WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 42 · 1 year ago

#42 Ester Lee - Homecare Registered Nurse - BrianVee Whywework

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ester Lee is a homecare registered nurse. She takes us through her journey with work, along with the twists and turns along the way.

...welcome to why we work with your host, Brian VI ous. He speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which would be an encouragement to us all to get up. Get going on. Keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now, here's your host to why we work. Brian Way. I'm Brian V, and this is why we were today. I had the great pleasure of speaking with Esther Lee. Esther Lee is a nurse down in the United. So what I want to do is track through her work journey, but also find out how 2020 has been for her. Join me in this conversation with Esther Lee. I'm Brian V. And this is why we work today. I have the great pleasure speaking with Esther Lee. Good evening, young lady. Good evening, Brian. Thank you for having me. Thank you as well. Thank you for coming. I was you and I were just saying I e think we're family, but don't know if there's there's a proper word for it. Maybe someone could let me know if there is. You're my my dear wife's sisters. Yes, my dear wife's sister's husband's sister. So, er, you're my in law. So, yeah, you're my Maybe we'll just go with, like, sister in law. That might work that might that might work. Thank you for coming on. Um, I did a little introduction about you just a moment ago. And would you do me the honor of just introducing yourself and telling us a little bit about yourself, and then we'll start from there? Yes. My name is Esther Lee. I'm a registered nurse here in, um, a Gordo, Mexico, in the United States. I'm 42 years old and I've been a nurse for and about 12 years now. I've lived in the United States since, um, mainly in United States for since 1986. Even though my dad was an air force, we travel a lot around a lot during my youth. Um, let's see, um, being a nurse is not my first career. My I worked in the nursing home as a dietary aid, which is in the, um, in the dining hall of the at the local nursing home. Well, and that to me. It's start while I was getting my education as a nurse. Very good. Esther, before we get into, Like what other things you did or even the dietary aid. What was what was your first job? So you're talking about in 1986 you would have come to the United States because your father not come to the United States. Your father's American, but you were. So there's around 10 years old. If my math is correct, um, what was your first job or something that it got you out of the house to do? For whatever reasons, Um, I was also, uh, bagger at the local commissary on the airport space. How old were you then? Think about my twenties. My 20 years old, maybe 18. Was that Was that your first job? Your first paying job? Yes. My first paying job. Why? Why did you decide to do that? Why did you get out of the house toe to get a job? My parents were very, um, King on. Give me some work experience, and, um, they really and they just because I didn't really have any education. So that was and I at that time I had access to the Air Force base. AM My mom was also Bagger at the commissary. And so through her, she was able to get in a good work with me with Bagger and it What? My point of view. They looked like they were done a neat thing, you know, packing bags and the carrying it out. And I thought it would be a good idea to start my work experience gets some extra money instead of allowing us from home. And Dad, So, um, did you did you really...

...think that you did not want the allowance anymore? Did you say E. I'm a worker now. No more allowance. I don't want that. Or was that just part of the deal? Depends, that team would get now. Okay, Other things. So I kind of in a way, I was trying to avoid doing that, and for some reason, it just felt better to work outside the home instead of, uh, maybe some people are not as appreciated for the work they do in the home. In the in, the wage tends to be below the average. And there's no to the funny thing I'd like to talk about a bagger, right? Because I've had experience with American, um, commissaries and stuff through your brother through people we've befriended here in in Korea, and that's new to me. I'm from Canada, and maybe I'm just from a small town that does it. There are baggers or e think there's probably another name for them, but it's not like a separate job, necessarily, like they could be going in stocking like a stock boy or stock girl or stock person. And then if you know a cashier is busy, then they call someone to help. Or if someone needs assistance. I was. It's interesting because I have a view which maybe you can shed some light on with banking because I think we were in Texas and your brother took us to a commentary and we went and bought to some little things, and I'm like, there's a bunch of ladies sitting down there. They're not hanging out. There might have been a couple of gentlemen, too, and they're just hanging out and then someone like, you know, do you want me to beg your stuff? All right? No, like like like I think you know, we had a thing of juice or something, Whatever they were buying, Um, I know we're good. And then I think maybe your brother something Maybe my My sister in law, Your sister in law, um, said, you know, No, they do that. They're working. But if they work by the tips So what is its foreign to me being Canadian, where the job would be, they get their regular pay, and then they do whatever is needed around the store. But these people are just there waiting to do this. Sort of begging. What is your coming out of, You know, 2030 years later? Well, 20 something years 22. What? What is your view? That the Bagger being growing? I obviously growing up in that. Maybe it does that happen through other department stores in the United States as well. Is it just comment, Terry? Um uh, military unique to the military experience. What do you think of that? What do you think? I think it's good for people who do it, but I don't know if I if I fully understand it, or, um I find I wouldn't recommend it as fine, but But, you know, I think what was it the there was? Who was the guy on the Cosby Show that was filmed? You know, what was his Alvin? Alvin was filmed like, out of just, you know, randomly at just a few, Like, a couple of years ago. Whatever it was now, um, bagging groceries. What would he have been doing? The same thing, Or was he just working for is it like a stock? But I think he was working in a retail, but I don't mean it depends on the policy of the store. Yeah. What do you think about that? Especially having worked in it. You said your mom did it and being relatively close to the military, having your brother and having been and your father working in the military. What do you think about that? Besides, being as a career might be a tough gig, but as a job, I think it's I think it's a really good job mean, uh, from my Spitz's point of view, I mean, it's sometimes you got low days. Sometimes you got high days. Sometimes you got ordinary customers. Sometimes you've got customers who are just totally nice. It's it's one of the it's just an inmate. I mean, no, I, uh it's hard to really explain. It's just either love it or you hate it. What was the need? What was the I mean, maybe it...

...goes back decades? I'm not sure. But what was the need? Was that the need Thio get the people who were because they tend to be older people? I didn't see that many younger people, but you were 18. So obviously you break that mold or that idea of mine, is it? These people are needing a job or you're saying it's more commissary. So is it like for veterans who may need help? What, who's who's what was what initiated that particular job, especially since it's not like other department stores or, you know, grocers. Um, probably one of things is we're not on a payroll or the payroll, so there is no tax liability, Abbas and um for, I guess, for whatever reason, they could not spare personnel Thio bad gross room and last year's depending on the order to cash, your would be overwhelmed that they ended up doing it. Just buy them themselves. Yeah, yeah, it's It's interesting. I have I have a little a uncomfortable with it. Like, you know, you feel bad if you say no because, you know, there's people sitting around looking for work, but I'm like, I just need to put my juice in the bag. E think I'm okay. Right? But then you like, I feel like a little guilty like, Well, maybe I should. And then I should just give them money for doing something I could have done. Um, but I know that they're needing the money, right? I need the product, but I don't know if I always, but I see if there was veterans. If it's in the military veterans coming through and I've seen just the limited amount of times I was there, people in wheelchairs or walkers and those sorts of things, you know, for them Thio get their cart to the cashier, and then there, after all those other processes, I see it as helpful for people. But I'm like, No, I'm like what I really think like your brother was were buying juice or something. Like really like, No, I think we got it. I'm pretty sure, but maybe they're just, you know, asking anyone because anyone I guess they're kinder than I am, but I'm just I was wondering, but that's great. So you did that job into 18. And this is obviously you're Are you in high school at this point? College? In college at 18. So backing up. So your first job you were in college, so all the way through, you didn't have thio work, So I know that you took a bachelor of nursing. What got you on that path then? When did that? First, the idea of you getting into nursing start early on it. I was. I juggled mentally juggled what career I would have. And when did you start juggling? Uh um, like, what turns you on to this or that? And then at what? Around what age? To be honest, I had a major car accident in 1998 when I was 20 years old and e broke. I had a single car roll over and on the highway, and I broke my C one, c two and C five and I was hospitalized for a while, and, um, I being a nurse was one of I was, um I wanted to be a nurse, but I wouldn't really want want to be a nurse until the accident, because I was hospitalized for at least three months for my bones to Hill. And I was just so amazed about the kindness and the work effort that it nurses around me were at. It's I love. I mean, you can put a list of them, but any of these, like first responders type things my whole life, like people say, Oh, I hate the dentist. Okay, I understand you don't want to get your teeth drilled, but they're there to help you. Oh, I hate the please. I understand if there's some issues going on, but they're there to help you. Oh, I hate the fire department. I understand. Maybe somehow you could hate the fire department, but they're there to help you. Oh, I don't like the doctors because all the I understand, but they're there to help you nurses as well. It's the same category for me and my whole life, whether small or a little bit more. Major nurses have always been so kind and gracious and helpful. And all of these...

...professions, they make me want to do them like this is why this podcast exists because I meet people that do their job so well that I admire them say, Oh, you know, if I had your talent, I would want to do it. So you're saying you were juggling? What were you juggling between What thoughts before computer going to college Computer puter program in high school in high school. So in high school, you're thinking I might want to be a computer programmer or something in the hospital, but you weren't sure about astronaut or are some of the sciences. And then, uh, my mom was a major. I would say it would be a major influence on my career decision because yeah, she wanted me, too. God bless her. She wanted me to meet her husband and I don't know, it would be a doctor or a physician assistant or something, but she thought it would be a good, um, roll Thio be surrounded by eligible men who had. You gotta love moms, right? You gotta love moms. My dear wife's like, you know, Okay, if we could just get you in this position, it's not like I mean, there's a lot of jobs where we could give examples which were the opposite but like, Okay, let's put you in the hospital because that's where you're going to meet a doctor. She You know, you know, as you said, like, bless her, she she had a good hope for you, right? And you're you're in the right spot. So So you were dealing one with computers or science, and so you're dealing with stuff versus dealing with people. So you had that dichotomy of choice, and then you got into So you obviously applied for the bachelor of nursing, so But that must have been in high school. So what tilted you over the scale? Even before your accident, I briefly volunteered again because of my mom. I briefly volunteered. And the pediatric unit at the at at the out. Our patient of the P Jet pediatric outpatient of the hospital of the military hospital. Okay. Okay, so that kind of tilted the scales for you, He said as it were. Okay, So was that relatively when you took your bachelor of nursing? Was that relatively close to home, or did you venture off out on your Actually, I got my associates degree first, because that was at the time was being offered and it just more affordable and more tightly. Uh, time, Uh, I was able Thio be able to commute and be able still work at the local university for two years. And then I got my are and to be a sin degree, which is about a year and a half through does sound Light, which worked at the local university. But it was the main hub was at the Las Cruces, which was about our away from Okay, So where is that in the timeline of you getting an accident? What year did you start? Your degree or even the associates? Technically, I started in 2005. How old were you? That if you don't mind me, I guess if anyone's good with 27 ish, Okay, so 27. Okay, so we have to go way back in. What were you doing at the time of your accident? Bagging groceries. How long did you do that for? A few months. And then my accident. And then I just Once I recuperate it and got out, got, um uh was back home about 99. I started. I'm working, getting my pre wrecked what we call prerequisites to get into the nursing program, which was from 1999 2, um, 2005. And then in 2001 I was working as a dietary aid at the nursing home. So you were you deterred? Were you discouraged because I did not know that you had an accident and you broke your neck? It's were you from How was that...

...healing process? Because, I mean, we have an incident here in our in our family where someone got in a car accident. So, you know, my dear wife is a little scared to drive now, thinking, Oh, we're going to be next. Or how was that process for you and e mean, that's you didn't just cut your finger right? You broke your neck and you were hospitalized for several months and also broke two bones in my hand. So you did her Japan. And so how? What I mean And then you got a degree. Eso How How is it? Was that road a bumpy road? Were you able to stay focused? Did that fine tune your your focus ability? How did that I was able to stay focused mean I had during the first year of recovery. I was a little afraid of driving a car. Not because, um, okay, getting accident, but mostly because I was just so recovering how to use my neck. But mainly I was I think I was recovering pretty well. And just still, you know, revving up. Could wrapping happen the idea of, you know, getting my my nursing degree and just being getting in career? That's one. So, how long were you dietary? Uh, eight criteria. What aid? Yes. Um, you are six years. How is that job? So what is it you're doing for my listeners? Of what? What does the dietary aid do? I mean, I can kind of guess what the words say, but what is What was your job for? 16. It was is a comprehensive job of working in the dining room, which, uh, not it wasn't very, very large dining room. But I I'll be is Yeah, probably. It's small. I just want you know how describing feet. But it was small enough for me. Thio deliver drinks, uh, drink heart and, um, had that. Excuse me? I had the responsibility. Uh oh. I'm sorry. Mm. We all cough. I was and the responsibility of, um, delivering drinks. Uh huh. To the residents tables, E also had responsibility of maintaining the Clinton has and, uh, dining room, including the tables, the floors, and yes, sir. Do you wanna Do you wanna grab a drink? Um, yeah. Just for a moment. I You're good. Thank you, E. I always keep one nearby. I tend to get frogs in my throat all the time. So you're helping in the cafeteria? Does that include patients, or is that visitors to a hospital? And that includes the rest. Just the residents of the nursing home. Okay. Okay. Uh, Henderson. Six years of doing that. How did you then switch into being a registered nurse? Was there? Did you come to the end of your proverbial rope? You know, um, I like. And 2005 I got my was accepted into nursing program, which, um, was part which had both, um, we call died, acted in practical, which is classroom and, um, really time learning how to be a nurse. And so they kind of groomed us into Don't test that we needed to do as a nurse. So, looking back now to being accepted into the program. Was that program difficult? Was that like for listeners? I've interviewed another nurse, but she was from Canada And just the process of becoming a nurse. Is that a daunting task? Or as long as you stay on top, you'll be fine. How did you find E? Especially after having a broken neck and facing adversity. But how did you find E? Found it. You know, it was it was a lot of work and a lot of writers because they set a high standard for the exams. And But I enjoyed learning...

...all the information and being learning the new skills, and I just And if it's for every test, I kept praying and kept moving forward, hoping that I would be ableto get that license and be able to use what? The knowledge that they have taught me. So from the time of being accepted into the program until receiving your license. How long was that period? About two years. So this brings you to around 77 2007? Yeah. So since then, you've been pretty steady in being a registered nurse. Nothing else has changed. Um, I in 2007 I got a job at a local hospital and on the med search what we call the med search in floor, which is, um, the in patients, um, for 12 hour shifts for 3 to 4 days. And I did not do well with that It right? I wonder. I was watching something just yesterday about doctors. What? And maybe it's a common. There's a common sense reason for what is the reason why doctors or nurses have to do like these very long shifts and then a day off what I mean firefighters. And it happens for a lot of maybe these first responders type positions. What's the reason for the long shift shortage here in the United States? It's both doctors and shortages, but okay, And then maybe my math is not good, and it isn't. But if if you're doing a 24 hour shift, as some people do, or along 12 whatever hours it is, but then they're giving you 24 hours off, isn't it just one and the same? Mm, no, but I really don't know. But then I thought, 01 good reason would be. Let's just say you were in the hospital as a nurse and you start your shift at seven. And you're there all day, then opposed to dividing the day and half. Then you know. Okay, I'm the nurse that comes in at, say, a regular seven. Whatever short hours or seven hours and then I'm on Lee, you need to update me on all that happened. Already opposed to keeping you there and having you run the day, right? So then you know all the happenings in the day. You know, Bob came in in the morning and sues there at lunch And what she has to get What procedures? Procedures she has to get done then. So it's, you know, your managing days rather than splitting them up and having to pass that information on to other nurses or doctors. That was my only thinking that maybe Oh, that's why they do it. But you're saying shortage primarily. Yes. And e would. The way you explained it would be ideal to have continued new ity of care like that. To be able to, um, be able to have enough information to pass to somebody instead of having like five different people. Five different nurse working with yeah, especially for the patient to right. If you're you see three and I was in the hospital this year with my mom and even the over the days, it was annoying. So how much more would it be if it was one particular day that someone comes in who does not know the person's case? And then they're asking these same questions, right? So if it's Monday and then Tuesday, another nurse comes in and asks the same questions. They don't really know you. There's no relationship being, and some of that is, as you mentioned in your experience of breaking your neck. Is that Is that the experience? Your accident? I don't know. Experience of breaking your neck? Um, you found solace. You found comfort in the way that nurses treated you. And that is harder to develop if you know in one day three different nurses come to see and read your file and see what's going on. Uh, it's a little bit better over the day, but what's even best if it's the same nurse, which is near impossible because that means you have to work 24 hours a day, seven days a week. So what was it for you That got you off of? Was it just primarily the shift, That 12 hour shift? What was your initial problem from the first job that you received after becoming a registered nurse? It was I worked, was working the night shift. And, um, I had...

...difficulty trying to contact the doctors or the on call doctors about my patients and trying to get what? What time is what time? Sorry, What time is night shift start and end 787 p. M. To 7 a.m. uh, and also had difficulty with Corning with the pharmacy and hospital pharmacy about medications. And it just in trying to find, um, the right equipment like I be poles. And but, I mean, what you're saying is then it's a common problem for everyone that works. That type of shift, you're hitting a wall like I need to call Dr Do Little or whatever, and he's not answering or she's not answering. Uh, I need to call Mr Pharmacist Mrs Pharmacist, and they're not answering. So everyone has that because it's late hours and they're not working or they're busy or something like that. How is that? Um how would that be a problem for you? If that is the commonality, So Okay, I can't get in touch with him. So what? I can't get the pharmacist. So what? The patient A B or C? You just have to wait because I can't do anything. How How did that become? Ah, frustration. If it was a frustration, or how did that become a block? It was I don't have that really good people skills, so I can't have a good I didn't really have a good report with my charge nurses and the other person that I worked with trying to communicate my frustrations in my using kind of brainstorm with them. It was it just we didn't click that well enough. Remain to be able to. Okay, what ideas do you have? Not the situation s O. That was one. The barriers were you able Thio. And that's I think that shows humility toe to realize that you weren't just able to deal in that situation. Were you able to see in your co workers or the head nurse something that they had that they were able to cope in that situation Timeframe that either you long toe have or at least respected them because they were able to do it. Were you able to see that in them? Were you? What? What was it that they were able to do in that? Especially that timeframe where it's hard to be a nurse because you're held back. What? What what characteristics did they have that you noticed? I mean, it could be just Ah, was it in French and blase, or you just don't care. Like it doesn't matter. Esther, just relax, okay? You know, it could have been just a nonchalant attitude. Did you recognize something that they were able to dio? No, not really. Just it just didn't. Can't. You can't. It just seemed to be magically able to handle it it. But, I mean, it's good that you recognize that. Yeah. So how did that? How did that determine where you went or what you did next? What did you? Well, when I left the hospital, I did try to contact, like, other facilities. Um, such as the public health office doctor's offices. Uh, and I seem to hit a wall with finding a job, and Okay, how is that? How is that transition? So you were disliking your job. And how many years did you say you work there? At the hospital? Yeah. Eight months. Not not years. Eight months. So when did you start becoming frustrated? Day watch Day one. Did you say what I mean? What do you mean, frustrated? Frustrated with not being able to deal with that that time of day shift in all of that. When When did that become? When did you realize that it wasn't for you? Eight months, maybe 5.5 months into it. 5.5 months. So at 5.5 months, how are you feeling about your direction? Was it? I need to get out of here and or I need to get out of here. And this is what I'm going to do, you know? So you're dealing with 2.5 more months before you actually got out of there. What was What were you thinking? What were you planning? So thinking of this podcast of why we work if someone's you're not happy with your position? It wasn't necessarily I don't think you weren't happy with nursing. It was just you were finding this...

...wasn't for you. So what was what was going through your mind? How are you going to get out of this? How did you get out of it? How did you go through that process? Because then even you said you were coming across some difficulty later on. So did you plan it out? Well, Or in hindsight, did you not do it as well as you should have? Mm, I So, after 5.5 months, you realize Oh, this is not for me. So what did you dio? Well, it doesn't necessarily not for me. It was like, Well, this is getting very difficult. Eso I wasn't a very heavy case of denial, so I was like, Okay, I will continue to carry on and maybe out magically get whatever they got the other players. Yeah. Yeah, and it just And it was just too. I was hit just at at the end of eight months. I was hitting just too much of a brick wall, and I just So that's 2.5 months of saying it's getting harder and harder, right? It wasn't what they couldn't find magic. And there was no spells you could use so it was harder and harder. But in your mind were you thinking I want to go to a different hospital, hospital or different shift? Or or was it just You got to the eight months you like. I'm done. Was there a plan? Um, well, it's not more plans more, but being confronted by my supervisors. Okay. Okay, so it just came to an end like this is not gonna work. They weren't happy with the results. Differ getting with me. And we'll you weren't happy. Therefore, you know the results. If you bring that to sports. If if the quarterback is not happy with his team, it's going to show in his performance right or any sort of job. It's understandable. So when you were confronted at the end of eight months, so I mean, even for listeners, if you're finding, like maybe what would you say to someone just now? Just in that time frame? When you're finding in the 5.5 month period, this doesn't seem right. And the 5.5 period plus one day No, it still doesn't feel right. Plus two days. No, it's getting worse plus three days because you had 2.5 months of it getting getting getting getting worse. In hindsight, how would you have? Maybe done that differently? So you didn't come to that wall at the eighth month, or would you have done it differently? I I don't I don't know how I would really would. Would you say, maybe just looking for a different job, like just looking Internet? Well, I was seeing other, you know, I was hoping also back in my mind. Okay. Just if I could just get one whole year of experience at the hospital, that would look good on my resume. Okay? Yeah. So that's what I was really trying to shoot for, but Okay, that's admirable. I mean, that's a good thing. You want to throw that on the resume. Yeah, and I just thought Okay, maybe if it doesn't work, I can give They need nurses. So maybe somewhere I didn't really have a concrete plan b going on in my head until Yeah, So you were grinning and bearing it right? You're like, I'll see if I can get through it for just the year. I would suggest if if people come across situations like that is, you know, just just look off to the side, like, Okay, maybe I could do something there. At least you know where you want to go in that year, right? There's nothing wrong with trying to throw in that year and getting one full year. It's better. Maybe, obviously not because you still have a job and you're still e mean. In hindsight, just these little bumps if we can, uh, smooth them out a little bit, is just to look around and see, especially because you are new to nursing. Mean you had the dietary aid experience, but this is a little bit different beast of figuring out these different jobs, these different scheduling, um, the hierarchy within the hospital. And, you know, just talking to some people, even some of the co workers. And maybe, you know, just getting as much information as you can while you're going through that difficulty, so that when you either are confronted with it's time to go or you...

...do reach that one year mark, you have a plan, or at least you thought it through. Not just if I could just get through this, because obviously you didn't right, s. So it's a plan. Just get through it. But also for this is just about work, right? Just having it doesn't hurt to look at a different hospital, right? It doesn't hurt to look at a different job. I mean, for some people, it's looking at a different career, right? Different further education. Well, if you got this far, maybe if you just did this one more thing, and then this would get you to the place where your would be really successful. So at eight months, how long was it before you found another position? After you finish that Well, uh, about, um, maybe five months later, I ended up working, um, at at a call center. Told the E was trying to get some income. I work at the call center at a flower national flower company. That for seasonal? What was the what? What was that? Were you a t end of your eight months Where you still wanting to being a nursing, or were you not 100%? You're like, I want to be a nurse. I just need to find a job. Yeah, I was Yeah. I was still wanted me being a nurse, were you? Were you applying? Yes, I was applying to What were you coming up against? What was the difficult? Because you mentioned before the reason why, uh, shifts air so long is because of shortage. And everyone knows there's a shortage of nurses. I mean, not everyone knows, but the idea is theirs. Nursing is a good position to get into because they always need more nurses, and it's ah, high demand job. So, what were you getting interviews? Was your resume not seeing I don't even know. How does it? How do you go find a nursing job when you're a registered nurse? What is the process? Uh, just, um it should be any, like any other job you're posting online. Um, looking into classified your, um, trying Thio just go to whatever medical facility, doctors, office, nursing a long term, uh, nursing home. So were you actively doing this? I mean, I'm always under the impression that if you do not have a job, your full time job should be finding a job, right? Like full time. Not through a resume on the Internet. Or, you know, I called someone today. No, it's your you don't have a job. Your full time job is finding a job. So were you in the five month period of not having a job and then getting a call center job? Were you diligently seeking or were you limiting yourself either one by not making it your full time job to find a job or two defining what you wanted so narrowly that it restricted you on your ability to get a job? Like, were you willing to go to another city or state Or how, what was restricting you the most? Or there's just no jobs at that time. Just basically, my I think my shyness kind of restricted me because I just Sorry, you what Restricted my shyness, My being reserved as a reserved person kind of person. I What is the word that you're using? Minus shy? S h Y oh of being a being a shy person made it hard for you to be actively engaged in more aggressive and finding a job. I mean, you broke your neck like, Come on, you walk in the office and say, Listen, I broke my neck. Give me a job and I'm good, right? Like you gotta You gotta work with what you got. You don't need to be shy. You did well in school and you could hold your own. And you don't need to be shy. Listen, I need a job, right? You don't need to be shy. You got to get a job. You gotta pay the bills. My mama wanted me in the hospital. I needed to meet that doctor soon. Your ticket on my talk here, talking on my teeth. So you were not active. You're not. You don't need to be aggressive, but you're...

...just not as as as fourth. Um, coming with being act. Did you feel discouraged? No, I didn't. I didn't like that fact. I didn't get my full year. I thought I didn't feel worthy enough. Yeah, you didn't feel worthy or you're angry, e. I didn't feel worthy because I just I'm that kind of person who e cannot have a front. I was hyper person goes Well, maybe maybe you're not. Did you feel maybe this isn't for me? I'm not good enough. Well, I thought it was e was going toe learn. I was had toe. I was going to be a sponge and learn and I'm a good team player. It just I'm just wanted it. Just getting that first step, you know, right? Getting my foot in the door. I have a e. I have a hard time getting myself to put that foot in the door. Did you? So when you in the five month period, did you have just by passing your resume in or going to things Did you have some opportunities for interviews or even the resume wasn't working. I had one interview, and there was it was a clinic and the cloth crucis, and they liked me. But they told me because I did not learn no Spanish well enough as a second language. I cannot work there because apparently they have only client. They have some clients to are no English. Very well, so Yes. Okay. Okay. So eventually. Then you said you needed the money. You needed some work. So you went to a call center? How did you get that job? Um, I applied because they had, um they were They had, like, radio promotes about coming to do this. And you weren't shy about that because you were desperate at this 0.5 months on. Like, I need some money. Give me the money. Now do anything. Anything. E go back to bag. And so how how long did you do that? And what I mean, call center jobs or difficult, I think. I mean, you're what product were you selling something where you was on the team for the flowers? Flower flowers? That was I mean, that that might be a little bit easier to sell. No, I don't know. Flowers or nice opposed toe insurance or something. The neat thing is that they called me and then I don't call e. Just take orders. Okay. That's good, then. So you don't That allows you to be shy, or I mean, you know. Okay, I'm here to help you. I mean, that seems like maybe a little bit in line with your character. How long did you work at the cost of, uh, in the house? Month and a half. So in that month and a half, where you're still looking for a nursing job. Okay, so why a month and a half? Um, seasonal work. And it was it was a season, my job. And, um, they told me, OK. And at the end of that month in house. They the order. We're not coming in as much. And I wasn't laid off, but I wasn't invited to go further. Yeah, so it was a mutual after that divide. After after not working as in the call center. How long before you got your next job? Three weeks doing. I'm what I'm doing right now is a registered nurse and home care. What? Well, how did you find eso then? That three week period. Was that the time in which you found this job? Or was that something you were looking into during your month and a half? Or is it something you you, through your resume and a while before, um, it was about it's about. Yeah, about three weeks. And then I saw an ad in the newspaper for nurses, which I did happen seen before. And so I said, Okay, Mom couldn't hurt toe do it. So I applied and got interviewed and was hired within two weeks. Mhm. So in. So this is the job you've been doing. So how long have you been in this? Now this particular thing?...

...12 years. And have you received a promotion or is your job in the same? Like before you were dietary aid, and then you went into registered nurse. But now you're registered Nurse. Is this where you've been for 12 years? Doing the same particular job? Yes. So, as a registered nurse where you are now for a good chunk of years. 12 years? What? What? What does your day look like? And how is it different than your other? Your previous job, Where you didn't like the night shift. And how does how did the two compare? I'm work. I'm working in airships Were five days a week. Um, am starting from nine. Aunt. Um, 5 a.m. is depending on what's going on with my patients. You said sorry. You said nine am until five PM ish, depending on my patients. Uh, and you're you're comfortable in that time frame. One. Yeah. What is what is your typical day look like as a registered nurse in New Mexico? Um, well, I'm working with a special needs clients who, um, need total care. Uh, they need their medications. They need thio be changed. They needed, um, Do you need to be helped to go to the doctor's office. Uh, and it, um it's basically working on one on one that was a patient and uhh at the end There home. I'm just doing for them what they can't do for themselves. So you're going to people's homes. So you're traveling a lot? Not Not, really. Just it's to clients, mainly. Okay, so I'm not really doing any traveling to and they're right here in town. So over the 12 year period, you receive for many various reasons, different clients. But you keep a base, actually have the same to clients, or you've been working with same to clients for 12 years. I mean, you develop a relationship there, don't you? Yes. Is it too? Is the maximum or the minimum the maximum? So each registered nurse in this particular industry? No, just for thes kind of clients. Um, there's that there's, um, other types of work in the home care for nurses where, uh, doubt might. And it depends on the Austin insurance, because insurance dicks take Dick dictates how many hours my client can have, and with the chance that my two clients have, they allowed 20 hours each a week for nursing. But other alliances like V A clients and some elderly and some people who have just got out of the hospital with, um, after surgery or what? Whatever they ended up in the hospital for, they might have lesser hours. So do you divide your day? Do you divide your day between the two clients, or do you rotate days with each one? No. I defined my days. Divide that each day between two clients. Okay, so you have a little variety in your day. What is for the 12 years of this particular position? What is most difficult about what you do? I mean, you're going to someone's home for 12 years, right? Many marriages don't last that long, But you're with these people for, ah, long period of time. You you're not only just giving them medicine, your knowing them, your knowing the little things that they like, they don't like what annoys them. What annoys you like? There's a riel bond being developed. I mean, it could be a good one. Could be a bad one. What is most difficult about what you do and looking at a 12 year period? I mean, it's giving you some good insight about your position. Mm.

Um, I think most difficult would be talking with this medical supply companies and the farm back to the same problem. Yeah, the same problem you have before. Yeah, but the doctor, maybe that's it. Go ahead. Yeah. Can you say that again? The doctor said that there with the whole spar, I think I think the WiFi is cracking up That you were saying. The doctor. I'm guessing the doctors arm or available for home care. Yes, they're well, they're not more available, but they seem more. You can work better with him. I guess it was B. They're more approachable. I guess it would be better terms more accessible. Uh, s so it's funny that the pharmaceutical companies are hard to deal with regardless of the time of day. Right? Getting getting what it is you need. So it's You were insightful when you first got your job there. There's a difficulty there and you couldn't do it. And even 12 years in, it's the same difficulty minus the doctors. Because maybe it's just the time thing. The doctors I don't bother me after six o'clock or something. So that's that's interesting of a difficulty you have. But that doesn't bring a difficulty in with the patient that just process that you need, which helps the patient. Is there a difficulty in in the job that you do with the patient? Like I don't want to go over lines? Um, a patient, client privilege or anything, But is there difficulty in trying help? I mean, you're by yourself, um, some some difficulties in the performance of your job. I met a nurse when again when I was in Canada, with my mom and one of the nurses that day, or get hurt her back because there there was a male nurse. And he usually helps lift and clean or something like that. That process and she couldn't do it or she had to do it without the help. So she pulled out her back and I asked another nurse who was telling me about this, and she said, That's that's one of the hardest things is getting patients up that air not normally mobile and this is dealing with patients are a little bit different situations. Um, but the physicality of your job for you, about the job inside the home with you one on one with a patient for listeners getting into nursing because it seems like many jobs have the problem problems of just if I could get the suppliers and these external people because they're not here, those tend to be common problems, regardless of the industry. But on a one on one with the patient, What is something difficult that you come across especially with the same people for 12 years? Uh huh. Uh, maybe you love you love your job, and there's no difficulty is just just those pharmacists, external people. Really? Well, that's good. So it shows that you like your job. Then what is what is something that brings you the most satisfaction in your job? Uh, just knowing that when I leave at 5 p.m. That they're doing up that they're still there. That I know that seems probably couldn't seem like weird to say that, but they're still there. They're still alive. They're okay. They're stable. And I'm just happy to be able Thio. They got what they need for the most part. That I could get them, thio them in for them and it just knowing that dirt, I just like that. They're okay. and I can leave from, uh, no and go to my home and not have a clear conscience about that, not worry about, okay. Did I forget anything that I don't have any of that kind of worries? That doesn't sound weird. It all that sounds like you care. E mean, it would be different if you like. Okay. Five o'clock. Gotta go. I gotta get out of here. And I don't care anymore. But, you know, you're caring. That doesn't sound. Maybe it this day and age. I don't know. It sounds weird that you...

...care. Maybe. I don't know, but I know that certainly doesn't somewhere. Esther, what is something about your job that you would like people to understand and you're 12 years in. So you're in my view of veteran, right? You're you know, the ins and outs mawr particular of these clients. Um, but what would you like people to know about your job and what you do as a registered nurse? Uh, in home care? Maybe they don't understand or appreciate. It's really hard to say. I can't really think of anything. It's well, I I spoke speaking to someone yesterday and there, uh, in the military, and they just they brought up some things and some other roles that she has is that Cem perceptions. So, you know, perceptions. I'm making this up, but just off the top of my head, maybe from a doctor's position. Well, nurses, they just complain, You know, they're they're not doing as much as they say from a nurse's perspective, you know, or other people who arm or empathetic of nurses like nurses air overworked and underpaid like a teacher, Um, and then by you shedding light on your actual job and your duties that could give some balance there and understanding what it is. So understanding someone else's perspective of what they might think of you, Um, and your insight gives people a clear picture of what? What you actually dio. So in that, are you able to think maybe some people think I even really off top my head? Okay, your home care nurse, you're not really a nurse. You're not in a hospital, right? Did you ever think of that that someone might think those things about your position? You're not dealing with cuts and bloods and gunshots and you know that stuff that's not. You're You're just giving people medicine and watching TV all day beside the um, no, I never really thought that I'm making this stuff, E. I mean, if you think about it there, people can twist things whatever way you want, but you have the stage to say, um, no, my my job, I do some work. Mhm. Um Mm hmm. Uh, seeing my client helping them. And each day's uni it's your also not taking care of the Klay, but also psychologically. Where Oh, um, you're taking care of them physically and not just psychologically. And you're no, you can't walk out. Uh, just one second. So having people understand about your job, it is a difficult job. You do do work, and it's a job that's appreciated by the pure clients and and in the hospital industry in general, Can you think outside of your job and give me a tip or a top tip for people getting in tow work. So if you're thinking okay, Well, when I was 18 I I wanted to stop getting my allowance and get out to make my own money. It was good for me. It wasn't good for me. um, I was shy about being more active in getting my job. You know, it worked out now, but if I would have done something differently, this is what what I would have done. Do you have a tip for people getting into job? Or even I think you have a really good story where you were dissatisfied with your job and you recognized it,...

...and you made a change one way or another another. You know, you came to the end one way or another, and then you went through some period of time. But it kept you on that path. You didn't. You seemingly were not deterred by being a nurse, even though you stopped being a nurse for a period. But then you got back on it. And now you've been doing it for 12 years. Do you have a tip for my listeners? Of what is the best way for them to get in tow work or what is best for them to put their best foot forward? Hmm? Just a tip. Assess. Uh, would you be able to look into yourself and assess what you want to dio and what you, um what skills and what abilities you have. Because, um, you know, there are jobs for both introverts and extroverts people, Um, assess, um, the needs of your area of where you're living at. And sometimes you might have to actually think about moving outside appointment live to find the job that you want. And, um, if and don't be afraid to get that first work experience, work experience gets, sometimes it may be able to be the right foot in the door to be able to get used the first step. Maybe you meet somebody like a coworker or boss. It could be a mentor to be able to help you, um, Thio for you to aspire, to get where you need to go, and you may not be able to get where you want to be, um, right at the get go. But, um, just have a plan. No, no, your own limits and no, um, and just have a Plan B and Plan C and a Plan D. But, um, it the job for you, it's out there. It's just you have to look for it, and hopefully it will look for you. And at the same time, that's really good. advice, sister. How do you besides work? How do you find a Some people call it a work life balance. What do you do outside of your work? So that it doesn't seem like all you're doing is working. Where do you find some balance? And what are some things that you do? Maybe to rest well, with the cope it it's a little bit difficult, all right. I used to be up, go to the movies on a regular basis, go to the local theaters and see plays mhm. And, um um, sometimes I just play a little video game if I'm not feeling the mood to be around people, and, um and I sometimes raid Mm. You mentioned you mentioned cove it and being in in home care. How has cove it affected your job. So 12 years, and this is how would you rank 2020 in the other 11 years of your work? Or even if you want to say to the other work you've been doing? But within the 12 years of being a registered nurse, especially with these same people, how has 2020 been different? Or is it basically the same for you? and what you do, whatever. Maybe some challenges. It's been basically about the same for me, but I know that, um, some of the insurance companies have pulled back on home visits for the patients. And right now I can't get my own patients to their doctor to see the doctors in person. And so I had to help. You would think home insurance would be covering home visits more since people well, they're kind of scared. People are told to be home right? Well, they're scared of having the virus spread to those, especially on the most vulnerable population.

But then it is like a Catch 22 right? If if the people who are, say the most vulnerable or who need home care are not getting care, then they're in trouble for a different bunch of reason. Mhm. It's just a kind of a really sad thing toe See, that happened for those patients? Are you able to talk with or visit other hospitals and see how they're dealing with it? Or is that completely separate and not part of, um, maybe your responsibility or anything on your radar of how difficult it is for registered nurses in hospitals. And you might even be thankful that you're no longer, uh, in a hospital that has thio change a lot of the ways things were done. Um, no, I don't have process Thio. Anybody in the hospital? What? Being a nurse, a registered nurse, and going through some of the difficulties, whether it's a broken neck or a loss of a job being, you know, mutually let go from the call center. What is something that you wish you knew starting out that you would like to tell someone about? Now, that may be in a similar situation. I mean, there's so many people who in high school either never got a job. Uh, or as you were, you were in between a few different career paths. And some of those were big decisions for people toe get into college or into university. Picked this program, not pick this program or go travel. What is something, um, that you were able thio learn along the way that you wish you would have known previously? Mm Be. And just e understood news of Well, he of working in the hospital. Can you And I just wish I needed you. Yeah, I wishing you the nuances of working and, um, hospital, you know, just off of how Thio the interactions and relationships and where would you chalk that up? As as How would someone do that? So if you're talking about being a nurse, uh, and and understanding the nuances of the hospital in the relationships, how would someone gain that prior? You know, besides, the way you did it, how would How would you get that? I mean, watch er or I love those hospital TV shows and really ones, too. I like I love watching those, and you can see how people work. But how would someone get that really practical experience? I don't think can be gained without actually living through it in because in either there's some nurses who can be a part of the hospital experience for many years since and there are some who are like me, you just can't really cut it is just unless you, until you get your feet right in the water, is it's really hard to convey exactly how it is. So, yeah, I guess what you're saying is wishing you knew, or at least knowing that there's a lot that goes on in the hospital besides the actual job and be ready for that extra challenge, even even though you can't you can't go lift some weights and be trained for it. There's nothing that you can actually do to get it. Watch some TV shows, maybe talk to people like you, right? Talk to other nurses and, you know, get the inside scoop of you know how things you know, What is the relationship really between a doctor and a nurse or those in the administration or those outside, like the pharmaceutical reps and all of those sorts of things talking Thio. You even said that in your advice, right? Tip of just going out and finding, um, is much information as you can, being aware of that position and that goes for any job find, you know, you wonder why company's air on social media and they put so much money into...

...marketing because they're researching. They're researching, you know, the the audience that they want and for us to find a job, really, we should be doing the same thing. And if someone wants to be a nurse, you're not going to get all the information But the more you research, the more you'll find out and you'll be prepared. And so I think what you're saying is good to say, Be ready. Um, even though you can't experience it all talkto talk to as many people as you can and at least you'll be. You'll know that you're getting into a war. You're getting into a tough situation. And if you're willing to face that, knowing what you're up against, then you'll be OK. It's what would you say in your work? Um, what is one of the biggest mistakes that you've made? But you learn from it and that you can take something with you in your career. What is a mistake that you made that you learn from Mm. I mean, you could even think going to that first job right where you found this wasn't for me. And that could go back to the advice that you're saying is Find out more information, right. And I learned the more information I have. What is What is Ah, miss, Take that. You made that you learned from Mm hmm. I can't Really No, there's nothing. I mean, it takes we're learning always from our mistakes, right? We learned because I mean, you could be one of the very few people in the world has never made a mistake. Um, but there's and there's also the thing if not want to reveal mistakes, because then might show something. But the idea of knowing that are missed aches. And your You said this a moment ago about a person getting into nursing. You're going to learn as you get into it. You're going to learn mhm once you're on the job, once you get your feet wet, but you're also gonna make mistakes along the way. And then that's when the real learning comes because you're gonna learn Well, no, I tried this path, but that path didn't work for me. Esther, Is there anything else that you would you've given some very good advice on getting in tow? Work tips, but some encouragement for people. And I think you were I don't know what 18. If you were thinking like, wow, I'm at the pinnacle of my career bagging groceries or when you were in your twenties laying down with a broken neck for several months. You're like, Wow, this is this is the wonderful life. I don't know if you thought all in your fifth month or six months of your first nursing job. If you thought all this is a good as it gets or when you finish that job at eight months, you know all. I don't have a job. And I just went to university and I have to pay for this Or, you know, what's my mom going to think? Or Dad going to think? And then you get kind of and you're calling your call center career position and then you're without a job again. And then you finally get your job. All of the thoughts and emotions that you go through along all of that adversity. Is there anything that you have to offer to encourage people encourage my listeners of why we were in their work? Mhm. There's, I mean, there's as an adult. There's just more to life than, you know, sitting around at home and mooching off your parents. Yeah, I I like I don't like work work, you know, I don't You know, I don't I'm not one of those self obsessed workaholic to like to go work, but I don't like being said. Seven. Terry I right, like the idea of going someplace and getting something done? You know, even if it's just dragging a grocery, you know, all you're doing is just putting groceries in the bag, the doing something going out there. And it's not...

...just the money because you're not always going to get paid the big bucks. It's just it's something sort of stimulation people and satisfaction nature, giving a service to somebody even if it's even if you don't have really customers and you're working with, you know, your, uh, co workers. So I'm project or something. Just it's There's something so says, Actually, that's satisfactory about work that, um, it there It shouldn't be a reason for you to stay home and mooching off your parents or the government. It's it Z, and it's not that your worker bee that you have to be there. It's because you want to be there in it. It's giving you, but just making me protective enough and you can do what you want. Outside of that, um, time at work, you can have your extracurricular activities of playing games of chatting with your friends outside of the work I it's hard to contextualized that, um to somebody who has never really experienced that. Yeah, we we try thio when we're younger. We think we I thought I knew everything or everything that I needed to know. And then we can say these truths, but they're not always adhered to their not always listened Thio, you know, not mooching off your parents or the government Some. Yeah. Yeah, I'm going to do it for a long as I want. But those things, um, if let go, they instill some bad habits along the way that eso having some wise wisdom from yourself to say, You know, it's not the right path and there is a job for you, and you can stay productive. You could do something. That's a service to people, things you can enjoy. That's great advice, Esther. The If people want to reach you, do you have a way that people could, um, maybe about nursing or living in New Mexico or the latest movies or books? Um, no, I don't have anything like that. Just est early. Enim Yeah, a well dot com. Yeah, Email. You are good. Yeah, I think you You have a lot of insight. You have a good career going on for you. You face adversity, and you seem to do it without complaint. And I'm sure your clients, your patients, appreciate you. You've had a long standing relationship with them. As I said, 12 years is a long time. Esther. I have one more question for you. And that is why do you work? Well, the primary reason is Thio. Um, I worked for living to pay for the for the Bills, but I work because I just cannot. I see myself, you know, stay at home. And right now I'm my primary source of income, and I until something socially happens. That's different E stuff. But that broke off on the end part of what you said, he said. Until that happens differently. Air until something socially different happens. What was the I can't imagine not not working. Yeah, it's both of them. A lifestyle for me right now. And source of income. Well, Esther Lee, I appreciate the work that you do again. The your patients obviously would appreciate the work that you do. Registered nurses are...

...appreciated not only in America, but across the world. I thank you for your work. And you've been a great guest on why we work on all the best to you. Thank you. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe, Follow and share with others. So they to be encouraged in their work. E hope that you have yourself a productive yet joyful day in your work. Mhm.

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