WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 29 · 1 year ago

#28 Jaime Jay Bottleneck Virtual Assistants

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Jaime’s Profile linkedin.com/in/jaimejay 

Website bottleneck.online/inquiry (Company Website) 

Phone +1 (844) 376-9410 (Work) 

Email info@bottleneck.online 

Twitter slapshotstudio  

Jamie's Company: 

 "I'm proud to say that I'm committed to ‘The Ripple Effect' of giving. I love supporting ideas, bravery and collaboration with entrepreneurs who want to grow their business. Enter Bottleneck Virtual Assistants, an outsourcing agency founded to help ambitious leaders identify, hire and cultivate a strong and authentic team through a carefully designed systematic approach to growth. Virtual assistant services: + Personal Assistants Integrated Services Program, ("ISP") + Graphic design + Web development + Administrative assistance Learn more by visiting: https://bottleneck.online/ISP" We are more than just a staffing agency; we are teachers, with an authentic desire to transfer our collective wisdom to our clients as we journey together through the hiring process.   

Partner with us today at bottleneck.online

Welcome to why we work with your hostan Brian Vig as he speaks to meeple like you from all over the world, as wetogether dive deeper into our motivations struggles, joys, seeminglymisstepd warnings and advice, which will be anencouragement to us all to get a get going and keep on working working is good. Now, here's your Houst to whywe were N Cryng, Mei viatwhy. We work. They had a great pleasure. Speaking ofMister jme J he's the owner of bottle neck virtual assistance. He helpscompanies not bottle neck themselves, doing the daily tasks that othercompanies will do for them he's been through a lot and he does alot not only that. The way that he presents himself is of joy out ofgratitude, knowing what he has gone through, but whatim pressed me most was afterthe camera was off. He poured into me offering to me anything that he coulddo for me, which I just thought was wonderful. I was speechless. I didn'teven know what to ask. What you see on the camera is what came after as wellso sit back and have a listened to Mister Jm, J at Bottleneck, virtualassistance and listen about his ripple effect Ombrivy, and this is why we work-and I have the wonderful pleasure of speaking today with Jamie j good day, fine, Sir Hello Nice to meet you Brivi n iced, tothank you so much for having me on I'm yeah. I'M J excited to chat with you.I'm excited too, because I had because of what just happened. A moment ago wewere trying to get connected. I had the opportunity again to watch you ind yourown potcast, and you have this energy about you. It's it's very contagiousand it's really exciting. I know we don't always have it, but you seem likea very pleasant guy to speak with, and I know the work, some of the work ofwhich you're doing that I hope to get into in the introduction. I I addatthat, but now can you can you bring us back into 'cause? This is why we workso it all starts from somewhere. What was your first job Jamie, your veryfirst job? First job, I hired my little brother, a with no money down, and we lived on a golf course. o Wewent and jumped in the lake got a hole in t of golf balls. We sold golf ballswith a hack in the side of Hem for twenty five cents, nd one's with nohacks, we sold for fifty cents to a dollar, and then we found that we wereon the exact opposite and of the clubhouse, so people were thirsty andwe decided to implement a secondary stream of income. So we added freshmade lemonade, so we had lemonade that they could purchase while they lookedat the balls and our sales actually increased. So my brother and I broughthim in and we did a seventy five twenty five split first and then we ended updoing fifty fifty because my brother loved getting in Hutting of the ballsLe a little bit more, so he needed o raise Ho. How old were you? I think I was twelve and my brother was ten. What made you like? I mean thinking nowwhen I was twenty or thirty. I I see a lot of my balls go into there. I'm likehey, there's a good business, but at twelve. What would what would make youwant to do that right w? What was your desire motivation just to to make somemoney? Well M? I think it was fun. It gave us something to do. It was duringthe summer Um. We had just relocated to...

Colorado from Alaska and Um. We werejust we Kindo, didn't know what we were doing and one day golfer came by when we were sittingright by the fence and said: Did you see a ball come over here and weerelike no and I went to go help and lookand? I found like three or four andhe goes there. You Go. Here's a dollar and, I said Whoa you gave me a dollarfor finding four golf balls cool. How do I find more? What is your parents? Think of youdoing that? Just I M N, with theand M, my mom was right there, helping us,make the lemonade and she'd bring fresh Bach, elimonade out and and yeah sheabsolutely loved it. She thought it was. She thought we were great. Do you think,like I speak to my kids and I have some students that I speak to about this ofencouraging kids to to start something like that to be innovative, I mean thelemonade stand. Is One of the oldest things for kids to do or anyone to do,but for kids to do. Would you encourage kids to think of ways to learn the value of work at a young age,or would you allow them for their own motivation reasons to do something likethat? Yes, and yes, and if you think about it,I we in our ripe old young age, whatever we consider our age to be. Weknow the lemonade standas been around while, but if you put yourself in inthe shoes of a six year old, a ten year old and eleven year old, this is rannew. They are cutting edge. They are starting a business in a lemonade.Stand and, and and for that reason, whether I see someone outside t e groupof kids- usually it's two or three kids, the friends get together and Oh, wewant to get the latest. You know video games, you know, let's go earn somemoney or hopefully their parents will push them in that direction of a bigproponent of untpeneurial spirit and, and that starts from a young age. Soevery time I pass elemonades den, I wouldn't say every time quite a bitor if they're on our road, my wife and I may walk down and we'll pay for it.'cause. I, like I like rewarding kids that that try to do something creativewhatever that may be. I think it's fantastic we're a sucker for the girlscout cookies. You know- and you know so we want to make sure that we makethem feel good and hopes that hey they feel like they've done somethingsuccessful and we'll continue to do that. I think it's just a reallypositive way to help kids out these days. Because of what I I think, one ofthe biggest challenges is giving your kids everything you're. Setting them upfor failure, in my opinion, in my opinion, you're sending them up forfailure, because if, if one doesn't understand the value of the dollar, I don't gave Youre six or sixteen ortwenty six Um, it's going to be a struggle, its stron, it's very val,that's great advice to when you see these kids selling product, you know to the best of your ability.At that time you might be in a hurry, but throw them the dollar throw themwhatever. It is five dollars, whatever it may be, iner Ino them. It encouragesthem to to keep on going yeah, yeah and and kids get real, creative, sometimesand they'll do small, medium and large. You know I will always take the larger.I always take the UPCEIL. If they offer you K Ow, I love asking what else doyou have for? Do you have anything else? If anything that goes with us well, Howe don't and sometimes somethingwill snap, it's the craziest things coldcome up with, but it's like that's a great idea. Yes I'll have that too, andit just makes them feel really really good and I just think it', it's a lotof fun. It's neat seeing the smile come on their face and then they take thatmoney that they work really hard with either creatively, speaking with thesigns that they drew or all that and they get to go out and they get toperch something on their own. I...

...remember when I did it. I bought alittle model airplane that I was looking at and I felt like now. This isthe best toy ever because I earne this. It was fantastic T it's a great way. Imean I can't get out of my head this weekend. We had some friends over andthey had children that have children and they were playing with our childrenand we weren't really paying attention to them because they were playing andwe were talking and then they said. Okay Mdad come to our cozy cafe, so we havea tent in the living room, just like a little sort of fun tent and they builtthis cozy cafe they put the sign up the open. They put the menu on it and theygave us coupons to come to buy and they had e little tea set and they were sohappy of doing it, and I was just I was quite 'causethey- know what I'm doingand and promoting work and I'm like. Yes, that's h want Li kids to do, but Ithink we should encourage them more right and we don't always do it theright way, but hoping that they will get something and then start their ownthing at a very young age, yeah, it's all about rewarding them. I remember mybrother and I m making up tickets and giving them to our parents and theycame and watched our little play. You know it was the goofiest, probably dorkiestthing in the world that didn't make any sense to them, but you know it was neat we you know we had them get the tickets,they sat down, they had their popcorn, they were ready to go and we just had alot of fun. That was one of the benefits of growingup in the seventies it NS therewas. It was just. It was justreally neat and I I think, a lot of us get sidetracked with all thedistractions in the twenty first century. Ie screens alleviates a lot of that family timeand I really believe that Um close NIPPD families really help in preparing someone forthe world, because my my wife's daughter, my my stepdaughter, this isour first year in college, she's out of the House, Um Wowr her eyeis, going tobe open. No, it's a completely different world from you know, cominghome, opening up the cabinet, the cupboards- and you know, there'sthere's some potato chips. They can grownd grab or there's a there's, adrink they can grab and they don't have to pay for it. Now, all of a sudden,it's a different world nobody's going to give them that anymore. It's Clikethe lessons that we've learned along the way like in hard ways of likewhen you go off on your first day. You know to college or university and Youop in your copboards. Oh, thesecupboards are very big and bare it'snotroman. It is Iwhen. Thoy were not jumping in thedrink or stirring one with lemonade. What what type of jobs did you findyourself getting into as you got older and in your teenage years, yeah? Well, Um life got really tough. We were homelesstwice why I was a kid once following as a dope as an adult homeless, meaningliving in nine Hutdren and seventy nine Brown, suburban, Chevreley, suburbanand UH. I got a job at sixteen at McDonalds and I remember still to thisday clear Asabel, my mom and my brother, coming through the drive throughordering my twenty piece, chicken mcnugget, and I think one time I gotthirty one pieces in there now I stole- and I know that that'swrong. I definitely understand that at the time I didn't quite realize whatthat meant. I never got in trouble. I never got cought for anything like that,but I knew that that was wrong and looking back on it it, I my family having a little bit extra toeat, Um trumpd that and I try to justify temt in that way, but Ihave a hard time with it, but I still did because I know that's all it is andth you know. If you work at McDonalds, especially back in nineteen nd, eightysix,...

...you weren't making that much money and H, so we would save up enough towhere we could get a hotel about one two days a week and thenyour living offoff off of my living and then my dad finally got a job, an actual, reallygood job and we moved to Huntingto Beach, California and lived right bythe beach and had a great time. But that was a really big lesson for me:understanding the importance of work, and even though I couldn't afford ahouse or anything like that, it made me feel good the value of contribution andworking hard and many people. May Not. I mean I respect the living daylight,go through a McDonalds or well. I don't really go to McDonalds anymore, but ifI were to to go to at McDonalds, I'm so nice to the person, I don't carewho it is that drive through or there I respect to Liv in daylight, AOM, 'cause, I've been there. I understand you knowhow challenging it is and for them to take the time to work in a job work, hard support their family, maybetheir single mother, single father, who knows what their story is, but I thinkif you can just give them a couple of seconds of of a smile or thank you somuch for helping me out anything. You do to brighten e day because they couldbe going out and doing something else, selling drugs or doing something crazym getting in trouble and and to value what they do for a living and why theywork. They have some motivation for it. I just love being able to be there andsaying hey. Thank you for doing what you're doing it's it's! I don't care, Idon't care if you're Worki ng at McDonalds, I don't care if your CEO, OFortue, O five hundred comn. It doesn't matter to me, as long as, in my opinion, you're a good person andhey it's worth a smile, Um yeah break it up and forty years ago,or more a McDonalds open to my hometown, and when I was a little older, I'd wentto McDonald's and I still go to McDonalds. I I have a a weakness for it and I happened to go visit. My Mom inSouth Korea now and I went to go visit my mom Um. She was in the hospital inFebruary than I went through the same McDonalds and I went through the thefirst par, which is the cash part and the lady that was. There was the samelady that worked there. When I went when I was a little kid, and I remembermy mom would give me like ten twenty bucks and like okay, you know a singlemom would give me twenty bucks and and h go get some McDonalds. So I get somefor her and some for me and I said to the lady: I'm like don't please, please, are you not the same? Lady 'cause? Iknow it was, but I was just trying to get around of you know the timeline you were here when I was a kid she goesyeah. I probably was, and I go how long ago Ho. Well, how long do you think tit was, and I said you know I'll calculate and I wantto be conservativeand I'm like maybe thirty years she was no dear. I was here whan it opened and there's afew ether of US here, a couple managers- and we were here when it first openedso almost forty years ago wo. I said: How do you do it and she goes. We LoveOur job Y and I said W. I even said thank you for your service, like it'salmost like like they were dedicated and I and you know McDonalds s would betough and you know they're not salads they're, not eating salads there, so itdoes take a toll on Yo but yeah. I appreciate everyone's work.Who, who does something that is, is for the benefit of other people, one way oranother serving Aman helping with food? So after you Ho, I mean that's anamazing story in an of itself of you at sixteen working to support your family and thenyou guys had a break and went out to...

California and did that bring you intohigh school yeah that brought me into high school. I actually lost a year ofhigh school because of us being homeless. I wasn't able to attendschool, my an Betwo, my freshmen and sophomore years, so I had to Redo mysofthware year. ECAUSE I didn't have enough credits and when we moved to thenew location in Hanington I ou know I didn't know anybody and my mom tried toget me on the football team. They wouldn't take me 'cause, my eligibilitybeing one year removed M, so I joined during the Surf Team 'cause. It wasn't.You know the traditional sport, and that was a lot of fun. So I got topaddle round the pier for a pge class in the morning and then go to school.That was neat. I met a couple F, good friends that way and then yeah from from there it was itwas a while before I worked again um I I went and I got into racing and stufflike that, and that was kind of my work and my my dad was doing really well atthe time and then yeah. Then, all of a sudden, I foundmyself in a position. My Dad went to jail for embezzlement and we lost everything again and so atthe age of I think, eighteen and a half and my brother's sixteen and a half twoyears younger than me. We found ourself homeless again and like what hat heck, we were going to Arace in Oklahoma,city, Palka city. As a matter of fact, Oklahoma and I ve got a call for mydads aid. We had to turn around and come back all the way back toCalifornia, so we did and we came back and he kindof told us what happened andwe were like what Te Heck. So within three days we got back to Californiamoved out of our house and we didn't. We didn't have anywhere to go again so tried to sell everything we could ormorcycles and whatever we could fit into the trailer and the truck and thecar. And finally, my Ma finally got someone to rent her a small home andthat's where we stayed- and I stayed for about another six months, because Igot a job as a lineman which is really hard work and didn't really like it'cause. I had to drive about two hours back and forth to work each way an, but I felt bad because I didn't want tobe there and not contribute to my mom 'cause. She was working. Shegot a job with. How is how is your mom doing at this point? I know my dearwife, we move rou country to country a few times and been in between jobs, andmy wife is Noresse. She wouldn't have it any ther way sheloved us. You know she did everything for us, so I went 'and join the army'cause I felt guilty of being at the house and so came and told her one day I said aim',I just I as signed up for the army and she broke down, and she did not likethat at one bit, but you know N, you know sh you'regoing through so much, and that is you know a secure job. Ijoining the military and that can give you stability and your mom probablyknows that and recognizes that, but none my baby, no, I know nly. When she heard I was signed upwith the infantry. No I'll be well protected, mom yeah yeah. It was a challenge Ya. They comeover your service. How long did you stay in the military three years to theday, yea three years? Todday? Ninety. Ninety o? Ninety? Three? No Ninety oneJanuary, Ninety, one to January ninety. Fourth, in all those ways 'cause, I know itit's going to lead into what you're doing now, but all of those ways shows that you're learning toappreciate service yeah, the and the people who, like the military, wetherMcDonalds, even appreciating the struggles of coming from nothing go.You know from something to nothing, to...

...something to nothing again inunderstanding and not and not being prideful and arrogant, saying you know,I deserve this position or I have all that I ever need, and I don't need toremember the people that are on the bottom, that seemd to develop very early with you and it, Ithink, probably led you into what you're doing now yeah. I would. I would say that that would be a good assumption,except for the fact that I deal di still did not understand the value of adollar believe it or not. From from when, when I was into theracing and all that we were really spoiled, we didn't pay for anything.All we did was race and Hade Fun and our food was always there. We werenever told we needed to get a job, and that was a big deal. Whell I went intothe army, I didn't manage my money very well. I got out of the army went backhome the day I got out. My Wife told me: She wanted a divorce and I had plans tomove in with their family and get a job and a everything was lined up Um withher dad's company. I don't remember exactly what it was, but then there wasum no place to go no vehicle, nothing called one of myfriends and stayed in the back of his duly truck. He was kind enough to. Letme do that for a couple of days and I felt so guilty cause he's going aroundto his job. He worke construction, I'm like I just can't do this and Um they were' hiring. So I couldn't get ajob there, and I said you know what Eric thinks you so much boy's name asEric Amazing friend of mine. Since ninth grade ARY ARY Lorene- where weare, we talk every now and then but you he was a big impact in my life. SoI had my army rucksack. I said I'm just gonna, I'm just going to go and hetried to stop me invited me to stay with him and I said absolutely not. Mypride was too big, so I walked around for a while. Then I realized well cramp.I don't have any money so there I am out of all places at McDonalds. Bagging people to buy me a hamburger,so I could eat wow. You want to talk about somethingthat's hard to do. You gotto, really check your pride and do that unvanonceto me my good Budy Eric had put sixty dollars in my rucksack and he didn'ttell me 'cause. He knew I wouldn't have accepted it so here I am baging peoplefor two days to get a little bite to eat and I remember finally getting a acheeseburger or something like that and taking a bite and just KINDOF savouringit 'cause. I was so hungry and then I'd wrap it back up and put it in my ruckand walk a little bit longer a d taking another bite like like wow. I canreally Gonto take this slow 'cause. I do not want to bag again, so I ended upmaking my way down to hunting to beach, where I had some friends from when Ilived there before the army and they they were kind o enough to take me in Igot a couch. I got a job, an Bennigans and ffound my way out of thepredicament I was in and got myself an apartment, and thanks t thanks to those guys there forletting me crash on the couch for three months, and they finally said Jamie.You gotto go so H, yeah, I I got my own place and yeah that was about Uh. Thatwas about the time when I I made enough got my apartment and then I enteredinto corporate America there. So you said you didn't really value the dollar.When did that start to gain some traction for you youll? No, this iscrazy. I worked in Carvnon America n made some decent money Um and I should made really good money, but Ialways never seemed to be able to save any of it hm and it just kept going andgoing and going and took me. I was in Corporat Maroy for about twelve yearstoo me eleven years to get out go out...

...of my own Arr. Here I was on my ownstarting in two thousand and six STARTEDG, my own agency and sa madediecent money and then two thousand and eight head. I lost everything and Ididn't save. I was going out. I was having fun. I was doing all that stuffand we lost virtually all of our clients in the span ap about threemonths 'cause. We were a real estate based Addin and see when, when the real estate market justcrashed, literally crashed- and I was living in stock in California at thetime, and if you I don't know how many people remember how hard it hit. But stocko was the number three city in theentire nation to hit foreclosures one and three homes had went intoforeclosure. So, needless to say, um reality hit me and I vowed from thatmoment on in two thousand and six, the next venture I get into. I had to worka couple of jobs and that stuff to get back on track, but I, when exventure Ido I'm going to make it as a recession, proof as possible. 'cause I learned in a down economy. The number one thingthat companies stoppe doing is marketing and advertising. Thosebudgets are gone and the second thing is staffing: They they start layingpeople off. So I wanted to come up with a way that I could thrive in a downeconomy and lone behold. Here I am, I run a a virtual staffing agency thatsurvives explain that that's bottle neck virtual assistance, so can yoexplain what it is that you do for clients, yeah sure. So, a lot of MNORSteam leaders, business owners, business leaders, um sea level, executives- areextremely busy throughout the day extremely busy, and some of them aremissing. Work are a missing family time. You know, maybe they have to call andsay hey. I can't go out on datenight. I got to work late, this Weeken I got atwork, I'm sorry. We've got a POCA off they're missing the kids soccer gamesor you know the sporting events or you know going to the recitals. Whateverthat may be and H um. What we've found is the reason. The reason they're doingthis is they're so entrenched in the the mundane details of their work that they can't really focus on t ehigh level activity that would make them more successful. Idon't know how many people are listening. Are you buying how manytimes you've gotten back home or if you work at home and Youeyou're done workn,for that? Oh I' forgot to send that EMELL IVE got TA, run too good. Do that,just that little act of sending an email is probably going to take someonethirty minutes and it may be a two minute email, but you have to Swichyour mindsit to leave what you were doing. You have to tell you're betterhalf or whomever it is that you're around or maybe you're alone, and youdon't need to do that, but you got to say it to yourself. E excuse me, I gotI forgot to do something I'm going to go. Do this and maybe we stop anotheractivity, then you sit down. You got ta fire up the computer, you gotto do allthis stuff. You got to remember what it was read through whatthen you got tosend it and then you got to make sure you did it. Then you got to uptoeatyour notes or whatever it is, and for a two minute email. You spend a half hourof your time. I don't know about you, but when I check emails it used to takeme an hour a day, easy I'd, be doing in an hour a day and eighty. Ninetypercent of my emails I'd just throwin the trash, but I I scam over them scanover them, but I throw hem in the trash. Well, my assistant, now I spent aboutfive to ten minutes a day on email 'cause. My assistant goes through allof that forme same thing. With managing my calendar. I used to manage my owncoulor. I don't do that any more. I worke Tuesday, Wednesday Thursdaynowand Friday morning, so at eleven o'clock, my wife and I go play hockey.That's how we met after we're done with hockey we're off until Tuesday and andthat's because we systemized the business so well, and you asked whatbottoe a virtual assistance is. That's what we do. We, we...

...source high, highly skilled personalassistance for very extremely busy executives, so they can outsource themundane details or their day to day operations so that they can focus ondoing high level activity, and I think, if you're a business owner, you shouldbe working in your business about four to eight hours a week, the rest of thetime. You need to be focus on growing, on innovating, on thinking, on planningon all kinds of other stuff to grow and scale the business um different ideas,different concepts, partnerships, things like that, you don't need to beworking in the details. That's why a personal assistant is so unbelievablyhepful and believe us. We wouldn't have been written up in forbs twice. Had itnot been for this, our first year of doing business in this particularbusiness, I only did eleven thousand dollars and it was just me well here weare now close to fifty on our team and four years later, we exceeded the sevenfigure mark, which is unbelievable, and that's because of the power ofleveraging your time, focusing on the highlove activities talking to Brian Vand and all the while, all the details of the that are extremely important.systemization processes workfos are being handled in the back end by peoplewho like doing that, how did you co up with the name? And do you remember whenyou came up with this idea? To do this? I mean this yeah. Based on your whole,I mean Jamie J y. You were bottle necked for most of Your Life Yeah Right, I I am the bottle neck. Like I mean listening to your sor, youweren't down once you weren't down twice you weren't down three, that youwere down yeah and you were into you know, one way to put it as to bebottlenecked and you weren't able to to soar to where you are now and I'm notall about, like all about, like everyone's going to be rich or famousand all of that, but you went through through some very tough Ti. I don'tenthink you were bottlenack you. It was squashed under the bottle. Oh YeahRight. How did you come up with this idea, based on your experience and andthe the name is? Is Wonderful Yeah? Thank you. So I was part of amastermine. I had a agency that web based grative agency and all of my friends and all my collegesare asking: How are you getting these virtual assistants to help you withthis stuff? This is fantastic, and I said, Oh, you know I go to thePhilippines and I have a good relationship there and cause one of myformer business partners, one of the p Philippines in California- and that'sthat was my first experience back in two thousand and six M and and theywanted to know how they could get one. I said, oh just here, I'll, introduceyou to this person and they said Jame. You need to create a business out ofthis and I said really. They said Oh yeah, so one of my friends that waskind of doing this part time out of Las Vegas someone I used to work with incorporate America introduced me to a Fella and I just took it from there andran and and absolutely loved it and with regard to the name, I wish I couldclaim credit for it, but I absolutely cannota good friend of mine mark Hafner M, its a imiaward winning audio producer,amazing fellow, very, very creative. He and I were talking about what we weredoing and a lot of executives they're their own bottle, necks, they're,they're, afraid of giving away the secrets they're afraid of havingsomeone else, do the work for them, because it won't be up to their levelof standards and a lot of times they they think. Well, they don't knowanything because it's in my head, I've a certain way of doing things andthat's a major major bottleneck. Every single owner that is challenged intheir business is without system processes or work fo and, in my opinion,are the bottle, Nex and I'm not afraid to say that to their face, because Ithink they need to understand that now I don't call everybody a bottle NTIT,but you have to. You have to really look at yourself in the mirror andfigure out if you're running a company...

...and an IT- and you are not in theposition that you want to be in your to blame, there's no one else.That's like the I've seen recently the show the prophet yeah, like that's many of the problemsthat he comes across when he goes to these businesses. They are the bottleneck ethey're. Looking at these people, they're like hey, my business is great,no you're the problem, you're, not outsourcing you you want to have allcontrol, and you are inhibiting your your business to to intrive and to bewhat it is another show that comes by that bar rescue show. I don't know ifyou've ever seen that ie seen a couple of Amsa, Jo and he notice that whatthey do is they work on the person, not the business mhm yeah, then that helpsthe process much easier. What is difficult, what is most difficult aboutyour job? I mean everything is not you know if you're not completely unbottleneck, there's still some difficulties that go with the business that you run.What is a big difficulty that you have yeah a lot of people say eighty twentyO, I I call it a seventy thirty rule M. There's a lot of things that we have todo. I have to Um. Do Processes and systems and I have to do review stuffand I have to go into our base camp an and our project management software tosee where the team is at and what we're doing? That's thirty percent of thestuff that I could I could do without, but it's tomfhing that I have to do inorder to be on top of things now in the other. Seventy percent. That's where I go on potcast. It givesme a ton of energy and I you know I love traveling to events, although atthis current time as the time of this recording whe're in covets oryou're,not seeing that as much I like doing virtual events, I love live streaming.I love, I love just having fun interacting. I love taking breaks,reading some books, getting some good ideas innovating on my time, which isduring the week working time that that's what I thrive. That's Whar. Ilove. I Love Partnerships. I love like right now, I'm partering with theuniversity in Canada and we're doing a really end, depth, detail analysis of remote work, distributid workforce andhow what three things are going to be most difficult about this and t it'sjust really neat doing all of that stuff. That's seventy percent of thejob. I love thirty percent, not so much, but I understand that's what I have todo in order to accomplish the goals that I set for myself and we've setcollectively together, both my family and my team, my business Ting Jamie you've had an interesting lifeand you're still living it. How can you say that work has broughtyou through life? I mean you, you mentioned some McDonalds and and someother even from jumping into the pond and selling lemonade. But how has thiswork? Helped you through your life and how has it been like the constant inyour life to help you move on and TN yth? I love this p. This is a fantasticquestion and thank you for answering it asking it so that H, I I I think what work has done for me is the necessary means to an end. Sothere's a lot of things that I care about my life that I want to be able tohelp educate others. U Plastic Pollution! Things like this that I love to do that.I can't afford to do because I have to work to get there. But, oh my gosh,imagine how awesome it would be to be able to work hard enough to earn somekind of monthly recurring revenue or sell a business or do something whereyou have that freedom of time to do to make a biggerimpact. We hear aboucall that the ripple effect to make a positive impactfirst and foremost in your own...

...community, then in your region, then inyour nation and then you have a global impact, and I have that global impact.Now, with our staff in the Philippines, I cannot tell you how much it makes mejust want to jump up and down when I hear one of our vias bought their first home,one of our vas thirty, some years old, I won't say his age to ptective- hassix kids bought his first car, and that was because we created something forthat now, another family can thrive O', not to mention all the business owners that can now leveragetheir time. They have a lower cost they're able to put more money backinto their local community. We are in the process of UF sponsoring at Riskou.We would have never been able to do that, but the work the way you ask thisquestion. The work is getting me to where we want to get to. We want to geton a sailbone and we want to sail around and we want to talk to differentcommunities, and our hope is that we can record what these differentcommunities are doing. With regards to all this plastic pollution, see whatthey're doing see, what they're doing right, see, what they're doing forclean up see how the PLASTI pollution is impacting their local environment,and we want to record this and work with different junior high level, kidsmiddle school level. Kids, we think elementary is too young and we thinkhigh school they're too, set in their ways those middle school years. Man, ifwe could get that put into the course curriculum for them and have the kidsfollow us around for a term get that put into the curriculum and naybe. Weturned some of those kids into oceanographers. Maybe maybe they wantto have a passion for doing something, that's going to make the world a betterplace than what we've found it in and that's just I know we can't change theworld that way, but if we can change and influence one person to be moreresponsible for what it is that they're doing, it's only going to make it thatmuch better for t F, future generations to come. So that's why we're so drivenbecause it's an ends to the mean for something even bigger, more impactful,that we call the ripple effect. That is good. I like the ripple effect andthat's how work brings you through t. It encourages you to make more ripplesexactly exactly hundred percent. Could you give some advice- and evenyou mentioned the valuing of d, The dollar or a dollar, how you didn'tbefore so just adviced to people who are not working, maybe they're. First,looking into the first job in between jobs, maybe because of things that aregoing on now or they're, not happy with their job so vice, but also based onthat valuing of a dollar howhow. It would be how you've come tovalue the dollar and your new perspective, your appreciation of thedollar and the value and there, in the reason why it is important towork Yeahi, I would say my dvice would be towrite down one of the biggest dreams. You have right now and write it down Um and the reason I say to do that is now.You have a goal that you can get to, but don't rely solely on that goal. Whenyou write down your goal, that's kind of something. That's like a dream,maybe that's something that you, but I will tell you this right now when youachieve that goal, you're Goingnta want to know what's next. So for me, I havea goal like that, but I know every day I sad an objective that I wish toaccomplish, and the mission in our company is exactly that. A mission fora company is a mission in life. It's a daily objective. You hope to achieveeach and every single day right back gold down. Did you take it off yourlist great at the end of Ery Day, I always kind of look at my day and saidthis is what I did. This is what I did. This is what I d. This is what I didand it feels so good like I accomplish something and I think that's a Majingmajor driving factor to go where we want to go one day, my wife and I willbe on a boat. We will be on a boat...

...sailing around. I promise you that we will be there Um unlesssomething tragic happens, gone from mitten. We will be there and when thathappens, guess what we're going to be able to experience something else thatwe're going to want to get to from there, and I will tell you probably oneof the best feelings in the world and you could probably talk to a millionspeakers teachers. Anybody like that when they get to share their experiencewith others, and you see their eyes, light up and their ears perk forwardand they're just consuming what it is that you're sharing with them, becauseyou're sharing with them through the best of intention. This is persuasion,not manipulation. MHM. I want to make it that very clear. Delineationpersuasion is actually good. MHM manipulation is bad, but when you'retalking to people- and you see them wihe up like oh my gosh, that is soneat. I want to do something like that or I you're Gointo feel so good andyou're going to be driven to continue doing that, because you're going to beoffering a lot of positivity in the world, and I think ultimately, that'swhat it's all about jam. I talked to someone the other day and he mentionedabout appreciation and looking at your life and what you're doing now, howmuch? How valuable do you find or suggest to look back once in a while tolook back at our lives and say hm? I have much to be appreciated for have much iappreciate. If you can see, you should be very appreciative if youcan walk. You should be very appreciative Um if, if you can't flalk,but you can see, you should be appreciative if you can hear Ot shouldbe appreciative, in my opinion, it's I have such a blessed life, and here I amin an eleven hundred square foot home. I ow my own lawn. You know w. We doeverything. We do a lot we're very responsible for how we live now, but Icame from a lunch Muncheon today we practise social distancing by the waywe were our masks, but the gentleman that was speaking was talking about. He. He had an organization that helpsoutrisk youth and they had one story. GET THIS UM sex trafficking is a bigthing and I I know I might be going off in the bed wit Nive Worl. This goesinto sending perspective with the question that you've asked eleven years old I'd been bought andsold over fifteen times of fif eleven year old girl addicted tomethonfetomines, addicted to alcohol. U Hadn't been to school since first grade was on the street, rescued Um andrescued by the way in high heeled, Stiletto's short skirt, unbelievable think about that for a second Oli, Erold, absolutely tragic! Then you think about the eleven year old, that's goingto school and comes home and is complained because you took the eyepadaway. It's all about perspective right fast forward. Five years this elevenyear old girl is now in the honoroll starting a first year of high schoolshe's been helped out by that organization, and it was a wolfe yeah.What a story like emotional- and I don't think there was a dry in the room.At least I didn't have dry and UH. You look at something like that andholy cow. I can go back to being homeless and I'd be better off thanthat poor little war was when she was eleven years old, so you have to what you do and what you'r normal usedto is ordinary, but to so many other people, it's extraordinary y. absolutely, where can people find you jm, J Y? Youcould just Google Bottleneck Um, you can visit bottoeckdononline and I thinkprobably you can even do Jamie. Jan Now...

I know a singer of jme J siner was wasbeating me on Google. I think I surpassed her now, hopefully, but hyeah go to bottom Ckot online and if you want to talk or reach out, I'm onall the social media channels and we do a live stream every Tuesday andThursday at two PM Central, it's called live with bottlemeck and I talk to alot of people um that have stopped t a bottlemeck in theirbusiness and shareways of doing the same for others. So it's it's a lot offun, jmie, J, two, more questions, one. How do you rest? How do you find rest?What do you do W in you arrest? Well, this is going to sound weird oneway that I find rest is playing hockey. Believe it or not, because my mind rest,I focus only on hockey it', it's an unbelievable break. I absolutely loveit because I don't think about work. I don't think about challenges, anythingI think about hockey and it's a lot of fun. So for that two hours when I'mplaying hockey, I just absolutely love it and my brain rests. The other way ismy wife, and I we BOT every weekend we go down to thelake just about every weekend. Unless the boat's broke, you know boatand UtdDoun, another thousand those things break down a lot, but we we reallyenjoy going out to lake hanging out in the boat just going for a you know,forty five minute boat ride and maybe stop off at a cove and jump in thewater. Those are great ways to relax and you know we get some good rest, ow,sleeping and stuff like that, but those those are probably the two best waysthat we kinda. You know unwind a bit yeah. It's good. I mean it's wonderful to promote work, but we dohave to rest- and you probably see this with some of the people that you youwork with your clients that are overworked and that's why you're doingyour business is because ther hundred percent can, I say, wone we're thingboing it out. So several several months ago I got a call on a Saturday morningfrom a cline of mine. This is pretty big. Dude he's all tatded up just bi. Iwould not want to meet this guy and have him pissed off me in a dark alley,absolutely not vvery very strong present. I got a call s normally. Idon't answer my phones, this one hats, wr phone Um and he goes Jamie, Hey I I'calling I note Sardymoor. I just wanted to call in and let you know excuse me let you know that this is thefirst Saturday I'm spending with my wife and my kid since we've N, since in my business andI've, been having my business for three years that I have not been working- andI just want to let you know, thanks to you for allowing us to hire anassistant at bottleneck, hear of all m all my stuff fror me and then the phonerestles away- and you hear the wife say Jamie thinks, get my husband back yeah, but that iscarvey right that totally unexpected and now I love sharing that storybecause it wow had we never created bottleneck. We wouldn'te never made adifference and T is NOTA. True with you know, if we're not doing it for afamily or some other good reason, as you mention for children or what are we doing it for Noyou knowwe're not just trying to climb some ladder and get the money there has tobe another reason, and if we're not spending time with that reason, thenit's all for not yeah money's money's good. I will not say I mean money isgood, but what's even better Um is it's it's not not what you say or what youget from something it's. How you make someone feel MHM? Absolutely that's all the difference. Jam J last question: Why do you work? Why do I work? I work I work so that Ican take care of myself first and so that I'm healthy, financially stable.So I can help h with the global ripple effect of so many others yeah. That'sexactly why woe do it. I like the...

...ripple effect with Jamie J, BottleneckVirtual Assistante. Thank you, sir. You are a gentleman and I appreciate yourstory and your work thanks Ar Havving me biand. This is great. Thank you. Thank you for listening to this episodeof why we wer with Brane, be sure to subscribe, follow and share with otherN, so they too can encouraged. There Werei hope that you have yourselfeproductive and Joyful Dayin Your Work.

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