WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 74 · 1 year ago

#74 Christina Smith - Olympian, Author, Speaker - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Christina Smith is an Olympian, Author, and Speaker, who has taken it upon herself to continue to be active in her community and in the field of sports, as she is an advocate for player safety and mental health.

Contact Info

Christina N.’s Profile
linkedin.com/in/christina-n-smith-6857aa16

Phone
403-5897533 (Mobile)

Email
christinanathaliesmith@gmail.com

Twitter
PushStartGo

IM
pushstartinternational (Skype)

About

"Smith is one of the world's pioneers of the extreme winter sport of women's bobsleigh. Smith was Canada's first bobsleigh pilot at the inaugural Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City in 2002 with brakewoman Paula McKenzie. The Montreal native and raised Calgarian won Canada's first ever official World Cup bronze medals at the 2000 and 2001 events. Smith began competing in bobsleigh in 1992 and was part of the sport's international expansion and development.

Smith retired from bobsleigh competition in 2004, however, has been active in the sporting community via her involvement:
- in international and local athlete coaching & team managing;
- in US television support / international athlete multi lingual interviews for 2006 Olympic Winter Games;
- in television commentating at the 2010 Olympic Winter Games;
- as former co-host of an Olympian & Paralympian weekly Radio Show;
- as former Founder / President and Program Director of a Non-Profit Foundation promoting Health, Safety, Active Life Styles and Education for kids and transition help for athletes;
- as celebrity speaker; 2x author; master of ceremonies for non-profit & corporate community based initiatives
- consultant / advocate / ambassador of stem cell regenerative therapy & a healthy proactive lifestyle
- consultant / advocate / ambassador of brain injuries & concussion education / therapy
- social event organizer and workshop host
- social capital expert and strategic connector helping build communities


Specialties: Connecting/Acting Liaison, Networking, Motivational Speaking, Emceeing, Writing, Sponsorship , Mentorship, Coaching, Sport Coaching, Personal Training, Massage Therapy, Cycling and Golf Enthusiast" (LinkedIn, 2020)

...welcome to why we work with your host Brian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice, which would be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going on, keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here is your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian V, and this is why we work today. I have the great pleasure of speaking with Christina Smith. Christina is an Olympian, author, speaker and sports advocate. Today I want to find out how one goes from being actively in the Olympics, which is, Ah, high to life after the Olympics, which could be a low for some knowing part of her resume. She has been continuously active, so I want to know also about her work with sports brain injuries and how the medical field is working together to help athletes stay healthy. Join me in my conversation with Christina Smith, Um, Brian V. And this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure of speaking with Christina Smith. Good evening, young lady. Hello, Brian. Thank you so much for having me. Thank you Know, they all is what I'm supposed to say, right? You can give it another go and say Oh, and yeah, that that works. That's right. I don't know how many e don't know how many viewers I have here in Korea. Hopefully the whole whole bunch, I hope, um, and to you also. Bonjour, madame. You know C c and good and talk in German. Okay, I'm done. Thank you. As I said before, come, Thank you for coming on here. I appreciate you being here. I gave a brief introduction before we started, but can you give us, ah, little idea of who you are and what you're up to nowadays? Oh, wow. That's a that's gonna be quite a mouthful from Well, I'll take you back so you don't have to go too far back. Okay, Well, being, you know, even Olympian from Bob Slate, I have transitioned. And, um, let's say that I'm onto, you know, with my new book coming out, and I've been a Navid public speaker and now with the author title. And but, of course, everything kind of has evolved through I would say the exposure of finding out of a brain injury that I received, Um, just throughout, You know, my career. So things air transitioning right now, To be honest, eso that's kind of my new, um, say effort in the world. Um, and as well, I'm also educating myself around emotional intelligence. So that's ah, very exciting part of my life that I feel was really, um, say, if I would have had more understanding around that, I would have been even, I think a better athlete s Oh, yeah. So from athlete into, you know, being an entrepreneur and being into the workforce, but at the same time still having the struggles which I wasn't aware of that were coming from those brain injuries. So it's it's only been around 15, 16 years since, uh, you know, leaving the sport world. So I feel like a teenager. Well, you look like a teenager. Thank you. And speaking of looking like a teenager, Christina, what would have been? And I heard some interviews. I read some things your very first job. So I'm gonna bring you back, and I have a feeling it has might have something to do with snow. But, I mean, you're originally from Montreal and you spend a lot of your time out in the West Coast, in Canada, in Alberta. Is that correct? In Calgary? Um, but what would have been your very first job, even if it was like a volunteer position? Maybe not not official. Let's see, I would say, possibly an usher at at the Calgary Stampede. Very. That would be a fun job. Yes, it was called them. Sure, E never heard that before. Yeah, showing people to their seats and yeah, then that progressed to the Olympic Saddledome, which is where the the hockey games were in the figure skating in that were held during the 88 Olympics. Um and funny enough, I was...

...actually in a choir in the opening ceremonies where I was actually inspired to be become an Olympian. But I just never knew what sport it would be in what what got you into the choir? Well, I was really a say, a multi dimensional girl. I was in the art, so I was kind of an artsy fartsy and a jock and eso I was in, you know, band with playing alto saxophone and also got into the choir because I actually knew the conductor's daughter and she was encouraging me to join choir, which actually opened my world up to travel. So that was Yeah, I always actually contribute the bobsleigh the the so many of those talents, um, skills and everything. I really credit it to my my music in my that side of my brain, I guess because it was really attention to detail, perseverance, breath, you know, teamwork, eso money. So many things that I I learned through that avenue. And then they were transferrable into sports. How old were you when you were in a Charette? I, charette, let me see. Um, I think I was around 17. 16. So what was the motivation to get the job or Thio get out of the house and work at 17? And that's I think, around the common average age of maybe Canadians getting a job 16, maybe 15. Unless they're doing a paper road or something. You know what? I honestly, I I cannot say that I really had ah lot of, say, exposure to work until later in my life. Um, being like, I mean that if anything. I may even have been 17, you know, because I my parents were always about Let's travel during the summer time. Let's get out. Like they wanted us to be well rounded in the sense of seeing the world seeing, um, Canada particularly, um, and the work stuff seemed to be almost. It'll come. You'll have time do that for the rest of your life, you know? So work was more, um, kind of introduced on small doses, you know, like the summer job. And then it progressed to, like, literally working a za poll tester at electrical company. Uh, e mean, you weren't sticking your tongue on the pole. You? No, not at all. Not that kind of. But I have to tell you when you checked Ah 100 Aziz. Long as it's not frozen, you know, Then it gets stuck, Right? But the bull tester is actually we. We are a summer Students are hired to go and test the power pools. The electric power poles. Okay, with all that voltage we checked. I was a high school student, too, And you didn't want you to go do that job. Yeah, well, this exactly this actually, it was quite funny because we check at least 100 power poles in a day, you know, day after day. What do you physically doing to check them? I'm thinking, like a meter maid type person, but what are you doing to check the polls? We actually, first we we all get assigned to a partner, and you, you get a truck and you get you basically drive pull to pull the pole and each poll you stop, you pull up, you stop. You run down in to the pole, you check as you're running your check for, um, the insulate er at the top. There's lightning damage. It's cracked in any way. Um, you also have your hammer and you're pounding up and down the pole to see if there's any, like, rot on the outside. You know whether the hammer actually goes into the hole, you take core samples and the funny thing, and I have to go back to that comment about, you know, Ah, how you said about putting the tongue of putting your testing and putting your tongue on the ball. I remember we were You don't want to do it through the wooden ones not the wooden ones, but yeah, exactly. The creosote. Yuck. Um, but I remember specifically after, you know, when you get on pull number 75 you tend to be a little bit tired, you know? And you get a little lazy. Well, we didn't notice that there was a crack in the insulator. Oh, that was good Looks. Okay, let's go to the next one. Which means the electricity can actually leaked down.

And that's the goal is that we're trying to make these pulls safe for the power line workers that climb them, you know, And after, you know, look after him. So we're there, we're running to it. And as I'm taking a course sample, I'm bending over and and I'm getting lower and lower and somebody and my partner says, There's a crack and we're like, Well, we're not electrocuted yet. Okay, let's just, like, basically finish up and then get out of here while in the process of leaning over my bum, actually, um leaned against the fence, which was electrocute like which had electricity in it. I jumped away in the proper format like a bunny, uh, to get out of, you know, out of harm's way. Um, and I thought, you know, I got electrocuted, but of course, it was the electric fence, but anyway, also, the fence was electric. A new electric fence beside electric pole or a power pole. Yeah, we're doomed. That's right. I just shock the melted boots that my other friend got in her team. So, yeah, it was actually was a dangerous job. Very much so. Very much so. It kind of leads you into your career. In some sense, I would say how so? From 17 and into testing polls. How Where were you in? Were you in high school at this point? Actually, I was just about getting ready to go into university. Okay. What were you thinking in university? What was your path? What were you hoping to accomplish by going to school? Going to university? Uh, well, by going to school and then like so basically the the goal of getting educated. Is that what you're saying? Yeah. Yeah. And like, what was your thought process of what you were going to take? And what did you hope, Toe? Get out of this degree. Right. Well, for that, I always had a passion in anatomy eso in, you know, human anatomy, but also had a passion with horses and with animals. And I had an aunt and uncle that we're both veterinarians and, um, I, you know, being an athlete, but not that competitive athlete at the time. I kind of wanted to see, you know, how could I do something medical, you know? But at the same time, my uncles like, if you're gonna do something, he goes become a natural medical doctor. So I compromise, and I kind of became an athletic therapist s o. I have deterred you away from being a veterinarian. Yes. Yes. Yeah, I know why that was the case. Ah, he just said, Oh, man, you're gonna He he had crazy hours, you know, being wet, woken up in the middle of the night, go and address, you know, Ah, horse with colic or something or other. And I mean, he you know, we're pregnancy. You know, it was it just he was just trying to help, you know, get me into something he thought would be You know, you're going to get paid like, you know, veterinarian, But your lifestyle will be way more structured or way more say consistent potentially, you know, And it was very hard on his body as well. I mean, procedures of preg checking, which is like checking, you know, the horses to see if they're pregnant. They used to like it there. I saw that dirty jobs with my bro. It's dirty, but is hey, it's human nature, You know, eso So it's, um you know, those little little paths. And I remember doing the athletic therapy wrote, and I just remember that a lot of the athletes there, I don't know, it was a Ziff. Um, sometimes they they were complainers, sport in university. It was skiing was growing up. You know, definitely. Since the age of two and and then multiple sports from Highland dancing to track and field. You know, tennis, um, swimming, you name it. Um, but it was It was interesting because the environment wasn't what I thought it would be as an athletic therapist. So I made a decision based on actually a suggestion from my mom. She's like, Do you know that they actually do technically, Affleck therapy, but for horses? So I hear I am Horses aren't going to complain. Yeah, exactly. Or they, You know, they talk to you in in...

...a different way. Um and you know, those you look kick or their bite if you do something wrong or whatever. But if you approach them, you know, with your intuition and your your care, you know, it's they're amazing creatures and having that marriage between wanting to be, you know, considering being that vet and then also having human anatomy or the anatomy of the animal and the desire to be a caregiver. It was also something that I really I appreciated, you know, doing for people. Um really married a lot of the rules right there. Um but I get it just honestly, I I they say that people actually change their jobs or their you know, their occupations several times and, you know, with their life and yeah, it just it It was like a phase. Also, I went through. So as you approached graduation, did you have a plan? Was there something that you or was this part of the plan? This is what you were going to get into? Not at all. The plan was being a nath. Let ICC therapist so sport therapist And then upon graduation, I was like, Do I really want to be in this environment? Because it just I just felt it was very political, actually on I don't do well in that environment, I felt like I really just I wanted to do what I wanted, you know, to do with those with whether it's, you know, the athletes to help them and to not, um, to just have a really I love my autonomy. I love my freedom and well, and so, yeah, something just kind of deterred me. That and then with the opening of, you know, the suggestion of being an equine therapist that just, you know, brought me on a new path. And from there it opened up. Travel is well overseas, uh, doing equine therapy there. But that was also the marriage between the same times when I was introduced. Thio bobsleigh. So, to this point, you've graduated, Bond. You're looking for a career, and then bobsleigh can't. And for Canada, it did not exist. I mean, for the sport. It did not exist for women in bobsleigh. Is that not correct? That's right. Yes. I was one of the pioneers. Yes. So as you were introduced to it, you accepted the challenge. Yeah. My, my, my curiosity comes in. Do you recall your first time down? I don't care if the person's a woman or a man. I mean, that is My daughter asked me the other day. I said I was gonna interview you. She's like, Papa. I think I saw something like that. That looks really scary. You're right. Yeah. So why I go? Because you're in a thing going down ice bombing down the mountain. And it's like this and I tryto show her. Yeah. Do you all that first time or was there, You know, a sequence to leading up into what would be a regular course of a bob site. Yeah. No, I definitely do. And I remember they first teach you how to push the sled. And so back then, we just had, like, these little, um it's like a train track, essentially, and but a bobsleigh with wheels that would conform to the train tracks. Essentially, you push the sled, you learn how to load in and then do like a little bit of the hill and then come back backwards. Thio, push it back up the hill and then do it again, you know? So it's like, uh, this experience over and then come back and so it doesn't really prepare you for the run whatsoever, because on by the way, people never really tried to tell you about the experience because they didn't want to scare you away. You know the thing Waas You kind of Yeah, it's like just try it and you might like it or you're really gonna like it or let me know at the bottom of yeah, So some people, they just like never again. Other people are like Give me more and other people like me, I I my incentive. And I'll bring you through a run if you'd like. But, uh, my incentive was the fact that there were these women that were basically trying to get the sport underway and to become an Olympic sport and to think that I could be one of them. And that thrilled me that gave me purpose that gave me this goal Thio...

...to really challenge my discomfort and have courage and step into it and really, um, challenge myself. Was this your personal challenge, or did someone in the promotion of the sport in being a pioneer. Did they whisper that in here? Like, if you can do this, you will be the first. Or was this your own realization? My own realization? Yeah, it was so strong, because to me, I thrill in in doing things that nobody else does. And, um, I mean, that, to me, is that's my my excitement, um, to to literally, like, go where fear exists in the sense of not just external, you know, that fear. It's really like that. That thing that the unknown fear, you know, I consider myself like I say, um, get rid of as much of the risk is I can, you know, by preparing my equipment and preparing my mindset and my visualization and everything that goes into being, you know, that athletes execute, But then once you know, once you get that thing going, there's no stopping it until the very bottom and yeah, yeah, exactly. So I really I kind of thrived in that. It was a little bit of I guess, I don't know. I don't know whether it's adrenaline junkie, but it's more so that challenge and to do things that other people are afraid of and more so, the mental side of the fear. You know, um, and not just the extreme of the sport, because, I mean, you were asking me, you know, what was my first run? Like? I remember being told, Okay, when you go down, you know, just try to peer over the, uh, for the best. Exactly. Do one of these? Yeah. No, What? They literally said, you know, just look over the driver's head. So there's two of us, the sled. And I remember we push this let off. She got in and I ran in and got in behind her because, you know, I wanted to make sure I was in. And I remember I held onto the sides inside, like the frame, and I was trying to look over her head, and the first three corners were pretty. You know, they weren't really fast, but by corner four, my head, literally like, was impaled between my knees and I would Oh, God. Well, it wasn't because I wanted to. It was because the force e horses, you know, and like 4.525 piece. I mean, it's ridiculous. And the you were getting tossed within the, you know, the belly of the sled, you know, and and and so when you're in there, you have no clue of where you are. I mean, if anybody would have told you, okay, visualized or try to remember the corners count. Um, you know, there's 14 or whatever, and I mean, you lose track, you have no idea where you are. And then there's this part that it's almost like it's called crazy, which is circle and German and brings you around. And the intensity is so great. And I brought my natural path down with me once, and he was in the back. He said, Man, he goes, my body folded like a cheap card table. Like it was just great down. I have this this saying is that if you haven't gone to the bathroom, okay, bladder control isn't an option. You haven't been. If you weren't flexible atop yeah, you will be at the bottom. You'll be able to touch your toes if you weren't able to at the top. And, of course, like if you haven't blown your nose, you know, things come out of your Sinuses. I mean, it's intense. And so it's really it's really something that you have to have courage. You have to overcome fear. You have to have trust Number one trust in the person who's actually driving you down the track if you are the brakeman in the back. But as a pilot, it's really like you. You have. You have control in in what you're doing. But at the same time, it's controlling something that's out of control because you can't put the brakes on. You have to trust the people who prepare the track as well. The equipment that you have because you're so much I don't know, people are listening if you ever watched a bobsled competition. But as I think about as you're speaking, I love the Olympics,...

...and when you see and I don't know anything, hardly anything about bobsleigh or most sports in general. But I think generally with sports or in this particular sport, when you watch a bobsled run, is that is that proper A run? Perfect. Done. Well, you can see the beauty in it. Yes, right. Like when you're talking about being batted around like you can see. Okay, You know you don't even have to have a timer on yourself. But you know, okay, that was the fastest time, like Oh, that was that was close. Just based on how they hit a corner, come out of a corner if they're bobbing around or you know or they don't look too confident or off the first push. There's a beauty in it like that. I would say there's a beauty and a lot of things that we dio, but in particular, if someone hasn't seen this board or really taking it seriously, it's a skill that you have to develop. It's obviously something you have a talent in. But when it's perfect, it when it's when you become a professional at it or even, you know, as you try to learn it, there's a point where you get it's like, Wow, that was beautifully done. Yes, you're absolutely right. I actually, uh, that first run was actually with somebody who was also learning, you know, and s O. That was probably most likely why it was more aggressive. But at the same time, it can still have a Ngara s. If nature Azaz well, without it happening to be safe, full of Knox and different things like that. Um, the the like. I remember I had a break man in the back from Newfoundland, Sherry Wayland and she she used to say when she could feel that pressure just squishing her to the bottom of the sled and like that, that force she knew that we were just nailing, you know, so many great spots on the track. And, um yeah, like it was no word of a lie like it is an aggressive, smart, like they're people that go down just for a tourist run. And I've I'm actually also a massage therapist, and I've had to deal with them after, and they're like, You're like, I would have never known that my neck could hurt this bad, you know, stuff like that. So, of course, there's ways that you, you know, protect yourself, shrug your shoulders, and there's different things or do neck exercises and strengthening. And I mean, there's so many different things. But there is still that hard core, um, hardcore sport. So, Christina, were you doing stuff on the side where you working? Something unrelated while you were preparing for the Olympics, Was there some other sort of work you were doing to make ends meet? Or did you have sponsors? How did that work? How did how did your life kind of balance out with being an Olympian? Well, with the pioneering part, you know, the eight years prior to being, you know, officially an Olympic sport, which was like, October 2nd of 1999. Specifically, um, I used to do equine therapy back in Canada once I returned from being overseas because I I lived overseas for a couple of years, doing it there as well as doing Bob's Lake. But when I returned home, I hooked up with the chuckwagon circuit s O they were through. Uh, are you familiar with Chuck Wagon in Calgary and during Stampede? Is that what I'm thinking? And there's several other stampedes and other rodeos that were going on, and they have chuckwagon races on a circuit throughout the provinces. So it's absolutely amazing community. So you were connected with it, or you were racing as well. I was. This was my off season job, So I was doing equine therapy. Azad Well, as a massage therapy on the you know, outriders and the drivers and their staff. And there you didn't fall on the side of, um I don't know the other side of the coin saying we should never use horses in sports. You were fine with it. You were just there to take care of them. How? How did that work for you? Oh, yeah, I know. It was great. I mean, those guys have put so much attention into their their horses. I mean, um, they look after them like there were kids, you know? So you actually get therapists like myself, or I mean, they put so many supplements and just such love and attention, you know, to their nutrition. And there's stuff, you know, their care. So I really felt like I was part of the team, You know, them and yeah, it was great because it made such a nice side...

...job when I was competing, for sure. So after. And this is part of what you're doing now. So you go to the Olympics? Uh huh. And then the next day. And I think this is a big part of your message now is the transition of life and transitions for anyone in different parts of life. How was the transition from being an active participant in the Olympics to being a new Olympian who now needs toe look into your future, right? Yeah, that's a very good question because I just had such passion to give back into community. I always said, you know, the the important or not so much the important thing about, you know, actually becoming an Olympian. It's not necessary that it's what you do after that is so, I think important in society, you know how you give back. And I recognize that, um, I was being approached by a lot off foundations to come and be on boards to, you know, be keynote speaker at events. And it was something that I really, um, loved about that transition piece out of sport. Um, because it really fulfilled me. I do know that, of course I kept doing my therapy and that, um, but there was that part of the speaking that really resonated with me in the schools and businesses and events and stuff eso that that actually kind of stayed a little bit in my life, even though I've done some other things. But it really was something that now I've come full circle back to. And that, of course, is incorporated with my book. Well, I mean, once you have Olympian at the end of your name, it's you can. It's It's probably better than having doctor at the beginning of it on you and you take it with you and it will be for the rest of your life. It's something that you can always no glean some wonderful pieces of experience from and shed them to other people. So you, of course, you can use it now with your book and speaking engagements, and it's just it's given you. Ah, you know, almost a climbing and Everest. And everyone wants to know how it waas. Yeah, totally. Yeah. And actually speaking about Everest. I've been toe base camp, but one of my friends, Bill Borger, summited both um swam the English Channel and summited a Mount Everest being at the base camp. Did you say maybe maybe, uh, you know what? I don't believe so. I I don't know. I was thinking about the other day I was up, but Colombian icefields uh, glacier and I was climbing, you know, closer and closer. Glacier and I was kind of really in that moment, I thought, I wonder this is kind of like it, you know? So, yeah, it did cross my mind literally a week ago, but I think that's Aske Llosa's. I'll get so Christina, what are you doing now? What is taking up your time? What is your work? All right, well, I still have my massage therapy. Uh, that I'm I have clients that will not let me give up, uh, using these hands. Eso it is that Is this hard on you physically as well, though after, you know, a few years Is this tough? I mean, that's what you hear. But massage therapists in general that the longevity is is not that long, and it things start to cramp up for you as well. Is it tough? Do you know what? Because I had such a good foundation in physical fitness and, you know, strength training. I really think that that has created a longevity for me because it's super physical. Of course you know the job. And I never really looked at this as a job. I looked at this as my hobby on believe it or not, and it's really kept me in that that mind space of knowing that there were other things that I always wanted to embrace. And that again, like I was saying, things within that were community focused and, um, very philanthropic, but at the same time around educating people and and using my experiences, you know, And again, I I refer back to this book, Um, everything that I thought could be a lesson toe. Others was really what I tried to portray within the book. It...

...was like, This is how I did it. It may not be your you know what may work for you, but guess what? You know, maybe you may consider it or you don't know what you don't know kind of approach, And And so, um, this phase of my life is really like I was mentioning it's come full circle to really bring these talents and these desires and dreams that I've wanted to dio, uh, to fruition. But never, ever, ever did I think it would come in the state gift wrapping that it has come on ditz purely like I had mentioned the very beginning. It's really about my journey around the mental health in the brain injuries. Yeah, your book empowered. How was it when you first put your pen? I spoke to a few authors in just the idea. First putting, you know, the pen to the paper or the fingers to the keyboard. That must have been a thrilling adventure to just like going down the bobsled run for the first time. I'm like, I'm going to write a book, and here I go. That's interesting because, you know, people get this thing called writer's block, you know? And yes, that that Israel, um and I think one of the big things is I was so compelled to write stories, and so I started just, you know, storytelling and writing that. And then I'm like, Well, what are they learning out of this? You know, And and is it just to tell people that I had done all these things like that never was my purpose. You know, it was really about what they can get out of this and and how it could help them, you know, if any. And, um, so the journey of the writing, it's It's been very interesting because I actually went through a publishing company. Well, initially I did a one completely on my own, um, and published it and it was called push start, Um, the vital tools to daily empowerment. So, like, literally, I think it's push start your life. That was title. And it was all about helping me through transition. And all those mentors and all those people that had helped, you know, guide me in little ways, whether it's nutrition or therapies are, you know, um, advice with finances. And, you know, um, anything that you can think of I tried to put them and give them, you know, acknowledgement in that book and also try to give tools to people on how to maintain their daily life, like, you know, journaling and affirmations and hydration consumption. You know how many glass of water they've drank, you know, to their logging, their diet. So I tried to make this book very comprehensive, but at the same time, very useful, but it was more of Ah, a tool, you know, things. A daily tool. Um, and so this book here it was it was interesting. Um, at times I went through huge emotion like it was like it was almost like a therapy and, um, I would encourage anybody. Is this because, as you were writing, it was conjuring up the emotions from the huge, huge things and also in appreciation and gratitude for the journeys that I had been on, whether hardships or successes and just dissecting them and really looking at the diamonds, you know, in the in the diamond in the rough. Essentially, because a lot of people kind of dwell on a lot of things, and I really think that it's so important to go through that process. And But, of course it's official, you know, it's it's in a hard, you know, uh, soft copy or soft perfect. Oh, and and it soon to be printed. Um, because right now, with delays with Covidien, that but yeah, Blackheart books was very instrumental and is still instrumental right now. It's setting me up, Thio really having marketing and great guidance with business and that so covert Yeah, has probably set aside some speaking engagements. But being unauthorized, is there anything else that you're you're able to do nowadays and obviously being a therapist? Yeah, actually, more so, uh, I would say...

...mentoring. You know, I have people that come to me, you know, especially with their Children. But the biggest thing that I'm doing currently is actually educating myself around emotional intelligence. And I'm in school. It's the you. So while you hyphen e q dot com Which is all about, um, basically nure OGA modification. So it's marrying, you know, brain science with games and how you can rewire your brain essentially and learn about, um, emotional regulation. Because a lot of people on and you'll see it, you know, CEOs and businesses, you know, may you know, erupt in anger. Or, you know, like there's so many things that are qualities of that you would only normally see in Children that actually are brought through into your adult life and the whole, um, brain dynamics in the rewiring. Essentially through this, through understanding the science and they this method with their game system on their actual physical card games that they use. And it's phenomenal how I'm learning about gaps within my career that I could have even been a better athlete as well as now, knowing what I don't know or what I didn't know now understanding how to improve myself as a business person as just how I'm showing up in the world and and knowing, uh, you know, the what my needs are and those needs air, Not just, you know, it's not about wants. It's about needs, your intrinsic needs. And that's really what drives you and what's what really Christina needs. And, you know, I'm sure your needs may be completely different, you know? But some people, um, they they're chasing the wrong thing. And when you find that that line in that that that space within yourself that you're really true to yourself, that that's essentially you know, being you and then from there they consider that almost like your money tree or your your the line where everything will flow from. So if you know who you are, success will will just happen to you because you're living your truth. You're living, um, your your best version of yourself and s Oh, yes. So in this InterMune oh, through co vid tons of learning, um, tons of preparation around becoming actually a consultant, potentially a coach's Well, I'm right now. I'm coaching people like just kind of friends, you know, testing my skills out and and very open to to receiving anyone that that's out there listening. Yeah, if they want Thio, you know, learn through my journey that it's really actually weren't taking the book because I believe that you know, there's next steps. And to me, if that could be something that I could open up to other people and to bring them along on my journey through emotional intelligence and and help them through, you know what, maybe blind spots in their life that would really thrill me. So again, it's all about purpose. And it's all about, you know, making the world a better place. And Ed King is our CEO, and he's all about making, you know, a big difference in the world. And and sometimes it happens one person at a time. But you know, change will will occur, and it's teaching the world to be more empathetic is really like all. It is a great goal, and I'll have a question for you in a bit about your overall goal. But I can't get the thought out of my mind when you mentioned you hyphen e Q or the idea of remapping our brains from whether injury or life experience. And I think of you testing the polls. So you're going. I mean, life experience, right? A metaphor of some sort analogy of testing each pole. And then in life, you have some bad experience. You come across a crack pole and you get your butt against the electric fence and you get electrocuted and it's a poor, horrible experience, and then you're gone off to the next poll. So but now, in your life, you have this poll electrifying sort of experience and you need to go back. I don't know if you need to physically go back to that whole and figure that it's all okay, but we have to, in our mind, go back to some of these experiences, reassess...

...what happened, get a better evaluation and then reconnected in a different way so that we're not living, you know, as a 40 50 year old CEO. Yelling at someone like a four year old would do because this is something we experienced a long time ago. Very true. And you know, it's interesting because you're you're talking about going back and like, when I think, um, you know, with going back in my career and when you know how you were saying? What did you do in the sense that transition and part of the struggle was actually nine years after retiring was when I discovered at literally, I was at a brain injury event as an Olympian there to support the event. That that was where a doctor, Dr Tracy Thompson, got up on stage and was addressing everybody saying, You know, you may not realize it, but you may have a brain injury and actually rattling off all the symptoms which I ended up having, and so that in itself was my insulator crack per se. That really derailed me, but also gave me clarity to see that. Wow, like all those symptoms now, uh, pertaining to the areas of my brain that were affected that were damaged, gave me clarity. Then I was able to basically rewired literally through technology that they have, um, at a place called Mile Symmetries, where a doctor, Stuart Donaldson the late unfortunately, he's passed since April 4th of this year. But, um, his legacy continues, you know, rewiring brains that he's been able thio, um, find out through technology that does a brain map. And so But the key is is that you know, the revisiting of you know, when did this start and going back in time? And that's actually again. The process of writing this book is learning from our past and learning where we may have derail ourselves or where you know, little cracks within our ourselves. Yeah, cracks in your mind. Yeah, exactly. So it's phenomenal. And Aziz Well, the neural Gamification, you know, with you Q. It does rewire the brain, which is also very essential, you know, in that regard for people that have had brain trauma and also emotional trauma. Christina thinking whether now, having a better and a mawr fuller understanding of yourself and being able to appreciate the difficulties in the transition that you went through What is still something difficult that you you have to deal with, Or it could be just, you know, scheduling with what you're doing. Three Cove it Keeping you may be away from animals more so the normal. I'm not sure, but what is something difficult about your work? Mhm. Difficult, I would say, like I'm a pleaser. I'm somebody that you know. It's like it doesn't matter what time if somebody needs me and you know, they call me up and they need a treatment. All let go because I'm always like, wasn't he warned you. I know, I know. It's not funny. I became What do you told me? I shouldn't. But now it's instead of its for instead of for horses or, you know, animals. It's for people and and it just shows me that, you know, people they no matter how much money a person has or how much you know, things they have in their life. And whatever it is, you know, bodies need attention and bodies like we have to look after ourselves. Number one and I really feel that the challenges are to find that balance of, you know, always putting myself actually first, which I have a friend, her nicknames knuckles and she said, from Bob's like and she said, She said, You know, selfish ourself First isn't selfish e. I actually think that very often because, of course, if we break down, you know we're unable to then, you know, help others. It's like a mom. They're They're always, you know, putting their kids first or their husbands first. And, you know, our maybe there's a Mr Moms out there that do the same thing you know, but the opposite with their wives, you know? And but it's so important that anybody that is in a role, you know, whether it's, you know, caregiver, whatever, uh, being putting yourself in your your...

...health and wellness versus so, so important and, um, mind the mental side of things. You know, mental health is super. That, to me, is so key. Um and and of course, more key than ever just because of having gone through that journey. And I think that, um, you know, daily exercise is so important And to make that time, you know, So I don't know if that answered your question about the difficulty. Yeah, the difficulty of keeping up. And I wonder because you're an Olympian and so I am not. Most people are not, and they understand they have to take care of themselves. And so you have that. I got to take care of myself. But do you have an extra pressure to take care of yourself? Because I mean you, you're like it's like asking a fish. What does it feel like to be wet? You don't know, really But I guess you do, because prior to being an athlete, you kept. But then you were younger. So, you know, we tend to take care of ourselves when we're younger, generally speaking. But do you feel like Oh, I need to go out and I have Olympic ring. I could represent my country. And I better not eat doughnuts today. Yeah, that you know what? I actually am very conscious. I'm conscious of maintaining my my physique, maintaining my I feel it's part of, say, the obligation, you know, and again, not at all. Olympians feel this way. But I feel that I stepped into this into this world and I knew that, um, I was becoming a role model. With that comes a responsibility. They don't want to see you 20 years down the road dragging yourself down the road like yeah, and you know what? Yeah, like this. I think it's it's a gift that I've been given toe have that extra bit of pressure. Um, but the thing is, I could easily turn it off if I want to, but I really think that it's it's almost I actually looked at this as if you have a pain and it keeps you, you know, from doing things or from wakes you up at night. But if you exercise and that pain goes away, okay, because often it does. And people need to take to test Christina. People need to take more medicine and get rid of the pain. Yeah, that's what they need to take, isn't it? No, not at all. I'm still in the know noninvasive don drug mentality. A lot of people do, though. I got a sore knee. E need medication for that, but that now I need another medication for the medication that I was just taking, not knocking people that have to take medication for certain reasons. But some people overdo it. Yeah, So I'm I'm always trying to say is that like, if there is the pain and if you realize and give it a chance to actually go away with movement, whether even if it's stretching every day, even if its breath work, which everyone should be doing daily, you know when when you notice that it goes away, that is like that little, you know, niggly little thing that probably speak to this. I found this. Maybe it's because we're getting well, I'm getting older. You're not getting older, but the idea that if you're gonna exercise, you can get I mean, I get a really bad pain, right? Like wherever it is different times. So I just knee pains like big back pains, neck pains. But if you exercise, not just generally, if you continue for 5, 10 minutes, it kind of works itself out many times. That's just me, but and it's like a really that's a good excuse to go sit on the couch like this Knee really hurts right now, but five more minutes and it's just the kinks Get out. And I think more people should. Is that Does that happen with you? Or is that just me? Oh, no, that's That's another reason why you know, I mean, hey, as athletes, we have little injuries that we live with, and that's kind of a bit of ah, you know, a sore spot for me. Literally, um, that I I really think that there should be, um, also a phase of when athletes leave that they get, you know, in a sense, maintained or throughout their latter years of their life to make sure that we're not sending them out into society broken, you know, because, um I mean, you've given your heart and soul and time energy, money, everything to, you know, doing your sport. And people have invested in you. And I think that there should be, you know, even a a...

...sponsor that steps up and says, I'm gonna look after the alumni, you know, and and that and and I I think it could be really that pain could also be considered your training partner. You know, like, Okay, I know you're there. Yes. I'll get up and I'll get myself, You know, my running shoes on to go for that jog or whatever on DSO you know, yoga. I mean, I just think that any type of exercise as motion is lotion is really what I say. And movement is medicine. That should be your medicine. A lot of university. When you say this, I'm thinking universities because you have a lot of athletes. Specially Canada were not given big scholarships or, you know, we have student loans at the end of school. Not the world is our oyster, but a lot of athletes put they risk their lives. They're risking, ah, lot of limbs, and at the end of it, they're not. They don't become famous athletes. They don't get big deals. They don't get sponsorship. They go get a job, they go get work. But they had injuries all through the way. So what you're saying with getting some places to sponsor schools to sponsor, I think would be a valid point in a good idea? Yeah. Yeah, I think there's tons of alumni out there that, uh, you know, are definitely broken. And I really think that there's an ambassadorship, Azaz Well, that could sustain itself beyond sports. You know, um, I actually did my thesis basically on legacy, but living legacy, which were Olympians in, you know, after they had retired from being an active athlete and they to the survey that I sent out, they felt that they, you know, have got this respect from people in the community. And people looked up to them and various things. So it's like, why throw away that number one, um, and as well, um, facilities, you know, have access for alumni and facilities, like, you know, gyms and things. And a lot of our you know memberships and that all that stuff gets, you know, cut off. You know, once you retire And I really think that the living legacy of Olympians and of all sports that have, you know, gone two World Cups world championships, You know, the the the big league, you know, at those athletes continue to have value. And they have, um, the ability thio to be part of society in Ah, very um, very integral way. Whether it's, you know, to advocate sport toe advocate, Um, you know, good good ventures and and certain nonprofits that air trying thio make a difference in the community. There's a lot of, I believe value left, Herb return on investment. A lot of potential for people toe get as you're doing, get involved with your community and that with alumni or people who have given ah lot Onda live with some of those the bumps and bruises. Is there a skill, Christina along the way that whether in sports or in your you're speaking, you're coaching and even writing the book that you've had to develop, which a listener may here. Okay, maybe that's something is you're talking about doing continual education now lifelong learning but a skill that you had to hone along the way. And maybe you're still working on now. Hmm. Interesting. I would say, Really, brain my mind, you know, being able to regulate emotions, being able thio. Um, stay focused. Um, to be able Thio Look at, you know, um, look at the task. Whether it's, you know, uh, something that is uncomfortable. Something that you know. There's a lot of things that make people anxious, you know? And they hold back from really living, um, big, you know, and living within, you know, the capacity of what they are capable of doing just because of fear. And I really believe that mindset is ah, huge component of success for myself. So is this Is this why you're going to start your own podcast and not be fearful? Correct. Correct, guys. Thank you. Touche. You're gonna push great step in your step into the fear, minimize risks...

...and step into the fear. That's right. That's why Isn't this my coaching course with you today? Oh, my God. You're doing well. A nice fancy microphone like, Yeah, I bought it. Used. There's my secret, but it used Yeah, I have no shame, huh? Yeah. Is there something about you that you would like people to understand and what you're trying to accomplish? I mean, you've been on your own Mount Everest for some, most will never be an Olympian. So whether you actually climb Mount Everest or not, you have climbed your own your you've transitioned into what you're doing now, which probably went down to a valley. But you're you have a passion for what you're doing. So you're on your own other mountain peak. Is there something you like, people to understand what you're trying to accomplish in the work that you do each day? Yeah. So they can get a better perspective of you. Okay. Um, well, one thing I will clarify everyone gets fixated on the peak. Yeah, and there's so much danger on the descent, you know, And and that's where you don't want to lose your focus or your attention and losing of, you know, the details on the way down, you know, because you won't make it. And And that, that's I think, is, um you know, part of not, in a sense, letting your guard down in a sense of like, making sure you're paying attention to everything. Um, and but at the same time, being vulnerable and being, you know, riel with yourself and that we all go through emotions. I mean, the biggest thing is to, you know, being able to feel a safe space to share what's going on. You know, we experience within a day on average, 300 emotions. But our limited vocabulary only keeps us to maybe 10 to 12 that we use, you know. So, um, anyways, I just wanted toe kind of clarify that statement, but can you just refresh again? That final thing about how you actually let me tell you? You said how what toe leave with people, right? How? How would how would you like people to understand? What would they Maybe not understand about you now, but what would you like them to understand about the work that you're accomplishing wherever you are on the planes? Yes. Thank you. And thank you for this opportunity, because not only with my book. Um, that's soon to be released. I do have a website that people could go to. I'm not ready for plugging yet. I'm not. I have lots of questions for you. You pull back the reins there, young lady. E wanna know. What about? No way, Jose. Let's ggo the idea of what people might not understand what you're trying to accomplish, the things that you do each day just so that they can have a better appreciation of you. Mm. Well, I don't know whether it's evident, but I really seek to be the best that I could be, so that furthering my education, I think everybody could further their education. And to me, that's very important is to always stimulate the mind. I want Thio pursue my triggers and triggers are things that may take you off of your game, you know, of being grounded. And that's something that I'm learning through the emotional intelligence. And and that should be, you know, pursued at every moment that you experience one. So that might be something people may not. No, about me here and think about, um as well as, um getting involved with, uh, the concussion mission that I'm on through sports and really being a big advocate, too. I'd really love if we had a bigger community involved in this initiative. Um, so I've spoken on that around, you know, having sports and and just being a big advocate of sports. But at the same time, you know, um, finding solutions. Do you think there are we? We are coming up with solutions is sports. How do you see them Inter intersection, intersecting sports and injuries. Are we kind of working together and trying to help along the way? I mean, seemingly here, football or other sorts of sports. They're trying to bring up protocols, But how do you find we're doing with this advancement? Mm. Well, there's...

...definitely technology out there that can either help with treatments of injuries, especially the brain that are specifically related. There's also Ah, Professor, um, you know Doctor Peter McCarthy, who has technology, that he put sensors whether it's in the helmet, uh, to to actually get data from athletes that are sliding in specifically right now in the skeleton sports, which we would like to expand on all sliding sports bobsleigh, luge. And of course, even the big dream is all sports, too. Collect data on that, um, what's going on within the head and the neck area. So in the basically the pressures and the trauma that the brain is experiencing, you know, with impacts or with vibrations and things. So so there. There's a huge, um, say advancement that is almost like it just needs toe, have the spotlight on it, and you can see the owners and stuff. You know, there's the hesitation of We don't want everyone to really know what's going on because it's going to hurt our sport. Yeah, which is really ashamed, because again, I I'm hugely pro sport. That is like number one, you know? But the thing is, we're not living in the Dark Ages now, like we've we're seeing the light. We're starting Thio realize that this is this is Riel and we need to do something about it. And if we keep bearing our heads where you know we're being negligent, it's unethical. You know, when you know something. So it's so important that people realize that there's things out there currently. Parents should be educated s so that they can take precautions, you know, And it may just involve a tweak of a system, you know, um and I mean, heck, you know, vehicles. You didn't have safety belts? Yeah. Speaking of safety belts and tools. Is there a tool that you use in your work that helps you stay efficient? I mean, thinking it could be the pen. It could be the your new apple computer. It could be a number of things that helps you stay. Yeah, working my iPhone, your iPhone, your iPhone that a lot of people give that answer. My phone e my laptop. Absolutely. Like, I feel I have the ultimate freedom of, you know, being able to move and go anywhere to do work. You know, um, I embrace technology, but I don't let it say take over my life. I'm very much respectful, like I don't wanna be in a meeting when the cell phone goes off or at a dinner, you know, having it there. Like to me, it's It's actually kind of convenient. But at the same time, it's unfortunate that these air also our our cameras now because I there's that temptation that people have having a cell phone. Well, I'm just going to use it for the camera. But then, of course, all the notifications and stuff like that. So it's there's always that potential of distraction, and I really think that you know the beauty of this. I could be on a ski hill on a on a chairlift, and here I am, booking appointment. You know, it's still have that a Tommy, that freedom of being able to do the things I love out doors, Um, and at the same time having to tell myself, you know? Okay, you're posting something. Now you're getting off. You know, like you're not going to stay and start, you know, because it is Yes. And it's actually really a big danger to the minds, like our own brains as well as the young people, the young people, like There's Dr Mari Swingle. Um, at the Swingle clinic here are in Vancouver, and she's done research around technology and brains and for Children. And how, um, you know how it alters things within the brain. And it's just it's a phenomenal work that she's done a swell assed Dr Stuart Donaldson with his research studies s o anybody e saw a meme once or something. I mean, back to technology. I'm sure I...

...saw it on my phone. It was a picture. I think the queen was going by and there was a whole bunch of people and they had their cameras up taking a picture of the queen. And then there was this Oh, elderly lady not elderly, but maybe fifties or sixties or something. And she was just looking at the Queen. And I don't know if the caption was but like, this lady has learned to enjoy the moment, right, Because because you're by taking the picture. You're not even actually looking at the moment anymore. But she's like, learned to embrace the moment. And I think we need toe do that more often. I mean, I find myself all the time like taking a picture of the thing. Um, I really enjoying it. I just want to show it to other people. You know, that's interesting, because I'm a paparazzi like the ultimate. I mean, my my parents to this day have trunks and trunks and trunks in my my so called old bedroom, you know? And they're like, Well, you live in a condo, you know, you never know there could be a fire, so you should keep them here, you know, safe. And now, you know, going through it. And now with the movie documentary, you know that's coming out, um, on the brain injuries and that that which actually I'll post for you once it comes out. But, um, going through archives and all those pictures, it's amazing how much I forget. And I say of thank goodness for the picture, but my good if I don't even remember what you know. Where was I on that picture? What use is it? You know what I mean. And I really think that again. You know, I have reasons why certain things. Maybe not so clear or or I may have forgotten a lot of things, but, um, my dad always said, you know, and actually my grandma, even who's 100 by the way? She's always saying, you know, back then put a little note next to it. You know, my dad the same thing to keep check? Yeah, that's embracing the moment. That's just wisdom, right? That's my mom would always do right? Always the back on the back of a picture of the date right on. And I saw a picture of me in great one I posted the other day, and my mom put people's names on the bottom of the picture, right? And like without those names, I'd be like, apparently I was in that class. I have no idea Thinking back to being a threat. Yes. Getting your first job, Uh, changing some career jobs. As you said. Not really certain what you want to dio do you have? Ah, top tip for somebody getting into work for the first time or changing their career? Mm hmm. Well, I always kind of had Thies say traits that I like. I wanted to go, you know, later on, Like I was saying, you know, the something doing with anatomy and something to deal with athletics, and so I had kind of like the idea of it. Yeah. Yeah. Excuse me. Um, it's not covert promise on, uh, we do that. Our home hope no one here is like, it's cool. It's very gullible. Um, and but as an usher, it I think, if anything, any of the things that you choose to be a part of, uh, there's something to learn and everything. Like, i I I think of the interaction with people, the social, the abilities stand up, you know, having proper posture, you know, in public and representing the Calgary Stampede. You know, and having that, you know, that being proud, you know, to represent something having a uniform on. You know, all these little things are little aspect of what kind of build you as a human being, you know, politeness. And actually, it's funny, because I I wrote a chapter on it. It's how to connect with people and and the basic, you know, principles of, you know, um, just knowing, um, number one, like developing who you are, how you show up in the world owning, you know, your space, but also honoring the other people that you're connecting with. So people need to be good listeners, you know, um, and be able to, in a sense, um, revised or summarize, you know, reflect upon what a person is saying, uh, you know, to you and I think that just looking at different things I have done, I actually was even, uh, I worked at West Jet. I was a super sales agent, so...

I used to like, book people on flights and things. And that was another role again that I learned a lot of skills from, and how to interact with people and and just, you know, having that empathy that they may be struggling with, you know, finding their seat or booking a flight or whatever it is, you know, from the early days of my life and and learning to to deal with people and the various emotions that you encounter, you know? Um, yeah, so I think that if, say, somebody has younger kids and they're trying to think you know how to introduce them to things. I really think that the things that create that interaction for them, that ability to be socialized and and to have responsibility, um, to to, you know, learn how to dress appropriately, look after their you know, they're manicures and, you know, like shine. Like how your father, I think, or your mother and father introduce you to work. As you said in the beginning, it wasn't necessary, but it was. It was kind of slowly introduced us something, and that allowed you to experience work for the first time without some parents are you know, you get out of the house and go get a job or, you know, at some maybe out of desperation, Mom, Dad, that they don't have a job. I have to go. So it was really good the way that your family introduced you to work in thinking of family. Do you have a way in which you turn off your work and focus more towards your other part of life? So do you. How do you make those work life choices? Hmm. That's interesting. Um, you know, when you really enjoy what you do, at least I feel that everything I'm doing, I'm enjoying that journey in that process. And I mean, I'm not married. I have no Children, so I'm very much, you know, a free spirit, a bit of a gypsy, you know, And so but when I turn it off, it's more still through my daily fitness routines, you know, meditations and and and actually getting out in nature. Um, socializing right now, of course, without, you know, the ability to really socialized with a lot of people, but make I call it like I call it actually motion meetings. So trying to incorporate activity while meeting with somebody, you know, whether it's putting some headphones on and talking to them while I'm moving or actually encouraging somebody to come out with me to, you know, to integrate that aspect into their life in order to, you know, get kill two birds with one stone. Christina thinking back of maybe it has with the Olympics a za bobsledder, maybe some other aspect of your life. Is there a mistake that you made that you learned a lesson from, or is there something where someone told you something that you you are not mature enough to listen to that you would have preferred to have. Now eso Is there some sort of lesson that you learned either through mist ake or not listening to people that you could impair to someone else so that they don't make the same mistake? Very nice. Um, well, I really respected authority, and I was very much I I was, you know, kind of brought up that respect Elders, Um And I wasn't somebody who would talk back or would actually even question that they would put me in danger or, you know, in a line of danger. And I remember specifically and it's just I shake my head at it because I'm like, but I was so again I had such faith in the the experience of this person and actually he was a new Olympian is well from another country. And I was renting equipment from him. And, um, I had a brakeman, which is my partner, and I remember the what he said was, Oh, well, you know, like we have these things called runners, which are like skates, but they're not sharp. They're rounded and highly polished. And these these runners get bolted onto the sled, you know, so that I mean, there's four of them and there's two in the front and two in the back and the ones in the front move anyway. So I recall him saying, Oh, well, this one doesn't really like, you know, It takes a smaller bolt to get this one to fit, because sometimes they're shaped differently. So once blood would be a...

...little bit off to, you know, a pair of runners that were made. And but the thing is, it was really off. So he technically needed, like, half the size of a bolt to, like, connected, and anyways, it was just I look back again. It's like how silly how how how wrong was that? But I again didn't question, and my brakeman actually was like, well, that's not safe, you know, like and And the thing is, I'm like, Well, he said it was so we gotta go, you know? So he was saying, This is normal but it wasn't that normal and you were trusting him completely. And so basically the moral of the story. As you know, we actually crash that run, and I remember I think the bolt had come off or something. But it was like I can't believe, you know, I subjected not only my partner, who trust me, but I subject myself. Plus, I didn't question authority for safety. So I and I actually wrote about in the book as well, because that was such a key component of growing up in of of learning to you. No question authority especially question any elements of safety. So that was something that I would say I learned from, and I'm forever apologetic to my poor brakeman, you know, because it's good Thio question authority. We just need to learn to do it in a respectful manner, I think is, is absolutely point right, like it's not as some snot nosed little kid doing it. It is someone who's mature and and has a question, has an issue with a certain thing, and then that authority may even in turn appreciate the way in which, you know the issue was brought up, and it's also, yeah, sorry. Well, just that they would appreciate that this younger, mature person is coming up on bringing up in issue. It's not. It's not, Ah, question of the authority. It's a question of the situation. Yeah, and and also the fact that I was brought up, that it's not just authority, It's your elders, you know. And so you can have an authority that's younger than you, you know as well. So, um, I just You're absolutely right. It's about the approach. But it's also having the confidence to stand true in In, um you know, making sure that situation gut, you know, if if if it doesn't feel right, it probably isn't right. You know, I'm standing true, Christina. The idea of character I don't know in sport or just in your career, where do you place character in your experience where you see it in other people? Yeah. No, I think it's very important. Um, the character is, you know, I mean, we all have different ones, which makes the world a beautiful place because it's like all the different cultures out there and languages. Character puts color into the world. Um, character that is coachable, which is, you know, non coachable. That to me really says a lot because you can still have conviction. You can still have, you know, an opinion. And but please be open to possibility be open even if something looks like, you know, this is no, it's on Lee this way. It's like you could be completely missing out on something that could better you know something and actually have a good example for that. I remember I had a brakeman and she knew what she was doing. And like she used to share, You know her. You know how to do things, you know, like we should do this or what? That, and even even though I had away or I knew of the way that she was expressing to me, and she was younger than me, but still, I still listened, and I didn't cut it off and say, Yeah, I know that, you know, like because I thought to myself once you cut somebody off from them, sharing what they think a certain things should be like or whatever. You know, you actually may be sacrificing learning something new. And but the funny thing is is that she came back to say, You know, sometimes you you worry me because it seems like you don't know anything, you know? And I say, Well, actually, I just I like to listen to what you have to say, because maybe you may enlighten me with something new, and if I cut you off, I...

...may lose that lesson, you know? So that was kind of how I approached those situations. And I really hope that I continue to bring that forth into the world, you know, and I encourage everybody else, too. To try it out as's character is quite important, and I like that to be coachable. That's and that goes with any Some people might think, Oh, that's sports. No, to be coachable in any realm of life is is, uh, a beautiful thing toe having to see when you see anyone that is open and willing to see instruction. But it's not always easy. It's not always easy. Yeah, I mentioned this earlier that I was gonna ask you, Do you have a new overarching goal or some specific goals that you'd like to share? Uh, let's see. Well pertaining to, I would say, my speaking, um, with you know as well the book having that that you know together and stemming that into a program around, you know, introducing people to emotional intelligence and just helping people better their lives and stepping into discomfort. So, like, those are those are goals that are really, um, se in one avenue of my life. Another avenue is, um, um, being an ambassador around advocating for, um increasing emotional intelligence in the world and and, ah, lot of potential collaborations with this line of work, Um, and studies that I'm doing, you know, because it's really lacking in the business world and in the school system. Um, another avenue is purely around ambassador ring, um, around the brain injuries and, um bringing forth through a new website that I have, um that is going to be free and populated with all the most latest science based materials. And in an area that people can go for a guidance on how to, you know he'll themselves through natural, non invasive ways and on drug. And also just understand that there's treatments out there. Or maybe just to get information for their buddy that like you that usedto you know, it was was it? Uh uh, e I wish I played football. No, I was never good enough about hockey, but I probably fell a few times, which could have surely attributed to some issues. So Yeah. So it just seems like the platform is really around Wellness, um, around, um, developing the brain around just, you know, bringing forth things that people don't know what they don't know kind of thing. And I'm really, um I feel like I'm starting to surround myself with a lot of amazing professors and, you know, scientists and researchers and passion coaches passionate coaches and and, e I mean, we're doing a study right now at U. C. L. A. We're gonna be launching a survey for sliding sports that involve, you know, thesis I in Tisdale that's in the UK, and then a coach that's in Germany, who's actually from the UK and myself trying to create this thesis platform to help, which is really big. Um and I mean The New York Times has picked up stories that were were catalysts to Ah, lot of this is Well, because it was around the suicides, um, that have occurred in my sport, which has been really, ah, moving force for me, uh, thio to know that you know these colleagues, these friends of mine from my sport who have passed, you know, and knowing that they were suffering with mental health and knowing that I had suffered from mental health, um, and and how it was so associated to the brain, Um, and the, you know, the injuries that were found later in my life, you know, after retirement. So there's so it is just great things. And yeah, and and just getting that word out. So I don't know, like my path I did. I would never have been able to tell you that I would be on this right now. Um, but you know what? It is what it is, and and...

I'm excited. And the movie documentary, like I mentioned, you know, that's going to be coming out in the New year, and hopefully that will raise a lot of your title to that. Yet I'm not sure whether I'm allowed to tell you. You don't have to tell me, but I will. I will launch it at concussions hope dot com Which is, uh, that website. Well, I know another goal you have is to start your podcast in the new year. 20 one. You know what that is? A big one. Thank you so much. Because I think, honestly, I think I have been literally waiting for all these milestones toe happen so that it can all be part of the whole project, you know? You know, as so it's I feel like all these products have toe happen prior to me launching the podcast. But then again, Hey, what are we waiting for on a Yeah, what are you waiting for? And don't wait for it all to come together because it never come together. I have a family waiting for a drive somewhere, but not to hurry you. But the thing is, it never comes together. It never really never comes together on a more serious note. And it leads me to another question. I only have a few questions left for you. Is there some adversity that you have faced that you are able to incorporate in your work to help you move forward. Mm. And I ask that for the follow up question, which is for other people who are facing adversity in difficulties in their lives, especially this year, and just knowing life in general, right? Yeah. Um, I That's a tough one. Thank you for challenging me. Right now. My brain is definitely firing. Yeah, I would, uh, if I think about it, it's more so, um, having a voice in an environment where there's higher key, you know, And I think that what has been I know that in sport I mean, it's it's nothing new. But like often, athletes are suppressed. You know, it's like not to speak up. And, you know, there's a lot of that and especially, you know, I'm not saying that it no longer exists, but it there's components of of speaking up that are not as say, encouraged in that environment, and to be more so like a military, you know? And this is the coach with, uh and um, I think that the finding my voice has really been something that I have been working on and and to know not to be afraid to speak up. And but the thing is, is that and we kind of talked about a little bit is that it's really about approach. It's about having to process things and being able to feel that you can be vulnerable because it's it's actually natural. It's human to show emotion of any sort. But there's also the ability to regulate that and to know when's a good time and and also the approach of, um, of conflict or of having some things that are challenging and knowing how to work through those challenges. And again that comes with emotional intelligence. So there's, um I would say, Honestly, master, get a book, get online, come and hang out with you know, you Q community that will change your life, you know? So, yeah, thinking of that into an encouragement to people who are facing adversity. What would you say to them that in order thio overcome anything? You have to learn how to address it, how to address it within the emotions of yourself? Um, how to not be triggered by certain things and derailing yourself from being able to address that in a calm in a levelheaded manner. You see where I'm going with that? So, like, Yeah, it's so powerful And that's why you know, it's it's such a I find a blessing. Thio have been introduced to this kind of this science like because a lot of times you wonder that God, that person really is composed and they don't flinch when they go through. You know, adversity, trauma, obstacles, whatever it is, you know, And that, I think, is a riel. Um um se ah, skill that needs to be...

...perfected. But the skill has to be broken down. So, you know, dealing with a lot of past traumas and dealing with just like little things that come up and knowing how to address them as well as, um, just having that desire thio to better yourself, you know, I think it's super important. Well, Kristina, I think what you're doing is super important. And how could people contact you and reach you? You mentioned a couple of websites, but you can mention them again of ways that people can connect. Sure. Eso I have an author Christina smith dot com website s. Oh, my name is on the book. You can see it out there. So the spelling on and and then also the concussions hope dot com website is another one that you can reach me at a swell, um and those two will be fantastic. I also give, like, little perks. So if you sign up, you might get like a a copy or, ah, little sneaky peak into my book A swell. And if if you you can either request it or it may just come to you depending on how far along in my development of my website, but it will be there. So keep in touch for sure. I also have Thio commend you on your humility. I'm the one that I think found you on linked in I was like looking for different categories of people. So it wasn't like you were saying, Hey, can I be on your podcast? And not only that, I reached out to you and then we kind of set up a meeting and you were so kind and consider it and gracious. And even now we were setting up for now. Oh, no, it's it's okay. So I just anyone listening, I want to know. I want them to know that you're kind as you seem behind the camera as well. So I appreciate the work that you're doing. But I do have one final question for you, Christina. It's very kind. Thank you. And that is why do you work? Um, well, the first thing that came to mind was to make a difference. Um, really, there's no purpose if there's nothing that contributes to society that really is making a difference other than putting money in my pocket, Like, to me, that's that doesn't drive me. You know that I really I get joy in, in, in Having something to do that is a great you know, has a bigger purpose than just, you know, working for the weekend to me. Ah, Saturday. You know, ah, Monday could be a Saturday or a Saturday. Could be a Monday, like every every day. Could be a workday. Or it could be a playdate, depending on whatever. But it's really like, um e think that I've just really enjoyed my journey of work and and everything that I have chosen in my life has really been, um, enjoyable because I'm either learning something from it. I'm contributing to society through it. I'm helping people in multiple ways. I'm just There's always that, you know, that growing component. Eso I'm getting something from it, but I'm also giving. So it's a win win in so much, and it's very it z been inspiring for me. I do want to tell people that you have to be happy inside first and foremost, and if people are doing things in life to find that happiness, it's actually not really the right way around it. You have to find that happiness within you. And then, you know, in all the you know, the things that we're going to do toe have the things that we have in our lives and the possessions and all those things. Those air just, you know, bonuses, I guess. But really, it's it's a it's about finding happiness within, So I think it once. You, you know, really hone in to that for yourself. Um, everything you choose, you know, you could find find happiness in it, or you should, and if not, get out of it. And, you know, make sure that you're doing something that you enjoy. But ultimately it starts with you being happy. Christina Smith you are an inspiration. I am happy to have spoken with you and I. I think you're a very sound strong voice in sports and helping people in your community. Christina Smith...

...speaker, Olympian and author of Empowered I Appreciate Your Time and the work that you're Doing. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they to be encouraged in their work. E hope that you have yourself a productive be a joyful day in your work.

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