WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 36 · 2 years ago

#36 Greg Jackman K7 PE Teacher BrianVee Whywework

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Greg Jackman, the K7 PE Teacher, talks about the importance of staying focused on what is important, especially during trying times. He offers encouragement to those who need a reminder during bumps in the road during our journeys with work.    

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Welcome to why we work, with your host, Brian V, as he speaks to people like you from all over the world, as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which would be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going and keep on working. Workings tough, but working is good. Now here's your host to why we work, Brian V. I'm Brian Be and this is why we work. Today, of the Great Pleasure speaking to Mr Greg Jackman, physical education teacher out of Newfoundland, Canada. I met him many years ago and he was a kind man then and I'm pretty sure he's a kind man now. So what I would like to find out is where his motivation came from as he got into physical education, but also what he does when life pushes us off course, when we lose people, when work doesn't go the way we think it should, and how does he get back on course and stay motivated to teach the kids that he teaches? Join me in this conversation with Mr Gregg acman. I'm Brian V, and this is why we work. Today, I have the great pleasure of speaking to Mr Greg Jackman, good day find sir. Any Buddy, how are you? I'm doing well. You and I have had a chat for the last little bit and I've enjoyed it immensely, going down memory lane all the way back to our Katie. Here's would you be able to give us a little idea of what you're doing now and then we'll circle back to that later. Sure. Yeah, I'm currently employed in Newfoundland and Labrador province in Canada as a physical education specialist, or as some people call a gym teacher. That's my primary gig day to day. We go back to work tomorrow with kids in the building and, as I mentioned, I've just taken on a side Gig as a fitness trainer. So I sent my days teaching Phizad and fitness to kids and my evenings with adults. It's almost like Batman or spider man or someone. By Day I do this, by night I do this, but you're doing the same. Yeah, pretty much. You must love it, Greg. Can you bring us back to what would have been, or what was your very first job, and how old are you? Well, I mentioned I've cheated a little bit because I do follow your podcast, so I do I was prepared for some of this. Yeah, the first work I was ever introduced to with with my dad and my grandfather, like just labor work around the yard, you know, from a very young age, help and caught and stow firewood for the winter or fairly young age, responsible for mowing lines, which branched out. Sorry, sorry, great and it problems like things like this. I don't want to to gloss over, as I say, because those are really good ways of learning work ethic with family. Piling piling wood, right, yes, splitting wood, piling wood, get in the wood out the wintertime, go get a log and put it on the fire. Those are great things that some maybe even as a teacher, you can see that some parents or guardians or people that are in these children's lives are not giving them those little responsibilities that actually are great foundation into work completely. Yeah, I'd agree with that one hundred percent. One of my favorite pictures of myself is with my grandfather, who I was very close with,...

...and it's a picture somebody chose to snap when I was probably about fifteen years and we're both detor in our coveralls and just lean it against a pile of wood that we're about to put a chains on too, and it's one of my favorite picture. But now it's my favorite picture because with my odd but that's what we spend a lot of time doing. was working together from a pretty young age. Like I think parents should be encouraging work ethic more, quite a bit more. Actually admire my sister quite a bit. She's got two boys and and and she's instilling that and then. But on the flip side of that, I sometimes think back that I might have been given a little bit of for such protective parents. They gave me a little, quite a bit of leeway in the workforce. Yeah, with the work they had me doing in the machinery, as you know. With with that said, I was always supervised, I guess, but I was working hard. No do so you were saying. After piling wood and stuff with your grandfather and your dad, you got into what was it so and that spurred once I was respond you know, trusted enough to operate lawnmowers and stuff, I was responsible for the vast properties that my grandparents lived in the neighboring yard, both large properties, and I was I was on task of lawn maintenance pretty much to myself. Alsomeln, and then that evolved in my small I'm from a community with both five hundred people and I became the neighborhood lawnmower lawn boy. So pretty much, and you know, I made a few dollars for myself here and they're doing that. The first is saying this is what was your motivation, Greg? Is it just because it was your grandfather's? Okay, that's the friend of the you know, it's a small town. That's a friend. They're just asking you. So you you feel obligated to do that? Or did you have a more deeper motivation of getting out there and working? I've never really been driven by money, though I do recall enjoying getting paid, obviously, but I don't know, Brian, if I ever really thought about that, but you might have just planted the answer for me. Actually, I think I felt like it was kind of my duty. In that little town there was only a handful of you know, Young Gaya do it like literally, I went to a two room schoolhouse for kindergarten, one two before I got shipped off to the big town of Clarionville for school and out of like when I went to kindergarten, they're only five of us, you know what I mean. So each age group was pretty limited. Sadly, not everybody does have that motivation. I I think I felt like it was my responsibility. Now. I also had a little bit of insight into getting to know a lot of households because another job that I did have through high school I delivered the wait weekly newspaper that came out from CLARIONVILLE. So Dad and I did that together. My F my town of five hundred was stretched over a few miles, so dad would run me around on his pickup truck Tuesday evenings before we went to hockey practice and I'd be run up on people's bridges with their door with her paper, and it wasn't flaying it on the door, it was knock on the door and have a chat with the little old lady inside and and Dodge on to the next house. And Dad and I had that down to a science to fit it in before hockey. But that gave me and into getting the know families right and some of the elderly people who needed lawns caught everything else. You don't hear that Greg you don't hear that much with people in their jobs I had a paper delivery root and I got fired and I certainly was chucking it. When I did chuck it, not stopping and talking. Maybe there's a conversation or two, but not to the point where you made it within your time. It was a plan scheduled event, knowing that you're going to have to talk to Mrs Jones or not. But also what was good is your insight and I think...

...that should be praised to we're having people who see a need, especially at a young age, seeing a need that, okay, your grandfather needs his lawn more lawn mode, and then the other neighbor, because there was only a couple of people your age around, to have the insight to know that there is a need and you're the one to meet it, and I think that should also be lifted up to for kids to take it upon themselves to see, you know, some simple things like there's a piece of garbage on the ground. Well, are you going to walk, literally walk over it, not to hit it and avoid it, or you actually going to pick it up? Is there someone in your neighborhood who has a need that you can, you know, use your energy and know how and fill that need for them. Yeah, I think you're right. It is sad. Now I'm two hours away from that community by highway driving. Mom is still there and there are no young people to fill the right now there's not as meant there's even fewer young people in that community now, but of the young people that are there, there's no I don't know if there's no drive amongst the young people that are there or if there's no sense of community to fill the role or where what the missing link is. But if she needs worked on, I either have to take some of the time in the weekend and drive it and do it, or we have to find an adult who's living at home unemployed, you know, do the covid or whatever, and right now and and try to hook them up to do some work on the side. For like there's no getting a kid and throwing them twenty or fifty bucks, you know, to to support them and to keep that sense of community there is at the same time, like that's gone. That's that, at least in that town it is. It's pretty unfortunate. I think there are some kids peppered about and those are the ones that they'll in twenty years have a story to say that I was the one that met that need, but it's so hard, especially when you're looking for them. So, as you you know, went through hockey and you were doing your paper delivery route. Is there any other jobs that you had up in through middle school in high school outside of the family? LAD NOT A lot. My grandfather was overseas for the Second World War and brought home a war bride. So Nan was through veterans affairs. They were a lot of an allowance to pay people. So it tickled Dan Pink that she could write great checks for work that I went. Nothing did. And now, don't get me wrong, it was never on the you know, it was always on the up and off why I punched the hours, but she took a great deal pride being able to do that. So a lot of my work was exactly what I've described. Around Sixteen I got a job at the local you pick strawberry for weeding vast fields of strawberries and I only lasted two days at that, and it's not due to my work ethic. They I've always wondered if I actually got fired and I never did officially get fired, I just never got called back. Yeah, I think I was too meticulous of a weader like I think. I think I was taking everything out of this giant field when they were looking for somebody to just bang through and clear out the majority. So I think I was a little bit too meticulous to good Ay. And the last summer high school I started pumping gas and I did that then for summers through. We know I've missed one. To know I pump gassed from last summer high school on Through University and to Summers in during high school, I like we had I don't know, I guess they had them in Novas coach to like government grants for student jobs. All hated different things and so some of them might have been cleaning up a small neighborhood like mine. Like it. Maybe work make work. Jeck, I landed a GIG work into cash at a local...

...art store, which was pretty cool because all the tourists that went through the province were dropping into this place and, you know, again being a pretty talkative guy, I got the chat with all the tourists that rolled through. Kind of thing. So, Greg, knowing that you're in fitness now and as a teacher and doing something else, where did this desire come from? Because, as you and I both went to Acadia. Where did the desire come forward from? Where you decided to go to Acadia and take what you took? So the Acadia thing was a decision based on my small town syndrome, I'll say. Growing up around the bay and Newfoundland, I guess I kind of got brainwashed into I wasn't going to the big city of Saint John's, which, if you've been to Saint Jazz you know it's not a big city. But that was the mentality, was that I didn't want to go to a big to a big town, big city. So I looked for small, you know, small town universities. So I think the only places I applied upside of Memorial University was Acadia and Sane Effects. So that's how I ended up at Acadia. Now I live in St John's and I absolutely love this city. Every day I love it more the drive to go down a Phiz Ed Rut, I don't know, from a plan book at home, like you know, one of those school day these books that my parents had. I START I switched my dream job from NHL Hockey player to Fiz, that teacher in Grade Eight. So I don't know why it was if it was just, you know, your typically young boy. Excuse me for second from no problem, that's fully animals. You you have three of those dogs. What kind of dogs are they? They're huge. Her setters. They are huge. They're big, they're good dogs. I got my first setter, well, I grew up with setters actually, but Gordon setters, and I got my first setter actually my last year at a Kadia and ultimately, fourteen years ago, my wife and I met at a dog park actually, and she showed up at a gold retriever. I had an Irish setter. We loved that Golden Retriever till the day she died just a couple of years ago. But Connor one, Cathy's hurt as an Irish setter and now we have three our setters. So, Greg you mentioned your dream of playing in the NHL and that reminded me. You played at a Katie in the Cheating Cup. Was that? Is that? Yeah, I did, and foot high that. Yeah, that was some great times at a Kadia. Yeah, I wouldn't take back a day at a Katie. To be this is a Katie University and Wolfield Nova Scotia that we're referring to. So from your acceptance to a Kadia your drive was consistently to be a physical education teacher pretty much. I mean it wavered a little bit. You you know you would. You would hear chatter from teachers. Oh, there's a lot of teachers in my family. My Dad was a teacher and principle he never discouraged me from doing it, although strangely he did discourage my sister from doing it. She's also a teacher now to but you do hear the rumblings of you know, think lying and hard, think twice about going into the education system. So I can't say my my plan never wavered, but not significantly like you know. Just, I think, the typical doubt that lots of people have, like am I on the right path here? Am I doing the right thing? Now? With that said, when I finished my bachelor of Physical Education, I went, am I pigeon holing myself here, like there's one physet teacher at best in every school, so am I going to get in with this? So I stayed at the Katie actually and did a primary elementary classroom degree as well, and that did open up doors for the first...

...few years of teaching in Nova Scotia, like I would, land term replacement contracts and things were teachers that were off. So before we get into the what you're doing in that next chapter of your journey, you mentioned discouragement along the way in terms of work. Did you ever find in this isn't to dive into you, but more so for listeners to understand the path of people take is not always linear. Did you experience discouragement in you know, whether from pumping gas days into being at Acadia and taking the courses that you were taking until you received your first full time job? Did you experience discouragement and uncertainty as to if what you were doing was the right path for you? Yeah, there's there's no doubt that I did. I think most of my discouragement came post degrees. The struggle to find work as a teacher is real. It's disheartening because most people who go into the teaching profession do have a passion to do it and they're very eager to do it and I know people who have been substitute teaching literally for fifteen years and I have never even had a short term replacement. So it was a bit trying early on. Actually it was the repeated. Maybe not rejection but let down of the education system as far as getting my foot in the door but then having the door slammed on my foot. Is Wat roll of me home to Newfoundland. So so were you trying outside of Newfoundland as well? Well, after I finished it, a Katie, I stayed in Nova SCOCHA. I was I was teaching in Nova Scotia for the first four years my career. Okay, but it was all like I it was all term term work. Like one of your interviews the other day, something popped up about, you know, going in and presenting yourself to people. So the first day that I was eligible, the first administrative day, like school opening before students, that I was eligible with a teaching certificate, I walked into the brand new high school in the Napolis Valley in Nova Scotia to shake hands and hand over my resume and tell them I was up for anything. And before I left they well, they said, are you willing to solve as a teacher? Obviously yes. Are you willing to solve as a student assistant working one? I'm on the students. Sure, I'll do anything. And before I left I had already had four days book like my first visit I had four days book so I'm walking over the front doors fist building. I cloud noted this is going to be easy, and all of a sudden the viocee principal runs out the door behind me and he said, actually, there's a forty percent frint core French position. Would you be interested? And I said I'm interested, but my French is fairly limited to about first year university and he said, well, either you teach it or I teach it, and I'm not teaching it. He said, bringing your resume and we'll see what we can do, and that's how I landed my first Gig. So, to be honest with you, Brian, there have been bumps in the road that have discouraged me, but to be honest, I think I've been wanted the luckier ones. I've maybe even semi charmed things have gone well for me. Not Everything has gone well for me. I probably had my dream job set up about three years later, teaching K to five is Ed in Kingston and my administration had full intentions of having me back, and just people pull on strings for other people brought that crashing down around me and that's when I decided to come home actually. So when you received the job that you have now, how long ago was that? Thirteen years ago. I landed a grade seven classroom position in a...

...rural community here in Newfoundland, my wife hometown actually, and I did that for a year and the very next year the fizzed teacher in the neighboring communities school retired and I moved into that and my wife and I were both teaching at that small rural school for four years. And here in Newfoundland rural schools are under the threat of closing just due to low numbers, low population and the economics of it. And they had threatened to close that school and we didn't, we wouldn't have been at a work but we didn't know where they would bump us to. That was the uncertainty. So we chose to make a decision in our best interests and, as much as it broke our hearts, we picked up and moved to the city and and I've been in this school as Phys a teacher. This is my ninth year now, but in this position, having a contract with this school board, it's thirteen years now. So what do you do in it in a week? I mean covid is put a twist on most people's position nowadays. But what would have as a physical education teacher? What is required of you? What do you do? How do you plan? What is it typical week look like for you? It's busy, to be honest with you. People would be a very surprise how busy there, Jim Teacher is. Planning has become well, in a typically, you're planning has become pretty standard and easy for me now because there's a routine to it. Obviously you're keeping things fresh and new for kids, but there is a routine to it. Now with covid that throws a whole new level of planning in because I constantly now have to be prepared for the threat of everyone being sent home and going online. But it's a busy day I and I tend to give up any and all of my spare time. I run any activities I can during a fifteen minute recess break. I run lunchtime activities for kids and I run after school programming, to which, sadly, all of that is kiboshed right now because of covid. But it's a busy day. I'm in a kid to seven school I I'm bringing them in and teaching them the very fundamental movement skills in a lot of cases all the way to, you know, the blossoming careers of young local athletes. I guess. Yeah, it was going to say, are you getting into sports as while? Are you helping out? Oh yes, are you a coach yourself? Yeah, when I by, I guess if I were going to say I specialize in sport, I do volleyball for the main sport that I take after school, and I organize coaches in and and I do track and field in cross country running, and the list will probably go as by memory comes made. But you know, I helped coordinate other coaches and bring volunteers into the building. Most of the Court coaching platform is done by myself, a few other teachers and any stable of parent volunteers I can I can bring on board. And on top of that that's the sport side of it. But there's a few teachers of us that run a committee. We petition for grant money from the government every year and we run a very extensive, actually I was gonna say pretty extended, but a very extensive recreational program through the year two and we do it in blocks throughout the year. I'd hold it up against any actual programming and I'll only go so far as say in the province, but I put it up. I put it up against a lot of them. We're taking we're taking kids orienteering and snowshoeing and swimming and cross country skiing and curling and all the traditional sports of basketball, volleyball, floor hockeys, you name it. We're exposing kids to it. We bring we either bring in specialists to do it on our on site or we use...

...the funding to bust them out to to other facilities to encourage you greg here in Korea dodgeballs big. I find that they don't expose children. So in Korea you either are going to be an athlete or you're not, and if you're not, there's very little use for sports. They have a gym class, but I do not think they expose kids to as many sports as they should be doing. So dodgeball is big and other smaller games like that or soccer. Yeah, right. So so what you're saying, especially Canada, right, and you have, you know, the Max of the four seasons, so you're able to use and experiment with all of those sports that you know. If you're down in Florida or something. You can't hockey's not so big and you know, curling is not Hor snowshoeing doesn't exist. So it's really it's commendable to take that upon because those are great experiences. Like if there's other especially kids, if they're finding they're not academically inclined. I really enjoy going to my gym class with Yester Jackman. Yeah, what do you find, Greg, is most difficult about your job? That's a really good question. I mean it could be with the students and yeah, and I was going to say just before that. Maybe we'll go back. How have you found in your young life, in thinking the last fourteen years, how kids attitude towards athletics or activity has changed? Because when we were younger and you speaking about being in a too room house or to school, was it who room school house to Room School House, the idea is to be outside and play until it was dinner time or go, you know, go help do something until it was dinner time and time to commit. Not all, but the majority. Now with technology, cell phones, you know, Internet and all of that stuff, there's a pull away from that. So how do you find, even from your own life or when you first got into education. Kids view of being active and even physically. How are they managing with all of the sports that you're doing? I would say in my gym. Well, I pride myself on an ability to build report with kids of all ages. You don't see kids choosing or wanting to sit out in Mr Jackmans phys a class. It's it's almost unheard of and it has been that way since I first started. To be honest with you, even like when I first started sebbing, like to I'd go in as a phizzed sub and junior high, which is it's a dangerous place to be, and somehow I was able to get the kids who notoriously sat on the stage. I was able to get them up and moving. So in my gym it doesn't I don't think it's changed much at all. A part of me, but maybe it's the hermudgeon in me, wants to say that it's changed a lot in society, but I don't know if that's true. Like there's still lots of kids banging around like I did. Yeah, you know, there's a family that they've all moved on. They had four kids and I ran into the one day downtown at like a concert outdoor concert facility or something, and I was talking to the mom and I was like where are the kids? And she's like, well, two of them are down there watching the concert and two of them are up in that tree. And you know what I mean. Like there there are people still kind of active and just playing, and when we were kids, let's be honest, there were people who were not playing. You and I did, but not everybody is. So would you...

...say that that is commendable to your teaching ethic here, teaching practice, or is that? You know, we're societies were mudgeon and saying all kids nowadays and that we're just getting older, and we hear more of that of what maybe our kids would have our parents would have said. I think we do do that. I think we're prone to saying that the she the young. I think every generation says that the younger generation is not what they were. And in some cases that's going to be true, because things get shed from society and things get shed from people's desire. But the next generation also finds new and better things to be a part of or new and better things to involve themselves. And now, don't get me wrong. My Passion is in people being active. My Passion is the outdoors, to be honest with you. So when I see like my neighborhood kids are very out doorsy and it warms my heart to see it. That's probably why a lot of our after school recreational program is in the outdoors. But I think people deserve more credit and sometimes we give them. I think a lot of people are active. Shouldn't war people be active one hundred percent. And not to get ahead of you, but we mentioned earlier that now I've just recently taken on a roll. I got, you know, asked would you. I started training at a local gym three years ago and I recently got asked to start coaching there and I decided I wanted to for the same reason. I wanted to be a leader in that environment. That if more of these adults had have been given more attention in the fizzed part of their schooling, they'd be a lot more comfortable in the gym that I'm seeing them and that it's funny. From my question it seems like the problem isn't the kids, the problem is the adults. I I've wondered since the day we got sent home from school for Covid I wonder how many families are not going to go back to scheduling every minute of their days, because scheduling is hugely important. It creates structure, it it sets the precedent for responsibility and punctuality and everything else. But children and adults alike need to take time to step away and be lost in wander lost, for a lack of a better term, like, you know, to go into nature, go into your local park and stroll around it, admire something as simple as the ducks in the in the pond. It doesn't have to be high intensity exercise to be beneficial to your physical wellbeing, aiding you right. So you know, and good question. You get back to the point of a scheduling. Like a lot of families here anyway, we're very open about sharing that. Wow, I love this new found down time with my family. We get to play together, we get to pretend and or, you know, or go for a hike or a bike ride. Bike sales and St John's were off the charts this summer. It's interesting. Are they going to hold onto that or, as soon as everything gets up and run, are they going to overschedule themselves? And not just their kids. They're overscheduling your families, in my humble opinion, you know what I mean. Like to each their own. You do what you want, you you, you know, as long as you're not bringing harm to somebody. On a firm believer in doing what you what is for you and for your family. But it just again, it warms my heart to see families so proud and ecstatic of their recreational time together that I hope they hold on to it when the time goes well, I think it takes people like you also to maybe journal record what you're doing now, and I also commend you on...

...your your mental health awareness by doing your pushups and you got me to do it and yeah, it's thanks for joining, but you're doing it in a way that sheds a story on, you know, different aspects of life and and helping bring awareness to mental health. But also what you're saying here is with being keeping people physically active into maybe even journal this to record it and remind people later on down the road of all the benefits that we experience back in two thousand and twenty or you know, however long this goes, because we are people who are prone to forget. Yeah, like will get stuck back into that scheduling. We'll go, okay, we got to do this, we got to do this, hurry up and hey, remember in two thousand and twenty when you and your family just went for a walk in the woods for three hours and you brought a little picnic basket and how much on that was and it didn't hurt any of your scheduling exactly. So to to. I would think that this would be something that is good for anyone to do, ourselves included, is to remind ourselves and to remind other people that we don't need to be so rigid. It's good to have scheduling, yeah, but to take some of that and schedule some free time and some family time and individual time as well, a hundred percent. So so, Greg, thinking of the kids, who maybe a better off than the adults. And in your job and in your work, what is difficult for you? What is that most difficult thing that you come across? Brian, I feel spoiled and saying that I don't encounter a lot of difficulty in my job. Like I say, kids are cooperative for the most part. I guess if anything, the difficult part is keeping things fresh for then, do you know what I mean? Like to go back to the kind of the younger generation, but, you know, like we are competing with all the technology that they're surrounded with. You don't want any programming, whether you're teaching math or language or, you know, science or Orph is it? You don't want to kind of start resting on your laurels and it's just predictable what you're doing year to year. So I guess one challenge just keeping things probably my biggest challenge is keeping things fresh for kids. Really you had mentioned to me earlier before we record it, that you were doing some new programs. How do you stay fresh? What is it you look to for some inspiration? What where do you find some new programs or how do you use O? Their physi teachers, other physit teachers are are easily my best resource and I mentioned to you earlier that that has expanded now, thankfully, do to covid. It's kind of weird. I I have felt guilty saying this to people because I know the sincerely know the tragedy that people have been through during COVID, from job loss to isolation in a home that is struggling to put food on a table or is dealing with abuse within that home, to the loss of family members through covid or other extenuating things. But strangely, the whole pandemic experience has has been a bit of a blessing for me. So I guess what I get in at is I've reached out to a lot more people during the pandemic I've been forced to. My hands were taught. I couldn't meet with colleagues locally. So what did I end up doing? I'm ended up meeting brand new colleagues all around the world. So, for example, as as teachers in China, we're starting to rant back up into their system. We were just kind of sliding into the pit of what the pandemic was bringing...

...in North America. So as we were trying to get our heads around how are we going to deal with this online learning thing, just big boogie man, I was connecting with teachers in China who were kind of coming out the other side of them. So, to loop back to answer your question, I guess my best resource for keeping things fresh and new our other physit teachers, to be honest with you. So you're do that rough and sorry about that. Online and P I think you mentioned earlier as well podcasting listening. There's Jim professionals listening to yeah, there's a few really strong physette teachers that deliver through podcasting. There's a few very strong leaders in the physver old internationally that have put together Webinar, series of Webinars, you know, like the guy who teaches out of British Columbiana, Nathan Horn. He just did like a you know, fizz ed summer camp. So it's just a series of webinars from different physeette teachers around the world throughout the summer to stay on top of your game getting ready to go back in into it this September. So for anyone that looking into becoming a physical education teacher, do you have the freedom within a school year to teach would ever or sport you would like, or is that dictated to you by the province in the curriculum that they give you? Well, there's a dictated curriculum. You can be as creative as you want in filling that curriculum, do you know what I mean? So there are suggestions in the curriculum as to how you can you can achieve different outcomes, but there's nothing holding you to their suggestions. They're just that, suggestions. So you know, you can explore different sports from around the world or sports from the history of an indigenous population at times, or your traditional sports that everybody sees, you know, on NBC Olympic broadcasts. Like there's room in the curriculum for the children to invent games. So there's lots of opportunity to change things up for kids through the year. That's encouraging to know, Greg what brings you satisfaction, even though there's not much difficulty, but what might bring you the most satisfaction in your work as a physical jugracial teacher that lightbulb moment for a child that they can do something that they didn't think they could. And, to be honest, I get to see it a lot in Physi I really do. People don't realize what they're capable of physically. A lot of people of all ages are very out of touch with what they're able to do with the miracle of the body that they own. And children come in with those walls of early that I can't attitude. And you're in k through seven, so you're really at that developmental very very Ya. I mean you know you can get a kindergarten who is amazed that and they jumped off, you know, a foot high structure and stuck a landing on a gym in a gym, on a gym Mat, you know, like as if they're finishing in gymnastics routine, and they're amazed. Literally, Ryan hands out everything. And you know that kid who comes to you and says I can't, I can't shoot baskets because I'm too small. And somewhere lined the way, whether through themselves or through things they've seen in the media or through a friend or a family member, they've been convinced or commence themselves that they're too small to shoot a basket and you give them the skills to do it and they've conquered something magical when when they accomplish it. And that's a pretty much a daily routine for me, to be honest. It reminds me of my daughter's French remersion teacher that I asked her, why do you do...

...what you do? I go because I teach. You know, great, three, four, five, and how do you teach it? Every one or two is use because I can, I can start the beginning of the year knowing they can't read in at the end of the year they're reading, and that's huge, like from being moved to not hold a ball to be able to put it through a net or, you know, so scared to jump off a plank onto a mat. Those are those are for adults, not for all, but generally speaking like, oh, that's just you know, just do it, you know, we know it. But for a kid that's huge, it is very big. Ye, and here's their confidence immensely Greg I think. So. Yeah, you mentioned something earlier about wanting people to understand, but what would there be that maybe parents, administration, just people on the outside don't understand about your job that you would like them to understand the immense value of it? I think if you we could scour pop culture for all the disparaging jokes at the feet of a Phizet teacher and it is what it is. And you know, all people, all walks of life, all careers are, you know, the butt end of a joke. But people really don't realize the vast accomplishments inside a gymnasium. To be honest. Obviously, like in any occupation, career or workspace, there are some people who are doing a better job than others and making it a better experience for the people in front of them. But again, I stay and by the fact that the vast majority of teachers are there because that's what they want to do, is affect lives in a positive way. And people don't realize the power of a gymnasium. People understand the fond of a gymnasium, but they don't understand the power of what goes on in there, like the sense of accomplishment, the sense of confidence that can be built, the cooperation skills that are developed in a gym, the sense of self worth that can be found in gym, like the fitness. The fitness per se is, I almost want to say, an afterthought like and now and again things change once you get into the junior high in high school ages. But really I'm looking to make people well. I mean, you know, one of the new phrases that's been around that for quite a few years in paste is physical literacy, like just competence with your body. And once you provide somebody with competence with their body, it changes everything. You know, developing spatial awareness leads to better drivers on our roads. When you think about it, being able to perform, and this is not a great example from the primary age group, but you know, being able to perform a squat it ensures your ability to get of a chair as you grow older. It all comes back to how well we can use our bodies. Now, don't get me wrong, I'm a lover of academics as well, and those are things that you undoubtedly carry through till your old age. But physical competency is it. You're using your body all day, every day, other than when you're lying in bed. So I think it goes along way. We I think we accomplish a lot in the phyzett program to be honest. No, you're right. It's something people should understand, and I think a lot of people do if they take a step back and get rid of whatever you're saying, that the comments or whatever. Yeah, but it's I think back in some of my greatest times were in gym class and I remember all my like a Pat Hanna Berry, like just a great teachers that you know, you could even trust, you can you can go to for advice outside of Jim Class, just people, and even now I still know my gym teachers and they were...

...great all along the way. Greg if someone's wanting to get into being a teacher in general, the Physical Education teacher in particular, what advice? And maybe they're looking back and maybe they're one of those kids that are mowing lawns in their neighborhood or pumping gas and their local gas station, but looking at their career path, or even someone that took a different degree and they're looking at changing their career into teaching. What advice would you have for them? First off, be sure you want to do it. To be honest and echoes for any part of the education system. It's not glamorous. Outside the walls of school you are a rock star in the eyes of child, but it's not a glamorous job by any stretch. So make sure you want to be a teacher before, not before you start your path, but as you're on the journey and checking with yourself. Kind of thing. I mentioned you earlier. I watched somebody send a video my way to day actually that spoke about you know, that that first got feeling you get about being a teacher, and I believe that's true. Like I said earlier, I don't recall any light bulb moment, but I just at some point in life. I just knew as what I would end up doing. Experience that you can gain fairly easily volunteering. You know you can. You can easily go, not easily, I shouldn't say that, but you can easily, relatively easily, go and get trained to coach in different sporting events. You can take that into the sporting world, which gives you experience working with children and delivering, you know, whether it be drills or organizing practices or whatever. Yeah, I would say volunteering at a very young age would be a would be a big part of it and start daddling in it at a young age. You know, like job that I didn't get as young person that I really wanted was with the local wreck program and I was very discouraged that I didn't get that job because I knew even as in my teenage years that it was something I wanted and believe, was meant to do. But getting on board with programs of the young age to expose yourself. Another job that I didn't mention earlier that I took a lot of pride in and had a big part in following through on the education visiting. I traveled to the states for two summers and and taught in sports camps down there. There's lots of opportunities. I don't think there's anything would be beyond the fact of having to achieve your education to back you, whether it's a teaching certifict any how where you live, or university's degree or whatever you have to get in. Nevergard. I think the other thing is experienced, because the experience will go back to the first thing I said, the experience working with children will tell you if it's something you want to do or not be on the show, even even what you said about not getting that wrecked job, if you find you have some opera to what you believe is an opportunity and it doesn't present itself at that time, but the desire to still do it, in the drive to keep going despite that setback, maybe an indicator that this path may be the right one for you. A hundred percent. Yeah, because you all, like you said, yes, but, like you said, you're going to hit bumps in the road. Things are not going to go like I mentioned, things have gotten pretty smooth for me. That doesn't mean things have got flawlessly for me. You know you you don't cake walk your way into a career. It's just not going to happen. Bumps into road teach you lessons if you're...

...looking for them, and, like you just said, they did. It's a gut check for yourself as to whether or not it really is something you want. There's no doubt. Is there a go ahead, Greig, well, just I was just going to readerate. Getting yourself out there is is is paramount, if you ask me, and not because you're going to become well known, leading you to a job or career. Necessarily it may, but but more. I think it's more about putting yourself out there so that you find out more about you, because you can start holding skills for a future career very early in life if you're self reflective and if you're asking questions. There's a lot you can do at a young age just by exposing yourself to things. Greg on on that same line, do you have any advice for people, regardless of the type of work, but that maybe discouraged uncertain of their career path? They might find themselves in a job they dislike or they might have management that they're not fond of and you know they're wanting to try something new or they just need a reminder of the initial motivation that brought them on this path. Because we do, as we mentioned earlier, we get discouraged. You know, things happen. You and I were speaking people in our lives. We lose them right and and then, you know, a whole different day is presented before us, or things with covid and stuff like that, and there's lots of bumps in the road that discourage us or push us off. Do you have any advice for people in their work or in their journey with work? I think there's lots of things you can do if you're faced with that discouragement or adversity. It does it probably does depend on your personal circumstances, who you're surrounded by. I think patience is a big thing if you do become discouraged in any facet of life, work, relationships or whatever else. I think people need to develop a greater sense of patients to see things through. There are peaks and valleys and everything we do. You know, every day is not as rosy as the previous one and it's likely not going to be as dark as the one you might be living experience all but patients would be a big thing. I go so far as to say self talk, if you're not surrounded by people who you can turn to to you know, to check in with your self as to where your discouragement may lie or what things you can do to change your situation. And if, if you're lucky enough to be surrounded by people who don't have to have all the answers but can play a sounding board for you to share your ideas with, I think that's vastly important. I know I've been guilty over the years of maybe losing touch with people who would have provided wonderful advice. I haven't talked to you and I think we calculated a twenty one years or something and you gave me good advice this evening. So keeping people in your life, they don't have to be immediately close to you, but people that you can talk to so that when you run into those moments of discouragement, not that they necessarily can give you a pep talk and said everything is straight, but, like I said, they can be your sounding words. As sound having people to be your sounding board is is invaluable, absolutely invaluable. I'm fortunate enough that my wife is that person in my life, not that there aren't others, but she is my primary, one sense of grounding to...

...everything I do. But yeah, I think turning to other people turning inward for yourself and and self reflection and and be impatient. Greg. Speaking of other people, how could people reach you if they want to talk to you about maybe they're some people up there on the rock that want to get into education or yeah, for sure you can. I can share with you an email address. I got a twitter handle, MR GJ seventy seven, and I'm on twitter. I'm a bit of a hit and miss facebooker, but that's always a possibility. But yeah, if there's anybody with there whoever wanted some insight or advice or connections made, maybe I might be able to help somebody somewhere down the road. You never know, Greg. How how do you rest? So you're a physically active person, but how do you rest from your work? How do you separate yourself? What is it you do? That's never been a challenge for me, Brian. I don't know why, but I have always described myself as a hobbyist. I love my own recreational ventures. So I may come home exhausted at the end of a day and I'll load my kayak into the back of my truck and go float around upon for an hour and I might not be paddling very hard because I might be pretty tired, but I'll paddle it. I every year. I know one spot on the local lake where eagles come in nest every year and that's one of my favorite things to do to relax is to go and, from a distance, just sit and watch the eagles as they raise too eaglit small shars. I sleep very well. I don't have much trouble sleeping. My wife and I like to share a lot of hobbies. We're not big TV people, but we might take a half hour an hour to flake it in front of the TV some evenings if we feel we need it. But yeah, relaxing has never been a problem for me. Looking back from owing the lawns and throwing some by actually not even throwing the newspaper, but talking to her and your neighbors, handing them the paper and maybe even telling the news before they get it and saying did you how has your work helped shape your character? So thinking of an answer in terms of the listeners and how important work is. How has worked help shape your character? I don't know how this answer will come off, Brian, but I think my character is shaped my work more than my work has shaped my character. To be honest with you, I think from a young age I have been interested in the wellbeing of other people, and I don't just mean physical wellbeing, like just a general wellbeing of others, and I think that has made me successful. To be honest with you, I'm quick and willing to talk to anybody. I'm I'm not one to pre judge anybody on, you know, any of the topics of people get prejudged on whether to color their skin, or there's socioeconomic status in society or, you know, their religion or any like. It doesn't matter to me. I'm I'm a firm believer in a human being as human being and I think that outlook on life has served me well. To be honest with you, I'm I've probably lived life overly cautious that I was going to offend someone, but to my credit, I don't think I've offended many people through my comings and goings. I do speak my mind. I'm...

...not afraid to say what I believe in. But while speaking my mind, I wholeheartedly believe in the opinion of the other person. Maybe not believe in it, but I value that they have something and I like to let people know that I value their opinion or their insight or their suggestions and I think those things. I carry those things into a classroom as well, like I don't look at the students that I teach as lesser than myself. Yes, I have to have control of the room, I'm the leader in the room, but it doesn't make me more important than a six year old, you know what I mean? Like I'm not. I'm not a more important human being black on the planet. So you know, that's not something I just carry through my life with, you know, friends and colleagues and family members. Is Something I've portrayed in my students as well and I think it served me well. I think it's led to the type of teacher I become now. It gets a good action. My career as affected who I am. Yeah, but I I would put my character as a greater influence on my career. It's and that's a better way of looking at it, and I don't there's people that are shaped by their career, which probably would be detrimental to their character in most instances if they're fully shaped by what it is they're doing and then they are disheartened because they are their work opposed to influencing their work for something better. And it's something about you. I we've known each other for twenty, thirty, almost twenty five years. I guess is about you is that you were consistently kind. I couldn't say anything against your character and I felt that you always from I guess, to be honest, what little we know of each other in the period of time we knew each other is that you were consistently kind and that you did value me, despite my erroneous views, right or erroneous ways, and for that I appreciate, because what you're saying is absolutely true. When I know of you, I have I appreciate your kind words to it's it is true. Greg. I have one final question for you, young man fire away. Why do you work? Okay, so this is your question that I've really cheated on. I haven't scripted an answer, but I but I have an answer. I think we all work for the future. I think we're working. Yes, we're working for financial gain, but it's for the future, whether it's to put food on our tables, the next day, or whether it's to buy the new toy that want to you know you or your child want, or whether it's putting money away for your child's education down the road or your retirement or whatever. I think we all work for the future, and lots of careers could say it. But also as a teacher, in that capacity you're working for the future in a much greater sense socially. So I hope I don't lose points for cheating, but as I listen to your show, that's what struck me, as I think we work for the future, we're not working for the past. Well, it's a great point in you're the first one to say it the way you have, but this is what I want listeners, especially younger people. It's for your future and when you're younger, and not all, maybe not you, you're not thinking that the future is so long or all the things that you have to do for your future. Your...

...many kids. Think about now, or younger people think about now and maybe tomorrow or next week or next year, but not okay, when I lose my my mom or my dad, how how is you know who's going to pay for that? Or when I retire, how is that going to be paid for and thinking more and just reminding people it's for your future and I don't think that's cheating at all. Thanks, Mr Greg Jack Been. I appreciate you, I appreciate you being a teacher in the Public School district and I I think you have some things on your horizon that you're looking to do and I hope you all the best in all that you do. Thanks, but I need to thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive, be a joyful day in your work.

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