WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 80 · 1 year ago

#80 Everett Oliver Voice Acting Director BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Everett Oliver is a voice over acting director and he owns the company Voice Acting Director. Everett is a giant in his field as he provides consultation, coaching and production to a range of talents and functions within the entertainment industry.

Contact Info

Everett’s Profile
linkedin.com/in/everett-oliver-2279765

Website
voiceactingdirector.com/ (Company Website)

Phone
818-515-3550 (Mobile)

Email
eo@voiceactingdirector.com

Twitter
myboothdirector

About

"Everett Arthur Oliver is a 25-year veteran in the entertainment industry. He currently runs his own voiceover company called: MY BOOTH DIRECTOR which specializing in: Professional Direction for your Voice-Over auditions. He is also an animation demo co-producer, a private coach for commercial and animation and also a career consultant.

Recently, he was nominated for the co-producing/directing SOVAS Award in the category of Outstanding Animation/Gaming Demo Reel, Best Voiceover. He also received another nomination for directing a Narration Demo Reel in the category of Outstanding Narration Demo Reel, Best Voiceover.

Formally working as a Booth Director at AVO Talent Agency in Los Angeles, he has directed numerous voice-over actors in countless auditions for animation, commercials, interactive, narration, promos and trailers and also sound-alikes.

He has also worked in voice-over casting for several award-winning animated shows such as Godzilla, Men in Black, Jackie Chan Adventures and Hellboy: Sword of Storms just to name a few. He has worked at several companies such as: Columbia TriStar, Disney, Film Roman distributed by the WB, ABC, and Syfy.

Lastly, his experience includes TV animation productions for several hit animated shows: The Simpsons and King of the Hill." (LinedIn, 2020)

...welcome to why we work with your host Brian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice, which would be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going on and keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here is your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian V, and this is why we work today. I had the great pleasure speaking with Everett. Oliver Everett is a voice over acting director with over 25 years experience. He has his own company, and he has worked in animation as well. He's a coach consultant, and you've seen some of his handiwork and such things as The Simpsons, King of the Hill, Hellboy, Jackie Chan's Adventures, Godzilla and Men in Black. Today I want to find out how hard it is to be a voiceover actor, how much work it takes and what he looks for in finding a voice over talent. Join me in my conversation with Everett Oliver. I'm Brian V, and this is why we work today. Have the great. Pleasure speaking with Everett Oliver. Good evening, Find, sir. Hi. How are you? I'm doing well, killing me. I You know, you have no idea what I do with these hitters. I have no idea. I'm learning as I go. But no, I appreciate in the chat that we were just having, and I appreciate I mentioned Uncle Roy set us up with a connection. Can you give us a little idea? You know how this goes? It's just who you are. A little snapshot. And then I'd like to bring you back Little snapshot of who I am. Um, I am a voice acting director in the voiceover industry. I coach in the animation and animation commercial industry. Also a career counselor. I also am a addition Coach addition, Additional coaching I coach auditions. E could speak. Here we go. We haven't even started. Um, I produced demos. Direct demos. I should say I have workshops. Um, and I traveled all over the world to teach, inform, guide, mentor and, uh, my own company. That's me. In a nutshell. I run my own company. Your five. My boost, Director. No, that's an old one. Former, I am voice acting director. That's what I officially go by. But I was a former Booth director at a voice. The name of your company. What's the name of your company? Voice acting director? It is voice acting. Okay, good. Everywhere. You do me a favor. Let's go back. What would have been your first job? Maybe as a teenager, I was speaking to some of my last episode. She was seven years old and she was bringing candy to school and selling them to other students. Clad. I'm having a flashback because I know my cousin does that. And he he was like, 89 or 10. So put that out there. Well, what about you? What were you? I mean, that's not a bad idea. Like, what was I doing as a kid? Like, I was missing some great opportunities. I think, Um, the very first thing, maybe it was volunteer. Maybe you made a dollar. Maybe you didn't. The only right now that comes to mind, which is gonna be a laugh is I worked at McDonald's. Nice. No, it's I e your number 80 and I think probably 10 people have worked at McDonald's. Donald said that or another 20 or 30. Did paperboy like paperboy, Actually, one paper girl. So how old were you when you worked at McDonalds? I waas 15. 14, 15, 16. Why did you do it? Why did you get out? Why did you get that job? Because I had to. Because their parents had to do it. Um, you know, it was like you might as well, you know, join the work for us. It was something to do on Fridays work Friday nights and Saturday night. Um, this was also help pay for college that I was leaving for college. So at 15, you're you're thinking you're thinking about college already. That's part of why you're working. Getting some of you wanted having to save up for college. Did you work at all before college after McDonald's, or did you keep that job all the way through? I kept that job up until e think I was there for, like,...

...2.5 to 3 years. That's pretty good on bond. Then I left. It was it was time to go. I didn't I did a lot. That's that's a good stint at McDonald's. E. I mentioned. I went back to my hometown in Canada and this past year because my mom happened to be sick and I went through a McDonald's drive through And there's the lady at the drive through And I was like, I remember you in 1980 something doing the same thing And she said, Yes, here I go. You must have been here for I don't you know, I don't want to age. Here I go. You did it several years and she goes, Can you guess? And I said 20 must have been. Must have been 30 years. She said, No, dear, we're in. A few other employees here have been here since it opened almost 40 years at McDonald's. And I'm like it kind. No offense store. But it looked like it, right. Like she she was. She was mean. McDonald's isn't the healthiest. If you worked there for 40 you're gonna eat it. But, you know, I was like, Thank you. I even said thank you for your service. Right. Because if you look at the art that they serve it does they, Sir, I remember I used to watch that number. Like how maney did they serve at McDonald's now? and then now they're just off the map. So, what were you thinking for going into colleges? You mentioned what was your drive or what was maybe a passion. Or maybe just someone told you what you might want? It was more or less, you know? Well, I come from a background of education, so my there was no choice. I had no choice to get a job job, go to school. That was the deal. I was like, Okay. And I grew up. Didn't have anybody to the D E S O on Guy grew up in New York. So it was That was just the thing that the kids did. They as teenagers, they had to find some sort of, you know, they ever worked at McDonald's or Burger King. Um, just a little odd jobs. There was no, like working at a grocery store. That's just not what we did in the city. Or we worked in, like, you know, offices. Um, I also did work that I think about it. I worked for the Rockefellers. That's a mail carrier. Okay, even or not. Is this in high school? Um right. Oh, I'm seeing I'm seeing my hair. Stand up. Um, uh, as you think about what? It was high school. I don't think it was high school. What did you take in college? What was I studied mass commuter. My degree is mass communications with a concentration and radio, television and film. It's a bachelor of arts. And so while it wasn't your deal to go to school, you were pushed that way. Why did you pick mass communication? Because my because I was an avid soap opera watcher. Anyone in particular you've really got asked me that? A days of our lives. I mean, I watched that at one time. That was probably in high school. I watched three young and the restless. I watched another world. I watched, um, days of our lives at one time, Um, then bulls in the beautiful As I got older General Hospital when I was in eighth grade. Uh, the edge of night when I was in eighth grade. E Alice, You said General Hospital in General Hospital? Yeah, that was in the hospital. It was the edge of night. You're probably a little bit too young to know that one. E Think I watched General Hospital s so when you're looking at and you're watching it and the into a career, a least college and mass communications what we write as you watch it. You wanted to be an actor. You like to find a behind the scenes stuff. How I think the thing was this I was I was sitting in the dorm watching soap operas and then the light bulb hit me. This is what I want to major in. And this is what I wanna dio I didn't know what you know most. My personality is high energy and fun. And so I was always I'm always the jokester in the family. So everybody thought that I was gonna do stuff on camera. I've got a little shy. A lot of people don't know that. You know, I get tongue tied in front of camera, blah, blah, blah. But I knew that I would work behind the scenes and, you know, see how that worked out and then go from there. So as you were in college and taking mass communications, were you finding this was fulfilling that idea? Where you a little disappointed, or was it pushing you directly where you want to go. I kind of liked, you know, when I was so I kind of like the behind the scenes. It was kind of cool to just watch shows. I actually was a producer of a show. It was kind of like a talk show that we that we had called Center Square and...

...that was something that we had to put together. I believe it was like every week. And so I had Yeah, yeah. One of my former college buddies had passed away, started to show. And so after he had graduated from school, we took over the show. And so he just had themes. Um, I went to an African American university, um, in Atlanta, Georgia. So we just took on things off whatever college issues that were happening at that time. And so we just went ahead and, you know, brought people in from the community. Um, and basically like a regular talk show like Donahue, Sally Jessy, Because I also was an intern for Sally Jessy Raphael to and I was in college. How was that transition from your family, which seemingly was close? You know, Thio nurture you and the idea of education and work But you went from New York down to Atlanta, Writer into Georgia. How was that to go in the decision to move or you just gear and to get out? I'm Let's just say this. I was independent at the age of nine. Alright, everyone, I'm done. I'm out. I'm a born. I was born in where he's in New York and I still have that New York feisty toughness. Go, go, go, go, go! And when it was time, um, to go to Georgia, it was okay, you're going to the south, you're gonna learn the south, and you're going to just figure it out. And so that's what my parents were Advocate off. Go, Just go. How did you feel when you got there? The difference between I'm kind of from your north, which is Nova Scotia, Canada, which is kind of like in New York, maybe not as feisty. But, you know, I have aspirations of getting down south, and it just seems like a totally different atmosphere. How was it for you? As you got there? Very small country town, Vory relaxed pace. Very friendly. Um, I went to I went to a black college, so That was kind of a little bit new and different from me because I grew up in a city of a multi pot of everybody. So going to a black college was like, Oh, okay, we're gonna have to figure how this works out. And, you know, there's a certain, uh, class, You know, that I would say so. It was kind of like middle income upper milk. Upper level students go into these because I went to one of the prestigious schools in the South. So and there's a mixture of all four Morehouse College, Spelman College, Clark Atlanta University, Morris Brown, which made Oppa's one big university so you could take classes all over at every at every institution. Mhm. So as you were finishing up your college and your experience there, what was seemingly at the end of your your diving board to jump into the workforce? Um, it was time to move to. Well, I was after I graduated. Was it was a point of what you going to do for two years. So I stayed in Atlanta for two years, and I knew that my friends in college or moved to California and at the age of eight. I remember having a conversation with my great grandmother. I think my great aunt's that I told them that I was moving to California when I was eight. California s Oh, yeah, in 1994. It was just like, Oh, OK, you know, now it's just time to just make that transition from Atlanta to Los Angeles. So were you hesitant for the two years? What was that? What was I was just trying, trying to figure it out, trying to figure how I'm gonna get there, you know, with the proper steps. Like with a plan rather than the physical ability to get there. You're just You wanted a good plan and my family. You should have a good plan. Otherwise you gotta tell them about it, too. Well, you know, and it's so interesting because I don't create a plan. It just winds up just falling into place. I'm one of those type of people that I just you know, what if it's if it's going well, just let it go and let the universe, or whatever you believe in, let it all fall into place. So what did you pull the trigger on? um I just had to experiment. I had to see if it was right if California was right for me. So I just came out here for 10 days. Um, fooled around. I looked around for different sites to just kind of see...

Check out what California is about. Wind up staying longer than 10 days. Had a rent a car that I kept longer than 10 days. Got pulled over in Beverly Hills with all my friends in 10 days. It was It was it was like, Hey, I'm having a good time. As you know, the running money is running out and you know, you can't pay for this rent a car, But you are having a good time. Oh, yeah, It feels right. It still trying a picture. And I got it. Everybody, they don't worry. I got discovered. I'm We're good. We're good, you know? You know, we're having good. We're just having a good time. They were like, Wow, you're you just loving it. And I'm like, What do you What do you Um when are you going back? And after I and I mentioned this story before, after I returned to rent a car and found out that, as you know, I just went and said to them, um, here's my credit card. You might as well max me out because I have nothing else. Hmm. You know, and a time my uncle's family members were here with me, and they were basically told me, um, the flight leaves at 10. 30. Back to Atlanta. Be on it. Yeah, I think we need to get showing that flight. So I literally take right. And I literally remember going into the people that were staying with people, I went to college and they saw me packing and they were literally looking like Where you going? E Gotta get that 10 30 flight back to Atlanta, But I will be back in 30 days. Oh, yeah, right. That's the year. Right? Feeling of sure that 10 days was enough for you to realize this is where you wanted to be. Oh, I knew. Oh, I just had, you know, it's a feeling of you. Just go for it, you know? So did you in that 10 days, make some connections for the work that you're doing now. Or how did you wheel that while you were there and for to come back. Did you have a plan in particular to come back to or it was just I'm going to go back, pack my stuff up and be back and then figure it out. Well, let's just say I will say this. I had a job offer in three days. I'm driving in Los Angeles. So, um, the time that I was here for the 10 days I went ahead and I interviewed for a job at film. Roman and I wore a blue tie or I was the only one basically, in California, you never wear a suit when you when you go in interviews. So when they saw me with a suit, they knew it was from back East. And that was about business. I'll say that. So that's that's probably how I got hired, right for wearing my navy blue suit. It works. Eso um I interviewed for a position, um, in the color copy, which basically entails you copying all of the, um, animation designs and keep a list of, um, you keep a list of all the backgrounds, all the characters or the props, and they send the artwork over to career, the actual the originals. And we keep copies in the event that they lose them. And then that way they could trace and say, Oh, we painted this specific background red. And this is the number on the back of the sell sheet debate, you know, painted back when they were doing in can paint. So I did that for about probably about six months, maybe eight months. So as you're in this color copying position, are you thinking I There's these other steps I want to follow? Is this just part of the process of where you wanted to be? How did you feel in those six months of where your career was in what you were trying to attain? Um, basically, it was I just needed a job. I wasn't thinking about it. I didn't realize what was happening because I was learning. My The way my personality is is that I'm learning the dynamics of the people around me. I'm learning the dynamics of my surroundings, and I'm learning the dynamics of the job once that feel comfortable comfortable in that job. Then I get bored really fast because my brain processes stuff really fast than it was opening on The Simpsons and I applied for it right away or this. Actually, the Simpsons went ahead and saw that I was a go getter and they called me and told me that there was an opening. And then they promoted into The Simpsons. Did you? Did you Did you call your uncle and say I'm all right now? Good. I'm good. E mean, you know, having a job before leaving Atlanta was great,...

...eh? So that way the parents was like, How does this work? I'm like, I'm every things just fall into place. And things have fallen in place for you. Where you were on things you did. Casting calls for Godzilla, men and black Jackie Chan and a bunch of other things that I'm sure that the list is very long to say. How has your career progressed into to position where you're in, You're in now And maybe some highlights or even some low points as it took you through where you are now? Nothing. Nothing low. Everything has been an experience. I used all of my experiences, my knowledge I absorbed everything like a sponge. When I was on the shows, I worked with the animation artists, so it showed me structurally on how an actual animation show is produced. Um, I worked with the voice actors. I saw what they did, and I just tied in with the voice actors what they do to the production of all the artwork because I've been in different levels in different positions. So being in casting helped being an executive assistant because I also worked on King of the Hill. So I got this work on sides with the network as well to figure out how that all plays into it. So I was fortunate enough to just learn everything and just go. Uh, this is how the animation world war, Because this wasn't this wasn't something that I wanted to do. I fell into it. I think my thing was, I was so driven into the soaps that I was gonna go and probably work on soap operas, then three. Epiphany. Waas. It's long hours. It's like being on a sad for 16 to 18 hours. That's like, Hey, you must give me a couple of lines because we need to move this process This because this is work. So me getting into cartoons. I'm like, Okay, this is simple. This is pretty easy. It's not that difficult. And I still have the feeling of being on TV. My name is out there on television. So this propelled propelled me to, um, learning all that aspects. And I kind of sort of teach that to my students just to kind of give them a little bit of knowledge and how this whole process works in the process of when you were in college and you kind of get a taste regardless of what you're taking in college, you don't get the full, but you had your show, so there's a different part of it too. At what point? In this experience, and when you're up to King of the Hill or any of the other experiences, did you realize you one the eye opening experience of seeing behind the scenes like a real taste of behind the scenes and like, Wow, this is just what I've been looking for. And how was that experience for you? I think I just you know, for me, I move so fast, I don't have a wow moment. I just do it, E just I think I just because I have to drive to just keep moving forward and I like, I get really, you know, doing the same stuff over and over again. Kind of right drives me insane. So I need new challenges and I need new experiences to keep me activated and to keep me motivated. You know? So very, really, as I have Ah ah ha! Moment, Onda Onley moment that I could probably think off is working with the actors when I was a booth director, so I worked at a talent agency when I was in my late forties. We keep that very hush hush late forties. I don't even think you're in your forties. Bless your soul. I'm a little older, but that's OK. Eso usually people we're gonna work in a talented to see you would probably be in your twenties s, and I was always kind of a late bloomer anyway, So then, you know, follow me. But it was the epiphany of working at a talent agency. Now, remember, I have worked in casting, so I was familiar. We're trying to get the actors the jobs, but the epiphany is like, Oh, there's some actors are so hungry for animation that I would look at them and go, You're not books and animate serious. They're like, No, but you could see there like hungry nights like, 00 there are a lot of people who are really hungry to get into the animation world, and that, to me, was just kind of like, Oh, it's just a cartoon stop. But serious. I wrote a term paper about Bart Simpson. It's funny you say that I wouldn't I would think now it animations become so big. But there was there a time where actors were like...

...animation. That's beneath me. Was there right point for that for actors? I'm sure there were. That was probably before my time, Um, when I really was in it with the casting. The animations just started, like blowing up. So working on Godzilla, we had, like, 40 episodes. We recorded 22 episodes per week for maybe it was maybe about 10 months or two a year, and then everything just started expanding. You know, when Sony, because I also worked at Tony when Sony had their blockbuster movies. We did an animated Siri's so you could just see the level of men and black went for, I believe, third or three or four seasons. Um, we're gonna Oh, God. Start your troopers. I believe that went for cutting. Kill me 40 episodes. They're gonna kill me because I can't remember on this stuff is looking at my face. I'm like, Okay, but there's a lot of work in the work that you, you've chosen right there's opposed to being the actor himself or herself who's looking for that work and needing that position, you're in a really good position to be able to help these all of them, and to be able to direct voice overs as well, Right, I for me, it's a process of me, um, knowing who you are, where you've been to get a little bit of background for me to go ahead into mentor, you, guide you and then direct you to How can I make this work? I mean, I've done I've done a lot of stuff. I mean, there's a lot of a lot of what we my question Everett of what do you look for in a talent? And is it really They have all the skills coming and you're just kind of showing them around or is that you're looking for something in particular, especially in the casting but also helping and in mentoring as well. What what sort of skills and talents are you looking for there? I'm looking for their improv skills and who they are. I'm really looking to go through. It's like for me. I could transcend myself into them, and I get figure out how they tick. So I want to know, What do you bring to the table once I find out what they bring besides them worrying about their voice? Then I could say, That's it. That's what I look for. Um, you know, they gotta be able to just play. That's the other thing I look for. I think that they're there, that's why. Okay, my friend in my ear saying they're overthinking. They just they want the job, they want to book the job. But I think that the issue is when they get the job, they're gonna freeze out because they're so fascinated with seeing all the celebrities who have done it for years, that they're gonna choke. And that's not a good thing, you know? So that's what I'm I really look for, you know, And then I'm also one that will bring, you know, as quiet as it's kept to talent. I do talent agencies. I will call on agent and say, Hey, this is somebody who I think you might wanna take a look Take a look at and then I'll go ahead and submit, You know, Riel. Sudam So I can't understand. It's about personality. That's the other thing to your personality has to fit. We all don't fit well with everyone. You also have to have this great dynamic personality. You touched on something A Zay said Uncle Roy and I were speaking about and he's like, Yeah, people fall in love with their voice, right? Like, oh, yeah, Someone told you that your you have a good voice. So they love your voice. And then he's the point. Was throw that idea out there, be willing toe work. What about the process itself? I think of and doing introduction to this just now. And the same thing happened with Uncle Roy. Roy Wilkinson is when I e When I was when I was doing the introduction for you, I'm like, Oh, no, he's a voiceover director because I was like, Yes, this is Brian in the very beginning, like just to introduce you And I was thinking and thinking I started laughing and trying to figure it out. And it reminds me of a couple of movies, one of Elvis of like, just the repetition. And what was the what was the other one? La Bamba, Richie, Richie Vallis, Richie Richie, Richie, Richie, La Bamba Guy But a but no. In the movie it was It was like they loved the music. But then they had to record and it was over. And, uh ah, and doing it over and...

...over it if you haven't seen in a while. But La Bamba Bamba the movie was La Bamba. Ritchie Valens, I think, Yeah, you're right. The hard work that went into that just to record something. Well, and you first go in with a passion. Some people are overthinking things, but the passion, the desire to do a good job But the hard work that goes, take one, take two. And I've seen you in an interview and like you had to get people ready for in particular, my booth director, in your position there of two takes off to the next one. You have to be prepared. Oh, yeah, You have tow when you're represented at a talent agency. They treat that as a professional, as a profession, professional. So you have to be in there to take you out. The agents would tell me I keep in there a little longer because something that they be intimidated by me. But that's just me. But you have to be Bring your a game because when you go and you book a job, they move. They have four hours. Sometimes we have a celebrity who can't stay for the four hours. So they need you to be on your game ready to go, because the time is money. No one's fooling around. No one is, you know, waiting. You know, coming in late, you have to have really seriously on your A game, you know? So I'm tough because you know Blackie's. But I try to prepare you to be like, Hey, this is this is the real world. This is, you know, forget the money. This is about you. How well can you handle being on an animated Siri's? Because other than that, they'll drop you and I've seen that. And I've heard that. You know, if you're not on your A game, does somebody else that we could replace you? Tough, tough game. This is a game. And you have to be up. You have to be original. You have to be fresh. You know, you gotta be able to think outside the box sometimes if they like it, you know, they're They're they're like, Hey, we never even thought about that. We'll keep that and add that in. So, you know, you should be constantly, constantly upgrading your skills. I don't care. And I even I work with my actors, and I'm tough like that, but I want them to prepare them for what's about to happen. Because things change going to slide to, you know, every how did you transition into your own company now and in your own company? What is the process that you go through and say on a weekly basis? God. So how did I transfer? Um, I was sneaky. I'm not gonna lie. Uh, coming with me. Oh, yeah. No, I just The actors told me, um, that's some of the actors told me in my agency you could do this by yourself. They really pushed me. Why are you working from anyone else? Yeah, right. You have the drive. You have the personality. I will say this that I have to share just with anybody. I got most likely to succeed when I was in eighth grade. Kept that your backpack down, just like I was like, Okay, I could do this. So, um, once they pushed me, I didn't. I was one that. Let's just go for it. What do we have to lose? We'll figure it out. And so my plan. So you think of, well, voice actors don't have any money, but you can travel to them and see the United States. I saw the United States when I was a kid. I used to, you know, travel by car families to travel by car all the time. But this was just the opportunity for me. Some places I hadn't been to like Toronto hadn't been to Toronto before. Nashville was fun. I hadn't been to Dallas at all. I remember being a Dallas kid, so that was just a plan that just kind of fell into it like, Hey, I kind of like this travel. I'm kind of getting myself out there. I'm kind of learning the different A regions because everyone sounds differently. According to them in the United States, I'm picking all of it up. So I was soaking stuff as a sponge. So we're going to their homes, or you going to other agencies there and meeting up a studios. So I would, you know, some of the actors would reach out to me and said, Hey, um, I heard you're coming to whatever city and I would say, Yeah, I'm coming. Do you know can you recommend any studios? They would set it all up for me. And so we'll put the flyers out, And then...

...everyone, um, would come, you know, I probably have no more than Oh, my God. 12 to 15 students. Sometimes I would stay for two days, teach them, you know, um you know, let's see how you get into character, See how quick, you know, Let me see what you bring to this character. Let me teach you what the process of a callback. I got a lot of actors who don't understand. I should say, Well, not even not understand. But don't know the process. What happens during the call back. Did you know then or did you realize or did you experience that Everett Oliver's name coming out of California to meet with such and such has weight. Did you Did you start to see ah, snowball effect of that where you're like, there's some people come to meet me a little bit surprised, but also that's right, E because, um, I'm based in Los Angeles and my home is New York. So when I would travel back east, it was somebody who was in the industry who knows who knows the business, what who comes from the heart and tells the truth. That's how I know. And then my name started just growing and then going through social media and I'm like, Oh, okay, But I didn't take it. Yeah, I really don't take it seriously seriously. And the reason why I share that with you is my aunt and uncle ran a print store, so they were in. They were entrepreneurs themselves and eso Every week I'm calling them and they would tell me, Don't make this no happy. You know, you could make this is full, successful career out of it and then that branded in tow, me expanding mawr. And, you know, I'm very as one of my actors will say to me, I'm very humble. I don't share a lot of stuff because to me, it's not a big deal. When I worked in television for The Simpsons and I worked in King of the Hill, my name appeared on the credits for all the Saturday mornings and casting. And I remember my cousin woke me up on a Saturday morning at 10 o'clock. What do you want? You know, I hadn't talked to her. She passed now, but I didn't talk to her in years. And she just because she saw my name flashed on TV and my attitude Waas And what's your point? Back to sleep trying. I mean, I've been working 60 hours and you waking me up about Okay, great. So you know, right? Right? Exactly. I'm on the look. I give luck, so, you know. But for me, it's like, Okay, it's no big deal. And I do that to this day. You know, when people I think I was at a conference once and I heard my name. You know. You know, people whisper. Oh, my God. This on, then I just welcome. How are you? I love doing that. I just love to it. And I'm just like, Oh, my God, you're out of control. I'm just having fun. Just having fun, You know, I'm not. I'm not that important. So what? You're important? What is what is the process you take people through or what is your week look like nowadays? I don't know if Cove it has kind of changed things for you. Or maybe maybe it's good. I mean, added animation might be picking up because it might be easier for them toe film. Well, it's a mixture of everything. I got a mixture of career counseling. Um um, day to, you know, people wanted to do a couple of sessions on how to the process of getting into character. How did they get? You know, the animation. What do they need? Um, I, uh, bookkeeping, uh, demos. Setting up group classes. I could see my friend looking at me like every you know this. You know, this and I'm like processing, setting up group classes, setting up guests. Um, I have, like, some agents that come and speak of my classes. So because I like to put exposure to the students, So let them know these air professional people who I network with that you need to get under their radar. So that's what I do. So this is what I do like five days a week. What do you specifically coaching people to do? Is this getting on a demo? Is this how to some more demo somewhere? Ah, lot of auditions. I coach a lot of people on auditions, especially for I work with kids. Aziz. Well, um, so a lot of there's been a lot a huge put a little...

...huge, massive push on animated shows They're being developed. That happened recently, even with Kobe. So I would probably say about probably June or July. We've been getting a lot of auditions and additions have been coming in, and I would say about maybe four or five projects a week. And so it's a fast turnaround. So it's just been ah, whirlwind of, you know, audition certain classes. Hey, you got time for a demo? Um, check. You know, working, preparing actors for demos. Sending actors, two different coaches. I'm a giver. I'm like, Listen, you need to go speak to this person because this person needs to get you to where you need to go. Um, so that's kind of like my whole week scheduling. And do you have some advice for people who would come to you at first or even before they come to you, thinking about getting into acting, their voice voice acting in in particular, or even thinking back to you when you first got your first job and say, McDonald's or doing something else on the side? Advice, Getting just working the idea of work and being productive, as your mom said or your parents said, Work is good, right? And it's something you have to do. So do you have some advice for people just getting into work or getting into your industry in particular strong backbone? I don't know why that came to me. You have to have a strong backbone for rejection. You have tow, keep it moving. You need to be. If you want to succeed, you got to keep pushing and knocking down doors. Don't go, and I just said this to somebody. There's a front or the back door but there's always the two side doors you need to be able to push those doors through. I just said it to somebody right before I said to You need to be networking mhm. Besides having your specific training, you gotta put yourself out there. Nobody is staying at home waiting for Brian Toe. Pick up the phone and call them. Trust me, they're not doing that, you know. I agree, you know. So it's finds. Find a mentor, find somebody who has a strong will and the desire to secede. Not it is. And who's also truthful? Mhm, especially in out in the street. You gotta find somebody who's gonna really support you to bring you to that next level. I've been fortunate enough that I found people. I just find people. And then I'm like, you don't know this, but you're my mentor. But the tag on his back, yeah, right. You know, because I have I have a business mentor. I have, you know, uh, creative mentor. I have different metrics for different things. So it's a matter of me, you know, reaching out and saying Let me run this idea, you know, by you so and going back to the actors. They have to be willing and able. And I will say this. It takes time. I don't know what you're rushing for unless you plan on leaving the planet in the next. You know, five years actors are all like I get you being hungry, but it gets to a point where you could see people less like constantly. And I'm like, settled e need you to settle down because there's one thing of being a go getter. And there's another thing of being a pain hyper and the pain and you will get cut. I'm saying it nicely. You won't get cut. How do you stay productive, Everett? I mean, you're busy. I think this year is kind of thrown a wrench and some things for people, but maybe What's your motivation toe work? Now? Now that you've had some experience with work, you're in this industry. What? Get your feet on the ground saying, Okay, here goes another day. Um, I love, even though I tell people people drive me insane. I'm a people person. I'm here to I feel like I found my calling of what I'm supposed to dio and how to get people to where they need to be. So I get up in the morning, Um, during my little water, I just a meditation you have no idea on I'm like, Okay. And then the emails you go. I go through my daily email checks, and I also do something that probably no other coach. I will speak just for me. Does I check up on people I get on social media? I get on social media, I see them, I dropped them. Hey, how are you? Frightens them for some plant or reason, as if they think that...

...they owe me money or there's something wrong, which is hilarious. But it's me doing a daily check on and saying, Oh, I'm just seeing if you're okay, is you know, if my ears I'm a great listener. I've been told that. And so that's why I'm good at you know what I dio And you know, once once I like I said, tap into them. Then I can go ahead and just move them, you know, get them in the right direction because everybody needs some guidance. Everybody needs some sort of structure. Yeah, you know, and I don't think people take. People take advantage of that. I think they just I think it just dive into something, and they they're not sure where they're gonna end up and they get lost. And it's I feel like it's my my plan or my, you know, vision to get them back on track and get them in the right direction. Do you find that you need that as well? From others? I mean, besides mentors in particular Do you do long for that to to make sure people check in on you to make sure you're you're staying? A strong is they're not consistently harassing me. Everything I call harassing, I do say harassing. Let's be clear. I wanna be clear. It's called harassing, you know, sending me email after email after email Me, you know, like every two or three days I'm like, Okay, settle, settle. You could send me an email once a month and our process it e okay, they're doing well, and I do respond to emails, you know? So it's It's like I said, you have to be organized. You have to stay one point, and if you want to succeed, you know the entertainment industry, I think, is known as a busy industry, especially if you're on the other side of the camera or the microphone. How do you turn off your work and make what people say balance or work life choices in check so that you're able to have you time? I mean, you mentioned meditation in the morning, but you're also jumping on the email as well and checking out other people. It's not really turning it off completely right? Do that. Or do you want to do that when for me, it's travel the traveling aspect of it e get like San Francisco. So I traveled to San Francisco about once a year. I've been doing that for about seven years. Straight short trips work for me, E. Congar Oh, to somewhere for five days, and that will recharge me. Even if I'm working. I'm being in a new surrounding, so that definitely invites me. I go back east for about a month. That recharges me. Seeing family members takes me away because of they know my personality, the laughter and humor seeing friends in Seattle that will recharge me, friends and family in Seattle that would we charge me so as long as I'm able to travel, I'm good. If I have to stay put and it's been hard because of Kobe, I will say that ever thinking back, maybe people have given you advice in the past, but knowing myself not mature enough toe receive it kind of going through my teenage years with my hands over my ears. Or maybe a mistake that you made either or something. You didn't listen to our mistake that you made that you learn from that you can pass on to other people. Is there anything like that in your life? I don't look at mistakes as e can't think of any mistakes that I'm baton because I used them as experiences. But uh huh, my great grandmother yeah, once told me, Don't think any wooden nickels. And that means Be careful who you trust. I will share that never publicly. I've never do not take any wooden nickels. I would share that with you. I've never shared that with anybody. The reason why I say that is because there's a lot of people who are naive. There's a lot of people out there in the industry who will take take take from you because people are hungry. What is the reason why you think people are so selfish and take take taking in the industry? Are they getting lost in their dream? Are they just? They were that way their whole life and this is just one way to manifest it. I think it's I think it's a money issue to think it's a money issue. I think people are caught up. I think I'll say it. We're Americans have caught up with money, fast paced. Go,...

...go, go, go, go Different countries, They're not like that. I will say Now I have traveled. I can only say speak for myself. I've traveled to Australia, I've been to Australia and I have been to Canada. I don't feel at least for that I could speak for, at least for the Ozzie's that there's so money driven. They like to play. Have fun. Yeah, I've been Canada enough. I've been on the eastern side of Can. I haven't been on the western side of Canada and I haven't been to Europe yet. That's something that I would love. Thio, you know, explore and I haven't been to really haven't really been to Mexico or South America. But we as a country, that's what we dio we just take. Do you? Sorry. You go ahead. No, no, go ahead. Do you speak to your your students about their character in this career? Do you coach them in in integrity and honesty? Do you do that or you kind of just lead by example? Or do you just leave that off the table? And just specifically to the job at hand, I for me, they could just look at me and tell I don't really have to teach it. They know people. I've had coaches say to me as well that I speak. I speak my truth. I speak from the heart. So they actors No, that they have to come from that place in order for that character to pop and to get, you know, to get that audition. That's pretty much what they're auditioning for. As these students come to you and thinking of education where you went for mass communications, Are you encouraging students to get more education or is it more experience? What is the maybe proper balance of people that you see coming to you? Or is it a variety of things. I really encourage people to get education from a perspective of. They need to take more acting classes, and they need to take really the most important. It's improv. That's the most important thing. How did they get that experience? Is it improv classes? Is improv classes? Uh, you know, I direct them to a new actor who I know, but they need to be. I think everyone is just so in one box and they don't know how to get think outside of it. Oh, they don't get to it. Thank you. Talking to me. They don't get to a quicker. They have one skill. They have a small skill set, not enough tools in the tool, but not enough to box. And right. And I just started class just literally taught a class about funny or to box so and they were working on part two. So yeah, and I think that's what it is I think they're so hungry about. They wanna be that character, that it's just that just the brain is just on the overload. It's like it's like thank you. It's like being on a, uh, what's the score going around around or can't get a hamster going around and around in a circle, right? You know, stuck on that. They lose focus of what's important, the education in that by getting more experience with some improv classes or some even voiceover voice over work or, you know, work out groups or, you know, you know, seeing lessons. I don't know why singing came to me to to put put your vocal placements you know, with your diaphragm. Um, so it's that is comedy a part of that? This getting people to get up on stage and maybe however dry or not, their their comedic ability is to get up there. And because it's more, it's a very revealing, um, vulnerable position to put yourself on stage and try toe entertain people. Is that something that not only helpful, you would encourage? So, yes, comedy is a major thing that they're looking for in the West Coast. When it comes to the animation, that's like the number one priority they wanna hear. How funny you are is money. Yeah, funny animated shows that are out there, so they have to be, What a hard gig. Make me laugh. Well, I mean, you know, you have to treat your audition as a mini performance, you know? You know, Listen, when I worked at the agency and I was having that day that mood day, the actors would come in and they go. That's what I would say to them. You need to make me laugh, and I'm and I'm tough, you know? I will say, you know, you gotta be doing something really off the wall to really make me, you know, laugh at you. You know, I'm a tough critic and already knows it, but, you know, that's what we do. That's their...

...job. They have to be able to do to do that. Everett, In what you do, do you have ah, goal on overarching plan, A mission for your company and what you're doing in your work? Oh, I do. But why should I? I'm not gonna share that. The reason why the reason why I'm not going to share it is because, um, yeah, you're not supposed to let everybody know your plan. I'm not everyone. Oh, I know. Yeah, I could see it with everybody's gonna watch this. You have a small plan that you can share for the idea. The purposes of this, too is, is not Thio. Get your secrets in your goals. Is Thio to show the importance to listeners that goals air helpful and important and help you set a pace for your journey with work? I dio e dio and I don't want thio attempted, attempted e don't wanna share too much, but I am rebranding. I'll leave it as that. Rebranding is something I'm expanding is so for me. I just do it. I don't really set it just It's like a feeling of, You know, it's time to move to the next level, and that's just happens for me. I'm very in tune with myself and my body, and I just It's a thing off. I know it's like something, something else. Speaking of being in tune with yourself, ever it. Is there something about you that people don't quite understand or the work that you're doing that if you let them know this, that they'll have a better appreciation of you? Are Uran open book and everyone knows I'm kind of intuitive? E just didn't shy away from that, but that's just a gift. I have my friend my really good friend. It's no laughing because he's in my ear right now. He calls me a ghost whisper. So when I sometimes say the word, thank you, that means I'm hearing people talk to me. Well, it's good to because then people can trust you because you're in that position for all of these students, these actors that come to you and your intuitive and that you have their best interests at heart and that you have this experience to back it up and that you want them to succeed. Yeah. I mean, they they could feel me and they could tell. I mean, I might do some things that are some antics or, you know, but it's just it's just guides. I'll use those words. It's just Guide's telling me what they need to hear. I'm clairvoyant. I don't know what to say. E was born this way. It wasn't something that I practice. Um, I just kind of sort of just know I can't really explain it, and then I use it. I do use it. I just In fact, I just told a coach the other day I use it in my teaching, you know, people are pretty shocked and surprised that I know about, um, you know, their grandmothers or there. How do you How do you How do you know that? Oh, my friend told me, and I use for it. I have to go easy on it. And what that means is I don't want to frighten them, because I don't know what you are believes are. So I have to go a certain kind of way, Thio. And it's still funny because I was in Seattle and, uh, it was it was I had 15 students. It was first time I was there, and literally everyone was talking to me the whole entire day. As I was teaching the students. I could. It was an experience that had never hit me before. In that full capacity as each person went to read as I was directing them, I could literally here, people talking to me, telling me, tell them this Tell him that and people were validating. How the hell do you know this? Just go with it. Just go with it. Yeah, in telling people what they need to know. Do you have I mean, the idea of adversity and people are going through through some difficult times now through their lives. And I think you will probably put a more positive, optimistic twist on adversity in one's life and not using it toe hold you back to set you back. But have you have experienced adversity to the point where you're able to use that in your work to give you drive, but also something to encourage other people with with the adversity that they face? Probably half? Um, I can't think of an example. I mean, I do a lot of career counseling. Yeah, so...

...when I'm talking to them, it just once they're comfortable. I just tell them whatever I need to tell them, you follow me. Um, it's a mixture of both what's happening in their career, what they should do and what they should pursue, because I I'll give an example. I think if this is a good example, yeah, just the only thing that's coming to me. Uh, So a girl walks into one of my classes and she was talking and I said, You need to kids. So she opened her mouth. You need to kids. And so you know, you could. You could just tell she was trying to do anything other than kids. She was on a hamster wheel going around, whatever that other thing is. So I forgot about her. Totally forgot about her. 56 years later, she ran into me. She I go into event and see her the corner of my eye dodging at me. But I don't remember her. So she says to me, um, you don't remember me? Blah, blah, blah. I'm like, No, but you look familiar. Oh, well, you told me that I was working with kids, blah, blah, blah. I said, Yeah. Now remember, because she started speaking and it just hit me. Oh, I'm at a big agency and I'm doing kids fast forward. Seven years later, we were on a conference. I was just talking about her. I didn't remember her name, but I remember what she looked like. Kind of sort of. She pops up on screen and I'm shying away because I'm like, Oh, just gonna be one of those. And she's just gonna just talk about me and I'm like, Well, just stop talking me. She's like, No, no, no, no. Every way we're in the same class. You know, you taught me and told me about kids. I was like, Oh, your hair style was different. Oh, yeah, I know you are, but I didn't put the correlation of putting her name the other. But the point is, is that I said something to her years ago, and it just came to fruition thinking of however, in whatever people face, do you give them specific advice? If they're going through a difficult time, Like, what do you say? You know? Yeah. Is E probably. Yeah, it's just a natural gift that have. So I do that, uh, and it comes out specifically for the occasion is specifically for that product at that moment. Uh huh. I did that the other day with just somebody. I gave them seven Christmas gifts. Eso yeah, it was just at the pen pending. And it was just like the set up, just having, you know, a cup of coffee. And it was just natural. So it's a natural thing for me, you know, to natural. Tell them tell what happens Because I hear things and I also see stuff and I go, You're not right for animation. Just No, you have to do it very gently, Brian. It's a very gently thing because people have heard feelings. Yeah, you were sensitive. Why do you say that now? You don't hear me doing a cartoon. Really? But things can change in two years. If you do this. Dismiss mhm. Uh huh. So, yeah. Do you direct people off the path completely, or do you give them or advice? Toe, Try these out toe. Hope to get into it on the hopes of building the skills. Or will you Will you be blunt enough to say it's really not for you? You might just pack your bags. Well, im let's see. How should I put this? I'm blunt and a much more smile kind of way because, like I said before, you have to really go easy because these air people's dreams Yeah, absolutely. But they do need a reality check. So I am not one to stay. I would say right now this is not I don't hear you doing this. Would you be great for video games? Mhm. You know, you know, animation is just not your thing. Mhm. You know, So have ah variety Thio work with too. So you can direct them down many other...

...paths. Which Oh, absolutely, absolutely. You know, I have told actors, um e learning, um, audiobooks. These characters and things, characters all, you know, trying to think the other one. I can't think of another one right now. It's a big industry. Is high demand. There's lots of there's lots of choice. There's lots of options for people to get into with, with their voice and acting e mean it za relative. I mean, people have been doing it. Don lafontaine has been doing it, you know? He was doing it for years. He's like, you know, the beginning. So this industry has really just grown to what it is now. Um, I never thought I would be in it. I'm still learning growing, you know, I don't know everything. Um, but I think if you're persistent enough, if it's just an animation, there is some sort of other voiceover work that you can dio, you know? So it's just a matter of fighting with your niches. Homing in that niche, I'm propelling to the you know, the level that you can be, you know, But you have to have you have to be fun. You've got to make this fun. If this is not fun, don't do it. I'll do it. You're not having fun. Go to something else. You know, if you see a lot of people get stressed at all. Excuse me. Oh, my health insurance. Yeah, I gotta bring my health insurance. I got a book. A job? Oh, my God. You know you're gonna book. You want me to tell you? You know what I tell you when you book, you book when you just you're sick as a dog. That's when you book, because you don't care. You know, one of my former clients, she she had a baby. She's booking Mawr that she had a baby than ever. She was like, Tal I just go in and just read it, and I do my thing, and I'm changing my baby's diaper and I book. You know, that's when you book, you know, or you have the opportunity to you know, at least me. No, you're casting director, and they just, you know, remember you, you know. But, you know, it's like rolling the dice auditions and didn't really It's like, really going to Vegas and just rolling dice. You don't know, you know, But you gotta be You gotta, you know, be pieces. And if this is something that you know when you're passionate and it comes from a place off the heart you know, you know, the more you play, the more chance you have to win E. I know dough. I just throw them their Everett. How can people reach you and with your new company and you're going to rebrand and all of that? But how can they connect with you? They could use your name in the subject matter. So I know where they're coming from. E o at voice acting director dot com All one word. So the letter e my first e o at voice acting director dot com Perfect. They could probably find you on LinkedIn if they want as well. And there's lots of videos and interviews about you all over the place, and they confined you on the credits of many of the animation features that air coming out every day. I have. They don't say features, say TV shows, TV shows different genres like he's not on any feature I'm learning ever. I have one final question for you, sir. Mhm. And that is why do you work? I love what I dio it has. Really? Being an entrepreneur has really made me as to who I am. I'm still growing. It kind of had that. I kind of had that epiphany when I traveled to Georgia. And the reason I say that is because I have a cousin that reminds me. You know you're an entrepreneur, right? Oh, I'm just I'm just doing it, you know, going to see, you know, family. Numerous. Um, I have supportive friends who remind me and say to me, Do you doing it? Just keep going. I've even actually have colleagues of mine. Who? I probably have shocked them like, Wow, I've come this far and then ISMM or that I have to do so That's why that's why do it. That's why I work. You know, it's fun. I'm having a great time on doing what I'm supposed to dio Everett. Oliver. I, uh Oliver. I see you are a giver. I can see that. And you are a lover of what you dio and you have a great passion. And I am sure your students appreciate that from you as the voice over acting director, coach, consultant and soon to be rebranded. Man, you want to know that we owe ever Everett Oliver, I...

...thank you for your time. And I appreciate you in the work that you dio. Thank you. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe, Follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive be a joyful day in your work.

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