WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 66 · 1 year ago

#66 Danny Coleman - Rock On Radio - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Danny Coleman is rocking on, but he has had his bumps and bruises. Listen today about how Danny keeps on and refuses to give up, especially as he purses his broadcasting career with Rock and Blues.


Contact Info

Danny’s Profile
linkedin.com/in/danny-coleman

Websites
dcror.com (Company Website)

facebook.com/dannycoleman (Personal Website)

https://www.facebook.com/DannyColeman...

newjerseystage.com (Company Website)

Email
rockonradio1460@hotmail.com

Instagram
https://www.instagram.com/rockonradio...

Twitter
https://twitter.com/ROCKONRADIO

About

"Weekend Mid-Day On-Air Personality at WPOP Radio 77, Creator/Host Rock On Radio, and Danny Coleman's Got The Blues

Creator/Host of the long running syndicated radio program,"Rock On Radio," and "Danny Coleman's Got The Blues." Host of "Rockonpodcast" and weekend on-air personality at WPOP Radio 77.

Emcee, interviewer, entertainment journalist, actor/model seeking work in any of the aforementioned fields. Highly dedicated and extremely passionate performer and personality willing to make the sacrifices needed for a successful career in the industry.

Specialties:
Interviewing.
Writing
Show Host
Emcee
Musician/Drummer/Latin Percussion" (LinkedIn, 2020)

...welcome to why we work with your host Brian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice, which will be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going on, keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here's your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian B. And this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure of speaking with Danny Coleman, the host of Rock on radio. He's been the host of Rock on radio for over 10 years, and I know his story consists of going from rags to riches and rags to riches again. I want to find out how hard it's been. How is work ethic has changed over time and how grateful he is for the platform he has built for indi individual music artists, giving them a voice in an otherwise loud industry. Join me today in my conversation with Danny Coleman. I'm Brian V, and this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure of speaking with Danny Coleman. Good evening finds her Hello, Brian. Thank you so much for inviting me to be your guest. It's my pleasure. Are you quite the evening yet? Are you still in the afternoon? We are in late afternoon. It is 4 p.m. Eastern standard time. I was saying a moment ago, and I was a little shocked you weren't like, in studio or in house or something. But you have some pretty beautiful weather to enjoy for Thanksgiving. Yeah, I'm outside in the backyard. My neighbors behind me or having a party out there. I can hear their music. It's beautiful weather for this time of year. Danny, could you give? I just gave an introduction. A moment ago to you. Could you give a little bit of what you're doing now, and then I'll take you back. Yeah. Okay. Well, I'm a host of multiple radio programs, the longest being a show called Rock On Radio, which I've done for nearly 12 years now. Um, I feature independent artists and, uh, for in a two hour what was life. But currently we're pre recording it due to the co vid experience. Uh, I also host a weekly blues music show on a local college radio station and I pull the weekend shift on an oldies station down in South New Jersey, where, where I live, I'm an entertainment journalist, syndicated entertainment journalist and a musician myself. And I also have a podcast. You're busy. Busy your man, Danny. I like to get in tow A lot of what you just mentioned, but could you take us back? What was your very first job? I read a bio of you that said, you've been working full time since 18. But I'm thinking if you started working at 18, you may have had maybe even a part time job before that. What was your first job? Even if it brings you down into your your younger teens? My first job was I began delivering. I had a friend who delivered newspapers, a newspaper circulation route and the the two local papers here. One would come in the morning. One would come in the afternoon. Well, they both decided to add a weekend edition on Saturdays because for the longest time, there were no newspapers on on Saturdays. They added Saturday delivery and it was the morning publication. Well, he didn't want to get out of bed that early to deliver the paper on Saturday. So I began doing his route on weekends and then eventually excuse me when he became, uh, of age to obtain a, you know, drive a motor vehicle. I got throughout because he was a few years ahead of me. And ironically enough, it's those monies that I saved to buy my first drum kit. Nice. So, yes, I was 13, I guess when he How old were you? Sorry. I was 13 when I took over the paper. 13. So I mean, besides doing it for a lazy friend who didn't want to get up on Saturday? Why? Why did you want that Saturday job? Why did you want Where you already thinking of the drum kit? Yeah, because I started to play the drums when I was 11.5. Uh huh. And at the age of 12, my cousin handed me Led Zeppelin four, and it changed my life...

...forever. And I said, I need to play the drums like that guy. Eso I needed to buy a drum kit, and I thought, Well, I'm gonna have to earn it. My parents are gonna just give it to me. Of course they helped, but I I paid 90% of the money for that drum kit. Came out of my pocket at 13. Did you stick with the drums all the way through? They I still play today. A za musician. That's your instrument. Drums and Latin percussion. Yeah, and and after your how long did you have that paper wrote that your friend eventually gave you? I eventually gave it up When I got to be, ah, sophomore in high school my second year of high school, I gave it, uh, I gave it up because I was on the high school soccer team or trying out for the high school soccer team. And I was in a I was in a band e discovered rock and roll as a freshman, and everything kind of went down from there. It's funny to hear, like rock and roll band and soccer player. I don't know. Maybe maybe that does cross over, but it couldn't be allow you to have longer hair. I guess I'm not quite sure. Well, you'll like that, Brian. I was a big fan of ice hockey as well. I used to play ice hockey, too. So it z I I tried to play. My friends were good, but obviously being from Canada, But, um, I just never had the ability. I don't know, maybe because I was small, but I I played soccer instead. So in high school, what do you thinking for career wise or was rock and roll your band? Where you gonna be the next something How How are you branching off in your mind? Well, in high school, for me it was all about music. I was in the high school band I was and I had my own rock and roll band. We were doing very well. Uh, and I thought, you know, I really would like to be Ah, professional musician, Danny. Three idea. Just before you go further about wanting to be a professional musician. How? Because I'm not a musician, right? Just like not a hockey player. But I appreciate music. How were you able to way the idea of rock and roll and being in the high school band? I mean, unless you had a very kind and caring music teacher, you may or may not have been playing some rock and roll, so How are you able, Thio say Okay, I can. For me, it would be like hot cross buns or something. But not in high school. Uh, the high school, Uh, there were two different bands in high school. There was the marching band and the concert band of which, if you're in one, you're in the other. And at least in in our high school, that's how it worked. And fortunately, we had a band director who, actually he just passed away last week. But he was very, very good individual about encouraging people to discover music of any, any genre, any style, any kind. Uh, and the band was separate from the you know, my life out of school. It's kind of, you know, you goto work, you punch a clock Eight hours later, you're done. Then you got your other life at home and for me, that's what it waas all my buddies. Of course, on the drum line we were all rock and rollers and we even created some street beats for the marching band involving Moby Dick by Led Zeppelin off a Led Zeppelin Two for the cadence for the band Walk on and off the field with. So it did kind across a little bit here and there. So as your your idea for getting mawr professional or getting to music professionally, how did that start to take track? Or how did you even may be divulged from it? Well, it was fun, you know, playing music. What's that song from Todd Rundgren? I don't wanna work. I just wanna bang on the drum all day. Correct. It was a lot more fun just to to play music. And and, you know, I had dreams off, touring and seeing the world and and playing in front of 20 30,000 people and on these were things that I wanted. Unfortunately, I also had parents who said, That's great, That's great to fall back on. But you need something you can count on. And I wound up getting my first full time job at the age of 18. A supposed to go into college, you know, music paid, but it wasn't paying enough to pay the bill,...

...so to speak was that Ah, hard decision for you to not to go to college. Was that something your parents were hoping? That you would have tried? How How did you make that decision? You know, my there were 521 kids in my graduating class. My class rank was 80. So I was in the top. What? 20%? Whatever. That comes down Thio of my class that. But by the time I got out of high school, I had just had enough. I enjoyed playing music too much. I did apply to one college three different times and all three times I never heard back, so I got discouraged. What were you applying for? I was applying to a college in upstate New York called Paul Smith's University was in upstate New York here in the United States, and, uh, they were famous for two things hotel, restaurant management and outdoor education. And I was going to go to school for outdoor education to be like a park ranger or far stranger or an educator. And, uh, I never heard back. Never heard I even had a friend that went there and gave her an application said, Here, take this. Drop it off in emissions. Eso I know it got there nothing. And I got the courage discouraged, then went to work the same day Everybody else in this area went back to school. I went to work full time. So is this word right? Because this Wall Street journal you into? Yes, September 9th 1981. I started working full time for Dow Jones and company. Well, for their at first I started, uh, just in the mail room. How did how did you get that job now, off the heels of being discouraged, right. You know, wanting you had visions of grandeur for music. You know, you're still doing it on the side. You apply to a university, and you didn't get it. So you had the wherewithal to go get a job. But how was that process? Do you recall of you know, I have to put a resume or did you know someone? How did that work? Well, I actually I knew someone, uh, girlfriend of mine. Her sister already worked there and she had heard of an opening and said, You should go apply. So I went and I applied, and I got the job and I stayed in the mail room for about the year. And then I moved up into the engineering division where I manufactured computer software. Mhm. Did you? I mean, that's a big step, right? I mean, from my even. Just saying it for me is is difficult. Did you see a pathway with the Wall Street Journal? Did you see something that you maybe would have wanted to pursue? Well, as I as I mentioned earlier on the writer, so I Yeah, I understand that they had they had an entire, you know, editorial division, and they had an entire I mean, it was the Wall Street Journal they used to print. One of the printing plants was right where I work. They used to print for pretty much most of the Northeast area right out of our our building. Um, so it was very interesting. It was very intriguing. And I thought, Well, this a good, good place to be on. Then the computer software thing came along and a chance to kind of be a supervisor in my own department. And with that came a little more cash, and I just kind of got stuck there. And then I met a girl and who would go on to become my my then wife. And I thought, Well, I can't raise a family on what I'm making here. So I got an opportunity. I had an opportunity to switch jobs, and so I did. It's it's interesting. I don't know if you you can comment on it, but being, you know, a guy growing up high school, not sure what I wanna dio have some ideas and then you get married in some switch. Not all guys, but a switch goes on like I have some responsibilities. And it's not the same frame of thinking that you had a few years ago when it was just you or I supporting or, you know, giving some money in our pocket. Oh, yeah, well, now that well, I was always raised to do the right thing. Be responsible because I'll never forget. When I didn't go to college, my mom said to me, What are you going to do now? And I said, Well, what do you mean? She said, Well, you need to get a job. I said, I have a job. I'm a musician and she said, No, you need to get a real job that's good to...

...fall back on. So I'm living in their house because I just got out of high school and eso I kind of to get a job. I accommodated There are, uh, accommodated their wishes by getting a job. And then I, um when I got the job, when I left out Jones I accommodated my then my then wife, too. Because we're going to try and start a family a few years down the road, and I needed something a little more stable. So are you touching down Jones? What's the connection? I'm ignorant. Down Jones to Wall Street Journal. Dow Jones and Company were the owners of the Wall Street Journal. There's still the owners, but I think Rupert Murdoch bought them out several years ago. He owns a few things I hear e think e not too badly for himself. Eso When did the transition transition or was it a straight transition when you met the girl who would become your wife at the time? Uh, into ups? Was that the next step that you made? Or did you do something else? Yes. That was August of 1989. I became a driver for United Parcel Service, Um, where I was until January of 2009, when I woke up and had a very bad feeling in my back and never made it to work that day because I collapsed in my driveway. No, no, My brother works for ups now, and hopefully that doesn't happen to him. Uh, you know, I hope not. Was there? Was there something in particular that happened or was it 20 years of grinding it out? 20 years I'd never been hurt. Never been injured, but 20 years of of as you just said, grinding things out, up and down steps pushing, pulling, lifting, bending, twisting, pivoting. Turning every day was an aerobic workout. I would walk a Muchas seven miles a day, sometimes the seventh, sometimes nine miles a day. And, uh, I woke up. I had the reason why I never made it to work is I collapsed in my driveway with four herniated discs. Blood in my spine. One of the disks leak. I've never knew it just one day, Just boom like that. And that began a very bad downward spiral for May. At that point, well, I know I read in a bio about you that you went from rags to riches and back from do rags to riches again. Is this in this time frame of this e mean near 20 years? You were nearing retirement age anyway, or at least the ability to retire. So you're at the height of, you know, your career. So is can you comment on the difficulty of that process of, you know, giving through your life and then things shattering where you're not gonna make any money unless, you know there's some sort of peyote. But even then, it's usually not a ZMA each as you require. Uh, in 2004, eso 16 years ago, I I left my now ex wife and I had two small Children at the time. Uh, there were things going on that I just couldn't take anymore. So I left. And it took approximately three years of bitter negotiating and fighting and because I was the only one who was employed and my my ex wife was a stayed home parent. And unfortunately, the laws here in the United States, specifically specifically in New Jersey or not very male friendly, So I really had to fight just so that I could bring home mawr of my paycheck. Then she did so. Ah, in in. In that case, it took three years. So my my divorce was not finalized until 2007. And in 2000 and nine. Yeah, and in 2009, my back gave out, which caused, uh, three years of unemployment. I was 46 years old at the time, and my back gave out. I was suffering from what they termed ageism because nobody wanted to hire a 46 year old guy with a bad back. So I had three years of unemployment, and during those three years I managed to essentially make what little bit of savings I had. I had less than $100,000 in the bank, and I spread it out over 3.5 years so I could live. But I also in crude debt,...

...and I was down to at one point I was down to between my savings and my checking $17. It's I mean, people could pass over and say, but the idea of having $100,000 and that's it, no other income, and you could just see it drop right nowadays, $100,000 isn't what it used to be. And that will drop very quickly so someone could hear. Oh, he had $100,000. He's all right. No, not after a few years. You're not. And then you're down to $17. Yeah, spread that out over over three years. That's $33,300 a year. I had child support to pay. I had alimony to pay, which eventually went away because my employment situation change. You know, they were they were pretty big money because they were based on my salary at UPS. So which was great money and great benefits. But it took a toll on your body and your and your family life. So yeah, $33,300 over 3.5 years. Um, if anybody out there is listening, can live on that. Yeah, you can. Obviously, I've done it, but things start to happen and it works on your psyche, and it works. I mean, I still had my Children at that time. We're 14 and 11, so mhm. I still had ah lot of living to do with that, and some of their demands is well start to increase as they get into higher teenage years thinking of college or something. And then I could only imagine. And I'm in that situation now. Just thinking Oh, Dad, I'd like to go to college, and, you know, a good answer, I think is well, start working. But from the heart, you're like, Oh, I'd like to give it to you. I'd like to pay for that. I'd like to do that. And then you're looking, Yeah. The $17 is not going to stretch it right now. That's exactly right. And I mean, I was near homeless. I was literally near homeless. My parents were still alive, but they live 500 miles south of me and down in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Um, and I And fortunately for me, Ah, friend heard of my plight through another friend and he took me in and let me live there for a couple of years till I was almost back up on my feet. And then his situation changed, and I now live with another friend of mine. So, uh, it's Ah, it's very on. I'm almost there. I'm almost there. But I've been scratching and clawing for 16 years, trying to put my life back together. and I'm getting there. Well, I had to reinvent myself on top of it. Well, that's what I was gonna ask about rock on radio. Because this is when you started to reinvent, did you? Not when you answered an ad. Was it 10 years ago? 11 years ago. Now? Yeah, it was March of 2000 and nine and a couple months after I hurt my back. You know, on the advice of a new attorney who said your days that ups are are done, they're not gonna hire you or they're not going to keep you on the payroll. Ah, he said I'd try. You need to find another job. And I tried looking at other jobs, but as I said, nobody wanted to hire me. The state of New Jersey where I live provided me with a jobs coach who wrote a resume and reached out to people. But nothing. And so I thought, Well, you know, I went to broadcasting school. Ah, year after I got out of high school, I took a year off and went to broadcasting school, and I got out. It was a year program and I got a certificate in an FCC communications license. And I said, just you know, Okay, let me see what happens. I never got a job in radio back then, though, because I was making more money at Dow Jones for the Wall Street Journal on I have bills to pay. So I thought, Well, now is good a time as ever. And this time I'm doing what I want for me. I'm not going to accommodate my parents. I'm not going to accommodate my ex wife. I'm not going to accommodate my girlfriend. I'm doing this for me. So I began. I saw the ad on Craig's list of all places. What what I wanted to do. The radio shows wanted hosts wanted program ideas wanted. I called and called the number, set up a meeting, and I went down there, pitched my idea for rock on radio, and they bought it. And april 9th, 2000 or April 26th, 2000 and nine, rock on radio was long. This is, I mean, knowing that you are in music from a kid. How was your music...

...coming along throughout this time? Even through the struggles with ups, where you still playing even, maybe some gigs or something, or just practicing When you you felt like it. How was music coming along before you answer that ad? Well, one of the funny things is once you and you said it earlier. Once I got married and had Children, my drum kit got taken down and put in a corner with a sheet over top of it for about 10 years. And then I wanted to buy my ex wife a convertible for her 40th birthday. So I thought, Well, I need some extra cash for this that she really won't see and you know, my paycheck or whatever match mattress money. So I started doing Latin percussion and started picking up work with acoustic gigs and acoustic acts, duos and trios, and I just started socking money away so I could buy her the in the car. Ah, but that was about it. Then I started picking up more work with the Latin percussion than I did with a full drum kit, because a lot of places we're switching to the smaller acts. They weren't having a 567 piece electric bands. They were going to two and three piece acoustic guitar type of things piano and a guitar, Uh, so I would pick up a lot of work that way. But just like everything else, it ebbs and flows. You know, sometimes you got a lot of work. Sometimes you don't. Right now, I'm in a down cycle. I really don't have much. So thinking about the step, I think it took some courage. So knowing that the music wasn't vibrant or there wasn't a lot coming from it, you had some difficulties and just thinking of my listeners. The step that you took to reach out to this radio station. You know, it's kind of, Ah, dream that you had taking journalism and, uh, the idea of being in music. How nervous were you to answer this ad? Or was it maybe out of desperation? How did you feel about doing this and going to the studio or the radio station and then presenting yourself? Well, it was an AM radio station, and it used to be a gospel radio station that had just switched over its programming. So they were kind of hungry for ideas. And when I went down there, I thought, you know, because when I was six or 15. I had gone into the recording studio for the first time with that very same band I spoke of that I was in high school with. And I remember hearing my band on the radio because we were in some contest, which is why we went into the studio to get a good recording of our material. And I remember the chills that I would get I got from head to toe. Wow, I'm on the radio and and being a musician, I said to myself, If I could give other musicians that platform and that same feeling, I'm going to do it. So that's how I I cultivated the idea and curated rock on radio, and they were on radio. I mean, it was a M. It was an AM signal, but it was terrestrial radio. Mhm. So that's how it started. So what is it now, Danny, that you do? I have some questions about that radio station as well, but what is it you do now? You said it's kind of a little bit of a downturn, but what takes up your day in the work that you do or that you're trying toe produce weekly or whenever you have an absurd we'll rock on radio up until Covitz Truck was alive program. Three years after I started on on the A M radio station, I realized that nobody was listening to me on AM radio. They were listening to me on their computers. So we had a mutual parting of the ways, and I took it to, uh my very first affiliate was a station called Hamilton Radio. They were in Internet radio station, and they were starting to carry live shows. So I went strictly Internet broadcasting in 2012, and from there I I am asked multiple other affiliates, and I jumped around a couple bit. There are reasons why various states Oh, you're you got muted there, Danny. They couldn't afford, uh they then when B. M. I and ASCAP raised their fees for the music and it shut a lot of Internet stations down or rethink their programming. So I lost a few affiliates,...

...but again I bounced back, and now I've got eight affiliates at a really solid in my corner. So can you explain? I'm ignorant to it, But the idea of having an affiliate or being syndicated What does that mean to to the simple minded like myself? Mhm. Well, what happens is my show, as I was, I was saying, I'm sorry I got off in a different direction. I used to air it live on Sunday nights. Now I have to pre recorded because we're limited to the amount of people we can have in studio due to the pandemic. So I pre record it, and, uh, at the end of the night, my engineer edits it, checks the levels, does all the things that he does so that it sounds like a you know, a, um, a cohesive, smooth radio show. And any on We air it on Sunday evenings at 7 p.m. Eastern time here in the US Uh huh. But what I do is I send those files out. I send them out to eight other radio stations, Internet radio stations, and they re broadcast the program or they some of them log in and they aired at the same time that I'm on the air. They just cut into our stream and air and live on their station as well. So or recorded in this case as well. So yeah, and I've got stations in New York, Florida, Kansas City, Over. Over in the UK and York Yorkshire, uh, trying to think of where else I have. Well, yeah, well, I listen to it earlier. And so out in South Korea to okay, Korea to go. Eso it's Are you getting yourself involved with the editing process or just strictly behind the mike? How How is how are you? How much are you involved in the whole process? Well, with rock on radio, everything is is me from start to finish. I'm the creator. I'm the host. Um, my engineer does all the technical stuff, but I have a producer, my engineers, a gentleman by the name of Art Ackerman. But I have a producer named Claire Henwood who is literally a godsend. I mean, this woman, she just amazes me the little things that she does and picks up on, and she handles a lot of She helped me now handle in a lot of the marketing and the social media. She runs my website not to mention keeps me on my toes, which isn't always an easy thing to dio. What? Danny is difficult about what you do especially since you do so much for the show. What is something that's hard to do? And it might even be e mean some of the things that she's taking up for you. But what do you find? That's hard? Uh, the hardest thing. There's two things that are a little on difficult side. Yeah, booking. Once you book a guest, you know, musicians could be, ah, narcissistic and flighty at times, so to speak. So once you book against a getting them toe honor that commit and be getting them toe advertise hell on the program. They're terrible at promotion. I am. I mean, I know I'm one of them. I'm a musician, so I try not to make those mistakes. Ah, like with this podcast, when you tell me it's it's going to air, I'm gonna promote the daylights out of it. For you, For you, For me. You know, I've had musicians come in and say, Oh, yeah, I should probably let people know I'm on the air and that's literally 15 minutes before we go live. What good is that doing that? So that's that's the most difficult thing. I don't have trouble getting guests. There's always people willing to come on and talk, especially for two hours, but getting them to promote themselves and remember that they're supposed to come on the program. That could be trying. Sometimes it's interesting I not looking so much for average. I mean, I always hope that it happens. But I understand just with my limited experience and there's no limit to guests, I can attest to that as well. There's lots of people that, you know mine is a little difference, not music specific, but people willing toe promote or talk. And I'm asking people to just like asking you just to talk about work. But I can sense when you message you as you said about honor, you, you and I, we connect it really quick. We're like, Okay, we're going to set this up. Boom. Done. And I really like that. But you can tell when some people are like, Well, I don't. And...

...this is like in a message, right? Well, I don't know. Maybe this day No, that's not gonna work for me now. That's not gonna work for me. Are we gonna We gonna just try thio together like Come on, we can do this, but those those air some really struggles and real difficulties. And I can imagine, especially if someone they want to be promoted and they're not doing their end. That would be frustrating as well. Well, that's the whole thing. I mean, I want to spread the word about my radio program so that people will listen so that I could give these people who don't want to promote themselves exposure. Uh, it's it's a very it's a Catch 22. You gotta help each other because in this business, especially now where there's such limited ability to perform or to to make your presence known, it's, ah, you need all the help you can get. You know, in talking, I was gonna ask about what satisfaction you get. But I also had another question, which I think tie into it in thinking back over 10 years of answering that ad in giving these indie artists, which I didn't even know what India meant. But it's just individual artists. For all of these years, I thought India like what kind of music is indie music? But it's individual artists and recording producers, is how grateful are you and looking back and not the struggles, but just giving people a platform to show their music. So maybe some of the satisfaction you get out of that. Oh, it's incredibly satisfying, Uh, in the individual, yes, individual, also independent. They're independent from the big record labels the big because so many times they get signed by big record labels than the record labels try to mold them into something totally different than what they are, which never made sense to me. So if they do it their self, there's a lot of D I Y a lot of do it yourself things that go on, especially with within the artists, artists who aren't beholden to the record companies. So it gives me huge, huge amounts of satisfaction to, uh, sit in studio and see some of the people that I've had go on to bigger things or two to sign or get a single that's going up the charts or Grammy nominated, especially with some of the younger artists. I've had artists come to me, Um, therefore, there were 14. I was almost 12 years ago. Now they're adults on do see how they've progressed with their music and really stuck with it. It's very gratifying to know that I had a hand in helping them out with. Speaking of gratifying and what you can perceive, is there anything that you you know, that you would like other people to know? Maybe having a radio show, podcast or just you yourself that if they knew this, they would appreciate your line of work a little bit better. Is there anything that you can let people some insight into? Some things that you know just to help us appreciate you better? Well, my radio show Rock on Radio Uh huh. Any income I get from advertisers, I give 100% of that income to the City of Angels, which is the station that I broadcast from CEO. A radio com. I give that to City of Angels, that city of Angels recovery radio. And what they do is the City of Angels organization, which is City of angels NJ dot org's. They get people who are addicted to drugs and alcohol. They get them in to treat they provide safe havens, they provide support to the families. They stay with you from start to finish, and they're a total 100% volunteer organization. Eso any monies I get that come in through advertisers? Yeah, I donate right back to the city of Angels. It's it's interesting. Go ahead. Well, and and what that does is I mean, anybody can be an advertiser on my program on rock on radio because all they have to do is donate. I don't care if it's a dollar donate to the City of Angels, and I would make that. I'll make them a sponsor of my show for 30 days. So, uh, you know, I try to give back in that...

...way, and I try to give musicians a chance to be heard. Um, I don't script to rehearse my program. I don't come out with, uh, you know, I don't have a list of questions that I like to ask. E essentially realized that people will tell you so much more about themselves if you give them the time to do so. Kind of like what you're doing now, letting me talk. And that's fantastic. Thank you. No, I appreciate I do have a list of questions, but I do try to meander through them. Um, but I when I'm listening to your program. I heard the commercials that were with City of Angels, and I was like, I even thought to myself not knowing what you just said Is these air good commercials? And I wanna listen to them because they're talking about people who had these problems and that, you know, they were helped by City of Angels and I was like these air, Really? You know, I was just thinking like, Wow, I would like to have these types of commercials because people will listen to these opposed to, you know, come down here and buy this for a dollar 99. Mhm. That's true. Well, that's true again, it's a It's an organization that helps that helps people, um, testimonies and testimonials and things of that nature. You know, you could go to City of Angels, NJ dot organ. See all the testimonials you go to my website, which is Danny Coleman's rock on radio dot com. Where to click The Quick link is D C r o r dot com, and you can see testimonials and and things about my program. Or you can see City the set up on do all that stuff that we use it to City of Angels. Danny. Knowing that some of the struggles that you've gone through and how it's it's not easy how how are you able, Thio? Take your feet off the bed, put them on the floor and and stay productive and keep grinding it out. That that? Yeah, that That's a great question. Because when I was at the lowest point of low in my life, you know, you struggle with a lot of things. This isn't supposed to happen to me. This happens to other people You only hear about this. Why is this happening to me? Uh, there is a chapel that I stop in every day for five minutes and just sit down and pray. And when I was literally and I'm not exaggerating in any way, shape or form three days from being homeless, I just went in. I said, Well, it's up to you, big guy. I'm out of it. I'm out of ideas here. Uh, you know it. It's you. I'm done. I can't do it. I had friends. I would say to me, if I had your life, I'd either be suicidal or in rehab because I literally lost everything I lost everything during the divorce. I lost. What? What wasn't taken from me. I lost when I hurt my back, and I literally had to start over from the ground up. And fortunately, I had support from, Ah, lot of good friends. Uh huh. And some family. But I just I really had thio. I really had to look at myself in the mirror and say, You know what? You're responsible for this thes air decisions that you made now start making the right ones and and I did, because I'm on my way back. I'm getting there. It's good to hear, and I think you would be the first to acknowledge everyone has difficulties in their lives and they come in different ways, and sometimes it seems like some people get hit harder than others, and it's a struggle. But it's good that you're optimistic about keeping going, Andi, and seeing that there things were getting a little bit better, and I'd like to hear that because listeners, you know, right now, you know there's difficulties, whether they're ill, right? It may not be a back problem, but some sort of other problem. They lose someone in their life and, uh, yeah, it happens a lot, and people need to hear that other people are going through some difficult times losing everything, even mobility and still striving forward and staying productive. That is great dandy. I had so much stacked against me. I don't drive Ah, big income flow from the radio show that I dio I don't derive a big income from the blues radio show that I dio mhm. So anything I get, though I now use wisely. Let's put it that way. I'm...

...not afraid to take the risks that at one time I go No, no, that's too too risky. Um e I make the decisions now based on what's good for me and what's not good for somebody else or what's good for somebody else. You know it, Z, I'm not selfish. I'm just not accommodating others needs before mine anymore. And not 24 7. Of course I'm not I'm not a jerk, but sometimes you gotta put number one first and that's you. And in order to do that, you've got to make yourself a priority. Sometimes. Are you able to solely support yourself off the radio, or do you also work doing other things on the side. I also I also have a day job that I had to take because unfortunately I take medication for blood pressure. So I needed to obtain a day job. But that's I mean for my show. I think that's great. I mean, I was talking Teoh a Nen h l referee yesterday who just happened to be from my hometown and as he was pursuing his career or his dream to do this particular thing to be in a NHL referee, he was laying concrete. He was working in the hospital. He was doing all these other odd gent jobs all the way through. And even now, he does some work in the Summer Times just when he's on the off season. So it's It's good to hear that people, and for listeners just the idea of even when you're pursuing something and it's thing that you really want to dio Bill, those bills don't really go away, and they need to be paid. So just a responsible Yep, you know, I work a day job in a hospital, actually, so yeah Ah, and I do it. But I find that Mawr and Mawr of my time is being consumed by what happens when I get home. My and my writing, I do interviews and I have to write and and, uh, you know, the radio shows and the music. Danny speaking. Yeah, but that's what you're taking up more time. It's because that's what you want to do, right? Yes. And you have Speaking of writing is there Is there any tool that you use that helps you stay efficient in your work? It could be the hospital job, but But in the dream that you're aspiring Thio Thio have a successful radio program or podcast program is there a specific tool that used to help you stay efficient? Yeah, my producer Clare, that's good. No one ever told me a person yet. I've gotten up like my tongue and my brain and my phone, and no one's had another person, which is good. No, she keeps me on the straight and narrow. Her mind works in ways that mind never did. Um, my strengths lie in interviewing beyond the ability to be willing to take a back seat, which is ironic being a drummer, I was always in the back. Anyway, I guess I got used to it, you know, but the ability to to let other people talk. One of my greatest accomplishments is when I'm done with an interview and the person on the other and says, Wow, that's it. That's the interview. This was like we were just chit chatting. That was, You made me feel really comfortable. Thank you. And and for me, that's what it's all about. And that probably means a lot to those indie artists, in particular as their new at this right and and having the comfort and allowing them to gain the confidence as they progress in their careers. Well, yeah, actually, yeah. No, you're your true. That's true. But fortunately in the position I'm in, I'm also able to talk with a lot of rock stars classic rockers from from the seventies, eighties and nineties. Even some of them older, Um, that that comment in particular. I've heard from many, many, many of them. But one of them came from Rick Wakeman, who was the keyboard is for yes, and and Rick said to me, he goes, he's like, you know, because only he can. Well, this was an interview. No, this was like I was having a point with my mates. Well, the thing, too, is especially more seasoned musicians or people in the industry. They received many of the questions over and over and over again. And you can see it on some of their faces when they're being interviewed. Uh, like it's already there. They have the answer. Oh, yeah, I know this and, you know, and that's that's kind of that would be draining. Yep. My matter of fact, I did an interview like that...

...just yesterday with a band called Aliens Don't Ring Doorbells E. And I said to The guy said, Look, this could be the only contrived question I asked you, What's with the name? I'm sure you get that all the time and they started laughing. They said, Yeah, we dio. But after that, you know, they were quite happy. They said, you know, good questions that you ask because people don't normally ask us that, let alone let us answer. So, yeah, that's it can be, Yeah, I'm sure they hear the same things over and over and over. Well, it's good that you acknowledge that your producers is your greatest asset because It is the first time I heard someone mentioned a person. Danny, do you have a top tip thinking of indie artists? It doesn't have to be with music, but people getting into work thinking of you, you know, first starting your paper route, you know, getting into the mail room, working your way up and then ups changing of career type people. Do you have, ah, tip for people getting into work wherever they are in their journey? Yeah, don't be afraid to take risks. Don't don't do something because it's not the what your parents would do or your girlfriend or boyfriend or would want you to do. It's your life living. Do what you need to do to make you happy. And if you're happy, you'll have no problem making other people laugh. Yeah, a lot of people are afraid, and what I have appreciated by doing this show is a lot of people that I talked to are they lean mawr towards taking that risk, taking that jump. You know, if you have a desire, talented dream, don't don't live with regrets, you know, to pursue it. And I mean, you did that by answering an ad, right? You wouldn't be where you are 10 years however much you know you're there where you wanna be. 10 years ago, you started something, and I was thinking of this Today is you know, But this podcast, just not, you know, a few months is you know, where will it be in 10 years? And then if I said, you know, the idea of getting behind a microphone or someone strapping on some skates or singing writing a song, Just start that thing that you want. Take that risk even if it means doing another job on the side. Bright. And And the only answer I would have for you there, Brian, is it will be exactly where you want it to be. Because if you wanted to be here interviewing me in my backyard for the next 10 years and that's what you want for it, then that's great. If you wanted to obtain higher levels and and Mawr listener ship and and attain, you know, then you'll find ways to make that happen to I've had to do it. I've I've built my show through grassroots. So if I could do it, anybody could do it trust me. Well, you mentioned earlier that you're you can hear your neighbors having a party next door. I like sitting here on your stoop with you, right? I find not to get on me. Is the idea of on Lee interviewing people who are, you know, can get you somewhere. That's for why we work. I don't think that would touch on the largest segment of the population is to get people who don't want to be interviewed and just, you know, you know, I've never been on a camera before. Come on, you can do it. You can do it because this is the people who work. These are the people we meet every day. And as long as this type of show goes on the's air, the type of people I want, people who go through struggles to people who have gone through adversity, eso there's no grander aspirations except that I hope it does well and people listen. But the idea of getting to the heart of people who work is really what I want to dio Onda and good for you. And I appreciate you, you know, let me letting me tell my story because again. I was ready to give up. I mean, I never turned to drugs. I never turned alcohol. I never thought about, you know, suicide. That's all to me. That doesn't make any better. That just makes it a whole lot worse. But what I did, though, waas I didn't hide from my mirror. I looked in my mirror and I said, You know, you got to get it together. Dude, you know, nobody's gonna help you here. Nobody is just going to give you a job. Nobody is just gonna make you rich and famous. Nobody's going to say, Hey, you want a tour with this band? Nobody. I had to do it myself. I had to pick myself up and do it myself. Uh, and and that's one of the things you touched on...

...it earlier. That that's how I raised my Children, who are now 28 25. I said, You know what, guys? There's three things. I love you enough to let you hate me. I love you enough to let you fail. And I love you enough to give you a hand up, not a hand out mhm. And to, uh to that I also said to them I'd rather live with a million failures instead of one regret. And and then I kind of kicked him out the door, said you're on your own. E just had breakfast with them this morning, actually, but they're kicked out, but they can come back. Yeah, the gay. I didn't come back. Well, I've been kicked out a number of times. Speaking of your life in your family, how do you Yeah, differentiate or turn off the music or turn off the work life and and live your life? And how do you make those work life choices? You know, having that day job really stinks. It eats in the into the things that I really enjoy doing. The radio, the writing, the eso it really think about. It's an eight hour or longer job. So it takes up a third of my day. Uh, mhm. But the time that I do have, I always try to make time for my for my kids, even if it's a you know what? What are you doing? I'm gonna stop by for 15 minutes. Um or are you in the neighborhood? Sure. I throw something I'll throw something on the grill. Come on by and we'll have some dinner. When they asked me, I I never tell them I'm too busy. It's all about prioritizing the things that are important. It's important, very important. And it's tough. And I was talking to someone the other day. It's all right. I know it will happen, but the idea of our Children not talking to us, not intentionally but just because their lives start to pick up. You know, where they get married and their job and one week turns into two weeks and even the person was speaking to like, Yeah, and it could be longer like months. And it happens, you know, without talking. And e think we just like exercise. You know, we don't always like doing it, But once we get the, you know the shoes on the shoes tied and we get into it, you know, it's not always our first priority. Even when we say it is to pick up the phone, you know, do we pick up the phone or we turn on our cell phone Nowadays, I guess, and and call the child and hopefully they, in turn will call us but just to take that moment and say I was just thinking of you. It doesn't have to be, You know, this big philosophical conversation and doesn't have to be groundbreaking, But just those little because before we know what those little moments were gone that they are and literally snap of the fingers, they're gone. I mean, my daughter's birthday was just last week, and I see these pictures of her that I have in my my files on my computer. God, where is that little girl? You know, girl? Yeah, my son, too. I see these pictures of him or him and her together, and it's like, Where did that? I mean, it's 20 years like that. It does in a blink of an eye, Danny, just thinking of blink of an eye. Is there any missed aches? And you don't have to divulge the mistake's. But any mistakes or things that you wish you would have known years ago that you could impart on us today, you know whether it's missed a cue, learned from something you didn't know. And there's a lesson in it. Oh, yeah, the same thing I e how much time do you have got some. I think your son is leaving your s o and are sorry. S u n Can I spell it behind you? Even I don't know how much time you have, but I have a day. Well, what I will do is I will I will fix that issue. Fortunately, I paid the the bill here, so I will fix that issue. Right. Uh, in the second U s. Oh, yeah, the idea of ah mistake or something that you learned along the way that you could impart to us. Well, number one is again be You gotta be yourself. You know, you have to, uh, you have to turn around and and be true to yourself. Be genuine. I know it sounds. I know it sounds cliche, everything. I don't mean to stick my face in the camera. There E No, it sounds. It sounds cliche, but it really is it if you do what you want to do, and again, it goes back to what I said. You...

...don't wanna constantly accommodate the others. Because all that does is make other people happy. And you feeling unfulfilled. There's got to be a balance. And for the majority of my life. I never balanced. Uh, I always gave in to make other people happy. And I can't stress. I'm not saying that's a bad thing, but what I'm saying is, sometimes you have to do things differently. Um, as faras, like money or finances and no, you know what it is, what it is you're gonna you know, I just want to be able to I regret getting that job when I was 18. I should have just said, You know what? I'm gonna be a musician. And if I butted heads with my parents, I should have moved out. But again, I accommodated. Did the right thing, you know? Then I got married, and my job at UPS gave me everything I had. Now my ex wife has but everything you know. And that's how it worked. But, uh, yeah, there. I mean, sure, there were tons of mistakes I made. Maybe I was too lenient in a lot of places. Maybe I didn't go after something hard enough. Like I said, I wanted Thio. But again, you live and learn. I think I'm in a spot I'm supposed to be in. I think all my troubles and tribulations and near homelessness and and lack of money. I think they all serve their purpose so that you appreciate the things that you do have thinking of maybe some of the people you interview and not a knock against them, but even your own temptation and knowing my own of thinking of career and character. So we come across people a lot who put their career first, and they might be a little concerned with their character. But first is their career. Can you comment on how a slippery slope that might be versus putting your career first and allowing Sorry, putting your character first and allowing your career to follow along? Yeah, you know, I could only imagine some of the musicians like and I'm you know, paraphrasing are I'm a musician, you know, walk in with their guitar in their hand and they Yeah, there's fortunately for me. I've been doing interviews with, uh, you know, a listers and B listers, so to speak. Since 2010, when I started writing for the local newspaper. Okay. Um, yeah, of course. Rachael radio is 2000 and nine and they were mawr of the indie artists who are trying to make it. So they had a much different outlook than those who had already established themselves. And I've only had two, 22 people, Aiken say, honestly, were, uh, jerks. Two people that's encouraging for 10 years. That's encouraging. E. I mean, of course, you do deal with some musicians when you're out in clubs and things that are just like, Oh, you know, I'm me. Look at me. Look how great I am. As I said, musicians tend to be narcissists. It's all about them. But, uh, for the most part, I can't really say that I've encountered that. But as a person individually, I realized that because I've been on radio programs where the host thought that he was the focus and not the guest where he didn't like to be questioned or he didn't like the answer or or, you know, back and forth. And they think that they're the personality. Yeah, you're a radio personality. But why did you invite me on if all you're gonna do you talk about yourself yourself? Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Good term for it. So I think that character is always farm or important than career um, you know, I could have a great career, and I've had a great career host in this radio show. But if people here the name Danie Coleman and then they associate it with Oh, yeah, yeah, he His show gets out to a lot of people, but he's a jerk. What good is it? I've met so many friends are made so many friends picked up gigs with some of my guests as a musician. Uh, I've been...

I've been lauded. I've been respected. I've been welcomed. I've been helped when I was down, all because I took the time mhm thio to be a man of character instead of first putting my career first. Yeah. Yeah. Whether or not they like me is a whole other story. Do you do you get to play with if you miss it? You said you did like Does that happen often where you get thio to play a little bit with someone, maybe someone you might have idolized, Or do you get that opportunity or is that a rare occasion? Well, I mean, it's a rare occasion, but it's happened about half a dozen times over the last 10 years. Uh, I've shared a stage with Guitar Player by the name of Gary Hoey. E got up at the end of his, said he pulled me up. My played drums for him for a couple of songs. Um, that was at the Stone Pony in Asbury Park, New Jersey Uh, and, uh, Ed Rowland of the band Collective Soul. Uh, I got to play Latin percussion for his. He has a he has a side project called Sweet Tea Project and they were doing a gig, and he asked me if I wanted to play some songs on Latin percussion, and I did, um, Al Stewart, the guy who did the song Year of the Cat and Time Passages and all that. I did a few songs without Stewart at a local gig here in my area. I shared the stage with the guys from the band Living Color Gary Us Bonds, Sarah Dash from Patty Lobel's band. Uh, gosh, who else? The list goes on, but it's it. Sometimes I got to pinch myself during those moments because it's like, wow, these air people I idolized. Now I get to actually jam with them. It's great, you know? E feel like a little kid. E I wish I could e I have a guitar sitting in front of me sitting in a small little mobile closet, gently weeping. Oh, on even. It would weep mawr if I was actually to play it. So, um, I I wish I played instruments. And speaking of education, thinking of and it doesn't have to be formal informal just thinking of learning to play the drums, learning Thio, you know, get behind a microphone The learning process in U. P s I. Where do you value education for listeners? And how important is it, you know, versus the I don't know yourself in high school, we don't need no education. Maybe, you know, some people have that attitude, right? We don't, um how do you value education? However it comes again? It's going to sound cliche, Brian, but every day is a learning experience. I just spoke with a gentleman who calls my radio show every Sunday night, Gentlemen, by name of Dave, we call him Dave the Rave. He has a podcast also on C o. A radio called the Monday Night Morning Show, and Dave will call me every now and then and he'll say, What do you think? Yeah, yesterday it was something simple about getting permission to use a photograph. I said, Of course, you always got to reach out whether they it's public domain or not, you should just reach out to know that they respect you. And he did. And he messaged me back and he said, Thanks, man. It was a great tip. He was blown away, that I would actually reach out and take the time E. Said, See, you learned something, you know, you learn things like that, Believe me over the last since 2002 until about I'm still going through it. But 2002 till last year, I'd say the end of 2019. Ah, my life is full of way More negatives than it was positive. So I started looking at all the positives within them. Negatives on I learned. So I learned how to do maybe something different or who not to ask or fast. I learned the ins and outs. I learned some new computer software like Adobe Audition, so I could put my blue show together. There have been a lot of things that I've taken you can always take. I don't care what it is. You can always take a positive from negative. I always joke that I put the fun in funeral. You can, you can You can find humor in everything. Uh, that. What's the other saying? I'm the funniest person I know. I laughing myself every day. People life's not that serious, man. Enjoy the ride while you can. Yeah, it's true. And I say this the idea of if we were to list these bad things that are going on, which are horrible, right? We could never take away the bad things. But if we started toe list at the same time the good things in our...

...lives, especially as we reach out of our personal circle and reach out a little bit further you're gonna find this the good things away, the bad even though the bad or bad, right? The bad or bad, the batter horrible. They kick us in the gut, they punch us in the face, but you'll find more things you have going right for you than you do going wrong. Oh, yeah, But sadly, along those lions lions listen. May some people have lions in their lives to. So along those lines Ah, it's only human to remember the negative things that happened to you and put your 100% correct, Brian. There could be 50 good things that happen to you today. But if one bad things happens, that's what you're going to concentrate on. Yeah, yeah, uh, it's on, and it's all it's up to us to change that mindset. Speaking of mindset, can you do you have any advice thinking of people who have a lot of this list going on the list of bad things going on? And it's not to diminish it right? People lose people and, you know, getting divorced, losing money and not having money and being homeless and all those horrible things. Do you have any words of encouragement for people that air feeling a little down trodden discourage whether it's because of this year or just, you know, they could say, Well, 2001 in 2002 or 1999 just keeps coming back to me, whatever it is, some words of encouragement for them. Well, first of all, it's okay to be miserable. It really is. It's okay to be miserable, but don't feel sorry for yourself and don't give up. That's the thing. Do not give up, because soon as you give up your done, you could literally be inches inches. Yeah, from from that big break. Or that that moment that you've been waiting for. And if you give up, you'll never know. Don't give up. Feel miserable. Feel bad, Get cranky. Uh, you know, snap your neighbor's head off or or your family's head off apologize. Realize that it's You're the one that's got the issue. Don't give up and move on. It all comes down to us. Tow us. Not anybody else. It's one of the problems with our society today. Brian is we blame everybody else. Lawyers love it. Theater knees and the lawyers love it. Oh, yeah, that's Zo. Yeah, it's their fault that you hit them. What? Yeah, the only people who make out from that is everybody but yourself. Eso reminds me the A few weeks ago or a week ago, I was talking to Steve Lot, which was the watchdog for Mike Tyson, and he read a poem in the interview, which is an anonymous poem that Tyson's first manager cuss read to him. And the idea is just what you're saying now is don't give up like find the poem If anyone's listening of, uh, don't giving, don't give up. You never know that last in a boxing metaphor that don't give up one more punch could be that punch, right? It could be that one more thing. You know, Don't don't get back on your heels. And it was It's a beautiful poem, but it's the idea of why would you give up? You know, you're just so close. And as you said, you could be inches away from getting that thing that you want and by giving up. There's lots of people that you know let themselves flow down river. But don't give up. Keep trying. Um, keep your guard up because people tried toe pull you down, but you're not knocked out yet, so why not keep fighting? Yeah, and I believe me in a business that I'm in. I've had Mawr disappointments than I've had victories, but the victories outweigh those disappointments when they come along. Uh, if that makes sense, yeah, and it's only because I didn't give up. I've achieved a lot of the goals that I've shot for and and I always feel that I am this close to to finally getting what I need. And I never stopped trying and and just don't give up. That's all I have to say. Danie Coleman. How can people reach you? So you know, to listen to your program to know that you're not one to give up, How can they get in contact with you? Well, they could go to my website d c r o r dot com, which is the quick link for Danny Coleman's rock on radio dot com. They can, and you'll find you can email me...

...their through that site. It also has tabs to my Blues radio show, which is called Danny Coleman's Got the Blues. That's on Monday evenings on a site called Jazz onto Dot org's and you can email me at that station, Danny and Jazz on two or G. You could find me on Facebook under Danny Coleman's Rock on radio to the number two or my personal pages, Danie Coleman, Instagram and Twitter at Rock on Radio or Coleman's Got for Danny Coleman's Got the Blues, but at Rock on Radio Instagram and Twitter, Danny I don't know who would. I heard someone talk about the other day blues, but can you give us a little insight into the blues? I mean, when you said that Danny Coleman got the blues, I'm like, Oh, maybe maybe you do. But the the idea, the essence and the beauty in the blues well, the blue that I had a blues band actually on Uh, excuse me on Rock on radio a couple of weeks ago and the gentleman his name was Wayne Kessler. Wayne says the complexity of the blues lies in its simplicity, and I thought about that for a second. And he's 100% right. Blues music is very simple. Now. I've had people say I don't like the blues. Uh, it's too depressing. It's too boring. Well, that's because they truly don't understand that there are multiple genres of the blues there. There is the depressing blues. There's Delta Blues. There's swing blues, There's jump blues. There's Chicago Blues. There's ST Louis Blues. There's various things that every one of them are different and think they are simple. As far as a musician. There's a buddy of mine's of jazz guitarist, and he loves toe recite to quote that blues musicians No. Four chords and played to thousands of people. Jazz players know thousands of chords and played a four people on. Uh, it's true. It's just all a matter of appreciation. Blues is dynamics. It's if the words and the things that they sing are essentially kind of like the guy here from Jersey. Bruce Springsteen. You know, these people write a song telling you what they did today, and and yet they put it in a non art form that that is just really amazing. I love as a drummer. I love playing the blues. It's my favorite genre toe play, Uh, but it's a very misunderstood genre. All rock and roll is rooted in blues music. All those songs that Elvis and Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis and Johnny Cash. They were all old blue songs, and the stuff that they wrote was basically stolen from those old blue songs. So I saw a video, so I saw a video of I think B B. King and Eric Clapton and a bunch of other guitarists on the stage, and they were just doing riffs and it was just like taking you. It was like a mind trip and one would go, the other would go, the other would go. And they weren't singing at that. But it was from my oppression blues or soft, pretty soft rock. I don't know how you describe it, but it seemed to me, especially with B B King, Right. Um, it was pretty amazing. Oh, yeah. And all of those guys that you mentioned Eric Clapton. Steve Winwood, Uh, you know the Count Stevie Ray Vaughan, countless blues players that Tommy Castro's. They all idolized B B King because he was widely considered, you know, the grand father or son of the Blues or whatever you wanna call it. He was the man that brought the genre into the forefront 60 years ago, Orm or uh and then the blues, though they always bubble under the surface. Then you'll have a band like in the early eighties, the fabulous Thunderbirds. They pop up and they start writing blues music like rock and roll and then becomes pop and everybody's like, Oh, that's really cool. Yeah, well, they were blues man. Then Stevie Ray Vaughan did it, you know, Now you have, uh, the the Gary Clark's and the Craze and and these other artists who are they got new artists out today like Samantha Fish. Shamika Copeland Um uh, Ana Popovic. Look, look, those names up these air women who are setting the world of the blues on their ear on...

...their their their music is more commercialized, and it's just fantastic. Well, Danny Coleman, you are in a very interesting industry, the music industry, and you have a wealth of knowledge about it, and I truly appreciate I have one final question for you. Okay, sir. And that is why do you work? Because I have passion, Brian. I have a passion to follow my dream, a dream that I've had since I was probably 11 years old when I first Saul, a drummer at a wedding at my mother's cousin's wedding on the guy gave me a sticks when he was done, because I was just amazed. Uh, and I said, 11.5. I took my first drum lessons at 12. I, uh, achieved a small drum kit. At 13. I bought my first real drum kit or 14. I was between 13 and 14 when I bought that drum kit I spoke of at the beginning of the program, uh, which I still have to this day. Actually, I still have it. It's a set of 76 Ludwig rockers, but if you have passion, follow it. I follow my passion, and even if I never am able to to make the living that I wanna make out of doing this, I know that I've touched a lot of different people and giving them opportunities by having my radio programs. And and that, my friend, is more fulfilling than than anything I could ever dream off. But I follow my passion, and I suggest everybody else does, too. It's great advice by Danny Coleman, the host of Rock on Radio. Keep it going, Danny and I believe what you said is music makes the world smaller, live and love and is always Rocco. Brian, thank you so much for having me, man. I appreciate it. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they too, can be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive, joyful day in your work.

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