WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 113 · 8 months ago

#113​ Jack Casey - BassGuyShow.com - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Jack "Bass Guy" Casey is the founder, producer, and host of The Bass Guy Show. Jack has exceptional talent and a tender heart as he produces his live show three times a week. (Live every M-W-F at 1pm EST Montreal time)

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Welcome to why we work with your hostBrian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as wetogether dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seeminglymissteps, hopes, warnings and advice which will be an encouragement to usall to get up. Get going on, keep on working. Working is tough, but workingis good. Now here is your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian B. And thisis why we work today at the great pleasure of speaking with Jack Casey.Jack is the founder and producer of the Base Guy Show, which you can findMonday, Wednesday and Friday live at 1 p.m. Eastern. Today. I want to find outfrom Jack. How can we treat people better? It seems like a very simplequestion, but I think he has a true nah act in this field. So join me today inmy conversation with Jack the base guy, Casey Um, Brian V. And this is why wework today. I have the great pleasure speaking with Jack Bass Guy Casey. Goodday finds her. Hey, Brian, how you doing today? I'm doing wonderfully well.I was just telling you how much I appreciate you taking the time to dothis. We've been trying to look at setting this up over the last few weeks,thanks to primarily Mr Frankie MacDonald. Would you be able to do me afavor, Jack, and tell us what industry you're in and what it is you're doingnowadays? Um, I'm in the industry of, uh, wearingmy pajamas right now and doing my show from home. You know what? My good e awalk down, everyone's in their underwear. 2021 is a great year. So far?Not really. But I had a interview the other day. Just full tie shirt jacket,Jack bottoms. A perfect I'm a musician, though I'm in the industry of music andentertainment. I started when I was about 14 years old. So my whole life,really speaking of 14 years old, what wouldhave been your very first job that you would have had, whether it wasvolunteer, just something trying something for fun, Maybe lemonade standor delivering papers as a preteen or teen ager? The very first thing Istarted working when I was about 12, and I never stopped. I starteddelivering newspapers. It was on Wednesdays, The Chronicle in the WestIsland, in Montreal, on Ben the Gazette. And I would deliver papers, too, apretty rich neighborhood. And then I'd have to go collect all the money. Andmy first riel official job was when I was 14 years old. Um, it was reallybizarre. I worked at a yacht club because it was close by and I was aBoston and like, you go on a little boat and you have a shot gun and youshoot it, and then the the race I have, I have No, I have no idea aboutanything about sports or boats or anything, or guns or anything and orhow to drive a boat. And within about a day I was driving a boat shooting doneand marking people scores, and I didn't have a clue what was going on in mywhole life. It's kind of like that movie. Catch me if you can. You figureout that you can you can just wing it, and you could just, like go. As long asyou're not flying a spaceship, it's gonna be OK. So that was my first joband the first job for the Boston. Uh, thing was, the guy like you just kindof took a liking to me. Whatever, and said Okay, here's your job. He goes,there's a pipe under here under the road and it was a cement road goes Iwant you to dig a hole foot wide and a foot deep right across the street. Andhe gave me a pitchfork and I'm a dumb kid and I don't I don't know what I'mdoing And I'm working in the hot sun And I dug a huge like World War twotrench in the ground and I had blister and blood all over my hands. And whenhe came back, he was like, Holy crap, you did it. And then my mom came overand gave the guy crap, and that was my first day of work. He was amazed thatyou were able to do it. Your mom was shocked that they made you do it thefirst time ever told that story. So that's I'm just thinking of was it a pitchforkor was it? Yeah, it was like an actual legit like old school pitchfork. Nogloves, and I didn't know what work was so in my head, I was kind of a scared,insecure kid. I was like, uh I was the kind of kid that, like when I was seven,I bike to school with my brothers and all the kids, and it was, like, twomiles away, and after about a mile, I thought I was in the Amazon jungle andI was like, crying as the same. Scotland is greeting. I could too far.So on my first day of work, I was like, Oh, I guess this is what everybody does.They huge massive holes in concrete and...

...cut their hands open. That's why thosemen that you those hands you shaker so tough high. Okay, I could do it too, Asyou were getting up towards high school. Did you work any other jobs? You saidyou had lots of different jobs, but what was the main job you might havehad? All the way upto high school? Um, I had Yeah, I had lows of jobs. I e Igrew up kind of poor and things were tough for me, So I have to get my ownmoney if I wanted to do anything, and I did paper routes. I worked in littlelocal restaurants. My favorite was this guy called Batty, and in the Montrealin the West Island baddies and I would help him clean and cook and do things.And then when I left high school around 17, I went right into ah, Bar and Iended up working in the grease pit. The guy got me down under the bar. I had toclean out the grease pits of the worst hardest job in the world. I became adishwasher, and I washed dishes instead of going to college like all my friends,because, like I said, I was poor. I washed dishes for about three yearsstraight and then move my way up to, um, like prep, chef or whatever. But thenthe bar actually had a stage, and it became a D. J. And then I started a jamnight, and I'll get musicians to come in. So, uh, and even back then I waslike in the local paper, and I was booking famous local musicians likeMichelle Excel in the Wild Unit from You, Zeb in Montreal, the big jazz band,and I was always like doing like I was scraping the grease, digging the holes,being a restaurant person. And then at night I go into the D. J booth and thenI would do battle of the bands. And then sometimes I would sleep. I'm noteven joking. I would sleep on the bar like because then I would clean the bar.I do all the toilets and clean the chair id sleep on the bar. And I wasworking 18 hours a day for a couple of years. So that was my education. It's that secure the modern. But themodern day Batman are Spiderman. Yeah, I worked. I worked hard and I moved outwhen I was 17 years old and had my own apartment. I worked my whole life andthen worked my way up Thio. Other stuff. What was your motivation? Get the paperout. Knowing that you were. You said you didn't have a lot of money or poor.And then what? Why did you do that? Was that for your own motivation? Was thatfamily kicking you out of the house and saying go makes money? It was a bit ofeverything. I came from a large family had a whole bunch of brothers and moneywas tight. My parents were working class and my but my dad was like a Hepassed away in 2011. He was, Ah, like a bit of a genius. He he knew he did,just didn't apply himself. He was a mechanic and a one class mechanic, thehighest level of Mechanic and Canada. He could fix any truck, car, machine,anything and on the weekends would go drive into the richer parts of town.And we'd collect garbage in the morning and my dad would find bits of oldbicycle, and he would build us all amazing bikes like really good bikes.It's not spending a penny. And then he put a basket on my bike and a stand.And then that's how that led into delivering the Montreal Gazette when Iwas about 14, when you were delivering to the richer neighborhoods, was thatencouraging or discouraging to you? You're thinking, Oh, I want to getthere. I wanna yeah, it goes. It goes so far later on in my later life. Butyes, the places I was delivering to, we're literally some of them mansionsso you'd huge houses. So I knew there was that world, And then there was myworld. But I was I wasn't I was too young to be judgmental or like, what'swrong with the world or whatever, But it became a theme later on, and myother jobs, it got even Mawr crazy with the diversity of or the difference of,like, poverty and richness and entering those worlds, I guess they're codependent on each other. But, yeah, it did. It did make me think, Like, howcome this guy has 2020 rooms in his house and we have one? Yeah, with 20people in it. When you got into high school and knowing that you went intoyou worked in a bar, what were you thinking that you might wanted to doWhen I was in high school? I had no idea what I want to do, but I just kindof followed along a path, but for no particular rhyme or reason. What wereyou thinking about? What you may wanted to dio? Well, during all that crazy work stuffthat was going on? I got my first guitar when I was about, um Well,Actually, I started playing drums when I was seven because my dad, even thoughwe weren't rich, he did care for me and my mom and dad. They were They weregreat to me and they got us a little drum set in the basement, and my dadtaught me drums on It took ages, and I finally got it when I was seven andthen invite other kids in and they became musicians. And then when I wasabout 14, I got a guitar and I was cutting. Grass was cutting lawns with apush lawn. More like the old school...

...1987. Whatever. And I would use thatmoney. It was expensive to $20 a guitar lesson back in the eighties andnineties, so I would take guitar lessons, and I used to sit at home andjust practice after school like five hours nonstop. One scale just over, andI'm dyslexic. So everything I do takes me a lot longer than the average person,I think. But I just I have this really dumb, stubborn determination to nevergive up on. I've been beaten down 1000 times and I get back up, so I just keptpracticing and practicing, and I knew I wanted to be a musician. Like the thingI didn't know then that I know now is that especially now maybe it's good forsome people like the industry, like Walt Disney and stuff Netflix. Butbeing a musician really, really, really sucks. In fact, my advice to anymusician is don't do it become something else because you you practiceyour whole life. You conduce tours and be with bands and travel the world. Butthen when it's over, you got no money you got. You haven't done the familything. You're just you're 40 years old and you're like, Oh, and then when I domy show online, I put my whole life into it. Music's free. It's theInternet. You just turn it on and everything's. Remember Napster? Whathappened? Thio downloading music like overnight music is free. So imagineputting a million zillion hours into what you're doing, and then someone'slike, Oh, that's a nice song, Click and then to the next thing Scroll. That'sso yeah, I think it knowing that back in the days of Napster, if if someonemaybe would have explained it better. Maybe things would have went adifferent way. I think the idea of copyright and all of that has is takento the forefront. And they're doing their due diligence on how to protectthe what is it called the intellectual property of the artist. But it's tough,right? It's tough. And you could put all that effort in. And at the end ofthe day, if you're still if you you're done producing, you're done recording.You're not getting any money. Yeah, that's the difficulty of being amusician. So you decided at a young age you wanted to be a musician. You travelthis road, you worked in a bar and then you worked your way up. You mentionedin the forties. Is is there something that you did consistently? Was that themusic or were you doing other jobs alongside? Yeah. We always bring you tobeing the base guy. Yeah, Yeah, it was. It was always the music that wasconsistent. And the only reason it absolutely. I'm stubborn. It makes youknow, money. And I watched a lot of my other friends who are professionalmusicians. They eventually 99% of them give up and stop and go do somethingelse and I don't blame them. Have a family and get a career. But I'm kindof like a music music holic. I'm addicted to music. I love it so much,and for me it's well for everybody. It's It's spiritually right if nevermind like a I don't want this anything but a popular band or song or whatever.You know, it could be pop or but when you see, like a band play in Chicago orsome like Amazing Band in Africa and everyone's dancing and like James Brownand it goes right through you and I just at shivers and and people. I wrotethis in one of my songs. People get married to music. People use music attheir parties, people, higher bands for their weddings and bar mitzvahs.Whatever music is always there on the game shows on the TV, it is so it'severywhere in all encompassing. But for some reason it's free. Like for mostpeople. I'm not talking about the industry and everything. I'm talkingabout most people, most musicians who work and gig. There's an old joke, thedefinition of a musician to someone who takes $5000 of equipment, puts it in a$500 car and then drives 5500 miles to do a gig for $50. So it's kind ofdisheartening. My point is it's It's a really prominent important thing. Itactually, Jimi Hendrix said that Onley music can conceive the world because ifyou think about it, music actually bypasses all politics. All you know,things that are going on. The world bypasses everything in, it unites usall, and it's it's everywhere and it's so important makes you feel good. Itmakes you cry. It's when you watch a movie. It's usually 50% the music thatmakes you feel the emotions of the production you're watching and it'sreally, really, really important music and I still haven't given up. I had,like, a I I I went up like this. I started like I said, dishwashing andbeing poured all that and I went right up and I got to a climax and I I wentthrough so much diversity. I don't know if we could talk about it all here,some of its personal, but through a lot of like wars and When I finally beateverything and I was doing well, my back and my spine cracked and I was inthe hospital and I lost everything. So...

...tiny violin and uh, it's that was aboutit. Was that the crack from overwork or something in particular that happened?I've thought about it and researched and studied it and thought about it alot. Um, when I was a kid in Montreal at Parc Safari in Quebec, I was takento, Ah, a little circus thing and petting zoo on. I was put on a rollercoaster on. I was about 78 years old and the guy who puts you on the roadholsters smoking a cigarette was like 1981. No one gave a crap and he puts mein the thing and he clicks and it doesn't click. And I start like saying,Sir, sir, like and I start crying and screaming and he starts the rollercoaster and my thing didn't click down and I went I thought, I'll just hold on.The roller coaster started. It was a big roller coaster like 20 ft tall, andit went up and I went flying like 50 80 ft flying through the air, and Iremember falling and I landed on my my legs and then on my spinal column, andI was winded. And back then, no. Nothing happened. No one got sued. Acouple of people lost their jobs, but that was about it, and that was myfirst major injury. I think that's where it stemmed from. I fell out of aroller coaster. There might have been a hairline there and then just the abuse,specially playing instruments and staying in a position for a long periodof time that might have added some stress to it. Yeah, and in school, likeI didn't know it at the time. But when I think back, because I've studied whathappened to me all through elementary and high school, I was taken home fromschool sometimes and taken to the hospital because I had incredible neckpain and headaches and back pain, and I never addressed to it. And then lifejust got busy, and I just kind of never dealt with it. And then I also havingto go through a lot of adversity. Like I traveled the world a lot. I lost alot of loved ones. Uh, everything I did was with, like, five bucks in my pocketon I eventually became like a teacher at university. And so I was like, Okay,and I was getting paid. Well, I had a nice place. And then that's when I losteverything and have to start all over again. And that was about almost 10years ago. And then I started the base guy show. What were you teaching? I wasteaching music. I was, uh, sometimes head of the base department or just ageneral music teacher. And I lived in Scotland at that time, and I taught atPerth College on, you know, it's a university as well. I taught it StoveUniversity in Glasgow and Glasgow University. I was working sometimes atthree schools at once, uh, every week, driving back and forth and stuff. Soyou said things kind of crumbled at that point. Was that because of yourback? Or was that for some other reason in the So I used to jog a lot, and Iused to be really thin and healthy and ate well, and I would jog in betweenplaying music and everything and um, one day in the summer, around 2000 andeight or nine, I was helping a friend dig a ditch. Here we are, back to theditch story. And there you go, through a full circle. And I was just helpingsomeone garden and I was digging. And then I went for a jog, and then I wenthome. I was living in a big apartment in Glasgow and I woke up at two orthree in the morning screaming my head off, and I went to go to the phone andI passed out and I woke up in my own sweat. And then I reached the phone andI called 911 and nurse and Cem. Police came over and opened the door, and Iwas taken away to the hospital. So So it just what happened? My l five sone disc just popped out, but like the size of like a finger, it wascompletely blocking my spinal cord. And I could hardly walk, and I was stuck onthe floor and I went through about I didn't get surgery start straight away.The NHS sucked. So I came to Canada and I was seen to hear a lot. It wasn'teven good here, though, too. I got some horror stories of I just saw on theTwitter on CBC that there was a man who went in the hospital complaining thathe had, like, paralyzed this hip or something. And the nurses and doctorsthought he was like, joking or like not seriously. They kicked him out. Theytold him, Go away, your good boy and they were demeaning and everything tohim. And that happened to me. When I first went to the hospital in the westof Montreal. I was lying on the floor. The doors were open in the winter, andthe doctor told me to take a Tylenol and go home, and I called the hospitaland I gave them Holy shit. Sorry for swearing, and they and then they werelike, Oh, you can't talk to us like this and blah, blah, blah. But thensomeone picked up the phone and said, We just got this guy's Emory because Ihad done one is like this guy needs to be in the hospital today and the nextthe next day. I was in surgery, and the doctor said they hadn't. The Emoryperson said, like you know, your whole...

...spinal cord is blocked, you shouldn'teven be walking. And there's lots of horror stories. Brian, it was pain. SoI did all that and blah, blah, blah. And I worked through my life and Ifinally became something and someone, you know, I just mean like I had, I hadcomfort and I achieve something. I was the first person in my family ever inmy family to go to school and to become a teacher. And then that happened. Soeverything was taken away. So it's like to me in my head, it was like no matterhow much adversity there is and how hard things are and how many people dieand how poor you are, and then you finally achieve something, and thenit's all taken away from you again, and I hate complaining about it or talkingabout it, but that's that's what happened in my life. It's of course,it's been tragic, whatever, but I always wake up, make my bed and do thebest. I can make some music and do something productive, and then you goonline and people say you suck, dude, get off line. Oh, I know the trolls, rolls, trolls.So it's a troll is just someone who sits there and say, You know, they justsay you're you're bald, you suck, You get out of here And they don't realizeyou just spent 18 hours a day for 40 years to come to this point and they'rejust like you suck. I was teaching class yesterday, and I liked the moviejust because of my upgrading Bringing, I guess, is the movie Annie Annie. I saw that in the theater whenit came out. Hey, but she sings this song tomorrow, right? It's gonna be abright day tomorrow, right? And then I had a lesson yesterday. It was Aesop'sfables, I believe, or even in another book that I'm reading. And it's talkingabout tomorrow. The kid wanted to know about tomorrow, and his mom said, Justgo to bed when you wake up tomorrow will be here. And then he will. He wentto bed, woke up. It's like Mom, is it tomorrow? No, it's not tomorrow.Tomorrow is another day away. So he kept living his life trying to get totomorrow, but eventually he learned that you need to make the best of today.So I see these two the dichotomy between Anne looking for tomorrow becausetomorrow is gonna be better. But it's actually not true, right? Because youhave to. What you said is make your bed do what you can do today because nomatter what, what you're going through, adversity is going to slap you in theface in many different forms. Yeah, totally. And when I was in the thedeepest, darkest places, that's when I started reading books like EckhartTotally the power of Now. Someone gave that to me when I was in India, and Iread it in one day, and and it was just like it's totally makes sense. There'sso many books that repeat the same theme that and everybody knows it'sliving in the now. And that's why I personally chose to be a musician,because in my mind you can have your nothing against it. But you can haveyour house and your car and your air conditioner and all the things thatpollute the planet and cause global warming. But you can have all thosethings, but you don't get to take them with you when you die and you can givethem tow your kids and your kids can have a great life. But the same thinghappens to me now. I would rather play music and have a soul and look at thebirds and be in the now, then be consumed by like I need to have acredit card and I used to be like that, but I need to have a house and a joband all that. Now. For me, what's important is Thio, you know, experiencelife as a human being and like all the joys and the pains and the music, andso I I think I sacrificed having I could have. I could have all that stuffif I want, but because I picked music, I don't have any of that stuff, so Ican I can play music and Aiken instantly warped into like Zen Buddhamode and play music, and it's the best feeling in the world. But I don't haveall that other stuff. I don't know how it works, Brian, because there areobviously a lot of musicians who do do really well. So you said aboutexperiencing life, and I think how I've come to know you is through the baseGuys show. So how did that How did you kind of pick yourself up or encourageyourself to keep going to start with your own show? Um, well, when I was the second time, Iwas in surgery and I was in for longer and I was on morphine and I'm inhospital and don't move mode. I couldn't move or anything. I took anapkin and I wrote a rap song on morphine about my situation like that.I'm in the hospital and blah, blah, blah, and it's It's on my websitesomewhere based guy show dot com albums. And there's a song called Spinal Rap.So I figured, Oh, I could do that. And then when I got home, actually hadnurses coming to my house because I had to get clean needles nervous because Iwas in a lot of pain. I was in bad shape and I had a mixing desk, and Iput it right beside my bed and I kept just recording music, and it reminds meof a time that when I was a kid, I broke my forget what it was, my elbowor my wrist or something. That was my...

...elbow and I had a cast on. But I keptpracticing guitar anyway, and I just kept I'm not saying you should beatyourself up like I hate this whole thing of like you have to achievewhatever. It's a choice. You don't have to do anything. You could just sit onthe couch and and, you know, do nothing. But I choose to do things because Ithink that life is so precious that I won't. We won't be here soon, so that'swhy I like music. I like photography and and filming, and I make videos anddo things because I know I've already seen it happen. I used to make videos20 years ago that people are like, Oh, look at this, there's you and you know,when you look at a photograph, the photograph is more valuable in yourhouse, in my opinion, because it's like you can see your child when they were ababy, Would you rather a big house or seeing your child when they were kids?So I kind of what I'm getting at is things or backwards I think we put allof this emphasis and priority on things and materialism and capitalism on wedon't put it on music. I'm not to sound like a hippie, but meditation or music.Or like you said, reading a book like the simple things in life we we were wekind of punish those things like, Oh, you're a musician. Okay, so you getnothing and, oh, you're selling real estate so you can have everything. Andthe real estate is what causes the pollution, in my opinion. Big, huge,you know, houses everywhere in car. Sorry if I'm rambling, a bit tired.Okay? No, no, no, it's it's good. But how did how did the base guy showbecome what it is now as it's growing. So I started in 2000 and 13 on aplatform called Concert Window, which is no longer around. So it's retro. Itwas folk musicians in New York, and you were able to stream live and there waslike a tip button, and one day I just start started to jam on a little tinywebcam. I found my computers in the garbage and they were given to me andit was like one pixel and I was like hardly moving And I got pieces of paperand I was like, This is a commercial break now and I just got inventive Andthen I just started streaming. Then people started watching, and it wasnever a lot of people. It was always 10 people, But then those 10 peoplestarted sending me guitar strings and tipping, helping pay my Internet bill,and they kept supporting. So I kept just doing it, and I tried to go backto work and I broke my back again and the doctor said to me like, uh, youcan't keep doing this because you could just, like, reach up for a cup thatfalls and you might pull your back again. So I have to slow down. But so Ithought, Well, I'm at home. There's the Internet. I'll just do it from home AndI just started. People were giving me. Everything I have is second handbecause, you know, I eat never any money. That's why I was always complainabout it, and then I looked like a grumpy guy. But everything I have isthis second hand and found I didn't buy anything. And I didn't go on theInternet because I wanted validation approval. I wanted toe by a hamsandwich so I could eat literally. And so I would do this and then I wouldwork my butt off and then I would make, like, 20 bucks, and I go to store andbuy some bread. And maybe one month they'll bikes, um, guitar strings, andit just got better and better. The technology got better and the fanshelped out. And then in one year in 2016, a group of people got togetherand they got me a car. And the guy drove the car from Toronto to Montrealon the lawn during the live show and gave me the keys. And it was kind of apinnacle moment, you know, like, uh, so that happened. But then it happenedagain. I couldn't afford to keep the car, so I gave it away to my friend. Sowhat is the premise of your show? E mean, you're very talented musically,but you also do various things. You have different people on interviewing.It's a show about a guy who's very frustrated for trying so hard 1000million times and never getting there like, but I'm enjoying the music havingfun. People like it. Onda People do support, and I do thank the people whodo support. I know all of their names and where they live. I write them everyday. It's always the same 10 people. Um and so what was the question again?Brian, We'll just What? What is the premise of your show? Because I knowthat you're playing music at times your streaming your music. You do thatthrough a change. But you all used to give you. Yeah, I used to just jam, buteven back in Scotland, I was watching Frankie McDonnell the house I wrote tohim and stuff, and I couldn't dream of having him on my show. But eventuallythat happened, and I used to just play. But then I had a friend come in, Doctornear, um Armstead, one of my best friends in a jazz band, and he was abit of a comedian, very big comedian, and then we just started goofing around,and then it turned into themes. So every week I was doing like Space weekor nature weak or school week and then and go out and do a little because myback hurts. I can't sit for and play for a long time, so I do segments andbits, too, and then Thio like, take a...

...break. But then I thought, Why not be aone person show where I do all the music, the editing, the productiontaken a guest and amusing my feet in my hands and really, what I'm doing thisshow, Brian. I don't have a clue what's going on. I'm kind of like Oh, my God,like And people are just They're like you didn't answer my question and I'mlike trying to fly the spaceship on like, a $5 budget. And so it kind of ittook years. It was really bad for ages like the audio was at a Sink 2013 14.It was tough. Technology wasn't as good and and then eventually I started toe.It's always changing. I'm always trying to find the right format and I go backand forth and I know it drives people crazy, but I'm trying to make it work,but what it is is I say hello. I play some music I'll interview Frankie onWednesdays, and then I'll show clips from my life from, like traveling anddoing things or someone else's life. So it's kind of a variety show, so I kindof I don't like, you know, like if you're a musician, you hang out withmusicians online, and if you're a fisherman, you hang out with fishermenonline and on your instagram and stuff. I've never really fit in anywherebecause when I do my it is a music show. I play bass. I'm into funk and jazz,but when I do my show, it's I'm a bit weird. It's kind of like Wayne's WorldMeets Peewee Herman. It's not normal and and Plus, I'm always like Oh, Ihave no money and everything sucks, you know? So I'm not. I'm the worst personto be a broadcaster because I tell the truth. I just say that I'm having acrappy day, and so I don't fit in with the Bay, the bass music community. Ifeel I shouldn't think what they think, but I feel like I don't fit in therebecause they're all just doing music. But I'm like Pee wee Herman show, so Idon't really. I don't fit in in anywhere. So I'm trying toe, But I'mjust doing my own thing. I don't watch other people. I don't care what anyoneelse is doing. Uh, I just focus on what what I want to do. And I don't meanlike like egotistic Lee. I just mean I want to play bass. But then, for me,music is boring because I've done it for 40 years. It can get boring. SoI'll go out and film some stuff and make a movie. So it'll be music andinterview and then something different, and it's very interactive. I talked tothe guests and everything, but for a long time it's like Frankie said, hedidn't know how to deal with trolls until his friends helped him. Um,sometimes, like, Yeah, when I do my show, the musicians were like, How come you're not playing bass rightnow? What are you doing? You're acting all weird. And then when I play music,another group of people are like, how come you're not talking to us? I'mtrying to tell you what kind of soup I had today. And so I'm trying to pleaseevery so I went through all that stuff, and now I just have to have fun andenjoy doing it. And the show's actually shows kind of always at its best. It'sIt never gets worse. It gets better as's faras like you know the technologyand and it's nothing. It's not a huge deal. I'm just talking in front of mycomputer and playing music. But if you take a step back and realize what I'mdoing, like playing the drums, the bass, the guitar, doing the sounds, doing thevideo, everything all alone on like Windows 1995 its's pretty fun. It's achallenge. It's a challenge. Well, maybe this is the theme you're talkingabout at the beginning that when you were delivering papers to the more offluent people, their homes and then you learned a little bit along the way. What I appreciate you about you andwatching your show. This is what magnifies me. This is what attracts meto. What you do is the way you treat people, and it's almost like I have towwatch you just to see how you are going to react to the people you have on yourshow. or the way that you're handling. You know that your one man band herewith all that you're doing, But you do it in such a calm, caring andcompassionate manner that it's very intriguing. And I'm talking, I guess,specifically about dealing with people. And I don't mean dealing butinteracting with people say on your Wednesday show where you have a bunchof people and they're from different backgrounds and it's just the way youhave this heart about you with people that I think we could all learn from.So I guess my question is, how can we learn to treat people better? Yeah, well, well put, Brian. Um, I wishit was all true. I want it to be true. I I am personally am like that my wholelife. I got that from my dad. If there's one thing that I got from mydad was that my dad taught me from a kid, never toe put the tiniest bit ofpaper on the ground like just do not pollute and open the door and stuff.And I've always treated everyone is equals my whole life, even like thingslike important things like Children, you know when people talk to kids ortheir little dog and they're like, Oh,...

Johnny, aren't you a good boy? Lookwhat you did. I'm like, Hey, Johnny, what are you doing? Like Get out of theway. You know, if I'm being mean and if I'm being nice, they'll be like, Oh,that's pretty cool, man. If you treat I used to work with kids. I used to workin schools, and if you treat Children, I don't even think about it. I don't doit on purpose as a trick. I actually treat Children as an equal. If there'sanybody with a disability or a difference or they look different, Ialways go over my. My main concern is who is the most insecure person in theroom who is having the most trouble? Who's the most shy boost and go say,Would you like some food? Are you OK? Do you want some space in my headthat's going on? I go out of my way. I learned that from my dad, just thio.Everyone's equal. Everyone gets a chance, and and and that's how I'velived my whole life. But the big but is from doing this and the self inflictedstress of it all is the Internet is a breeding ground for trolls, and we livein an age, not everybody. But we live in an age of cynicism and selfimportance and entitlement. And it's like everyone's God given right to justgo. No, you suck, You suck. Get out of the way. That's too fast. That's tooslow. Look atyou, your bald This sucks. You know so and then you constantly getthat. Not all the time, but it's always coming in from somewhere. So you haveto have thick skin, and you just you wish you could just block them. Andjust But you know what? I'm Sarah Soller said it to me. Best ones likeyou could take these things and be strong or whatever, but you're a humanbeing, like whether it's you or me or even the troll. We're really, reallypeople. And when you constantly tell someone you know that something bad,it's it's your human being, and no matter how like Zen you are, orwhatever it does affect you, you will think about it. And so when you putyourself out there, which I want because I want to do music. I'mentertaining the world for free or fun. I've put my whole life intoentertaining for free and you put yourself out there. But then you'realso putting yourself out there to all of that. We live in an age ofnarcissism and, like tick tock like videos of people dancing and showingtheir bodies for 10 seconds who get 80,000 million views. And then they canuse that momentum Thio, like, you know, monetize on or whatever. And so that'sanother form of troll. Trolling for me is like just a how like, uh, thingshave changed completely. Like back in the day. There was drum sets andamplifiers and people would go to the bar and talk to each other and you playand you like you'd even like, you know, give a signature or you get one. If youwere a fan, like when I was a kid, I watch bands, but nowadays it's justlike when you're this happened, like 10, 15 years ago. I've done gigs inrestaurants or bars or parties, and the band is like in the way people justwalk by and talk and laugh and It's not like we're important whatever, buttimes have changed. So it's just like music has been come this a tool forpeople thio to use. And they've forgotten what it means toe to be a toknow what a scale is or a feeling or blues or whatever. So I know I'mwandering all over the place where you see this is why I sometimes react tothose trolls. Whatever, because, um, it's like you've put so much into itand you're I've spent my whole life like trying to treat everyone is anequal and have fun. And then someone who's basically has a mental healthproblem dedicates their time to try to ruin what you're doing. They hate youbecause they ain't you or whatever cliche. But it's so I've been gettingbetter at it for last couple weeks. I've just started to ignore everythingand dive into the music and tow having fun, and and I do. I get there myfavorite things. They're just like I said, I wake up, I make my bed. I lovefeeding the birds. I love nature and just having a nice meal with a lovedone and producing a show I'm in heaven, really? But I wouldn't mind a couple of$1000 million to make it, you know, all worth it in the end. Brian. Well,you're being honest, right? You said you're wandering. You're not wanderingbecause you were saying, Well, I appreciate the fact of what I'm sayingto you that you seem like very seems like a very compassionate, caringperson to your guests and how you manage things. But then you're alsosaying, Well, that that is true. But also, these trolls or these other partsof life kind of bother me. So I'm not. Yeah, it's not even so much the trollsbecause they're just one or two. But it's more like what I was getting atthat the industry that we live and I've come this far and I'm doing all thisstuff. It's not that great or anything, but I'm enjoying it, and it issomething. And then I turned around and it's been going on for 10 years. Brian,I look and I just see people being so successful and making money and doingthings, and they're talking about, like, what? Sandwich they ate or they'reshowing their boobs or their but or their biceps whatever. Like they're noteven doing anything. They're just huge...

...here in Korea, people just eating,eating, just eating in front of a YouTube. You know, this is their thing,and they got millions of followers and they're making lots of money by justshoving food in there. And I think it's It's like culture has gone backwards.Can you imagine Michelangelo drawing helicopters and in the 60 14hundreds or whatever and then a large orchestras and most are and Bach andeverything? And then in the twenties, there was all the jazz bands and GlennMiller and everything, and now it's just like, uh, like bums, change orwhatever. That's probably gonna be the next hit So it Z and now videos air 10seconds long and everyone scroll and everyone's got a D H D cucumber 75 Youknow, everyone's just all over the place, scrolling and even like myfriends were trying to eat that everyone's just scroll it. There's nothere's no focus anymore. And people don't understand, you know, art,painting, composition, reading books, music. Not to be like a snob orwhatever. I'm not a snob. I'm poor and I'm My favorite show is the trailerpark boys, and I love to swear a but But I do know I can appreciate and Ican see, like, good stuff. And I know a lot of people do, and Canada alwaysexists in small pockets. But on the mass scale, I just see people going toe.I just see people going Thio Best Buy and buying huge screen TVs, and no onehas a stereo anymore. I I sound like a pessimist, but it's because that's theindustry I'm in. I'm in the industry of music and playing music, and people arelike, Do you want to do a show it my daughter's wedding for 50 bucks and asandwich? It's really insulting. Basically. Remember University of HighSchool? We didn't think of buying a TV. We bought a stereo right growinggrowing up like you. But you know, a Walkman or something. I cannot functionright, not some big screen toe watch something that that's interesting point.I never used an album, used to be an artwork and a cover, and you'd open itand you have to take the bus to go by it and then you listen to with yourfriends and it was social and it's I sound like, you know, I know I soundlike an old man saying, Oh, we're back in my day But it's gotten so bad nowthat, like just music, movies, film, I could go watch a movie that cost $2million for free. I could just illegally download it and watch it.What happens to all those people that you know? Well, they're in the industry,but, um and part of the reason I'm going dark right now because I'm tired.I've had a long, long day in my back. Busy. You are on TV and you were on TVtoday. You had your show debut with Frankie? No. Yeah. Cable 14 dot com. Wewere live with that Dylan attack And Frankie. It was my first time on rielTV today in Hamilton, Ontario. So it's near Toronto. You're you're a talentedmusician. But what is some skill that you've had to develop, say over thelast seven years is you've been putting your content online something that evennow you're still working on? Yeah, totally. It's like how to balance theworkload not to put too much on I used to do. I used to do 10 shows a week, soit's obviously too much. I brought it back to three. It's good math. That'stoo much. It's goods too much. So doing the graphics, the artwork, that stills.It takes three hours, four hours to set up to take down. There's all the preand post stuff like on Social Media and and then when you make a video, youhave to format it toe all different social media, and it's all encompassing.So ah, half hour show will take me 18 hours and I'll stick that up and itwill get 27 views. But I keep going and to keep trying. And I'm learning toework smarter, not harder and, uh, to to make things shorter and have more fun.But then I'm conflicted because I used to stream three or four hours so that Icould make tips to eat food. Because if you play the Beatles and the Eagles andyou play pop songs, whatever people like it, they can relate to it, andthen they go, I'm having fun. Here's five bucks, but if you do a really goodshow with its 20 minutes long and you produce it and you work super hard andyou get guests and everything and you no one's gonna tip because they're justlike, Oh, thank you for the show that you just did. So I'm always conflictedbetween Do I play for a long time on, like, a lesser known app and just letmy hair down Or do I make a pall of show? So I have a product. So I'm I'mlearning how toe balance all of these things and keep saying and have a goodlife At the same time I'm doing well But then Frankie calls me and says,Base guy, you're gonna be on the Brian V show. Basically, you're gonna be oncable based guy and I always say, Yes, Frankie, because I absolutely love himto bits. He's one of he's one of my best friends. We talk on the phonealmost every day and stuff, and he's just such a He's an inspiration. He'swhat we need. And the reason people like Frankie is back to all that trollsand cynicism and stuff going on. Franky is just a breath of fresh air He's sopositive all the time. He's so polite. And if anyone starts to talk bad, he'lljust like, won't react. Basically, he's a greatguy. Frankie asked Frankie. What should...

...people do if they they face adversity?Watch my videos? Hey, did that today on on TV. Uh, person after me was a famouscomedian on there was a famous hockey player, and they asked Frankie likeFrankie, can you name us? Ah, fun fact about yourself and he gave out. Hiswebsite address is YouTube address dogs and wolves. He's always on point, and Ithink we would be a miss, too, because I listened to you on another podcastand you had mentioned this and I didn't know. But Peter Glencoe, you and I haveYou have him on your show a lot, and I owe a lot to him, too, because he hasgiven you viewers and viewers to myself a swell and thinking whether we'rethinking of Frankie with his view and perspective on things. I think Peterhas a great view and perspective on things, too, in the adversity that hefaces, and it's still working hard and has a positive attitude as he does. SoYeah, totally. I think that's why, like people attract, uh to each other likeFrankie and Pete. Pete used to call me a little bit. We talk and I think he'sa great smart guy and he's like you said adversity and he's going throughstuff and he keeps going and he's always he's always lifting people, andthis is the whole thing I could boil everything down to Is that one, uh,cliche quote that no good deed goes unpunished and it literally is true.You could do something good and for free and give it away, and you willhave people jump on you. Um, you can just ignore it and get on. But why notdo the other thing? Why not lift people like I see that and everyone likeeveryone's enough. Who cares if you're a musician or you have a show or everdo. Everyone is enough, just the way they are, like Mr Rogers said. I likeyou, Brian, just the way you are. You don't need to do anything. You alreadyare enough, But why not lift people and say like, That's a good picture thatyou just drew or I like that. I like that, you know, poem that you wrote orand people are very quick to like. Passive aggressive is very a prominent.Today, people are passive aggressive. I think most of people who start crappingon each other and giving each other hard time they're not even aware thatthe reason they're doing it is because they're having a bad life and they'regrumpy and their feel like life's unfair are they had a bad day and thenSo they take it out on the Internet later on someone's show or whatever.Yeah, I like Pete for lifting people up and I could see that you and you toBrian. You know, he he gets a lot of heat because he's in the crypto field.And so people I think are less sympathetic, not in crypto, but you'redealing, as we mentioned before about money not talking about money. Butthat's where people tend less to take their their heart with, um I mean, notin the strictest way, but yeah, If you do this, then you're a bad person. Likeif you work for eso, then you're bad, you know? It doesn't work like that.It's more to life than he takes a lot of criticism. Yeah, he does. I think hedoes. He take. And Frankie too, I think takes a lot of even though he has a lotof love out there and stuff like you take a lot. So, um, they have chins.Yeah, I mentioned this earlier, and you mentioned this just now. But Aesop'sfables, my dear wife, bought me the this book for my students, but wethought it was bigger. It big, small. It look big on the phone, but the onethat's called I just read it the other day. The the old woman in the wine jarin the premise or the lesson is the memory of a good deed lives old womanpicked up on empty wine jar which had once contained a rare and costly winein which still retained some traces of its exquisite boutique. Okay, sheraised it to her nose and sniffed it at again and again. Ah, she cried. Howdelicious must have been the liquid which has left behind so ravishing asmell. So the idea of doing these good things and again the lesson was called,uh, the memory of a good deed lives. So as long as we're doing these goodthings, whether you're talking about Franky, is that what Peter talkingabout yourself or myself doing these there? Anyone else listening? Doingthese things is really what's gonna win over at the end of the day. Totally,Exactly. Right. Just between everything. Today I saw an old friend I hadn't seenin a while, and we actually, uh, we're in, like, 20 years ago. We were bothgoing through a crazy time in Poland. It was a huge adventure, and we saweach other today. And we're like that thing that happened in Poland, man,that was totally worth it. That was so fun. It's the memory. And if you and ifyou do, and a good intention or a good deed, you're right, it's It's thereason why we work because it does stay. The intention will stay. Uh, and itwill live forever. Or like when someone dies. Uh, you know, to live in thehearts of others is not to die. So as...

...soon as you just bring up the topic,the song, the person, it just becomes alive again. And that intention is theseed of goodness and love. And what could be more powerful than that? Iknow you're tired and we're on a time restraint. I don't want to keep you toolong. So good jumps through some things. But what about patryan? I'm wonderingthis because I know you have a patryan account. So how does how does that work?And and how could people connect with you? And I'm just, you know, anyonelistening? Thio, go to that. But how does that work? I I know very littleabout it. Yeah, it's a good question. I've tried lots. I've tried, I've triedeverything. And often I get people with good intentions saying You should trythis, You should do that. And I'm like, Oh, that thing I did seven times and itdidn't work. So out of all the things I went back to Patryan. Because its'sTechnically, it's stable and it's there and everything, but from his little islike I think I think it could be anything, but I think it's from like alittle is $2 a month. It's like if you're watching someone show all thetime and you're their friend or whatever you know if for two bucks amonth, you can pay more if you if you want you, you get some rewards. So onmy patryan, I keep it super simple. I really I no gimmicks air good and theywork and we live in an interactive world. So it's always like rewards anddo this and interactive and stream labs and O. B s and do this and but itbecomes a nightmare because there's so much stuff going on. So my patryan issuper simple. There's, like three things you can join and pay, like twobucks a month and help what I dio. You don't have Thio, and then you get tosee rare videos that no one else can see. So stuff from years ago, like whenI was doing crazy shows you get to see those. And but the main thing is,there's no pressure. You can leave whenever you want, and what you'reactually doing is you're just helping me pay the Internet bill so I can keepdoing this show, and I've been on it for about a year and a half, got ninepatry ins. It's not a lot, but they're great people they're loyal, they helpout. I've almost reached the goal. I'm imagine this. I've been doing this forseven years and and I haven't can't afford to pay my Internet bill with myshow yet. And I hate being grumpy and talking about it, but the same time, Idon't want to do it for free all the time because it's painful enoughalready. So it's patryan. I don't even know what it is, but it's on my websitebase guy show dot com B A s s base guy show dot com And on there there'sthere's a whole bunch of like, That's the thing I forget Brian, I'm amusician. I have albums and I think I've made I can't remember. I shouldn'ttalk about money, but over 10 years I've not made a lot. It's It's likeit's like 20 bucks a month or something, not even, but I make albums so, like,why not? You know there's T shirts, there's albums or whatever, and youhave my main goal section. Yeah, yeah, and And my goal is to actually pay theInternet bill. So I know a lot of these shows or whatever might be raking inmoney and doing well, or someone's on tick tock, and they're monetizing andmaking thousands of dollars per post. I'm just trying to pay, like a $95Internet bill, and I can't even do that. But I don't give up. I keep going. Ithink any sane person would have given up years ago. I keep doing it. Youmentioned the idea of being, say, in a bar where people are walking by themusicians talk about being on YouTube, for instance, and theimportance of likes comments shares all of those things because I think peopleeven I find myself and sometimes accidentally because I don't know why.But my YouTube is not, um, I'm not logged into my YouTube on myphone, which I have to do so when I goto like something, I can't becauseI'm not logged in. But I watch lots of things, and I probably don't do what Ishould do because you know that helps. Oh, the content creator. So what isyour view on that? It is weird because YouTube is probably the strongestplatform because the whole world uses it. The video's air there, but peopledo not use it for social media. They're not on there saying, Hey, how's itgoing? Whatever there are like there are millions of people on YouTube, butgenerally people go on Facebook to talk to each other, right and be social. Andon YouTube, it's just kind of a thing that you'll just stick on your Facebookand talk about it on Facebook. I don't use Facebook, by the way. I'mcompletely. I have one, and I use it to talk to my mom. I'm anti Facebook. Ican't stand it. Yeah, I don't sorry to bring that up. I can't stand it. ButBut YouTube is like people are. Except for creators. People aren't reallyusing. And YouTube's weird because if you click on what's trending, my jawdrops again. It's just like the death. It's like the Roman Empire crumbling.There's just someone like, Hey, everybody, today we're gonna make theZip zap song, And then there's like chickens everywhere and stuff, and it'sjust like, What the hell is going on...

...going from John Coltrane Thio? So Ialways go back to that thing. But YouTube yeah, I don't get much helpwith the algorithms. I just keep using it because there's a strong platform ofother channels there, too. But I don't really get any help from YouTube orcreators. I'm doing everything wrong or something. But it is helpful, though,right? For people who are taking in content, toe like to share those littlethings, even if you're not contributing to a patryan or some other. Yeah, theincome is those likes and shares. They do help in the algorithm, which it'shard to understand. I don't understand it all, but I think just those comments,you know, it was good, you know, thank you alike those things. And not onlythat. I think they put something in our in our our productive bank, right? It'san investment to show. Oh, that person liked it. That's good. And I think youcould get too caught up in who liked it or who disliked it or who says one. ButI think generally those things are important for the algorithm, butthey're also important for you as a content. If you create a show UNEP, ISSowed and a bunch of people like it, it's something that you like a Well,yeah, sometimes that happens. The video goes well. Everyone was in a great mood.There's comments and stuff, but then sometimes I'll put in a video with muchmore work or whatever, and nothing will happen. Not a single comment. No. Andthen the subscribers will just stay the same for like three months. Like howcould it not go up or down? So it's just like, How does it just all of asudden and then nothing. I feel like the numbers, like not just YouTube, buteverywhere. All these were all consumed by views numbers, which is validationapproval. And it's like I'm like, Yeah, but did you like John Coltrane's solo?Or is it about like, you could have 27 million likes and be the biggest idiotin the world who is not producing anything of what was that movie? JerryMaguire wasn't the baby sitter talking toe. Tom Cruise is like, Wasn't it JohnColtrane? I'll need to watch that. I think I call myself the other day. Doyou ever? But do you really listen to the music he was like? And then I thinkhe was talking to the kid. Just kind of get trying to change the world a littlebit at a time. What is your overall goal for the base guy? Show or together?Goal toe one day be able to afford a gold suit so that people know how, howsuccessful I am. That's an old dumb joke I had since I was a kid. If I getrich, I'll buy a gold suit like actual gold eso. When I walk around, peoplewill say, Hey, that guy's successful It's hard to walk around and my goal isalways the same thing and I'm the one who forgets it first is toe have funand enjoy myself and put some love and positivity in the world. But I thinkthrough all the adversity I'm 46 on have almost killed myself 1000 timestrying thio, produce something or become a teacher or do music. And theend result is like, you know, having no food in the fridge. It's like f man,like, really like, why am I doing this? So I asked myself, Why am I doing this?And I think it's really because of for a lot of the reasons is I've lost a lotof people in life like friends, brothers people have died and I kind ofdo it for them because I think that they're in heaven and they're lookingdown and they're saying like, you know, Jack, you know, or everybody Everyoneyou know, like do it, do something good like keep, keep running, keep going.That's why I do it. I don't know if that sounds crazy, but it's like avoice in my head telling me to keep going. Well, it could be a worse voice in yourhead telling you to do something else, And I could be It could be just thatI'm really, really bad. Maybe I'm crap. Maybe I'm a jerk. That's totallypossible to hit mall. I think we all have a littlejerkiness in us. It depends on how much we show on howmuch we display. I know there is no success and there is no goal. You'resupposed to just live and thrive and do better and stuff. But I just my wholepoint with this whole conversation is like that. I talk about lot. My show isif you if you do go through all these trials and tribulations through yourwhole life, like not like once or twice. Sometimes I hear people say, like, Oh,yeah, I've been doing my podcast Now, I've been doing this for seven monthsnow, and like they're on TV and famous now, you know, seven months. Hey,you're on TV seven Took you seven years, but you're on today? Yeah, today. So Istarted in 19, like, 84 I think. And I still have nothing in the fridge. So Ikind of like a man like, what's what's going on, you know? And so then I talkabout it, and I'm completely honest, like, now I completely just talk aboutthese are just my opinions and they might change. I'm not I'm an idiot. Idon't know what I'm talking about, but...

I'm trying to be honest and some andthey say that that you should be yourself and have fun. But when I dothat, it doesn't work either. It z is there something about you that peopledon't understand or the work that you're doing right as the podcast hosta musician that people don't understand that you would like them to understand,So they may get a better appreciation of the work you bring to the table.There's the screaming voices in my head nonstop. And there's this producercalled Larry who ruins everything is this. I love the Larry O for Larry.Larry is my fall guy is an imaginary producer. Anything? I'd like people toknow that like I like them. Send that. Yeah, I wish, Like in this whole ourconversation there was like two words I could use. Instead, there's to say,like you never know what someone else has been through so never, ever darejudge anyone, including myself. I we should never you never know whatsomeone's been through. Um, I really I really wish that people would, um, takea step back and stop consuming so much, uh, physically and mentally, and juststop and slow down. And if you're gonna watch my show or Brian Show or eat abanana or just stop and focus and look and look at something and realize like,you know that there's a history behind it and there's all the stuff behind. Ifyou keep scrolling and doing this and going to start getting bubble by, it'sjust everyone's just kind of literally Brian. You go on the street and I seepeople driving in their cars while looking at their phone like we'veactually gone insane. I want if I wish people could understand what music israther than just a candy or something that you turn on to feel good. Most thereasons most of people will enjoy music is they don't even know why. And that'sthe whole point. You're supposed to have fun, but I really wish peoplewould, like enjoy music again and go back into it and take a step back fromall the bullshit you mentioned a couple of times. Adversity in, you know,losing family members, losing friends, breaking your back a couple of times.Is there some particular adversity that you have faced that either encouragesyou or hinders you in your work? But you could also use that adversity toencourage people in the adversity they face in their work. Yeah, that you'rewhatever you're going through, even if it's the worst thing, even if it's likeleading to death. Whatever. You're not alone. People love you and, you know,stuff that some people that they make movies about, I think like in the olddays, uh, first nations would tell stories And that's how they toldstories to the Children to teach things now and today's culture. It's moviesthat you see the movie about the plane that crashed in the mountains and theyhad to eat each other. So they got through that right? Well, some of themdid. And like you said, the story went on forever and made many, many morepeople be aware of that adversity. So if whatever it's really important to,because some people like, give up or think they have to give up whatever mything is like, don't give up, reach out to someone. And if you're completelyalone, just keep going because there is nothing else. You're just not even ifit's shitty and and pain. I'm in pain and it's not been easy, but I'm still Istill think that it's worth living and and if you focus on what you have ordon't have, like I'm talking about, you forget to like, look at the birds andstuff and go for a walk and have fun. So don't give up like you're not alone.Yeah, you're touching on That, too, is because when people are faced with direadversity, they end their lives. And here in South Korea, it's, I think,next to New Zealand. It's one of the highest rates of suicide in the worldbecause people feel and it's usually coming from middle school high schoolstudents who are not doing as well as they're supposed to be doing by the theregulations or the expectations of parents and teachers, because theybottleneck them so much that everyone's supposed to be the best, which you know,working, making 10 shows at a seven days a week. It's impossible to do, youknow, very hard Thio accomplish. Then they feel in utter despair and jump offon apartment building. That's the really bad thing about culture andstuff like on one important side. Note is, we're not doctors, obviously, Butthere are mental health issues, and that requires professional, you know,like that whole thing is different cause people talk about stuff. But ifyou're bipolar schizophrenic, Tourette's all that stuff, you can'ttell someone to cheer up. Keep going because it's not that simple. But thereis. There is help out there, so on a...

...side note, we're not doctors. Mentalhealth is really serious, important, Um, and I think all the technology andcraziness is amplifying that. Now there's there's more suffering in theworld. But the part about culture, whether it's over there here of like,we from birth, you're taught toe like, you know, from a from a girl you'retaught to, like, you know, wanna pink dress and you're going to get married,and you're gonna have a big house. And the guy has to be tough right frombirth. You're completely trained. It's even worse, probably in Russia andstuff like that. We put so much pressure on ourselves to achieve allthese things, and it goes right back to Mr Rogers. Who, uh, you know, hecampaigned and went to the White House and and parliament forget what it wascalled, but he went on. What was it that, uh, Mr Rogers did? He went to theSenate Senate. Yeah, and he was talking about like, it's important to keep theshow going. And everything about Children and his whole message toChildren and to people was that you are enough. You don't need to be anything.You don't need to do anything. It's okay to be sad or unhappy or haveproblems. You're We live in a politically correct world right now,Like totally politically correct where everyone's supposed to be involvingwith. Good. That's a good thing. But you are enough just the way you are.But people always feel like Oh, I'm not good looking enough. I'm too old. I'mtoo young. I'm too stupid. I'm so smart. I'm a nerd, So nobody likes me. I'mthis. I'm that I need more money. You're You're enough the way you are,your perfect the way you are. And we don't remind each other of that a lot.And I do that my show all the time. Even though I talk a lot of crap andI'm always grumpy and poor, I'm always trying to tell people that you areenough the way you are. You don't need validation or approval. You're perfect.I love Mr Rogers. I think he's great. That show I watch it every now and then.Like once a month, I watched episode I was a little bit disappointed with TomHanks because in his interviews for that movie that he did, he was sayingMr Rogers is only for kids because you know, as a when you grow up, yourealize that his show was not for the reality of this life. Like he said thata few those were his talking points on the interviews. I was like, No, I thinkI watched Mr Rogers now and his shows air very applicable on how I can treatpeople well and how a better way to look at the world. That's what MrRogers does. He is like he has episodes where he talks to kids. He's like, Areyou angry? Why are you angry? And then he'll talk about anger or when J. F.Like in the movie. When John F. Kennedy got shot, he talked about on the show.He talked about an assassin blowing someone's head off. How does that makeyou feel, Johnny, You know, like really heavy, heavy stuff, racism and politicsand all this stuff. And he would ask he would address the problem like likelike, let's talk about your feelings and where they come from and why you'vethat. I think that would help adults like you said we should all watch more.Mr Rogers. Yeah, just a Rogers loop. Is there anything else that we haven'ttouched? upon Jack. Is there something that we haven't mentioned that youwould like to mention? Everybody should go watch FrankieMcDonald's videos. Absolutely, absolutely. I just I want to say that Ilike, despite my grumpy mood today or whatever, I want to thank everybodywho's ever like, encountered my life and passed my way and been part of thisshow or whatever. Put up with me love to everybody. Thanks for putting upwith me. And there's so many good people out there like Billy Dee andSloppy and Lynn and this guy John I just met. And they're just people likeMills Motors and sought cop and, uh, Mickey and Go Jen. I could go onforever, and they're just amazing, wonderful people. So thank you forbeing part of the therapy. That's what you're saying is when you first started.There's been this consistent group with you along the way, and it it becomes,you know, friends. But like a family of people who really support you, andthose are the ones you never want to forget. Yeah, and through it, Like Isaid, seven years so a lot of people have gone, but they're still there andsome of them creep back and say hello and there's no pressure. There's norules. And I'm really just an idiot on the Internet, talking like this andplaying guitar. And yeah, I think it's it's fun. The premise of my show Thisis the one thing I had a best friend. His name was We'll just say Velcro.That was his stage name. And he was one of my best friends, music friend. Andhe used to call on the show and be a member of the show like for about twoyears. And he passed away and he died and the very beginning of my show.There's some, uh, spoken word over the theme song, and it's my friend. Richardsaid that to me, used to call and leave messages on this show, and he said, um,let's stay in touch because it's important contact. It's good contact.We need that contact and we're only gonna die one day, and we're going togo on living into another format based guy loves, you know, fear. And that'son the end, or beginning of every show,...

...depending on how I do it. So, uh, whenhe passed away I kind of was going through my own thing, but it justsolidified everything. That his message and his love. I'm still doing this showin his name. I actually have a card here in his name, and I look at itevery day and, you know, and other people too. But he really inspired me.Thio He went through the hardest time in the world ever and he said to me,You got to keep in touch, keep going because whatever you're doing, it'simportant. Just keep going. And I thought that was a beautiful messagefrom, Ah, best friend. It's great to have friends like that who support youand encourage you along the way. How can people reach you, Jack? It's based guy show dot com So B A S s,as in the bass guitar base guy show dot com, and everything's on there likethere's it's just it's hand delivered on a silver platter. All the differentlinks and things like that. You you say you're an idiot and I agree that I'm anidiot, but you have some special skills so good on you. I mean, I suggestpeople go check you out and you are talented with the instruments that arearound you with the microphone in front of you with all those buttons and yourcreative in your show. And as I said, you're very compassionate with thepeople that you have on and caring and that that shows no matter what we havegoing on in our minds. But I have one final question for you. Yep. Why do you work? Because I just think because Becausewe're here and we're alive. We call it work. But it could just bebeing on doing things, not to get too Zen. But why does anybody do anything?And for me personally, waking up, making my bed and producing somethingand making something and putting some love? Despite all the complaining I did whenI do music every day, I literally the hair stand up on my back on the back ofmy neck daily hourly because I'm doing music and I'm like, I'm secretly havingthe time of my life. The only time I'm free and I have feel no pain is whenI'm working. So I work because it just I get I I'm aware that I'm a consciousentity in the universe. I wasn't here before. I won't be there in the future.I am now and I'm very conscious of that. So I try to make the best I can.Everywhere I've lived, I've put pictures on the wall or are likeflowers over there. Or just like I completely, completely ungrateful forexisting. And I try to do the best I can while I'm here all the time. Yeah, my perspective on life in that work is a good thing. Despite thedifficulties we have in it, I think once when it all ends the difficultiesair gone work is still a good thing. And I think the work that you're doingis wonderful. And I suggest people to check you out. Jack Blythe, Base GuyShow. I appreciate this time that you have given me and I appreciate the workthat you dio Thank you very much, Brian. Thank you for your time. Thank you forlistening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe,follow and share with others so they to be encouraged in their work. E hopethat you have yourself a productive be a joyful day in your work.

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