your time. I don't know about you, but when I check emails, it used to take me an hour day easy. I'd be doing it an hour a day and eighty ninety percent of my emails I just throw in the trash, but I scam over them, scan over them, but I throw them in the trash. Well, my assistant now I spent about five to ten minutes a day on email because my assistant goes through all of that for me. Same thing with managing my calendar. I used to manage my own color. I don't do that anymore. I work Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday now and Friday morning. So at eleven o'clock my wife and I go play hockey. That's how we met. After we're done with hockey we're off until Tuesday and and that's because we systemize the business so well. And you asked what bottle that virtual assistance is. That's what we do. We source high, highly skilled personal...

...assistance for very, extremely busy executives so they can outsource the mundane details or their day to day operations so that they can focus on doing high level activity. And I think if you're a business owner, you should be working in your business about four to eight hours a week. The rest of the time you need to be focused on growing, on innovating, on thinking, on planning, on all kinds of other stuff to grow and scale the business, different ideas, different concepts, partnerships, things like that. You don't need to be working in the details. That's why a personal assistant is so unbelievably hopeful. And, believe us, we wouldn't have been written up in Forbes twice had it not been for this. Our first year of doing business, and this particular business only did elevenzero and it was just me. Well, here we are now, close to fifty on our team and four years later we exceeded the seven figure mark, which is unbelievable, and that's because of the power of leveraging your time, focusing on the high level activities, talking to Brian V and and all the while, all the details of the that are extremely important, systemization processes, workfloes, are being handled in the backband by people who like doing that. How did you come up with the name, and do you remember when you came up with this idea to do this? I mean, this is based on your whole I mean, Jamie Jay, you were bottle necked for most of your life. Yeah, right, I am the bottleneck, like I mean, listening to your story, you weren't down once, you weren't down twice, you weren't down three that you were down. Yeah, and you were into you know, one way to put it is to be bottled necked, and you weren't able to to sort to where you are now. And I'm not all about like everyone's going to be rich or famous and all of that, but you went through through some very tough time. I don't think you were bottleneck, you were squashed under the bottle. Oh yeah, right, and how did you come up with this idea based on your experience? And then the name is is wonderful. Yeah, thank you. So I was part of a master mind. I had an agency that I web based, creative agency, and all of my friends and all my colleagues are asking, how are you getting these virtual assistants to help you with this stuff? This is fantastic, and I said, Oh, you know, I go to the Philippines and I have a good relationship there and one of my former business partners one of the Philippines in California, and that's that was my first experience back in two thousand and six and and they wanted to know how they could get one. I said, Oh, just here, I'll introduce you to this person, and they said, Jamie, you need to create a business out of this and I said really. They said, Oh yeah, so one of my friends that was kind of doing this part time out of Las Vegas, someone I used to work with in corporate America, introduce me to a fella and I just took it from there and ran and absolutely loved it. And with regards to the name, I wish I could claim credit for it, but I absolutely cannot. A good friend of mine, Mark Hafner, is a Emmy Award winning audio producer, amazing fellow, very, very creative. He and I were talking about what we were doing and a lot of executives there their own bottle necks. They're they're afraid of giving away the secrets, they're afraid of having someone else do the work for them because it won't be up to their level of standards and a lot of times they think, well, they don't know anything because it's in my head, I have a certain way of doing things, and that's a major, major bottleneck. Every single owner that is challenged in their business is without system, processes or workflow and in my opinion, are the bottle necks, and I'm not afraid to say that to their face, because I think they need to understand that. Now, I don't call everybody a bottle neck, but you have to. You have to really look at yourself in the mirror and figure out if you're running a company and it's in...

...you are not in a position that you want to be in. You're to blame. There's no one else that's like the seen recently the show the Prophet. Yeah, like that's many of the problems that he comes across when he goes to these businesses. They are at the bottleneck. I then looking at these people that like Hey, my business is great. No, you're the problem of you're not outsource. Seeing you you want to have all control and you are inhibiting your business to strive and to be what it is. Another show that comes to mind is that bar rescue show. I don't know if you ever seen that. I seen a couple of things because, yeah, and any notice that what they do is they work on the person, not the business. Yeah, then that helps the process much easier. What is difficult? What is most difficult about your job? I mean, everything is not. You know, you're not completely unbottled neck. There's still some difficulties that go with the business that you run. What is a big difficulty that you have. Yeah, a lot of people say twenty row. I I call it a seventy thirty rule. There's a lot of things that we have to do. I have to do processes and systems and I have to do review stuff and I have to go into our base camp and arts were project management software, to see where the team is at and what we're doing. That's thirty percent of the stuff that I could I could do without, but it's stuff that I have to do in order to be on top of things. Now in the other seventy percent, that's where I go on podcast get any ton of energy and I you know, I love traveling to events, although at this current time, as the time of this recording, we're in Covid so or you're not seeing that as much. I like doing virtual events, I love live streaming, I love I love just having fun interacting, I love taking breaks, reading some books, getting some good ideas in evading on my time, which is during the week, working time. That's that's what I thrive. That's where I love. I Love Partnerships. I love like right now I'm partnering with the University in Canada and we're doing a really indepth detail analysis of remote work, distributed workforce and how what three things are going to be most difficult about this? And it's it's just really neat doing all of that stuff. That's seventy percent of the job I love. Thirty percent not so much, but I understand that's what I have to do in order to accomplish the goals that I set for myself and we've set collectively together, both my family and my team, my business team. Jamie, you've had an interesting life and you're still living it. How can you say that work has brought you through life? I mean you you mentioned some McDonald's and and some other even from jumping into the pond and selling lemonade, but how has this work helped you through your life and how has it been like the constant in your life to help you move on and to can I I love this question. This is a fantastic question and thank you for answering it, asking it so that I think what work has done for me is the necessary means to an end. So there's a lot of things that I care about my life that I want to be able to help educate others. Plastic pollution, things like this that I love to do, that I can't afford to do because I have to work to get there. But Oh my gosh, I'm imagine how awesome it would be to be able to work hard enough to earn some kind of monthly recurring revenue or sell a business or do something where you have that freedom of time to do to make a bigger impact. We hear, if I don't call that the ripple effect, to make a positive impact, first and foremost in your own community, then in your region,...

...then in your nation, and then you have a global impact. And I have that global impact now with our staff in the Philippines. It's I cannot tell you how much it makes me just want to jump up and down when I hear one of our Va's bought their first home. One of our Va's, thirty some years old, I won't say isn't his aide to protective has six kids, bought his first car and that was because we created something for that. Now another family can thrive on, not to mention all the business owners that I can now leverage their time, they have a lower cost, they're able to put more money back into their local community. We are in the process of US sponsoring an at risk youth. We would have never been able to do that. But the work, the way you ask this question, the work is getting need to where we want to get to. We want to get on a sailboat and we want to sail around and we want to talk to different communities and our hope is that we can record what these different communities are doing with regards to all this plastic pollution. See what they're doing, see what they're doing right, see what they're doing for cleanup, see how the plastic pollution is impacting their local environment. And we want to record this and work with different junior high level kids, middle school level kids. We think elementary is too young. We think high school they're too set in their ways those middle school years. Man, if we could get that put into the course curriculum for them and have the kids follow us around for a term, get that put into the curriculum and maybe we turn some of those kids into oceanographers. Maybe maybe they want to have a passion for doing something that's going to make the world a better place than what we found it in. And that's just I know we can't change the world that way, but if we can change an influence one person to be more responsible for what it is that they're doing. It's only going to make it that much better for the future generations to come. So that's why we're so driven, because it's an ends to a mean for something even bigger, more impactful, that we call the ripple effect. That is good. I like the ripple effect and that's how work brings you through. It encourages you to make more ripples exactly, exactly hundred percent. Could you give some advice? And even you mentioned the valuing of doll the dollar or a dollar, how you didn't before. So it just advice to people who are not working, maybe their first looking into their first job, in between jobs, maybe because of things that are going on now or they're not happy with their jobs. So advice, but also based on that valuing of a dollar, how how it would be, how you've come to value the dollar and your new perspective, your appreciation of the dollar and the value, and they're in the reason why is important to work. Yeah, I've I would say my advice would be to write down one of the biggest dreams you have right now and write it down. And the reason I say to do that is. Now you have a goal that you can get to, but don't rely solely on that goal. When you write down your goal, that's kind of something that's like a dream. Maybe that's something that you but I will tell you this right now. When you achieve that goal, you're going to want to know what's next. So for me, I have a goal like that, but I know every day I set an objective that I wish to accomplish in the mission in our company is exactly that. A mission for a company is a mission in life. It's a daily objective you hope to achieve each and every single day. Write that down, goal down. Did you take it off your list? Great, at the end of every day I always kind of look at my day and said, this is what I did, this is what I did, this is what I did, this is what I did, and it feels so good like I've accomplished something, and I think that's a Majing, major driving factor to go where we want to go. One day my wife and...

I will be on a boat. We will be on a boat sailing around. I promise you that we will be there, unless something tragic happens, God from it. We will be there. And when that happens, guess what, we're going to be able to experience something else that we're going to want to get to from there. And I will tell you, probably one of the best feelings in the world, and you could probably talk to a million speakers, teachers, anybody like that, when they get to share their experiences with others and you see their eyes light up and their ears perk forward and they're just consuming what it is that you're sharing with them, because you're sharing with them through the best of intention. This is persuasion, not manipulation. I want to make it that very clear. Delineation. Persuasion is actually good. M manipulation is bad. But when you're talking to people in the you see them light up like, oh my gosh, that is Sony. I want to do something like that, or I would. You're going to feel so good and you're going to be driven to continue doing that because you're going to be offering a lot of positivity in the world and I think ultimately that's what it's all about. Jamie, I talked to some of the other day and he mentioned about appreciation and looking at your life and what you're doing now, how much, how valuable. Do you find or suggest to look back once in a while, to look back at our lives and say, Hmm, I have much to be appreciated for. Have much to appreciate. If you can see, you should be very appreciative. If you can walk, you should be very appreciative. If you can't walk but you can see, you should be appreciative. If you can hear, you should be appreciative. In my opinion, it's I have such a blessed life and here I am in Ane Hundred Square foot home. I mow my own lawn. You know, we do everything. We do a lot. We're very responsible for how we live now. But I came from a lunch. Lunch in today we practice social distancing. By the way, we wore our masks. But the gentleman that was speaking was talking about as he had an organization that helps at risk youth and he had one story. Get this. Sex Trafficking is a big thing and I know I might be going off in the bedwood different world, and this goes into setting perspective with the question that you've asked. Eleven years old I'd been bought and sold over fifteen times. Fifty eleven year old girl addicted to Meth and fetamines, addicted to alcohol, hadn't been to school since first grade, was on the street, rescued and rescued by the way in and high heeled Stiletto's short skirt. Unbelievable. Think about that for a second. Oh, old, absolutely tragic. Then you think about the eleven year old that's going to school and comes home and is complained because you took the eyepad away. It's all about perspective, right. Fast forward five years. This eleven year old girl is now in the honor roll starting your first year of high school. She's been helped out by that organization and it was a woof yeah, what a story like, emotional and I don't think there was a dry in the room, at least I didn't have a dry and it. You look at something like that and holy cow, I can go back to being homeless and I'd be better off than that poor little where was when she was eleven years old. So you have to what you do and what you're normally used to is ordinary, but to so many other people it's extraordinary. Yeah, absolutely. Where can people find you, Jamie Jay? Oh, you could just google bottleneck. You can visit bottle neck down online and I think probably you can even do Jamie j now I know as...

...singer, James J Singer was was beating me on Google. I think I've surpassed her now, hopefully. But yeah, go to bottle neck down online and if you want to talk or reach out, I'm on all the social media channels and we do a live stream every Tuesday and Thursday at two PM Central. It's called live with bottle neck and I talked to a lot of people that have stopped the bottle neck in their business and share ways of doing the same for others. So it's it's a lot of fun. Jamie Jay. Two more questions. One, how do you rest? How do you find rest? What do you do in your rest? Well, this is going to sound weird. One way that I find rest is playing hockey, believe it or not, because my mind rest, I focus only on hockey. It's an unbelievable break. I absolutely love it because I don't think about work, I don't think about challenges anything. I think about hockey and it's a lot of fun. So for that two hours when I'm playing hockey, I just absolutely love it and my brain rests. The other way is my wife and I. We boat every weekend. We go down to the lake just about every weekend. Less the boats broke, you know boat and must down another thousand. Those things break down a lot. But we we really enjoy going out to the lake, hanging out in the boat, just going for a you know forty five minute boat ride and maybe stop off at a cove and jump in the water. Those are great ways to relax and, you know, we get some good rest. Do we sleep and stuff like that, but those, those are probably the two best ways that we kind of, you know, unwind a bit. Yeah, it's good. I mean it's wonderful to promote work, but we do after rest and I you probably see this with some of the people that you you work with, your clients that are overworked and that's why you're doing your business is because they're hundred percent. Can I say one more thing, Brian Absolute. Several several months ago I got a call on a Saturday morning from a Kline of mine. This is pretty big dude. He's all tatted up, just big. I would not want to meet this guy and have him pissed off me in a dark alley. Absolutely not very, very strong present. I got a call Saturday. Normally don't answer my phones, this one I answer my phone and he goes, Jamie, Hey, I I'm calling. I notes sorry more I just wanted to call in and let you know, excuse me, let you know, that this is the first Saturday I'm spending with my wife and my kid since we've in the since in my business, and I've had my business for three years, that I have not been working and I just want to let you know. Thanks to you for allowing us to hire an assistant at bottles neck. Are of all my all my stuff for me. And then the phone wrestles away and you hear the why I say, Jamie, thanks to get my husband back. Yeah, that was power right. That totally unexpected and now I love sharing that story because it wow, had we never created bottle neck, we wouldn't never made a difference. And that's the truth with you know, if we're not doing it for a family or some other good reason, as you mentioned, for children, or what are we doing it for? We know, you know we're not just trying to climb some ladder and get the money. There has to be another reason. And if we're not spending time with that reason, then it's all for not. Yeah, money's money's good. I will not say I mean money is good, but what's even better is it's it's not not what you say or what you get from something, it's how you make someone feel. Absolutely that's all the difference, Jamie J last question. Why do you work? Why do I work? I work. I work so that I can take care of myself first and so that I'm healthy, financially stable, so I can help with the global ripple effect of so many others. That's exactly why we do...

...it. I like the ripple effect with Jamie Jay Bottleneck virtual assistants. Thank you, sir. You are a gentleman and I appreciate your story and your work. Thanks for having me, Brian. This is great. Thank you. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian v be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive, be a joyful day in your work.

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