WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 113 · 1 year ago

#113​ Jack Casey - BassGuyShow.com - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Jack "Bass Guy" Casey is the founder, producer, and host of The Bass Guy Show. Jack has exceptional talent and a tender heart as he produces his live show three times a week. (Live every M-W-F at 1pm EST Montreal time)

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Welcome to why we work with your host Brian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which will be an encouragement to us all to get up. Get going on, keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here is your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian B. And this is why we work today at the great pleasure of speaking with Jack Casey. Jack is the founder and producer of the Base Guy Show, which you can find Monday, Wednesday and Friday live at 1 p.m. Eastern. Today. I want to find out from Jack. How can we treat people better? It seems like a very simple question, but I think he has a true nah act in this field. So join me today in my conversation with Jack the base guy, Casey Um, Brian V. And this is why we work today. I have the great pleasure speaking with Jack Bass Guy Casey. Good day finds her. Hey, Brian, how you doing today? I'm doing wonderfully well. I was just telling you how much I appreciate you taking the time to do this. We've been trying to look at setting this up over the last few weeks, thanks to primarily Mr Frankie MacDonald. Would you be able to do me a favor, Jack, and tell us what industry you're in and what it is you're doing nowadays? Um, I'm in the industry of, uh, wearing my pajamas right now and doing my show from home. You know what? My good e a walk down, everyone's in their underwear. 2021 is a great year. So far? Not really. But I had a interview the other day. Just full tie shirt jacket, Jack bottoms. A perfect I'm a musician, though I'm in the industry of music and entertainment. I started when I was about 14 years old. So my whole life, really speaking of 14 years old, what would have been your very first job that you would have had, whether it was volunteer, just something trying something for fun, Maybe lemonade stand or delivering papers as a preteen or teen ager? The very first thing I started working when I was about 12, and I never stopped. I started delivering newspapers. It was on Wednesdays, The Chronicle in the West Island, in Montreal, on Ben the Gazette. And I would deliver papers, too, a pretty rich neighborhood. And then I'd have to go collect all the money. And my first riel official job was when I was 14 years old. Um, it was really bizarre. I worked at a yacht club because it was close by and I was a Boston and like, you go on a little boat and you have a shot gun and you shoot it, and then the the race I have, I have No, I have no idea about anything about sports or boats or anything, or guns or anything and or how to drive a boat. And within about a day I was driving a boat shooting done and marking people scores, and I didn't have a clue what was going on in my whole life. It's kind of like that movie. Catch me if you can. You figure out that you can you can just wing it, and you could just, like go. As long as you're not flying a spaceship, it's gonna be OK. So that was my first job and the first job for the Boston. Uh, thing was, the guy like you just kind of took a liking to me. Whatever, and said Okay, here's your job. He goes, there's a pipe under here under the road and it was a cement road goes I want you to dig a hole foot wide and a foot deep right across the street. And he gave me a pitchfork and I'm a dumb kid and I don't I don't know what I'm doing And I'm working in the hot sun And I dug a huge like World War two trench in the ground and I had blister and blood all over my hands. And when he came back, he was like, Holy crap, you did it. And then my mom came over and gave the guy crap, and that was my first day of work. He was amazed that you were able to do it. Your mom was shocked that they made you do it the first time ever told that story. So that's I'm just thinking of was it a pitchfork or was it? Yeah, it was like an actual legit like old school pitchfork. No gloves, and I didn't know what work was so in my head, I was kind of a scared, insecure kid. I was like, uh I was the kind of kid that, like when I was seven, I bike to school with my brothers and all the kids, and it was, like, two miles away, and after about a mile, I thought I was in the Amazon jungle and I was like, crying as the same. Scotland is greeting. I could too far. So on my first day of work, I was like, Oh, I guess this is what everybody does. They huge massive holes in concrete and...

...cut their hands open. That's why those men that you those hands you shaker so tough high. Okay, I could do it too, As you were getting up towards high school. Did you work any other jobs? You said you had lots of different jobs, but what was the main job you might have had? All the way upto high school? Um, I had Yeah, I had lows of jobs. I e I grew up kind of poor and things were tough for me, So I have to get my own money if I wanted to do anything, and I did paper routes. I worked in little local restaurants. My favorite was this guy called Batty, and in the Montreal in the West Island baddies and I would help him clean and cook and do things. And then when I left high school around 17, I went right into ah, Bar and I ended up working in the grease pit. The guy got me down under the bar. I had to clean out the grease pits of the worst hardest job in the world. I became a dishwasher, and I washed dishes instead of going to college like all my friends, because, like I said, I was poor. I washed dishes for about three years straight and then move my way up to, um, like prep, chef or whatever. But then the bar actually had a stage, and it became a D. J. And then I started a jam night, and I'll get musicians to come in. So, uh, and even back then I was like in the local paper, and I was booking famous local musicians like Michelle Excel in the Wild Unit from You, Zeb in Montreal, the big jazz band, and I was always like doing like I was scraping the grease, digging the holes, being a restaurant person. And then at night I go into the D. J booth and then I would do battle of the bands. And then sometimes I would sleep. I'm not even joking. I would sleep on the bar like because then I would clean the bar. I do all the toilets and clean the chair id sleep on the bar. And I was working 18 hours a day for a couple of years. So that was my education. It's that secure the modern. But the modern day Batman are Spiderman. Yeah, I worked. I worked hard and I moved out when I was 17 years old and had my own apartment. I worked my whole life and then worked my way up Thio. Other stuff. What was your motivation? Get the paper out. Knowing that you were. You said you didn't have a lot of money or poor. And then what? Why did you do that? Was that for your own motivation? Was that family kicking you out of the house and saying go makes money? It was a bit of everything. I came from a large family had a whole bunch of brothers and money was tight. My parents were working class and my but my dad was like a He passed away in 2011. He was, Ah, like a bit of a genius. He he knew he did, just didn't apply himself. He was a mechanic and a one class mechanic, the highest level of Mechanic and Canada. He could fix any truck, car, machine, anything and on the weekends would go drive into the richer parts of town. And we'd collect garbage in the morning and my dad would find bits of old bicycle, and he would build us all amazing bikes like really good bikes. It's not spending a penny. And then he put a basket on my bike and a stand. And then that's how that led into delivering the Montreal Gazette when I was about 14, when you were delivering to the richer neighborhoods, was that encouraging or discouraging to you? You're thinking, Oh, I want to get there. I wanna yeah, it goes. It goes so far later on in my later life. But yes, the places I was delivering to, we're literally some of them mansions so you'd huge houses. So I knew there was that world, And then there was my world. But I was I wasn't I was too young to be judgmental or like, what's wrong with the world or whatever, But it became a theme later on, and my other jobs, it got even Mawr crazy with the diversity of or the difference of, like, poverty and richness and entering those worlds, I guess they're co dependent on each other. But, yeah, it did. It did make me think, Like, how come this guy has 2020 rooms in his house and we have one? Yeah, with 20 people in it. When you got into high school and knowing that you went into you worked in a bar, what were you thinking that you might wanted to do When I was in high school? I had no idea what I want to do, but I just kind of followed along a path, but for no particular rhyme or reason. What were you thinking about? What you may wanted to dio? Well, during all that crazy work stuff that was going on? I got my first guitar when I was about, um Well, Actually, I started playing drums when I was seven because my dad, even though we weren't rich, he did care for me and my mom and dad. They were They were great to me and they got us a little drum set in the basement, and my dad taught me drums on It took ages, and I finally got it when I was seven and then invite other kids in and they became musicians. And then when I was about 14, I got a guitar and I was cutting. Grass was cutting lawns with a push lawn. More like the old school...

...1987. Whatever. And I would use that money. It was expensive to $20 a guitar lesson back in the eighties and nineties, so I would take guitar lessons, and I used to sit at home and just practice after school like five hours nonstop. One scale just over, and I'm dyslexic. So everything I do takes me a lot longer than the average person, I think. But I just I have this really dumb, stubborn determination to never give up on. I've been beaten down 1000 times and I get back up, so I just kept practicing and practicing, and I knew I wanted to be a musician. Like the thing I didn't know then that I know now is that especially now maybe it's good for some people like the industry, like Walt Disney and stuff Netflix. But being a musician really, really, really sucks. In fact, my advice to any musician is don't do it become something else because you you practice your whole life. You conduce tours and be with bands and travel the world. But then when it's over, you got no money you got. You haven't done the family thing. You're just you're 40 years old and you're like, Oh, and then when I do my show online, I put my whole life into it. Music's free. It's the Internet. You just turn it on and everything's. Remember Napster? What happened? Thio downloading music like overnight music is free. So imagine putting a million zillion hours into what you're doing, and then someone's like, Oh, that's a nice song, Click and then to the next thing Scroll. That's so yeah, I think it knowing that back in the days of Napster, if if someone maybe would have explained it better. Maybe things would have went a different way. I think the idea of copyright and all of that has is taken to the forefront. And they're doing their due diligence on how to protect the what is it called the intellectual property of the artist. But it's tough, right? It's tough. And you could put all that effort in. And at the end of the day, if you're still if you you're done producing, you're done recording. You're not getting any money. Yeah, that's the difficulty of being a musician. So you decided at a young age you wanted to be a musician. You travel this road, you worked in a bar and then you worked your way up. You mentioned in the forties. Is is there something that you did consistently? Was that the music or were you doing other jobs alongside? Yeah. We always bring you to being the base guy. Yeah, Yeah, it was. It was always the music that was consistent. And the only reason it absolutely. I'm stubborn. It makes you know, money. And I watched a lot of my other friends who are professional musicians. They eventually 99% of them give up and stop and go do something else and I don't blame them. Have a family and get a career. But I'm kind of like a music music holic. I'm addicted to music. I love it so much, and for me it's well for everybody. It's It's spiritually right if never mind like a I don't want this anything but a popular band or song or whatever. You know, it could be pop or but when you see, like a band play in Chicago or some like Amazing Band in Africa and everyone's dancing and like James Brown and it goes right through you and I just at shivers and and people. I wrote this in one of my songs. People get married to music. People use music at their parties, people, higher bands for their weddings and bar mitzvahs. Whatever music is always there on the game shows on the TV, it is so it's everywhere in all encompassing. But for some reason it's free. Like for most people. I'm not talking about the industry and everything. I'm talking about most people, most musicians who work and gig. There's an old joke, the definition of a musician to someone who takes $5000 of equipment, puts it in a $500 car and then drives 5500 miles to do a gig for $50. So it's kind of disheartening. My point is it's It's a really prominent important thing. It actually, Jimi Hendrix said that Onley music can conceive the world because if you think about it, music actually bypasses all politics. All you know, things that are going on. The world bypasses everything in, it unites us all, and it's it's everywhere and it's so important makes you feel good. It makes you cry. It's when you watch a movie. It's usually 50% the music that makes you feel the emotions of the production you're watching and it's really, really, really important music and I still haven't given up. I had, like, a I I I went up like this. I started like I said, dishwashing and being poured all that and I went right up and I got to a climax and I I went through so much diversity. I don't know if we could talk about it all here, some of its personal, but through a lot of like wars and When I finally beat everything and I was doing well, my back and my spine cracked and I was in the hospital and I lost everything. So...

...tiny violin and uh, it's that was about it. Was that the crack from overwork or something in particular that happened? I've thought about it and researched and studied it and thought about it a lot. Um, when I was a kid in Montreal at Parc Safari in Quebec, I was taken to, Ah, a little circus thing and petting zoo on. I was put on a roller coaster on. I was about 78 years old and the guy who puts you on the road holsters smoking a cigarette was like 1981. No one gave a crap and he puts me in the thing and he clicks and it doesn't click. And I start like saying, Sir, sir, like and I start crying and screaming and he starts the roller coaster and my thing didn't click down and I went I thought, I'll just hold on. The roller coaster started. It was a big roller coaster like 20 ft tall, and it went up and I went flying like 50 80 ft flying through the air, and I remember falling and I landed on my my legs and then on my spinal column, and I was winded. And back then, no. Nothing happened. No one got sued. A couple of people lost their jobs, but that was about it, and that was my first major injury. I think that's where it stemmed from. I fell out of a roller coaster. There might have been a hairline there and then just the abuse, specially playing instruments and staying in a position for a long period of time that might have added some stress to it. Yeah, and in school, like I didn't know it at the time. But when I think back, because I've studied what happened to me all through elementary and high school, I was taken home from school sometimes and taken to the hospital because I had incredible neck pain and headaches and back pain, and I never addressed to it. And then life just got busy, and I just kind of never dealt with it. And then I also having to go through a lot of adversity. Like I traveled the world a lot. I lost a lot of loved ones. Uh, everything I did was with, like, five bucks in my pocket on I eventually became like a teacher at university. And so I was like, Okay, and I was getting paid. Well, I had a nice place. And then that's when I lost everything and have to start all over again. And that was about almost 10 years ago. And then I started the base guy show. What were you teaching? I was teaching music. I was, uh, sometimes head of the base department or just a general music teacher. And I lived in Scotland at that time, and I taught at Perth College on, you know, it's a university as well. I taught it Stove University in Glasgow and Glasgow University. I was working sometimes at three schools at once, uh, every week, driving back and forth and stuff. So you said things kind of crumbled at that point. Was that because of your back? Or was that for some other reason in the So I used to jog a lot, and I used to be really thin and healthy and ate well, and I would jog in between playing music and everything and um, one day in the summer, around 2000 and eight or nine, I was helping a friend dig a ditch. Here we are, back to the ditch story. And there you go, through a full circle. And I was just helping someone garden and I was digging. And then I went for a jog, and then I went home. I was living in a big apartment in Glasgow and I woke up at two or three in the morning screaming my head off, and I went to go to the phone and I passed out and I woke up in my own sweat. And then I reached the phone and I called 911 and nurse and Cem. Police came over and opened the door, and I was taken away to the hospital. So So it just what happened? My l five s one disc just popped out, but like the size of like a finger, it was completely blocking my spinal cord. And I could hardly walk, and I was stuck on the floor and I went through about I didn't get surgery start straight away. The NHS sucked. So I came to Canada and I was seen to hear a lot. It wasn't even good here, though, too. I got some horror stories of I just saw on the Twitter on CBC that there was a man who went in the hospital complaining that he had, like, paralyzed this hip or something. And the nurses and doctors thought he was like, joking or like not seriously. They kicked him out. They told him, Go away, your good boy and they were demeaning and everything to him. And that happened to me. When I first went to the hospital in the west of Montreal. I was lying on the floor. The doors were open in the winter, and the doctor told me to take a Tylenol and go home, and I called the hospital and I gave them Holy shit. Sorry for swearing, and they and then they were like, Oh, you can't talk to us like this and blah, blah, blah. But then someone picked up the phone and said, We just got this guy's Emory because I had done one is like this guy needs to be in the hospital today and the next the next day. I was in surgery, and the doctor said they hadn't. The Emory person said, like you know, your whole...

...spinal cord is blocked, you shouldn't even be walking. And there's lots of horror stories. Brian, it was pain. So I did all that and blah, blah, blah. And I worked through my life and I finally became something and someone, you know, I just mean like I had, I had comfort and I achieve something. I was the first person in my family ever in my family to go to school and to become a teacher. And then that happened. So everything was taken away. So it's like to me in my head, it was like no matter how much adversity there is and how hard things are and how many people die and how poor you are, and then you finally achieve something, and then it's all taken away from you again, and I hate complaining about it or talking about it, but that's that's what happened in my life. It's of course, it's been tragic, whatever, but I always wake up, make my bed and do the best. I can make some music and do something productive, and then you go online and people say you suck, dude, get off line. Oh, I know the trolls, rolls, trolls. So it's a troll is just someone who sits there and say, You know, they just say you're you're bald, you suck, You get out of here And they don't realize you just spent 18 hours a day for 40 years to come to this point and they're just like you suck. I was teaching class yesterday, and I liked the movie just because of my upgrading Bringing, I guess, is the movie Annie Annie. I saw that in the theater when it came out. Hey, but she sings this song tomorrow, right? It's gonna be a bright day tomorrow, right? And then I had a lesson yesterday. It was Aesop's fables, I believe, or even in another book that I'm reading. And it's talking about tomorrow. The kid wanted to know about tomorrow, and his mom said, Just go to bed when you wake up tomorrow will be here. And then he will. He went to bed, woke up. It's like Mom, is it tomorrow? No, it's not tomorrow. Tomorrow is another day away. So he kept living his life trying to get to tomorrow, but eventually he learned that you need to make the best of today. So I see these two the dichotomy between Anne looking for tomorrow because tomorrow is gonna be better. But it's actually not true, right? Because you have to. What you said is make your bed do what you can do today because no matter what, what you're going through, adversity is going to slap you in the face in many different forms. Yeah, totally. And when I was in the the deepest, darkest places, that's when I started reading books like Eckhart Totally the power of Now. Someone gave that to me when I was in India, and I read it in one day, and and it was just like it's totally makes sense. There's so many books that repeat the same theme that and everybody knows it's living in the now. And that's why I personally chose to be a musician, because in my mind you can have your nothing against it. But you can have your house and your car and your air conditioner and all the things that pollute the planet and cause global warming. But you can have all those things, but you don't get to take them with you when you die and you can give them tow your kids and your kids can have a great life. But the same thing happens to me now. I would rather play music and have a soul and look at the birds and be in the now, then be consumed by like I need to have a credit card and I used to be like that, but I need to have a house and a job and all that. Now. For me, what's important is Thio, you know, experience life as a human being and like all the joys and the pains and the music, and so I I think I sacrificed having I could have. I could have all that stuff if I want, but because I picked music, I don't have any of that stuff, so I can I can play music and Aiken instantly warped into like Zen Buddha mode and play music, and it's the best feeling in the world. But I don't have all that other stuff. I don't know how it works, Brian, because there are obviously a lot of musicians who do do really well. So you said about experiencing life, and I think how I've come to know you is through the base Guys show. So how did that How did you kind of pick yourself up or encourage yourself to keep going to start with your own show? Um, well, when I was the second time, I was in surgery and I was in for longer and I was on morphine and I'm in hospital and don't move mode. I couldn't move or anything. I took a napkin and I wrote a rap song on morphine about my situation like that. I'm in the hospital and blah, blah, blah, and it's It's on my website somewhere based guy show dot com albums. And there's a song called Spinal Rap. So I figured, Oh, I could do that. And then when I got home, actually had nurses coming to my house because I had to get clean needles nervous because I was in a lot of pain. I was in bad shape and I had a mixing desk, and I put it right beside my bed and I kept just recording music, and it reminds me of a time that when I was a kid, I broke my forget what it was, my elbow or my wrist or something. That was my...

...elbow and I had a cast on. But I kept practicing guitar anyway, and I just kept I'm not saying you should beat yourself up like I hate this whole thing of like you have to achieve whatever. It's a choice. You don't have to do anything. You could just sit on the couch and and, you know, do nothing. But I choose to do things because I think that life is so precious that I won't. We won't be here soon, so that's why I like music. I like photography and and filming, and I make videos and do things because I know I've already seen it happen. I used to make videos 20 years ago that people are like, Oh, look at this, there's you and you know, when you look at a photograph, the photograph is more valuable in your house, in my opinion, because it's like you can see your child when they were a baby, Would you rather a big house or seeing your child when they were kids? So I kind of what I'm getting at is things or backwards I think we put all of this emphasis and priority on things and materialism and capitalism on we don't put it on music. I'm not to sound like a hippie, but meditation or music. Or like you said, reading a book like the simple things in life we we were we kind of punish those things like, Oh, you're a musician. Okay, so you get nothing and, oh, you're selling real estate so you can have everything. And the real estate is what causes the pollution, in my opinion. Big, huge, you know, houses everywhere in car. Sorry if I'm rambling, a bit tired. Okay? No, no, no, it's it's good. But how did how did the base guy show become what it is now as it's growing. So I started in 2000 and 13 on a platform called Concert Window, which is no longer around. So it's retro. It was folk musicians in New York, and you were able to stream live and there was like a tip button, and one day I just start started to jam on a little tiny webcam. I found my computers in the garbage and they were given to me and it was like one pixel and I was like hardly moving And I got pieces of paper and I was like, This is a commercial break now and I just got inventive And then I just started streaming. Then people started watching, and it was never a lot of people. It was always 10 people, But then those 10 people started sending me guitar strings and tipping, helping pay my Internet bill, and they kept supporting. So I kept just doing it, and I tried to go back to work and I broke my back again and the doctor said to me like, uh, you can't keep doing this because you could just, like, reach up for a cup that falls and you might pull your back again. So I have to slow down. But so I thought, Well, I'm at home. There's the Internet. I'll just do it from home And I just started. People were giving me. Everything I have is second hand because, you know, I eat never any money. That's why I was always complain about it, and then I looked like a grumpy guy. But everything I have is this second hand and found I didn't buy anything. And I didn't go on the Internet because I wanted validation approval. I wanted toe by a ham sandwich so I could eat literally. And so I would do this and then I would work my butt off and then I would make, like, 20 bucks, and I go to store and buy some bread. And maybe one month they'll bikes, um, guitar strings, and it just got better and better. The technology got better and the fans helped out. And then in one year in 2016, a group of people got together and they got me a car. And the guy drove the car from Toronto to Montreal on the lawn during the live show and gave me the keys. And it was kind of a pinnacle moment, you know, like, uh, so that happened. But then it happened again. I couldn't afford to keep the car, so I gave it away to my friend. So what is the premise of your show? E mean, you're very talented musically, but you also do various things. You have different people on interviewing. It's a show about a guy who's very frustrated for trying so hard 1000 million times and never getting there like, but I'm enjoying the music having fun. People like it. Onda People do support, and I do thank the people who do support. I know all of their names and where they live. I write them every day. It's always the same 10 people. Um and so what was the question again? Brian, We'll just What? What is the premise of your show? Because I know that you're playing music at times your streaming your music. You do that through a change. But you all used to give you. Yeah, I used to just jam, but even back in Scotland, I was watching Frankie McDonnell the house I wrote to him and stuff, and I couldn't dream of having him on my show. But eventually that happened, and I used to just play. But then I had a friend come in, Doctor near, um Armstead, one of my best friends in a jazz band, and he was a bit of a comedian, very big comedian, and then we just started goofing around, and then it turned into themes. So every week I was doing like Space week or nature weak or school week and then and go out and do a little because my back hurts. I can't sit for and play for a long time, so I do segments and bits, too, and then Thio like, take a...

...break. But then I thought, Why not be a one person show where I do all the music, the editing, the production taken a guest and amusing my feet in my hands and really, what I'm doing this show, Brian. I don't have a clue what's going on. I'm kind of like Oh, my God, like And people are just They're like you didn't answer my question and I'm like trying to fly the spaceship on like, a $5 budget. And so it kind of it took years. It was really bad for ages like the audio was at a Sink 2013 14. It was tough. Technology wasn't as good and and then eventually I started toe. It's always changing. I'm always trying to find the right format and I go back and forth and I know it drives people crazy, but I'm trying to make it work, but what it is is I say hello. I play some music I'll interview Frankie on Wednesdays, and then I'll show clips from my life from, like traveling and doing things or someone else's life. So it's kind of a variety show, so I kind of I don't like, you know, like if you're a musician, you hang out with musicians online, and if you're a fisherman, you hang out with fishermen online and on your instagram and stuff. I've never really fit in anywhere because when I do my it is a music show. I play bass. I'm into funk and jazz, but when I do my show, it's I'm a bit weird. It's kind of like Wayne's World Meets Peewee Herman. It's not normal and and Plus, I'm always like Oh, I have no money and everything sucks, you know? So I'm not. I'm the worst person to be a broadcaster because I tell the truth. I just say that I'm having a crappy day, and so I don't fit in with the Bay, the bass music community. I feel I shouldn't think what they think, but I feel like I don't fit in there because they're all just doing music. But I'm like Pee wee Herman show, so I don't really. I don't fit in in anywhere. So I'm trying toe, But I'm just doing my own thing. I don't watch other people. I don't care what anyone else is doing. Uh, I just focus on what what I want to do. And I don't mean like like egotistic Lee. I just mean I want to play bass. But then, for me, music is boring because I've done it for 40 years. It can get boring. So I'll go out and film some stuff and make a movie. So it'll be music and interview and then something different, and it's very interactive. I talked to the guests and everything, but for a long time it's like Frankie said, he didn't know how to deal with trolls until his friends helped him. Um, sometimes, like, Yeah, when I do my show, the musicians were like, How come you're not playing bass right now? What are you doing? You're acting all weird. And then when I play music, another group of people are like, how come you're not talking to us? I'm trying to tell you what kind of soup I had today. And so I'm trying to please every so I went through all that stuff, and now I just have to have fun and enjoy doing it. And the show's actually shows kind of always at its best. It's It never gets worse. It gets better as's faras like you know the technology and and it's nothing. It's not a huge deal. I'm just talking in front of my computer and playing music. But if you take a step back and realize what I'm doing, like playing the drums, the bass, the guitar, doing the sounds, doing the video, everything all alone on like Windows 1995 its's pretty fun. It's a challenge. It's a challenge. Well, maybe this is the theme you're talking about at the beginning that when you were delivering papers to the more of fluent people, their homes and then you learned a little bit along the way. What I appreciate you about you and watching your show. This is what magnifies me. This is what attracts me to. What you do is the way you treat people, and it's almost like I have tow watch you just to see how you are going to react to the people you have on your show. or the way that you're handling. You know that your one man band here with all that you're doing, But you do it in such a calm, caring and compassionate manner that it's very intriguing. And I'm talking, I guess, specifically about dealing with people. And I don't mean dealing but interacting with people say on your Wednesday show where you have a bunch of people and they're from different backgrounds and it's just the way you have this heart about you with people that I think we could all learn from. So I guess my question is, how can we learn to treat people better? Yeah, well, well put, Brian. Um, I wish it was all true. I want it to be true. I I am personally am like that my whole life. I got that from my dad. If there's one thing that I got from my dad was that my dad taught me from a kid, never toe put the tiniest bit of paper on the ground like just do not pollute and open the door and stuff. And I've always treated everyone is equals my whole life, even like things like important things like Children, you know when people talk to kids or their little dog and they're like, Oh,...

Johnny, aren't you a good boy? Look what you did. I'm like, Hey, Johnny, what are you doing? Like Get out of the way. You know, if I'm being mean and if I'm being nice, they'll be like, Oh, that's pretty cool, man. If you treat I used to work with kids. I used to work in schools, and if you treat Children, I don't even think about it. I don't do it on purpose as a trick. I actually treat Children as an equal. If there's anybody with a disability or a difference or they look different, I always go over my. My main concern is who is the most insecure person in the room who is having the most trouble? Who's the most shy boost and go say, Would you like some food? Are you OK? Do you want some space in my head that's going on? I go out of my way. I learned that from my dad, just thio. Everyone's equal. Everyone gets a chance, and and and that's how I've lived my whole life. But the big but is from doing this and the self inflicted stress of it all is the Internet is a breeding ground for trolls, and we live in an age, not everybody. But we live in an age of cynicism and self importance and entitlement. And it's like everyone's God given right to just go. No, you suck, You suck. Get out of the way. That's too fast. That's too slow. Look atyou, your bald This sucks. You know so and then you constantly get that. Not all the time, but it's always coming in from somewhere. So you have to have thick skin, and you just you wish you could just block them. And just But you know what? I'm Sarah Soller said it to me. Best ones like you could take these things and be strong or whatever, but you're a human being, like whether it's you or me or even the troll. We're really, really people. And when you constantly tell someone you know that something bad, it's it's your human being, and no matter how like Zen you are, or whatever it does affect you, you will think about it. And so when you put yourself out there, which I want because I want to do music. I'm entertaining the world for free or fun. I've put my whole life into entertaining for free and you put yourself out there. But then you're also putting yourself out there to all of that. We live in an age of narcissism and, like tick tock like videos of people dancing and showing their bodies for 10 seconds who get 80,000 million views. And then they can use that momentum Thio, like, you know, monetize on or whatever. And so that's another form of troll. Trolling for me is like just a how like, uh, things have changed completely. Like back in the day. There was drum sets and amplifiers and people would go to the bar and talk to each other and you play and you like you'd even like, you know, give a signature or you get one. If you were a fan, like when I was a kid, I watch bands, but nowadays it's just like when you're this happened, like 10, 15 years ago. I've done gigs in restaurants or bars or parties, and the band is like in the way people just walk by and talk and laugh and It's not like we're important whatever, but times have changed. So it's just like music has been come this a tool for people thio to use. And they've forgotten what it means toe to be a to know what a scale is or a feeling or blues or whatever. So I know I'm wandering all over the place where you see this is why I sometimes react to those trolls. Whatever, because, um, it's like you've put so much into it and you're I've spent my whole life like trying to treat everyone is an equal and have fun. And then someone who's basically has a mental health problem dedicates their time to try to ruin what you're doing. They hate you because they ain't you or whatever cliche. But it's so I've been getting better at it for last couple weeks. I've just started to ignore everything and dive into the music and tow having fun, and and I do. I get there my favorite things. They're just like I said, I wake up, I make my bed. I love feeding the birds. I love nature and just having a nice meal with a loved one and producing a show I'm in heaven, really? But I wouldn't mind a couple of $1000 million to make it, you know, all worth it in the end. Brian. Well, you're being honest, right? You said you're wandering. You're not wandering because you were saying, Well, I appreciate the fact of what I'm saying to you that you seem like very seems like a very compassionate, caring person to your guests and how you manage things. But then you're also saying, Well, that that is true. But also, these trolls or these other parts of life kind of bother me. So I'm not. Yeah, it's not even so much the trolls because they're just one or two. But it's more like what I was getting at that the industry that we live and I've come this far and I'm doing all this stuff. It's not that great or anything, but I'm enjoying it, and it is something. And then I turned around and it's been going on for 10 years. Brian, I look and I just see people being so successful and making money and doing things, and they're talking about, like, what? Sandwich they ate or they're showing their boobs or their but or their biceps whatever. Like they're not even doing anything. They're just huge...

...here in Korea, people just eating, eating, just eating in front of a YouTube. You know, this is their thing, and they got millions of followers and they're making lots of money by just shoving food in there. And I think it's It's like culture has gone backwards. Can you imagine Michelangelo drawing helicopters and in the 60 14 hundreds or whatever and then a large orchestras and most are and Bach and everything? And then in the twenties, there was all the jazz bands and Glenn Miller and everything, and now it's just like, uh, like bums, change or whatever. That's probably gonna be the next hit So it Z and now videos air 10 seconds long and everyone scroll and everyone's got a D H D cucumber 75 You know, everyone's just all over the place, scrolling and even like my friends were trying to eat that everyone's just scroll it. There's no there's no focus anymore. And people don't understand, you know, art, painting, composition, reading books, music. Not to be like a snob or whatever. I'm not a snob. I'm poor and I'm My favorite show is the trailer park boys, and I love to swear a but But I do know I can appreciate and I can see, like, good stuff. And I know a lot of people do, and Canada always exists in small pockets. But on the mass scale, I just see people going toe. I just see people going Thio Best Buy and buying huge screen TVs, and no one has a stereo anymore. I I sound like a pessimist, but it's because that's the industry I'm in. I'm in the industry of music and playing music, and people are like, Do you want to do a show it my daughter's wedding for 50 bucks and a sandwich? It's really insulting. Basically. Remember University of High School? We didn't think of buying a TV. We bought a stereo right growing growing up like you. But you know, a Walkman or something. I cannot function right, not some big screen toe watch something that that's interesting point. I never used an album, used to be an artwork and a cover, and you'd open it and you have to take the bus to go by it and then you listen to with your friends and it was social and it's I sound like, you know, I know I sound like an old man saying, Oh, we're back in my day But it's gotten so bad now that, like just music, movies, film, I could go watch a movie that cost $2 million for free. I could just illegally download it and watch it. What happens to all those people that you know? Well, they're in the industry, but, um and part of the reason I'm going dark right now because I'm tired. I've had a long, long day in my back. Busy. You are on TV and you were on TV today. You had your show debut with Frankie? No. Yeah. Cable 14 dot com. We were live with that Dylan attack And Frankie. It was my first time on riel TV today in Hamilton, Ontario. So it's near Toronto. You're you're a talented musician. But what is some skill that you've had to develop, say over the last seven years is you've been putting your content online something that even now you're still working on? Yeah, totally. It's like how to balance the workload not to put too much on I used to do. I used to do 10 shows a week, so it's obviously too much. I brought it back to three. It's good math. That's too much. It's goods too much. So doing the graphics, the artwork, that stills. It takes three hours, four hours to set up to take down. There's all the pre and post stuff like on Social Media and and then when you make a video, you have to format it toe all different social media, and it's all encompassing. So ah, half hour show will take me 18 hours and I'll stick that up and it will get 27 views. But I keep going and to keep trying. And I'm learning toe work smarter, not harder and, uh, to to make things shorter and have more fun. But then I'm conflicted because I used to stream three or four hours so that I could make tips to eat food. Because if you play the Beatles and the Eagles and you play pop songs, whatever people like it, they can relate to it, and then they go, I'm having fun. Here's five bucks, but if you do a really good show with its 20 minutes long and you produce it and you work super hard and you get guests and everything and you no one's gonna tip because they're just like, Oh, thank you for the show that you just did. So I'm always conflicted between Do I play for a long time on, like, a lesser known app and just let my hair down Or do I make a pall of show? So I have a product. So I'm I'm learning how toe balance all of these things and keep saying and have a good life At the same time I'm doing well But then Frankie calls me and says, Base guy, you're gonna be on the Brian V show. Basically, you're gonna be on cable based guy and I always say, Yes, Frankie, because I absolutely love him to bits. He's one of he's one of my best friends. We talk on the phone almost every day and stuff, and he's just such a He's an inspiration. He's what we need. And the reason people like Frankie is back to all that trolls and cynicism and stuff going on. Franky is just a breath of fresh air He's so positive all the time. He's so polite. And if anyone starts to talk bad, he'll just like, won't react. Basically, he's a great guy. Frankie asked Frankie. What should...

...people do if they they face adversity? Watch my videos? Hey, did that today on on TV. Uh, person after me was a famous comedian on there was a famous hockey player, and they asked Frankie like Frankie, can you name us? Ah, fun fact about yourself and he gave out. His website address is YouTube address dogs and wolves. He's always on point, and I think we would be a miss, too, because I listened to you on another podcast and you had mentioned this and I didn't know. But Peter Glencoe, you and I have You have him on your show a lot, and I owe a lot to him, too, because he has given you viewers and viewers to myself a swell and thinking whether we're thinking of Frankie with his view and perspective on things. I think Peter has a great view and perspective on things, too, in the adversity that he faces, and it's still working hard and has a positive attitude as he does. So Yeah, totally. I think that's why, like people attract, uh to each other like Frankie and Pete. Pete used to call me a little bit. We talk and I think he's a great smart guy and he's like you said adversity and he's going through stuff and he keeps going and he's always he's always lifting people, and this is the whole thing I could boil everything down to Is that one, uh, cliche quote that no good deed goes unpunished and it literally is true. You could do something good and for free and give it away, and you will have people jump on you. Um, you can just ignore it and get on. But why not do the other thing? Why not lift people like I see that and everyone like everyone's enough. Who cares if you're a musician or you have a show or ever do. Everyone is enough, just the way they are, like Mr Rogers said. I like you, Brian, just the way you are. You don't need to do anything. You already are enough, But why not lift people and say like, That's a good picture that you just drew or I like that. I like that, you know, poem that you wrote or and people are very quick to like. Passive aggressive is very a prominent. Today, people are passive aggressive. I think most of people who start crapping on each other and giving each other hard time they're not even aware that the reason they're doing it is because they're having a bad life and they're grumpy and their feel like life's unfair are they had a bad day and then So they take it out on the Internet later on someone's show or whatever. Yeah, I like Pete for lifting people up and I could see that you and you to Brian. You know, he he gets a lot of heat because he's in the crypto field. And so people I think are less sympathetic, not in crypto, but you're dealing, as we mentioned before about money not talking about money. But that's where people tend less to take their their heart with, um I mean, not in the strictest way, but yeah, If you do this, then you're a bad person. Like if you work for eso, then you're bad, you know? It doesn't work like that. It's more to life than he takes a lot of criticism. Yeah, he does. I think he does. He take. And Frankie too, I think takes a lot of even though he has a lot of love out there and stuff like you take a lot. So, um, they have chins. Yeah, I mentioned this earlier, and you mentioned this just now. But Aesop's fables, my dear wife, bought me the this book for my students, but we thought it was bigger. It big, small. It look big on the phone, but the one that's called I just read it the other day. The the old woman in the wine jar in the premise or the lesson is the memory of a good deed lives old woman picked up on empty wine jar which had once contained a rare and costly wine in which still retained some traces of its exquisite boutique. Okay, she raised it to her nose and sniffed it at again and again. Ah, she cried. How delicious must have been the liquid which has left behind so ravishing a smell. So the idea of doing these good things and again the lesson was called, uh, the memory of a good deed lives. So as long as we're doing these good things, whether you're talking about Franky, is that what Peter talking about yourself or myself doing these there? Anyone else listening? Doing these things is really what's gonna win over at the end of the day. Totally, Exactly. Right. Just between everything. Today I saw an old friend I hadn't seen in a while, and we actually, uh, we're in, like, 20 years ago. We were both going through a crazy time in Poland. It was a huge adventure, and we saw each other today. And we're like that thing that happened in Poland, man, that was totally worth it. That was so fun. It's the memory. And if you and if you do, and a good intention or a good deed, you're right, it's It's the reason why we work because it does stay. The intention will stay. Uh, and it will live forever. Or like when someone dies. Uh, you know, to live in the hearts of others is not to die. So as...

...soon as you just bring up the topic, the song, the person, it just becomes alive again. And that intention is the seed of goodness and love. And what could be more powerful than that? I know you're tired and we're on a time restraint. I don't want to keep you too long. So good jumps through some things. But what about patryan? I'm wondering this because I know you have a patryan account. So how does how does that work? And and how could people connect with you? And I'm just, you know, anyone listening? Thio, go to that. But how does that work? I I know very little about it. Yeah, it's a good question. I've tried lots. I've tried, I've tried everything. And often I get people with good intentions saying You should try this, You should do that. And I'm like, Oh, that thing I did seven times and it didn't work. So out of all the things I went back to Patryan. Because its's Technically, it's stable and it's there and everything, but from his little is like I think I think it could be anything, but I think it's from like a little is $2 a month. It's like if you're watching someone show all the time and you're their friend or whatever you know if for two bucks a month, you can pay more if you if you want you, you get some rewards. So on my patryan, I keep it super simple. I really I no gimmicks air good and they work and we live in an interactive world. So it's always like rewards and do this and interactive and stream labs and O. B s and do this and but it becomes a nightmare because there's so much stuff going on. So my patryan is super simple. There's, like three things you can join and pay, like two bucks a month and help what I dio. You don't have Thio, and then you get to see rare videos that no one else can see. So stuff from years ago, like when I was doing crazy shows you get to see those. And but the main thing is, there's no pressure. You can leave whenever you want, and what you're actually doing is you're just helping me pay the Internet bill so I can keep doing this show, and I've been on it for about a year and a half, got nine patry ins. It's not a lot, but they're great people they're loyal, they help out. I've almost reached the goal. I'm imagine this. I've been doing this for seven years and and I haven't can't afford to pay my Internet bill with my show yet. And I hate being grumpy and talking about it, but the same time, I don't want to do it for free all the time because it's painful enough already. So it's patryan. I don't even know what it is, but it's on my website base guy show dot com B A s s base guy show dot com And on there there's there's a whole bunch of like, That's the thing I forget Brian, I'm a musician. I have albums and I think I've made I can't remember. I shouldn't talk about money, but over 10 years I've not made a lot. It's It's like it's like 20 bucks a month or something, not even, but I make albums so, like, why not? You know there's T shirts, there's albums or whatever, and you have my main goal section. Yeah, yeah, and And my goal is to actually pay the Internet bill. So I know a lot of these shows or whatever might be raking in money and doing well, or someone's on tick tock, and they're monetizing and making thousands of dollars per post. I'm just trying to pay, like a $95 Internet bill, and I can't even do that. But I don't give up. I keep going. I think any sane person would have given up years ago. I keep doing it. You mentioned the idea of being, say, in a bar where people are walking by the musicians talk about being on YouTube, for instance, and the importance of likes comments shares all of those things because I think people even I find myself and sometimes accidentally because I don't know why. But my YouTube is not, um, I'm not logged into my YouTube on my phone, which I have to do so when I goto like something, I can't because I'm not logged in. But I watch lots of things, and I probably don't do what I should do because you know that helps. Oh, the content creator. So what is your view on that? It is weird because YouTube is probably the strongest platform because the whole world uses it. The video's air there, but people do not use it for social media. They're not on there saying, Hey, how's it going? Whatever there are like there are millions of people on YouTube, but generally people go on Facebook to talk to each other, right and be social. And on YouTube, it's just kind of a thing that you'll just stick on your Facebook and talk about it on Facebook. I don't use Facebook, by the way. I'm completely. I have one, and I use it to talk to my mom. I'm anti Facebook. I can't stand it. Yeah, I don't sorry to bring that up. I can't stand it. But But YouTube is like people are. Except for creators. People aren't really using. And YouTube's weird because if you click on what's trending, my jaw drops again. It's just like the death. It's like the Roman Empire crumbling. There's just someone like, Hey, everybody, today we're gonna make the Zip zap song, And then there's like chickens everywhere and stuff, and it's just like, What the hell is going on...

...going from John Coltrane Thio? So I always go back to that thing. But YouTube yeah, I don't get much help with the algorithms. I just keep using it because there's a strong platform of other channels there, too. But I don't really get any help from YouTube or creators. I'm doing everything wrong or something. But it is helpful, though, right? For people who are taking in content, toe like to share those little things, even if you're not contributing to a patryan or some other. Yeah, the income is those likes and shares. They do help in the algorithm, which it's hard to understand. I don't understand it all, but I think just those comments, you know, it was good, you know, thank you alike those things. And not only that. I think they put something in our in our our productive bank, right? It's an investment to show. Oh, that person liked it. That's good. And I think you could get too caught up in who liked it or who disliked it or who says one. But I think generally those things are important for the algorithm, but they're also important for you as a content. If you create a show UNEP, ISS owed and a bunch of people like it, it's something that you like a Well, yeah, sometimes that happens. The video goes well. Everyone was in a great mood. There's comments and stuff, but then sometimes I'll put in a video with much more work or whatever, and nothing will happen. Not a single comment. No. And then the subscribers will just stay the same for like three months. Like how could it not go up or down? So it's just like, How does it just all of a sudden and then nothing. I feel like the numbers, like not just YouTube, but everywhere. All these were all consumed by views numbers, which is validation approval. And it's like I'm like, Yeah, but did you like John Coltrane's solo? Or is it about like, you could have 27 million likes and be the biggest idiot in the world who is not producing anything of what was that movie? Jerry Maguire wasn't the baby sitter talking toe. Tom Cruise is like, Wasn't it John Coltrane? I'll need to watch that. I think I call myself the other day. Do you ever? But do you really listen to the music he was like? And then I think he was talking to the kid. Just kind of get trying to change the world a little bit at a time. What is your overall goal for the base guy? Show or together? Goal toe one day be able to afford a gold suit so that people know how, how successful I am. That's an old dumb joke I had since I was a kid. If I get rich, I'll buy a gold suit like actual gold eso. When I walk around, people will say, Hey, that guy's successful It's hard to walk around and my goal is always the same thing and I'm the one who forgets it first is toe have fun and enjoy myself and put some love and positivity in the world. But I think through all the adversity I'm 46 on have almost killed myself 1000 times trying thio, produce something or become a teacher or do music. And the end result is like, you know, having no food in the fridge. It's like f man, like, really like, why am I doing this? So I asked myself, Why am I doing this? And I think it's really because of for a lot of the reasons is I've lost a lot of people in life like friends, brothers people have died and I kind of do it for them because I think that they're in heaven and they're looking down and they're saying like, you know, Jack, you know, or everybody Everyone you know, like do it, do something good like keep, keep running, keep going. That's why I do it. I don't know if that sounds crazy, but it's like a voice in my head telling me to keep going. Well, it could be a worse voice in your head telling you to do something else, And I could be It could be just that I'm really, really bad. Maybe I'm crap. Maybe I'm a jerk. That's totally possible to hit mall. I think we all have a little jerkiness in us. It depends on how much we show on how much we display. I know there is no success and there is no goal. You're supposed to just live and thrive and do better and stuff. But I just my whole point with this whole conversation is like that. I talk about lot. My show is if you if you do go through all these trials and tribulations through your whole life, like not like once or twice. Sometimes I hear people say, like, Oh, yeah, I've been doing my podcast Now, I've been doing this for seven months now, and like they're on TV and famous now, you know, seven months. Hey, you're on TV seven Took you seven years, but you're on today? Yeah, today. So I started in 19, like, 84 I think. And I still have nothing in the fridge. So I kind of like a man like, what's what's going on, you know? And so then I talk about it, and I'm completely honest, like, now I completely just talk about these are just my opinions and they might change. I'm not I'm an idiot. I don't know what I'm talking about, but...

I'm trying to be honest and some and they say that that you should be yourself and have fun. But when I do that, it doesn't work either. It z is there something about you that people don't understand or the work that you're doing right as the podcast host a musician that people don't understand that you would like them to understand, So they may get a better appreciation of the work you bring to the table. There's the screaming voices in my head nonstop. And there's this producer called Larry who ruins everything is this. I love the Larry O for Larry. Larry is my fall guy is an imaginary producer. Anything? I'd like people to know that like I like them. Send that. Yeah, I wish, Like in this whole our conversation there was like two words I could use. Instead, there's to say, like you never know what someone else has been through so never, ever dare judge anyone, including myself. I we should never you never know what someone's been through. Um, I really I really wish that people would, um, take a step back and stop consuming so much, uh, physically and mentally, and just stop and slow down. And if you're gonna watch my show or Brian Show or eat a banana or just stop and focus and look and look at something and realize like, you know that there's a history behind it and there's all the stuff behind. If you keep scrolling and doing this and going to start getting bubble by, it's just everyone's just kind of literally Brian. You go on the street and I see people driving in their cars while looking at their phone like we've actually gone insane. I want if I wish people could understand what music is rather than just a candy or something that you turn on to feel good. Most the reasons most of people will enjoy music is they don't even know why. And that's the whole point. You're supposed to have fun, but I really wish people would, like enjoy music again and go back into it and take a step back from all the bullshit you mentioned a couple of times. Adversity in, you know, losing family members, losing friends, breaking your back a couple of times. Is there some particular adversity that you have faced that either encourages you or hinders you in your work? But you could also use that adversity to encourage people in the adversity they face in their work. Yeah, that you're whatever you're going through, even if it's the worst thing, even if it's like leading to death. Whatever. You're not alone. People love you and, you know, stuff that some people that they make movies about, I think like in the old days, uh, first nations would tell stories And that's how they told stories to the Children to teach things now and today's culture. It's movies that you see the movie about the plane that crashed in the mountains and they had to eat each other. So they got through that right? Well, some of them did. And like you said, the story went on forever and made many, many more people be aware of that adversity. So if whatever it's really important to, because some people like, give up or think they have to give up whatever my thing is like, don't give up, reach out to someone. And if you're completely alone, just keep going because there is nothing else. You're just not even if it's shitty and and pain. I'm in pain and it's not been easy, but I'm still I still think that it's worth living and and if you focus on what you have or don't have, like I'm talking about, you forget to like, look at the birds and stuff and go for a walk and have fun. So don't give up like you're not alone. Yeah, you're touching on That, too, is because when people are faced with dire adversity, they end their lives. And here in South Korea, it's, I think, next to New Zealand. It's one of the highest rates of suicide in the world because people feel and it's usually coming from middle school high school students who are not doing as well as they're supposed to be doing by the the regulations or the expectations of parents and teachers, because they bottleneck them so much that everyone's supposed to be the best, which you know, working, making 10 shows at a seven days a week. It's impossible to do, you know, very hard Thio accomplish. Then they feel in utter despair and jump off on apartment building. That's the really bad thing about culture and stuff like on one important side. Note is, we're not doctors, obviously, But there are mental health issues, and that requires professional, you know, like that whole thing is different cause people talk about stuff. But if you're bipolar schizophrenic, Tourette's all that stuff, you can't tell someone to cheer up. Keep going because it's not that simple. But there is. There is help out there, so on a...

...side note, we're not doctors. Mental health is really serious, important, Um, and I think all the technology and craziness is amplifying that. Now there's there's more suffering in the world. But the part about culture, whether it's over there here of like, we from birth, you're taught toe like, you know, from a from a girl you're taught to, like, you know, wanna pink dress and you're going to get married, and you're gonna have a big house. And the guy has to be tough right from birth. You're completely trained. It's even worse, probably in Russia and stuff like that. We put so much pressure on ourselves to achieve all these things, and it goes right back to Mr Rogers. Who, uh, you know, he campaigned and went to the White House and and parliament forget what it was called, but he went on. What was it that, uh, Mr Rogers did? He went to the Senate Senate. Yeah, and he was talking about like, it's important to keep the show going. And everything about Children and his whole message to Children and to people was that you are enough. You don't need to be anything. You don't need to do anything. It's okay to be sad or unhappy or have problems. You're We live in a politically correct world right now, Like totally politically correct where everyone's supposed to be involving with. Good. That's a good thing. But you are enough just the way you are. But people always feel like Oh, I'm not good looking enough. I'm too old. I'm too young. I'm too stupid. I'm so smart. I'm a nerd, So nobody likes me. I'm this. I'm that I need more money. You're You're enough the way you are, your perfect the way you are. And we don't remind each other of that a lot. And I do that my show all the time. Even though I talk a lot of crap and I'm always grumpy and poor, I'm always trying to tell people that you are enough the way you are. You don't need validation or approval. You're perfect. I love Mr Rogers. I think he's great. That show I watch it every now and then. Like once a month, I watched episode I was a little bit disappointed with Tom Hanks because in his interviews for that movie that he did, he was saying Mr Rogers is only for kids because you know, as a when you grow up, you realize that his show was not for the reality of this life. Like he said that a few those were his talking points on the interviews. I was like, No, I think I watched Mr Rogers now and his shows air very applicable on how I can treat people well and how a better way to look at the world. That's what Mr Rogers does. He is like he has episodes where he talks to kids. He's like, Are you angry? Why are you angry? And then he'll talk about anger or when J. F. Like in the movie. When John F. Kennedy got shot, he talked about on the show. He talked about an assassin blowing someone's head off. How does that make you feel, Johnny, You know, like really heavy, heavy stuff, racism and politics and all this stuff. And he would ask he would address the problem like like like, let's talk about your feelings and where they come from and why you've that. I think that would help adults like you said we should all watch more. Mr Rogers. Yeah, just a Rogers loop. Is there anything else that we haven't touched? upon Jack. Is there something that we haven't mentioned that you would like to mention? Everybody should go watch Frankie McDonald's videos. Absolutely, absolutely. I just I want to say that I like, despite my grumpy mood today or whatever, I want to thank everybody who's ever like, encountered my life and passed my way and been part of this show or whatever. Put up with me love to everybody. Thanks for putting up with me. And there's so many good people out there like Billy Dee and Sloppy and Lynn and this guy John I just met. And they're just people like Mills Motors and sought cop and, uh, Mickey and Go Jen. I could go on forever, and they're just amazing, wonderful people. So thank you for being part of the therapy. That's what you're saying is when you first started. There's been this consistent group with you along the way, and it it becomes, you know, friends. But like a family of people who really support you, and those are the ones you never want to forget. Yeah, and through it, Like I said, seven years so a lot of people have gone, but they're still there and some of them creep back and say hello and there's no pressure. There's no rules. And I'm really just an idiot on the Internet, talking like this and playing guitar. And yeah, I think it's it's fun. The premise of my show This is the one thing I had a best friend. His name was We'll just say Velcro. That was his stage name. And he was one of my best friends, music friend. And he used to call on the show and be a member of the show like for about two years. And he passed away and he died and the very beginning of my show. There's some, uh, spoken word over the theme song, and it's my friend. Richard said that to me, used to call and leave messages on this show, and he said, um, let's stay in touch because it's important contact. It's good contact. We need that contact and we're only gonna die one day, and we're going to go on living into another format based guy loves, you know, fear. And that's on the end, or beginning of every show,...

...depending on how I do it. So, uh, when he passed away I kind of was going through my own thing, but it just solidified everything. That his message and his love. I'm still doing this show in his name. I actually have a card here in his name, and I look at it every day and, you know, and other people too. But he really inspired me. Thio He went through the hardest time in the world ever and he said to me, You got to keep in touch, keep going because whatever you're doing, it's important. Just keep going. And I thought that was a beautiful message from, Ah, best friend. It's great to have friends like that who support you and encourage you along the way. How can people reach you, Jack? It's based guy show dot com So B A S s, as in the bass guitar base guy show dot com, and everything's on there like there's it's just it's hand delivered on a silver platter. All the different links and things like that. You you say you're an idiot and I agree that I'm an idiot, but you have some special skills so good on you. I mean, I suggest people go check you out and you are talented with the instruments that are around you with the microphone in front of you with all those buttons and your creative in your show. And as I said, you're very compassionate with the people that you have on and caring and that that shows no matter what we have going on in our minds. But I have one final question for you. Yep. Why do you work? Because I just think because Because we're here and we're alive. We call it work. But it could just be being on doing things, not to get too Zen. But why does anybody do anything? And for me personally, waking up, making my bed and producing something and making something and putting some love? Despite all the complaining I did when I do music every day, I literally the hair stand up on my back on the back of my neck daily hourly because I'm doing music and I'm like, I'm secretly having the time of my life. The only time I'm free and I have feel no pain is when I'm working. So I work because it just I get I I'm aware that I'm a conscious entity in the universe. I wasn't here before. I won't be there in the future. I am now and I'm very conscious of that. So I try to make the best I can. Everywhere I've lived, I've put pictures on the wall or are like flowers over there. Or just like I completely, completely ungrateful for existing. And I try to do the best I can while I'm here all the time. Yeah, my perspective on life in that work is a good thing. Despite the difficulties we have in it, I think once when it all ends the difficulties air gone work is still a good thing. And I think the work that you're doing is wonderful. And I suggest people to check you out. Jack Blythe, Base Guy Show. I appreciate this time that you have given me and I appreciate the work that you dio Thank you very much, Brian. Thank you for your time. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they to be encouraged in their work. E hope that you have yourself a productive be a joyful day in your work.

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