WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 52 · 2 years ago

#52 Ernest White II - Founder & CEO Presidio Pictures - BrianVee Whywework

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ernest White II is the founder and CEO of Presidio Pictures. He is also a great storyteller, explorer, executive producer, editor, actor, voice over artist, and host of "Fly Brother with Ernest White II". Today he brings us through his life with work, from home teachers to being a teacher to others, Ernest White II gives us a clear glimpse of how to treat one another and how to enjoy your own path and direction in life without regrets.  

Contact Info  

Ernest’s Profile linkedin.com/in/ernestwhite2  

Websites 

ernestwhite2.com (Personal Website) 

flybrother.net (Company Website)  

Email 

eewhite2@gmail.com  

Twitter 

ernestwhiteii  

About  

"Ernest White II is a storyteller, explorer, executive producer and host of television travel docu-series "FLY BROTHER with Ernest White II," currently airing in the United States on Public Television Stations and Create TV nationwide. He is also founder and CEO of Presidio Pictures, a new film, television, and digital media studio centering BIPOC, LGBTQ+, and senior/elder narratives. Ernest’s writing includes fiction, literary essay, and travel narrative, having been featured in Time Out London, USA Today, Getaway, Ebony, The Manifest-Station, Sinking City, Lakeview Journal, Matador Network, National Geographic Traveler’s Brazil and Bradt’s Tajikistan guidebooks, and at TravelChannel.com. 

He is also senior editor at Panorama: The Journal of Intelligent Travel, former assistant editor at Time Out São Paulo, and founding editor of digital men’s magazine Abernathy. Appearing on the Travel Channel television series Destination Showdown and Jamaica: Bared, as well as in the 2013 documentary film about the dangers of mass tourism, Gringo Trails, Ernest also works as an actor and voice over artist for radio, film and television, audiobooks, and educational materials, and speaks to youth and adult audiences about the incomparable magic of travel. 

He holds an undergraduate degree in political science from Florida A&M University, an MFA in creative writing from the American University in Washington, and is currently earning his Certificate in the Business and Management of Entertainment from the University of California, Los Angeles. A Florida native, Ernest’s obsessions include South Africa, São Paulo, and Rita Hayworth." (LinkedIn, 2020)

...welcome to why we work with your host, Brian VI ous. He speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice, which would be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going on, keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here's your host to why wait? I'm Brian B, and this is why we work today. I have the great pleasure of speaking with Ernest White. The second he is the founder and CEO of Prosciutto Pictures. Not only that, though, he is a storyteller, explorer, producer, editor, actor, and he is the host of a hit, Siri's called Fly Brother with Ernest White the second he is a travel explorer, and he documents his Siri's as he goes around the world trying different cultures. I want to find out, obviously, what are some of the best places he's been to his timeline that has brought him to this point but also boil down. What are some necessities for people to do, whether it's traveling abroad or just within a few kilometers of their own home? What he deemed as necessary to get rest from your work. Join me today with Ernest White the second I'm Brian V. And this is why we work, as I just mentioned, I have the great pleasure of speaking with Ernest White The second. Good evening, young man. Thank you very much, Brian. I always appreciate being called a young man. You are a scholar and obviously haven't known me that too long. But I try to figure I think I'm gonna go up to people, or I'm gonna find a book of, like, the best greetings. But I like, you know, a woman, young lady, or, you know, young man and people. Yes. Ha ha ha ha. And like, you have to be careful nowadays that you're being politically correct. I don't wanna like Well, what do you mean? Well, I don't mean your old, but I just mean we're all young at heart or we should be. We should aim for that. At least. Exactly. Ernest, I do. And you can explain it. It does rubbed the wrong way. Yeah, yeah. Oh, I am able to explain it. Sure, you could just say, you know Hey, we're young at heart, right? Exactly. If someone gets offended by it, because But I've I've said it most like, Well, a lot of ladies. I could see them like they're like, Oh, yes, yes, I like that. It does work for most of the population. Male, female, everything. It rubs me. I mean, you and I might be around the same age when I get the the odds, sir, I think it's it's starting to become more common. And I don't know if I enjoy that. I'm Southern. So on one hand, I was, you know, accustomed to the honorifics. But I'm, uh you know, I don't know if I see myself is a certain Although I did a challenge not too long ago and I had to record myself, and I turned. I had video, and I had a big streak of gray hair all the way around, like Oh, okay. Maybe maybe I fit it. They're being kind to me. Well, you know, I wouldn't know. No, you wouldn't know. Listen well, I'll shave to like, either way, whatever works. Ernest, I thank you for taking the time. Thio be with me today. Could you give us? I give a brief introduction before we started and just a little short thing. And I'd like to take this down. Memory lane. Sure. So you know, I have a television travel docuseries out on public television in the United States as well as create TV all about friendship and connection around the world called Fly Brother with Ernest White the second and in every episode I visit friends who bring me into their communities. Show me what they love about the place and we show the audience that the whole world is our tribe. And the show got started because a buddy of mine from college, it was involved with a small startup cable network. And he said, Man, listen, you've had this blawg for many years, which was true at the time. It was called Fly Brother, and it was a block about international travel. From a multicultural perspective. Mia's ah, black American man traveling around the world wasn't something that you saw a lot of writing from, uh, back, you know,...

...10 or 12 years ago. And so he was like, Man, listen, you're a great storyteller. You've been a lot of places. You've got a good voice. We would love Thio, help develop a show with you And that's kind of how everything got started with the show. But my interest and travel goes back to my childhood when I first was just enamored of cultures, of languages, of maps and posters for for travel and and just anything that was related to different cultures and countries I was in love with early on E. I like how you lead into a Segway there that because I want to bring you back and I'd like to talk about traveling all that and even finding out maybe if you've been decree yet or not, because that's where I am. But what was what you have been right? What was your very first job? Your very first job, even not even travel related like I'm getting into. I had a guy the other day he had a puppet show and he charged his friends 10 cents a show or something, or let me and like those types of because this is why we work. And so I'd like to get into the you know, the hard stuff about what you sure? So my first job, I was 13 years old. I was basically assisting the janitorial staff at my church. I'm Southern were all raised in the church, some house of worship, no matter what kind of heathens and hellions we end up becoming. But back in the day, that was my way of earning money. Because my parents I wouldn't say they didn't believe in allowance. But you had to work hard for those $3 on. I just felt like you know what? I would rather work hard for $3 an hour. And so my job was up at the church. What were you doing? Were one of my first jobs was helping assisting a barber. So all I did was sweep swept Herald. Speaking of hair like just sweeping air and endless What were you doing? And how did you decide to do it? Besides the motivation of not working for $3 a week, did you? Well, at 13 years old, there were, You know, there weren't really many options for employment. Even in the early nineties, I ended up world that the janitor of the church is called the Sexton. Okay. And so they would They were also not just janitor. They were maintenance. They did. They dealt with the physical plant of the facility, and I went to a relatively largest church, so there was a lot to clean, but we clean the bathrooms. I had to clean dust off the baseboards and the educational building. You know, it was it was mostly cleaning, which was safe for young people to do. It wasn't like they sent me up to change the light bulbs on the chandeliers or anything. I think probably speaks to your character if if you can, unless you turn totally against the idea of cleaning toilets. But I had a few jobs cleaning as we was a resident manager, janitor, janitor, Um, and if you're willing to clean a toilet, you're willing to do just about anything. And not a lot of sure not a lot of people are. No, you're absolutely right. And it doesn't mean I enjoy cleaning toilets, and it doesn't mean that I wouldn't rather pay someone who's much better at it than I am to do so. But it also in addition to I guess, showing that I am willing to do whatever it takes. It also I respect people who clean toilets. You know, because job that's very necessary and is can be hard work. And so just you know, no one is unimportant to an organization to our society. And in that way, I do appreciate I hadn't really thought about it until just now, because it's probably the first time I've talked about this job in multiple e love that idea of you get the full perspective. I mean, if you're willing, Thio and I maybe you lost the idea of it for a little while because you haven't had to do it. But the idea that you can walk, you know, you can you can travel around the world and go. And if you see someone doing one of those hard, gritty jobs, right? I mean, it's like this show dirty jobs or something like that. Yes, man. I wouldn't want todo based on you know what, but I appreciate you for doing that particular job. Absolute mopping. Have you ever watched a lot? Hey, read from Canada you got we got the salt, the ice, the slush, the mock, the the and it never ends. And you have that nice person, lord. And then someone comes walking like good day sir just ruins it all, man. And this water is heavy. It doesn't matter if the water is liquid or semi solid snow farm...

...or whatever it that is a job. And it only took me one time trying to my apartment floor in Miami, which has entitled to just think I never want to do this again Crowding cleaning that. Yeah, but those air good character builders. And that's what I like about trying to show. And the show is, you know, no job is beneath someone, and it's good to show where people have come from, right, you know, gob wise to start, and then where people are and the non linear path along the way. Because look, I think I don't know about you but me growing up or you look at people who might be successful. You think you know, they've always been that way, but not always. And a lot of had to go through some rough patches and some, you know, humbling times to realize that it takes all kinds to make the world, um, absolutely go around. But also, the work that we have to do is really important, and there's nothing that should be beneath us. And when you start to have that attitude, then you will wanna work with that person, right? More difficult thing. Is there any other highlights of jobs? I like that right from the beginning of working as an assistant of things along the way that even up until high school, that just kind of helped shape your character in your work ethic. Sure, sure, I my first bona fide job. And by that I mean as a 16 year old able to be, I believe, actually, I was 15 was at McDonald's. I couldn't work that. Actually, I was 15 at the time because I remember at 15 you could work the register and the fry machine, but you couldn't work the grill. You had to be 16 the work in the back. And, you know, I was a 15 year old, basically honing my communication skills both at the counter as well as on the drive through. So, you know, through a headpiece. And after that, I I also maybe for about six weeks, worked at the fudge Place at the mall where you had to like make fudge, and that was quite backbreaking labor But besides that, uh, just, you know, working at call centers with fully grown adults When I was maybe 17 16 in high school, um, working at Burlington Coat Factory, also with fully grown adults that sometimes I would gettinto arguments with. And it's just really interesting when I look back and think about my work experiences as a child, you know? And good work experiences, right? Pretty solid ones. They were solid. I don't know if I stayed there for very long, but I could get a job. Is you mentioned like the difficulty of, you know, having to earn the allowance? Was, Was your parent who? Where was the push? Where was the motivation coming from to work that some people that I've talked to and no, you know, one people don't get a job when they're younger, but to maybe a summer job, maybe a hit or miss here and there. But regardless of how long you kept these jobs, you had some several, you know, you had several pretty good, solid jobs. What was the motivation? I would like to think it was just the sense of independence that I got. It wasn't that I made so much money that I was independent for my family. And it certainly wasn't that my my folks were in any way. They just They were just old school, you know, they weren't anti spending money on me or my brothers, but it was just, you know, if you were going to get allowance, we're going to work for it. And you certainly we were not. My parents were teachers, so they also didn't believe in paying us for grades that we should have been getting in the first place. Right on day new, every other teacher in the school system, both. So, you know, I was I was, you know, I was a little bit of a nerd, so it was okay. I didn't I didn't run afoul of their values in the classroom, but still, you know, my folks I would say just the surface catalyst would have been that they just didn't wanna pay, but under, But underneath they were surely teaching you valuable lesson. Oh, absolutely. And but, you know, the funny thing is sad. Thing is, a lot of people don't have that. And that's why I like to highlight. This is well or even people that you know, you've heard it. Sometimes you're told things many times, but you don't hear it until you hear from someone else and they say it. And then it's like, Oh, it's the first time I've ever heard that working is a good thing And I should work out of even middle school or high school. And then hopefully some people do that or their parents. And they said, Yeah, maybe I should teach my kids that rather than giving them every single thing they want, Sure, you know that...

...like, that's a big thing. Maybe even nowadays And you know what, man? I I sense a little bit of spoiled brat fitness in myself even today. So it's funny because I can't even I would have been intolerable had I not had these jobs. You're right. You're right. Like, how bad would we be if we didn't have parents who are tough, right? Like, you know, if you let them run amok, then where will they go? And if you're a little tough on them and they still want those things that But no, I totally agree. My mom and things. You know my folks, my mother is 82 years old, My dad 73 I'm 40. I'll be 43 at the end of this month, October and it's just amazing to kind of have grown up with parents. You know, people who raised my mom were born in, like, the 18 nineties, early 19 hundreds, you know. So she had very old school values that were about community awareness and engagement, and then they're sociable people. I don't mean to say that they were like old in their way, you know, they're very useful. They are useful and vibrant and vital. Um, at the same time, they didn't play the fiddle. They didn't play Parcheesi. They didn't. Whatever you thought they were gonna play with your little shenanigans and trying to run, you know, around the end, end, run and all that. They didn't have it. And I love them for that. It's hard to be the recipient of it, I'm sure. But the value of it long term has proven to be beneficial. Ah, 100%. And I love him for it. So in this in high school, where you starting to figure out in carve out? I know you mentioned as a kid. You start to love travel but into schooling. Were you thinking of what you want to do with your career? I actually for most of my education, wanted to be an architect. You know, I love architecture. To this day, I would just draw buildings. You know, I didn't know how they were going to stand up. That's math. But the design department, the creation, you know, Sim City was one of my favorite games in life. I loved micro machines and scale models and any kind of on I remember one time my dad, like we worked on a bridge I made out of plywood, went to 84 lumber and made a suspension bridge out of plywood and some string. You know, that white yarn string that usedto come on, these schools and anything, and I would be enamored of buildings in different places, you know? So I would say on that foundation of maps and on that foundation of culture and countries and that kind of thing, just add a dimension, you know, go up from there with buildings. That was something that was very interesting to me. And I wanted to be an architect up until, um, probably no. Ninth grade when I almost flunked algebra. E Think I'm going to I don't know. I didn't even know English or political science or something like that urban design I was thinking about. Um Yeah, You became an English professor, did you Not? I did become an English professor. So how did how did that kind of you ventured into there? And then I know more of your professional career now. Kind of took off. I mean, with obviously you mentioned logging and stuff. So how did you get to that point? Well, so you know, as I mentioned, both of my parents were teachers, my uncles and aunts for teachers, deans. Education was my family business, man. It was like, You know how plumbers usually keep it in the family education and teaching and administrating and all that. We kind of kept it in the family. And, you know, in a way that was amazing. Because my folks again, and my aunts and uncles and family members, what would they have? Amazing intellectual conversations about what was going on in the world. And there were books everywhere. And, you know, it was I really feel blessed to have had access to all of that knowledge. And so for me, um, teaching was something you could always do. It was something that was available. I know. You know, my folks had been in the system for many, many years, So when I was graduating in college, they were like, Hey, if you want to come home, we can, you know, we will make sure that there's, ah spot for you at such and such, you know, middle school or high school. And I was like, That's not for me because I'll end up Chuck being one of those little runts And, uh, but I ended up getting my M f A master of fine arts and creative writing. Back Man was a terminal degree like 2005 at American University, and I really was drawn to live and work overseas For a...

...while. I was considering the Foreign Service. I had taken the written exam and passed it, but decided not to take the aural because I just really didn't agree with that. The administration at the time. And so I was like, You know what? I'm going to not do that, but I can see possibly teaching abroad. While I was waiting for my big book break earnest to that point to that point, have you or did you travel at all outside of, say, the states, or like, did you have? Ah, Did you get a taste for travel? Was there sketched or little trip? Did you do some trips when In your teenage years? Well, so my first trip abroad ever was to the Bahamas. Which for Floridians, you know, that's like going to another county. Um ah. Florida and I was maybe 14. But when I was 16 I went to Sweden as a foreign exchange student. I stayed with the family and the summer between my junior and senior years of high school, and I was way in the far north of Sweden, the town called Ronel, which was like 30 minutes outside of Lulu. That was the most famous person from there being Maude Adams. That's telling my age and, you know, and she had left a long time before, but the that experience to be in Sweden 1994. And you know, that was when the World Cup was happening in the U. S. Um, it was just a phenomenal experience, a life forming experience for me, and I just couldn't not think about traveling after that, You know, on DSO I did it every time I had the opportunity as a study abroad, you know, programs or through a study abroad program. Through my university, I went to the Dominican Republic and can you see when I entered into my twenties Before you get into your twenties, can you speak about these study abroad programs? Just the idea of students. I mean, when I was younger at I was an idiot and I e mean I still am. But the idea of being so involved or well equipped in school and having the opportunity to study abroad, how did you get introduced to that? And then how did you eventually do it? In a couple of times, I feel like there was a movie. Um, I can't if looks could kill where they did a trip to Paris. You know, I'm the French teacher. Like where I I actually believe it was film and television. That really kind of opened my mind to the possibility of foreign exchange students and trips toe different countries when you're in high school, Andi. Then I remember when I was maybe in the ninth grade, the French teacher at my school high school had was hosting a student from Estonia. I went to a mostly black high school in Jacksonville, Florida When I say mostly black, I mean, we had, like, four white kids out of 3000 students. One of those four kids was from Estonia. Hey, was super cool. You tried out for the football team. He didn't make it. But, you know, he every everybody loved him and, you know, because he was engaging, he really you know, he held his own, uh, coming into an American school environment. And so for me, that was interesting. And I was like, You know, I asked my parents if we could host a foreign exchange student and they were like, No, but you can go. Yeah, e will never forget my dad skipping white, skipping a beat like No, you know, the bags, right? Like, and it wasn't a mean No, it was just okay. Just it was what it waas fact. And so that was And I remember walking through the mall in Jacksonville and seeing youth for understanding international exchange. They had a booth, uh, or a table at the mall. And they were They had both inbound and outbound. So you could host a student. Or you could go yourself on these programs and that Zweden dangerous for parents walking in the mall with their kids, and they're not listening. Uh, I got a plan for you next, Zach. I suppose that that's a one way. Yeah. And, uh, in college, my undergrad university had an exchange program with the university in the Dominican Republic. So I went there. I studied Spanish, lived with the family. It was amazing. And it was a full semester of credits that I got for the summer. Great experiences. Yeah. I think people need to do it. Yeah, I know. It's It's just something. You...

...know, When I was younger, I had some travel experience and within Canada, and then a couple times down in the States, I went to the Dominican for a few weeks. Um and then I think one of my biggest trips Well, I went to Turkey and Greece, but there were such wonderful experiences. And like I said, I'm an idiot. I forget most of it, but I knew it just opened your mind to something different than you used to, because a lot of people, if they're not traveling, they're really not traveling. They're staying within, you know, 9 to 5. Monday to Friday, the same thing. They see the same people, they think the same thoughts. But then once you you explore something different than you think, Hey, you know things. And as you said, you were in Korea than me coming to here. Like when I first came here, someone said, It's like the land of not quite right, but it's It's not true. It's just not quite what you're used. Thio, right? It's just used to Exactly. It's totally different the way you know You're not quite right. Yeah, that's and that's the idea, right? Not you, but yeah, exactly. Yeah. And so it just opens you up. And, you know, if you're stubborn like I am still stubborn, like you talked about being a stubborn child or, you know, a spoiled child. I'm still stubborn. I still want my own ways, but I can't have my own ways, especially if you're another culture. And it teaches you that you know other things can be done Well, despite what you think, Yes. So as you moved along and when did what was your first career out of university? That in college I worked as a political operative in Washington, D. C. For a little while after undergrad. And then that didn't last long because I ended up going to graduate school right afterwards, and I ended up after that. I got a teaching job in Colombia, South America, and I was teaching English and social sciences at a university in Barranquilla, Shakira's hometown, And after that I moved What will die. I lived there for a few years and then backed about in Kiev on the high school level, teaching English and social scientists. So a total of four years in Colombia. So all this time, this is when you had your blog's starting. I did start my block when I was living in Colombia, you know, back then it was early. It was 5 4006. People were wondering what's going on. You know that this was before Instagram and most visual social media was out, but it was still very text based, and so I started off sending these email dispatches, and then eventually I went toe the block because it was easier just to post a story. And eventually the Blawg kind of grew where I was not only doing my own journaling about what was happening in my personal life and professional life, but also posting useful tidbits and how to find a mistake. Fares and cheap airfares. How to go to a place for the first time. How to get into a traveling mood when you're not used to it. You know all of these things to really try and encourage and inspire people to do more international travel. And again, this was in a time that was before Instagram. It was before what we would call the big Middle Eastern. Three airlines allowed you to fly from the US to Tanzania for $700. You know the bag. Then in the early days, it was $3000 for that same trip. And so you just hadn't had yet the big movement of international travel that we had over the last five years or so. Ernest, I have a question that's just starting Thio to come up with the idea of traveling and documenting is for me. When I first went away, I started to kind of document or write something some Facebook posts and sending some things. I think one was the idea of trying to share this information, but also a sense of loneliness in wanting to be homos. Well, was there anything that with that with you as well, like, you really want to share what you're doing? But there's also a longing to be like maybe back home and settled. Did you have any of that? Like you turn yours into a career. But the idea of you're sharing some valuable information but also in a little ways, wanting to be wherever home was or what you felt that would have been in place for you to settle. Well, you know, I always envisioned that I'd be living abroad and I made that happen. And so in many ways, home was where I waas when I lived in Sao Paulo, Brazil. That was one of the first places that I felt, you know, I actually let me start again. What? The places that I always considered home called me there. So when I ended up living in Washington, D. C. And going to graduate school there. It was because I felt drawn to Washington, D.

C. It was a city that gave me enough, um, exuberance and exhilaration and, you know, similar to New York without being overwhelming, incredibly multicultural, you know, you had a very large black middle class living there, so I was able to kind of just, you know, it was pre Obama era. We're all just looking good on going out on the scene, and then I would go to different embassy events. I remember the French Embassy always had a technician barbecue every year, you know, or just just the museums. The cultural Life of Washington, D. C. Was phenomenal to me, and that's what drew me there. And then eventually I felt the call to move overseas and mostly to South America and because I wanted Thio, you know, live in Spanish. I wanted to really kind of explore that aspect of culture and life, and I lived in Colombia for a while, and I wouldn't say I felt that home feeling until I visited Brazil for the first time. And that Sao Paulo, this megacity, you know, it's of 20 million people, 20 million Brazilians. It was just like I could get lost their you know, it was a place that I felt that I belonged. And I felt that way for a long time. You know, I would say I tell people I used to be married to Sao Paulo, and it's one of those places that you know, even though we're divorced whenever we engage, I remember exactly why we got together, and I remember exactly why we split up part of it. It's interesting because I mean it's in. It's obvious to that you're going to find people who are happy to be in their hometown and never goes far as their mailbox, right. Other people that air called toe just follow where the wind goes and quite content in doing so. So it's very interesting. And that comes Thio cultures and all these different dynamics that allows us to appreciate one another for the different. Yes, yeah, no, absolutely. And I will say, I mean, I still always had my relationship with my family and my friends back home in the U. S. And and certainly in Jacksonville, my hometown, um and I state and enough contact with, you know, with my family, like they knew the ins and outs of my life and and we did see each other regularly, but there was no pressure for me to have to move back home, and I feel it. That's definitely it's been a blessing. You know, I've got siblings, my parents are in good health, and so a lot of that it's important to remember all of that. It's important to note that I have been given a set of circumstances that have allowed me to travel easily. Um, not that you can't travel with kids that kind of thing, but also to live abroad without the feeling that I was giving up something or missing out on something, you know, I had a question. I didn't know if I was gonna wait till later to ask. But the idea of travel and understanding what I just said and you and I think agreed to is some people are not willing toe just content staying at home. And there's other people who are not content unless they're in an airplane. Sure have you and your experience defined the idea of rest and travel because even the people who do not want to go to assess faras their mailbox probably enjoy watching TV or sitting back and having a beer. And and that is in some way, although completely looks completely different than the traveler is the way they rest. Have you been able to define you know what every Seoul probably needs and requires, despite how it looks? Have you come across or defined that? So that's a really good question, Brian, Um, I will say this. I don't feel like I've got into a place of understanding what is a universal kind of, um, state of rest. But I will say that universally, we all want to be seen. We all want to be empowered. We all want to be loved, and I feel like when we're feeling those things were at peace, Bond, that, to me is a kind of rest, you know, we're feeling it's particularly when we're feeling loved. You know, that's something that is essential for every being on the planet, you know, and certainly human beings. And when we're in that space, we feel safe, and then we can let our guard down. We can relax. We can not have to worry about, You know, whatever life is kicking up for us, you know? And it doesn't mean that we're that everything is smooth sailing or anything. You know, um it just means that...

...if you're internally okay with yourself, you know, probably a lot of people look at you and say, Oh, look, he travels around the world. Everything's perfect. Everything I had to eat. No, there is Ah, lot of there's a lot of assumptions, you know? It happens surely happens. So with this year and having this show, I mean, you're into acting as well. Has Covert put a twist on the things that you were doing pre 2020 or how has things changed? What? What does ah week look like for you nowadays? All right, I would say certainly were set up to film season two of the Siri's. But that ended up never, you know, happening because things got can't sold back in April. But, um, honestly, I've pivoted towards working mawr with the visual storytelling. I'm working on a film, television and digital media studio that is centering bipac l g B T Q plus and over 60 narratives. And right now, I'm located in Vancouver, British Columbia, which is a place that's up and running. There's production happening. And so my focus now is certainly getting back out when we can to film a second season of Fly Brother but also working on scripted projects and documentaries. And so that's kind of, uh, Cove. It has allowed me the opportunity to shift into storytelling in, um, or what I would consider to be impactful and also fulfilling way for me. You know, travel is great, and it's one major facet of my life, but it's certainly not the only one, and that that's why I'm excited to kind of, uh, engage the world from all aspects of myself. What is it that even though you I like the idea of pivoting because I think 2020 has caused a lot of people unless their job was unaffected? I mean they might be working mawr. They might be working a little less, But the idea of pivoting when you're faced with adversity, maybe you can speak to that about how vital and maybe some of that was, you know, growing up and being presented with the realities of life, knowing of different jobs you had to do and the money that you were trying to do and setting yourself up to be different and to be able to stand on your own. And then that allows you to it so easily while other people's, you know, other people are finding it difficult. Wondering what you know. What can I do? What? What is there out there for me to dio? Can you speak about the idea of pivoting and vital situations? Maybe not so vital. Well, you know, for me, I feel like the major issue wasn't it wasn't that they came from such a young age. It's that I actually have been on the producers journey the entrepreneurs journey for a few years now. And because of that, because of that uncertainty, because I wasn't getting ah paycheck regularly or anything like that. You know, I had toe make my own money based on the opportunities that were presenting themselves to me. And because of that, you know, when things happened and people's sense of security kind of evaporated, I'd already had practice at staying on the surfboard, if you will. You mentioned about, you know, money may not be so consistent or at times it wasn't what is difficult about what you do, especially now in changing your career in a way, just maybe force while putting something on the back burner, the fly brother in particular. What is difficult about what you do and you're producing it and you're acting and even in your writing and storytelling. Sure, it's an artistic career. You know, you have to find the money if to source the funds. You know, I wasn't working for anybody but myself. And so it's definitely like any other business. And when you're the head of that business, you have to figure out a way to make it lucrative to make it, you know, financially viable. And often when you're working on an artistic project, you know you don't have widgets to sell. You are working on intangibles. And so it's. There's a lot of moving parts there, a lot of things. There's a lot of investment on the front end when it comes to just the production and getting everything set up. And, uh, you know, that's those were, I guess, processes that I was still learning, you know, I was doing everything for the first time as a producer is an independent producer trying to figure out I was leveraging my contacts. Is a journalist in the industry to be able to film and Thio to create a story? That was that was the easy part. It was...

...the business side. It was managing budgets. It was putting together budgets. It was, you know, managing people who were working for me. I don't want to say employees, but in some way, you know, collaborators. You know, there were a lot of, um, things that required my full attention. And Soto have, let's say, a safety net off a job with a paycheck every two weeks or something like that. You know, that wasn't necessarily I didn't have that luxury. Um, however, I feel like because I didn't have that I developed a lot of skills that again allowed me to pivot when necessary, allowed me to figure things out to be more creative than I would have been if I had a large pot of money that I could just spend and sure, the stories that we were telling would have been beautiful, but they would have been bland and boring because we didn't have Thio, we wouldn't have had toe push. We wouldn't have had to figure it out. We wouldn't have had to be creative in making that, you know, dollar out of 15 cents. And so I It was not enjoyable many times, but I do not regret a single moment of it. It's interesting because I can think of your mom and dad who They weren't your piggy bank, right? They weren't your money bank to go to to get money. You had to go and work and earn it. And then now you're like I got You know, I might be able to turn to them for assistance, but I'm not going there. Helps. They've assisted, right? Right. But you also you also have a driving force behind you to say you got to do it right. There's a difference. They assisted because it felt right to them to assist. They were able to, and they saw the work I was putting into it. It wasn't They were. They were not just throwing good money. I've kept You weren't on the couch with control in your hand going. Mom, give me 10 bucks. Give me 100 bucks. That wasn't you know, And I remember at one point, my dad did say, You know, you can always come home meaning the money might stop. I'll always have Thio. Yeah, yeah. And so that's though that to me said that I had no excuse. That's what that said to me. Not that Oh, I could just go and relax and be lazy. Quote unquote. It was them saying, Listen, you've got a safety net. Yeah, fly. What's the worst that could happen? You come back home and that people like me risks to Yeah, exactly. And I was gonna say for people like me, I love my folks and I love home, but I don't wanna be living at home. I want my own stuff, you know? And so to say you can always come home is a wonderful blessing. And at the same time, you're like, I'm gonna make this work eso And they knew that and they appreciated that that they had instilled in need, You know, they wouldn't even say instilled in me. They stoked in me a drive in an ambition and they instilled in me respect, honor, integrity, responsibility, You know, awareness And all of those necessary things that balance out. Um, you know, uh, ambition. Yeah. I don't know if it's the right analogy, but it almost puts feathers on you, right? Like just the idea of these air, the protective things that I have growing up and you know, But I have the muscles. I have the internal things but those things that you know, integrity, respect and all those things that parents should instill in their parents and their Children. Not all kids get that. And then I'm thinking adversely of kids. That wouldn't have that. Then maybe they grew up in, uh, you know, in their own careers and less likely to take risks because they know there's no one under them toe to support them. It's just all them on their own. Or they go to the further extreme and take all the risks and think that there's no real repercussions for the we're living thinking. I can't get the idea after mopping a floor, and it looks so pristine. There's that sense of satisfaction. What is the satisfaction that you get now that just you know, it lightens your heart and the things, and especially in producing right, like you're creating, and this is all coming from you with, as you say, collaboration with others. But what brings you a sense of satisfaction now, in the work that you dio it would be hearing people say I saw your show. Thank you. It gave me a different point of view about something. It makes me want to travel to this particular place. Um, it showed a, uh you you you really...

...capture the essence of our hometown. You know, those types of comments, particularly more so that the people that people from the places that we visited that we engaged with feeling like I did a good job in representing the destination, the culture of the people because that to me, is very important. You know, that's part of what I got from my parents. The fact that if I'm gonna put my name on something needs to be the best thing that I can that I can make it, you know, it doesn't mean that that's the best thing in the world. But as long as I put ah wholehearted effort into it, that's exactly what I should be doing. If I'm putting my name on something and so for me It does warm my heart when people are like I saw the Mumbai episode. Oh, my God, man, it was thank you. You know, or or whatever. Tajikistan and Stockholm and Namibia and South Paulo All of the places that I really have come to love um, in the world, you know. And so and not just that, not just in the travel space. But if someone reads a short story that I've written were that were adapting a short story into, Ah, screenplay a seven episode Siri's fictional Siri's And I want people to watch that and be touched and moved and feel romance, you know, and feel in love with life, with music, with great food with another person, you know, that's what we're here for. That's what we're here to do is to be in love and my storytelling gift. You know, that's what I've been given to give to the world is the conduit for that at least in my life. And so that's what I aspire to do as a storyteller. Now, what would you like people to know about either you or your work that they may not understand? But if they understand. Or if they understood this one thing, it would maybe allow them to appreciate you or your work that you do just a little bit better, right? It's like the idea of it, teacher. And, you know, as a teacher, you know, a teacher might say, I wish that the parents would know this what I'm trying to accomplish here or the difficulties that I have and trying to, you know, prepare the material, deliver it and have them do some work at home so we could make the better students. Is there something that you would like people to understand about you? Either as the producer of the storyteller, actor or even the host of your show? Is there something that you like them to know so they can appreciate your work a little bit better? Yeah, I suppose that it's just it's never azizia. Zit may sing, you know, there are many, many moving parts, as I said earlier, and there's a lot of internal work that goes into doing this kind of work. You know, you really have thio work through your insecurities. You have to work through your feelings of inadequacy and abandonment, rejection all of those things you have toe work through in order to get to a place where you are not where you're unstoppable. You know where a no does not deter you, where you aren't feeling thrown off the path because often you're engaged in conversation where you're trying Thio, you know, secure investment or distribution or just get people Or, you know, get people in a line alignment with the vision that you've got and you know, it's it's not always as easy as just talking for five minutes. And all of a sudden everybody is like giving you their money and saying Yes, go forth and make films you know, tell stories that's that's just not how it works. And so you know, there's There are a lot of assumptions about people who are working in artistic fields and are successful on some level, you know. And by that I mean they're making money, doing something artistic. So yeah, try. Try not to assume that you know how you think that it's an easy So after a show or what while show you see, the 20th cut the 100th cut of what it took for you to film and produce something or the story that you wrote that took so much editing or revision. And you know all of these things that go into it. And I'm thinking of, you know, it's like watching sports or watching a movie and us sitting in our chairs or, ah, what a bum he struck out, like Really? Or the movie that took thousands of hours thio and were like it was all right, you know, and e the whole You know what? And yes,...

I am that critical too. So it's not that I don't get it. It's what we do, you know? We don't know. Gracious is it might be a There's the whole story and behind it. Well, how do you stay so productive then? How is it you're able, Thio? I know you, you know, upbringing and all of that. But you're you're branching off your You have some plates up in the air. How do you keep you know, you wake up? I got to do this. You gotta maybe how to try to sales pitch yesterday. You had a sales pitch yesterday, and it didn't go so well, but you gotta get up. You got to do it again. What keeps you going? What keeps you productive? Well, now it's easier to keep going than it had been because there were times when I was on the brink of just saying, Screw this. I'm, you know, going to be I'm gonna become a library in, um and but, you know, sometimes you can't walk away, you know, and for me, I've never been able to really walk away from it. There would always be some little ray of sunshine, some little light at the end of the tunnel. Even if it was just a pinprick of light at the end of the tunnel, it would be something that would allow me to go just a little bit farther, do one more thing towards where I wanted to be. And then there was just that internal motivation, that internal knowledge that this is what is right for me, even if on the outside it doesn't appear that way, Even if you know to other people, it seems like I can't get it together, you know, because you go through those phases, particularly when you are creating your own career. When you're creating your own universe, you know when you're being the architect of your own dream, it often looks like something else to people on the outside. And so that kind of that inner knowing man, that everything that I have ever wanted is on the way, you know? And that even means those air things that just were in me, You know, the desire to tell a story, the desire to travel, the desire to connect with people, the desire to see myself and others and to really know what love feels like. You know, all of those things were in me from the very beginning, and so they're natural destinations for me. And so I go towards those things and everything that I do, and I don't want to say the older I get. But the more that I lean into that, the more I know it's the right thing, if you will. Because the Mawr alignment happens where things come together. Those you know, the magnetism of whatever pieces of the puzzle are supposed to come next. So the puzzles 10,000 pieces, all the pieces are on the table. But I mean, sometimes it's damn hard to figure out which pieces go next to each other. But eventually you look to your right and there's a whole set of pieces that are right there that fit in. You know this section of what you're doing, everything. Those puzzles, that they're all the same color, a little pieces, you know, that's how you start out, right? It starts out that way. That's easy. But then eventually you start getting to things that are, you know, a little more difficult together. Well, I don't know some of those ones that are all the same color and the pieces look very much similar. Oh, no, I maybe I'm just bad at puzzles. Well, I've been doing a life perhaps years. I haven't done a Really. I was just gonna say it's been a minute since I've sat down at a puzzle. I Well, when I was visiting my mom this this year, she had passed away and we're in the hospital, and there was these ladies that would just pump out the puzzles and they were giving up on this one. That was It was, I don't know, like Hughes of black or something. I don't know if it was the sky or whatever it was but it was so hard. But the point being is life is tough and we get through these, you know, these entity. Okay, well, can I get this piece? And I'm gonna am I going to give up on this piece or, um, I gonna keep going, And as you're saying, just those fine glimmers of hope keeps us productive and keeps us going. Speaking of tools, what is a tool that you use now? I mean, in your traveling, you probably had a camera, microphone and an airplane that brought you and but also writing and stuff. But nowadays, what is a tool that you can't really live without? It's something that keeps you really efficient. Your work. Hmm. That's a good question. I mean, obviously, a laptop is always necessary. Um, but I some people even go as far to say you know, the tongue, their mind,...

...their heart like, Ah, thank you that Thank you for that. My heart man, My heart. I am ah, hopeful romantic in every way you can be I want peace and love in the world wou I don't care I will hit you in the face with a rainbow And I'm just all about like people getting along, you know, and from I can't help it. It's It's just I don't know. It's something that I do carry with me that I can't live without because it doesn't mean that I'm always, um, having wonderful experiences where people are, uh, just singing Kumbaya together like I've had toe rough times. Yeah, well, I've also had toe let some folks have it, you know, in my in my lifetime and with love. But you know, that tough love. But my point in all of that is just to say, even when things aren't right with between me and someone else, that it just doesn't feel right. And I need to get that clear, You know, um and so for me, I would say, And just my heart, it is efficient tool. No, it is. And and then the idea of being productive. Also the motivating factor. You know, whatever is motivating you keeps you going even when you know our heart fails us or it's just glimmering. Or there's a pitter patter of something going on. You don't want to get up, but you don't want to face a difficult days that we usually do face whatever, Ernest, thinking of my audience of work. What is there? Is there a tip top tip that you have for people getting into work or changing careers on how they might proceed In doing so, One of the most useful things for me was the rial ization that nothing is wrong, that we are experimenting in this life. We're just trying things out. And yes, there is responsibility. So I'm not saying that you could just, you know, act willy nilly and not expect consequences. You know, consequences exist, but my point is that there's like you're doing the best you can. So what? Give yourself that grace that you mentioned earlier. You know, we all need to extend that to ourselves first because or as we're trying to extend it to others as we extend it to ourselves to know that we're not screwing up, we're just we're doing the best that we can. And if a pivot is required, a pivot is required. If something else, you know an expansion is required, an expansion is required. You know, if you need to go back home and stay in your parents basement, then do it for a long as you need to do it until you get on your feet and do something else, you know, But none of it has Is in any way a statement on your value as a person, you know. And so I think people get caught up in that they get caught up in Oh, I'm not where I need to be socially or whatever else. And it means I'm a failure. No, you're not a failure. You brought that up the pivot. I think that's how you're able to strive as well is is being open for the difficulties that come being as a worker, being prepared, being. You know, sharpening your skill set is well, because it's not going to be such a straight path. Is there anything, um, thinking? I've heard it and I mentioned it earlier. Rest people will say work, life balance. But I also heard someone say Your work life choices, how you kind of iron them out so that your on the outside, as we spoke about a moment ago, is it could seem that everything you do, you're traveling your storyteller. You're an actor like Oh, that's so but one it's not like that. And how do you separate the work from, You know, how do you make those choices to stop working today? You know, at this time versus continuing and thinking about it and taking that rest. For me, it's It's also recognizing that I may not get toe have the schedule that is consistent every day of the week. So it's OK that I take the time in the middle of the day to go have lunch with someone that I love or that you know, I'm kicking back and watching, you know, an episode of a TV show that I've been putting off for two weeks anyway at 2 p.m. For a half hour while I eat something, you know, like it's it's okay. None of it is wrong. Back to back to that. None of it is wrong. There are not one size fix, all...

...solutions for everybody's life. You have to recognize that there are certain things that will resonate with you and others that won't so for me, in order to really kind of achieve, ah, full life that includes all of the things that not only, uh, that I need to do, but also that I enjoy doing. You know, I may not get a Sunday off. My Sunday may have to be on a Tuesday. That's still okay. Actually, I prefer it because it means everybody else's work for me. But, you know, it's it's just but still prioritizing it because workaholism is the thing, and particularly when you're your own boss, you're responsible for the money coming in, and there's always something. There's always going to be something. And so you also need to recognize that, you know, your your life continues and you need to be programming that podcast that you wanna listen to, you know, and it doesn't have to be the same time. It's just make sure you get that. That is something I do. I put things on the schedule that I want to do that are not work, eh? So I can do them. That's interesting. I don't think I've ever heard of something like, You know, you have a plan, but scheduling things that are not work. Usually people are scheduling these things to do, but I mean, it's even. It's a very valid point to Dio well, and then I don't feel bad about doing something else or doing that during that time because I've and don't get me wrong. I'm not somebody that plans my week out to a 10 in every Sunday night. But, you know, planning has become a major part of my life. And because of that, I figure if I want to get in this enjoying this rest this rejuvenation, the relax ation, the you know I love culture. I wanna be watching movies and TV shows and going well, you know, there's not a lot of going these days, but I want tohave. I don't want life to be all work, and so I have to make sure that I've intentionally create a life that's not all work. I think there was some business. I mean, I know there was businesses before Cove it that kind of had the same sort of attitude of It's okay, you know, Thio, take a break at two to not to go to work on Tuesday, and I think Cove it is kind of opened that up to change the landscape of culture in the workplace of saying, you know, and I think there's this push from the younger folks than us that e don't know. They're the millennials or whatever, you, whatever the younger people that want something different. They grew up in a different way. They grew up in a different time, and they're kind of pushing the 9 to 5. This is how you do it. This is what you're supposed to dio, and that's okay. It's a good thing, and it's probably making. It's going to make a lot of businesses better. Yes, you know it There again. Nothing is wrong. It's all about what resonates with you. And so in my case, you know, I haven't worked in 9 to 5 in a long time. On DSO. It's What do you see as the way to build your own dream? Yeah, it's existing like you've you've had it existing in your life for a long time. It seems to be coming, you know, becoming more popular, especially with remote working and short, that rather than having people sit at a desk and I think that that is, um, we've got the technology now that allows us to do that, you know, that's the thing, like we can mhm that I don't even know what it's gonna look like in 10 years because there are things that are happening that kids are doing these days that I don't even understand on DSO You know what the future of work looks like? I don't know, but I'm excited that I'm at a time when I don't have to be, uh, chained to a desk. Ernest. Speaking of Children, um, is there something you wish you would have known before working in your career that you can impart to some people that air Just learning now and even older people are just learned. I interviewed a guy. He was near 50 and he's just learning the value of work, right? You know, and realizing he was not as responsible as he should have been, he wasn't taking things seriously and realizing. Oh, do you know what? I don't have any money saved up or, you know, I don't know what how long this job is gonna last. Is there something that you wish you would have known? Anything related? Um, it could be fine. Answer. Thinking about education or any of those things is something that you wish you would have known when you were younger in terms of work, I would say...

...better financial education would have been helpful. Uh, but, you know, again, everything is exactly the way it's supposed to be, because if I had been focused on the finances, I may not have taken the risk. Some of those that have created a phenomenal life for me. Um, but I'll also say the thing that I most and that I've discovered that I most wish I had discovered earlier in life was that I have never been unloved and none of us have ever been unloved. Those situations where we felt like we might be having been, you know, rejected or whatever. You know, dumped didn't work out. We ended up doing the dumping for whatever reasons you know it or firing or whatever. Separation, whatever. Kind of, um yeah, appearance of disconnect, disconnection. You know, we're never unloved, and that's important because we often operate from a place of fear and anxiety and uncertainty as well. It's It's the idea of knowing that you know your loved and there's a purpose for you opposed to not 100% ing and having no purpose. You are supported. I told you I was guru Brian is that Is there a mistake that you might have made? I mean, we all we can giggle and say, How much time do you have? Is there one that you don't even have to divulge? It just taught you a valuable lesson in life that you're able to just rest upon. I had one where I I thought I learned something new and valuable, and I had to tell the whole world. And if they didn't believe me, then they were just wrong, you know? And that was that burned a lot of bridges. Hmm. I would say, No, I don't. And it's not that I haven't done things that I regret. That's not what I mean. Nothing was wrong. Nothing is wrong. It's all a part of the journey. It was all necessary. Every single thing as painful. This of those things were as ridiculous, as humorous as some of those things were. Whatever fall, whatever trip? Whatever, you know, gaffe. Mhm. Yeah, it was all to the service of me aligning with my greatest self. There was an interview I had recently and the lady said something similar. Just know my dad taught me earlier. We don't talk about mistakes. We talk about learning opportunities and looking forward into just being better. So it's It's, I think it's there's a great value in that, too, because then you have the the extreme of people dwelling on whatever could she received as a mistake and never fully paralyzing from paralyzing. Yeah, from those sort of things you mentioned in education and thinking of my audience of where do you value education? I mean, you seem toe have many different hats, so you have had to learn a lot of things and not all of it has come from, and probably most of it is not formal education. So I'm not speaking about formal education and knowing your parents were educators. How do you value thinking of the audience where there's, um, I think some push against the idea of education, But I think it's just not properly defined to say there's a whole gamut of things in the whole gamut of ways that we learn and how valuable that is and just being even if it's just the personal character of the person being willing to be led and Tosh, you hit the nail on the head I was going to say it's the recognition that you don't know everything that I don't know everything that there's always mawr toe learn from people who know Maura about one thing or the other than any of us. And you know, I've known that early on because that's a that that is a tenant of education when you grow up in a household. And I was also thinking about the fact that my parents, when I would ask how world a word was spelled, they would send me to the dictionary to find it. Now, in child logic, you're like, That's dumb if I know it's awesome Bellet, I would, you know, like I know where to look for in the dictionary. But the critical thinking skills, the research ability, the ability to look at three different perspectives of the same news story or the same issue and be ableto decide what resonates with me and what doesn't...

...because I can. You know, I do have a general knowledge, but I also recognize that's the word I've never seen before. So if I can't guess it by context, let me actually look it up. You know, it's that recognition that there's always Mawr that you can understand by seeking out the knowledge. Some people are content with the illusion of knowing at all, you know, And that's, I think, gotten us into more trouble than it's been worth on DSO the kind of you know and also I'm I'm I'm an African American, Brian, a black American. We have a history off the denial of education in our, you know, in our existence here in North America. It was illegal for enslaved people. Toe be taught how to read and to write, you know, And so you're damn right I'm going to get my education because it's been denied people for so long that ability, toe access knowledge and the fact that we're speaking English, every everything is available to us. Everything has been translated into English. It may not be translated 100% you know, in alignment with the original, but we have no excuses. Were at a time when Mawr information has been is available to humankind than ever before, and yet people won't even they won't even google it, let alone go to a dictionary and try to find the word that they don't know how to spell Yeah, s. So it's a great message, right? There's so much available to us and And we kind of and e mean you're being humbled to of saying, you know, um, our shortcomings or we're lazy sometimes too. Like I mean, you've been selfishness earlier, you know, our own selfishness, but we're lazy. Thio, like just I would like to encourage people to push themselves. You know, when I was younger, I didn't push myself. And I probably find myself where I am because I didn't push myself farther than far enough for further. And I just just like people not to think As you said toe have that attitude. I had it like, What is this? T Was this old person in front of me trying toe chomp on an apple or something? Was he trying t don't know what he's talking about, you know, And and it does. It does kind of. It annoys me when I see a lot of not Onley anti intellectualism but anti teacher sentiment and I'm just like, really guys like without teachers and they're in perfect beings. This is not to say that every teacher is on the top of their game, and there's certainly a lot of burnout. But what are you doing? Are you teaching them? You know, now I think there's more appreciation because folks have to educate their kids out. And they realized, wow, education was kind of just childcare. But the, you know, my point is not education but schooling. Um, there's just I don't know when that happened. I really don't because I did grow up where you know, if if there was a parent teacher conference because of what was going on with me, I had to prove my innocence because I was automatically assumed the teacher is respected. Yeah, absolutely. But also my parents, they knew me, you know? And I think a lot of it is parents who are just not really being honest with themselves about the Children that they've raised. You know, it's like, Have you been on your game? Maybe not when they're being a terror in the classroom and and I know there are many reasons for this. I'm not saying that, but I'm just saying, extend that grace Grace that you want extended to people who have to deal with your little brats and 20 and 30 of them, you know, with all their a d d and all these other issues because you were smoking weed while you were, You know, while you were pregnant. You know what I mean? Like, there's, You know, clearly I'm coming from a teacher, but but but we know it. It's so true. Like, how can you tell me? I mean, you could just watch Johnny out on the playground for five minutes and no, he is a handful for the kid, for the teacher, and then the if the parents were getting mad at the teacher Because John, are you serious? Yeah, right. Watch your own son. And they do. But people are so quick to lay blame without under the standing perspective and granting grace. And it is it is interesting how we we fall short on that. We do that...

...were critical, right? Me too. Not me. Not my fault. It's someone else's fault. Yeah. Same. And and so I don't want it to be like, Oh, just a Buddha. No, not at all. I wear like the Nehru collar shirts and all, but that's because linen feels good now. Eso you value you value education. And I think that show. And you know what, man? It is part of my job, you know, as a story toe storytellers in every tradition. You know, I I identify with the tradition of the gri Oh, which is West African tradition of a storyteller, as historian, you know, as chronicler of a people's history. And you know that the Irish Gaelic tradition and I mean, you see it all over the world and First Nations and and in every society, storytellers story. That's how our lives come alive, you know, And education is a key component to that. That is how we learned how to live together. It's how we learned how to be in all the different amazing ways that we can be. You know, education is how we can fly to Paris because I sure don't know. I don't I don't understand Jet propulsion and I don't care about jet propulsion. As long as it's working, what else does just get me to where I need to be? Hopefully I'll be up front with the mimosa, you know, But I am happy toe Let someone have studied on and and and had the education necessary to allow me toe have an amazing life doing things that that have processes involved that I know nothing about. You know, that's why do I value education? And you mentioned that what brings you satisfaction from a story tellers, perspective or producer? Or is a host when someone says that you got it right and that's where you value the education of doing your homework and doing all that you can do to present the right story and obviously absolutely storyteller you're doing right. And if if anyone who does not value education really thought about it, they wouldn't want false information brought to them, they wouldn't want their jet to fall down from the sky. You know, they truly do. They wouldn't want a doctor would want that doesn't know what they're doing operating. They really do appreciate it. Just getting over that hump of realizing, uh, realizing they don't know it all and that someone else does know something that they can learn from. Yeah, however, yeah, that's a lot of that, though. Comes from empathy, you know, and again, recognizing like you're not the only you're not an island, you know, we're all out here together whether you like it or not, it's not about our feelings in this instance. It's one of those things. It's like we're here, So deal. Yeah, and you conduce So from a place of excitement and my and look, I am an introvert extrovert, you know, I love people and I want to choke him out sometime S o e brake. Exactly. So I'm not saying that it's all about, you know, e get when people are just like too much. But at the same time, you know, I'm It's no fun telling stories to myself. It's no fun creating artistic projects just for myself. Like, you know, I want to share it. I'm a social being, and I want people to feel what I feel, and I want to feel what another artist has felt. You know, it's interesting because you're right, because we do need one another, however, that education comes and what you're talking about. Love and empathy, uh, understanding and appreciation. All of that is important in in one just regular relationships, but also in the work place. Do you have any final advice or encouragement to people who, you know, maybe they're younger and they don't have that family support. They're not sure about what their future looks like or they're in a career and their disgruntled. Maybe they just lost a job, some sort of encouragement for people in their work. It's going to sound woo, understand, but it is what it is. Toe. Listen to your heart, start to meditate. And I'm saying that because that is where you will get your answers. You will start to perceive what next step to take. And when you tune into that energy, which is your energy, it's you talking to yourself, almost the right people. The right opportunities will show up, so...

...you don't have to have it all figured out. But just learn how to sit with yourself for 10 minutes and then 20 and and and then there's all kinds of, you know you can. You can Google. It weighs about to start meditating, but I recommend that because it will, you know, I again had the blessing of a solid family structure that allowed me the room to take the risks. You know, Andi, I know not everybody I know. Not everyone has that. And so in, in lieu of obvious support you go in Ward and then as you start Thio, listen to what you want. What's coming next Things will show up in your life that support and I've seen it and I've experienced it. I've seen it happen for other people, and it does require trust. And that's not always easy Thio to sit in. But I say, you know, start with 10 minute meditations every day if you can. Um, there's APS, breathing, APS, meditation, naps for your phone or whatever and just be sit there, have the thoughts, let them all, you know, flutter around and have monkey mind and all that. At first it will get easier. But it's also recognizing that you're not supposed to always be comfortable in life. And that's something that I think you know. My parents certainly made me understand earlier than later. You're not always going to be comfortable, and I still struggle with it. They tried to have me understand it. I still struggle with my desire for comfort it Z When covert first hit, I was saying I was posting like the benefits of wearing a mask. But now I thought of a new one like you could have a mask and you could be talking to yourself and no one will be the wiser. It would be It would be, uh, but also there was something else. I was going to say that Yeah, it's to encourage one another. Thio have one another's best interest at heart, knowing that we're there for one another, that is, it's a good thing to hear from you. Honestly, the thing that was going to say slipped my mind, Ernest one in just white. The second is, where can people find you? How can they connect with you? Man, you guys can connect with me through the show's website Fly brother dot net. Please sign up for our flight list for updates on where you can watch the show in the United States again, it's on public television and create TV. You can also follow us on our or you can subscribe to our YouTube channel, which is youtube dot com slash c slash fly brother. There's Instagram Fly Brother, And then there's also the studio that I mentioned Presidio Pictures. That's like the Presidio of San Francisco. It's named after that wonderful, magical, enchanted Forest of Possibility and and Magic and yeah, you can follow us there as well. I'm sorry, man. No, no, it's good. It's good. I mentioned that in the introduction about Presidio pictures, I thought of the thing. And it was like someone that I heard of talking about. You're talking about meditation and thinking all these things through its kind of assess your your gifts, your talents, and then just pick something. Pick something that you want to do, right? Not not to be afraid of. But you know, if you do a good assessment of what you have inside your desires that you have just pick something. I just do it and not be so afraid of the consequences. If you took that true assessment, right, you're not picking things you said really, really. And doing things without a plan, but just taken assessment. Make a choice and live with it. And if it changes, change, pivot. Exactly. And that's the thing that you will always be changing. Those desires will be changing. You talked about like a home space. You know, I don't have that same desire to be out in the world traveling like I once had a few years ago. You know I'll always want to travel. I'll always want to engage. But there is something now for me to benefit from stability, uh, or to get out of stability. And that's what I really appreciate right now. And I stay stability in the sense of being stationary. You know, I can go to the gym were often thing before. You know, those types I can cook and and tighten up by diet and all the things that go along with having a home space. But I don't regret the time that I took to be out in the world, particularly in my youth, and you're never too old. But it is that when you're young, now is the time To do Now is always the time for anybody, but you know it. Z, you know, don't waste your youth. Yeah,...

...indoors if you can get it. If you've got Children, if you've got responsibility. But you get what I'm saying. Guys get Explorer. I remember when I first came to Korea. The I don't know what is a two hours to Toronto. 16 hours or so Thio Soul. Another few hours. It's a long flight, and I loved it. Now I hate it. So can e Don't have that same patient. Give me the emergency exit areas that I need that space. Give me one A. Well, take that to, um Oh, that's always have plenty of miles logged. And coach, guys, one day for me, please. Earnest White, the second one. Final question. Why do you, sir? Because I love and work is a manifestation of love. It's not the only one, but it is one perfect. That's why. Work, Earnest White The second I hope you all the best over there in Vancouver, Canada, with your seemingly new things that you got on the plate and hopefully your show takes off again and all the other new Siri's that you have going. Thank you so much, Brian. It was a wonderful conversation. You ask really good questions. And I appreciate it, man. Thank you. I appreciate you raised Well, hard knocks of life. Take care. You too. Thank you. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian e. Be sure to subscribe, Follow and share with others. So they to be encouraged in their work. E hope that you have yourself a productive yet joyful day in your work. Mhm.

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