WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 109 · 1 year ago

#109 Chris Judd - EMCO Corp Account Manager - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Chris Judd is an account manager for EMCO Corporation where he brings products and services to his customers in the fields of Plumbing, HVAC, Waterworks, Industrial, Irrigation, Fire Protection.

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Chris’ Profile
linkedin.com/in/chris-judd-4a277591

...welcome to why we work with your host, Brian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice, which would be an encouragement to us all to get up. Get going on, keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here's your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian B. And this is why we work today at the great pleasure of speaking with Chris Judd. Chris is the account manager at M Co Corporation in Canada, where his company provides products and services in h fact waterworks, irrigation, industrial and fire protection. Today I want to ask Chris knowing that he is an athlete, how he has brought his skills from the field into his workplace. Join me today in my conversation with Chris Judd. I'm Brian V. And this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure speaking with Chris Judd. Good day. Fine, sir. How you doing, Brian? Thanks for having me on, buddy. I am. Well, uh, I appreciate you coming on, Chris. Will you be able to tell us I did a little introduction to you a moment ago. What industry you're in and what it is you're doing now. Uh, currently I work in I work for a wholesaler in the construction industry. Eso I am currently doing residential commercial, um, plumbing, heating and H fact sales on the wholesale side. Some part of supply chain, um, which is far, Far cry from what I was doing when I knew you in my previous life. So yeah, let's go back, Chris. What would have been in knowing that you're from California? Maybe the the answer comes in California. What was your very first job? Even as a kid selling lemonade? Whatever you do in Cali, my very first job was way. Have a local parks and rec on DSO. There's a There's a gymnasium there. There's always adult league basketball. So my very first job was, ah, scorekeeper for for this adult basketball league at our local parks and RECs called Lameda Parks and Recreation on DLA Meat is where I was born and raised. So I I think I was 12 or 13 and funny story. That's actually kind of where I got to know Jeff Cummins because he used to come home playing the CFL. Exact coach comments. Um, he would come home from playing the CFL, playing this. It needs adult leagues. And he and his brother were running. We're running the courts, and I was a scorekeeper. A tat. Time is a 12 13 year old kids trying not to mess things up. So they do get all. Was he good? Then you know what Jeff comes. He might even tell you Hey was better. He always thought he was better basketball than football. But, you know, he obviously had a football body. Eso Zuk, man. So what? What was your motivation to get that a 12. Where you just hanging out at the courts? Where you did you enjoy ball yourself? Yeah. You know, I was a gym rat. I my first love was basketball. Like so I'm a diehard Lakers fan. I always have been. I remember going to games of the Great Western Forum before the Staples Center. Um, you know, in L. A. It was It was the Great Western Forum in Inglewood, and I was taken to a couple games by buddy of mine. And then, you know, I remember, like going to a game. They come back then playing like on the 8 ft hoops that they had done there when I was really young and like, dominating the next day. And I was like, Oh, this is great. I quickly basketball guy. And so I would you know, I'd get up, I'd leave school. I I come home from school, I go right to the gym, I start playing basketball. So I was always there. And so that was just an opportunity for me Thio to be involved in basketball. Um,...

...you know, even though I couldn't play with these guys because they're grown men and I was probably 12 or 13, Um, it was just a way for me to stay involved on, be a part of the action down there. And I'd always wanted to work, um, for the Parks and Recreation League when I was a kid. But I obviously 12 13. You can't do that. So I don't even really know how this was legal, What they're doing me then. But, um, that that's that's why I just I wanted to be involved, and I love basketball. As you ventured up into high school. Was there a couple of other jobs that you had a swell? No. You know, my wife still gives me a hard time to this day about how much my mother enabled me to not do anything. So I didn't have a job until after I graduated high school. Um, and you know, like I was I played three sports throughout my high moral high school career. So all four years I played best baseball, basketball, football, andan, the summer times It was, you know, summer basketball somewhere football. So I was constantly busy and doing stuff with sports. Don't get me wrong. That's not why I didn't have a job. There was time for a part time job built in there. But, you know, I was really motivated to do those sports. And my my mother did not make me get a jobs like like most folks who were in high school, their parents on the You think of that, though, to its by being in three sports, especially, you were learning some work ethic there. That although it wasn't a job, has proven to be beneficial for your career. There's a question I have about that later on. But, you know, for someone to rise, you to say, Well, you didn't work. You were enabled. But you were working hard to. It wasn't all fun and games row. Yeah, that's, you know, you definitely learn a lot about yourself in sports. You know, I had my old high school football coach used to say football is a microcosm of life. Um, you know, because you're going to get out of it, what you put into it, Um, and and so that was a really good lesson for me in a very early age about the dedication and sacrifice that it takes to become a successful athlete on dure, right? Like I it was hard work. And that was in the best shape of my life in high school. Like I was skinny and, uh, you know, I was constantly, even when I wasn't playing sports. I was off riding my bike and I was I was always busy and active and doing stuff and very, very healthy. And and they're obviously was Cem transferrable skills and and and things that I had learned during that time period, which to your point, absolutely benefited me and and and lead, lead me and made me become kind of who I am today. So how serious were you and your thinking about how good you were in sports in high school? Were you thinking this was going to be a career? Was this going to be a university stint? What were you thinking for college and for your career? Well, it's funny, like I so my first two years. So, like freshman sophomore year, um, I had not hit my growth spurt yet, so I was a little runt. I was, you know, 5758 Even my great tenor of my 10th grade a year. I was only like 58 But I happened to be like my brother was the starting quarterback for the varsity team, and the football is always the first sport in the of the of the school year. So it was the fall, and I was actually by playing middle linebacker on my on my JV team. Didn't play quarterback, was a backup quarterback in the varsity team, and then my brother got hurt. And then as a 58 little runt, I got my opportunity to play Andi. I was still pretty realistic. At that time, I had limited skill set because of my height, and I didn't have the strongest arm in the world. Um, it wasn't really, I would say until probably, you know, not even my junior. Probably my 12th grade year. I was like, You know what? This? There might be an opportunity here. And it was It was in football, you know, like I would have loved to have been able to excel in basketball. But I didn't have the skill session. I was not. The athletes needed to be a, you know, a 6 ft 2.5 6 ft three guard. Yeah, I'm not. I don't have that skill set, um, to play basketball. So I focused on...

...football and I thought there might be an opportunity, um, to earn a scholarship and get a free education. Like I didn't think there will ever be professional sports the only. And actually, it's funny. Coach comments might even tell you this if you ever were to ask him. Long snapping, which is a very specific skill of football, was the Onley opportunity. I really had to probably do anything at the professional level because it's very specific. And my uncle, My uncle, Uncle Bob and Uncle Charlie. We're both centers, like they're both lineman and they both taught me to long snap because they both long stop for their team. So I've been long snapping for so long as I could remember, it was pretty darn good at it. But as far as the quarterback side was concerned, I was pretty realistic and just wanted to be able to get a free education. Um, and, you know, travel around and see what that opportunity would provide for me. So how did that decision come to you for which school to pick in what you were going to take for your education. So after high school, I actually, I didn't get I didn't go Thio College University Right out of high school. I went to a local community college. Um and, uh, and I spent 2.5 years. They're actually three years by the time it's all said and done, um, and it was around well, after I was done playing my last year, I was I didn't play all my first year, I had what's called a gray shirt, which is you're not a full time student, but your college clock doesn't start running because you're not a full time student on then I was like a third string quarterback. My first year, I was eligible, and then I wasn't even the starting quarterback until the first game. We had a three way try out. He was gonna be a starting quarterback first game of the year because the offensive coordinator thought I should have been the quarterback. The quarterback coach thought that another guy should have. The quarterback and head coach thought the third guy should be the quarterback, so no one could decide who was gonna be the quarterback. And so the first game of the year. I played the best out of three quarterbacks, and it was my spot from that point forward on Ben. I had a couple smaller opportunities. Um, there was a school in Missouri. I think that that flew me out, wanted me to go there. And there's a couple of local colleges. Um, they're great academic universities, but they couldn't offer any financial, um, financial assistance. Um, and then I got a phone call from Jeff Cummins, who I've known literally my whole life, pretty much He coached my older brother. Adversity. Basketball towards high school. Eso Jeff Commons is the head coach of the Katy University. Played in cfl aan de so Yeah, he knew my older brother. His younger brother was like my freshman basketball coach. Like I talked about before. There was a whole limited park connection. Eso he knew me, but there's like a short run. He remembered me is like that short run kid. Um but then he was able to see my highlight film. He flew me up here. Thio fulfill Nova Scotia. And much like I'm sure your wife is feeling at that time coming into the town, you're like, where am I? Like what is happening? Where people like Where you taking me right now? Um and I didn't I mean, I didn't know what I want to study, Brian. I knew I wanted something in the sports world because that's that's what I knew. I knew that I love sports. I wanted to do something sports related and so kinesiology was that route that I took knowing that there was different things in the sports realm that you could do with the kinesiology degree, including coaching which actually took a couple courses and coaching when I was a Takeda. So so you ended up being a coach for Katie. Are you still coaching? Educate Ian Now I am. Ah, I'm a game day consultant. I'll say, like, I don't really do much for the team throughout the week for home games. I'll go down and I'll hang out and I'll offer whatever kind of assistance I could give to the guys last. Last year, I was really I was on the sidelines and I was helping out with with the quarterbacks because the quarterback coach was also the special teams coordinator. So during a game, especially as...

...coordinators extremely busy because he has a lot of things on his plate S. So I was just able to offer, um, my, you know, my I wanted to offer to help however I could. And last year it was with the quarterbacks on the sideline discussing with them the Siri's. That was what they saw, what they might wanna look for next time on DSO. I've stayed on even since I stopped coaching, and in some facet I've always done something, whether it's being up in the booth, on game days. Um, you know, offering another set of eyes and the defense, which I actually did for one year. I'm no longer full time, and I definitely don't give very much to him. But I offer what I can, um, every season I have done so and I love every moment of it, knowing your commitment to sports, your passion for sports What you mentioned this earlier to what skill set were you able to bring into the job that you have now? Uh, I think one of the biggest skill sets that I have was leadership having been around such great leaders in my life, Um, in the coach world, onda and also getting to travel around and seeing the way that different people approach management and leadership. Um, I think I was able to bring that to the table. Um, the other thing that I bring the tables mhm, persistence. Um, you know, like, I have failed mawr things in my life, and I have succeeded at, but it's the opportunity that failure provides you to overcome and to adjust and adapt and change the way you're thinking or acting or doing something to become successful you know, and I I got into the sales world that way because, you know, sales, you fail all the time. People tell, you know, all the time. But for me failing or having having someone tell me no, isn't it doesn't really do much to deter me. Um, you know, I'll call someone. I have actually had to have someone pick up the phone and tell me, please stop calling me. What do you want? Um and you know, it's on. I told him that all you gotta do is answer the phone. You know, I'll keep calling until the end of the phone and told me to go away. But, you know, s Oh, that's like the sales. Definitely. I have advantages in the sales world. And I think I actually had several articles that that detail how some companies look for X next, athletes for their sales people because they know that they've been kicked down and kicked in the dirt by their coaches or by life or by the game or whatever. That experience that failure on da obviously being able to, you know, graduate from university and to play at a relatively high level of sports you experience a whole lot of that. So that's definitely helped, especially at the quarterback position. What is the process that you're you're going through, say, on a weekly basis, in your position as an account manager? Well, it's actually changed quite a bit during the global pandemic. But when I first started, I was tasked with identifying, um, kind of general contractors in this area from from Winterberg, Windsor, Nova Scotia, to Digby Nova Scotia, um, to attract them to purchase more of their critics. And, you know, anyway, some some bastard. But, um, I'm on the road. I was on the road, I should say, two or three days a week, um, attracting new bitch do new business while also keeping like our core customers happy. Um, you know, so you wanna grow the relationships that you have and you wanna develop new relationships. And so that's what I was doing primarily. My role is kind of, um kind of changed a couple reasons. One of them was one of the The relationships I established while on the road was with a pretty prominent developer in the area. And they have identified the Annapolis Valley where we live as a great opportunity for multi. You know, multi level multi unit apartment building complexes. Andi, I kind of took the point, um, on on...

...working that relationship. And they've now built 44 different four story apartment building complexes in this area. Um, and, uh, you know, the majority of it has been me working that account and, uh, and getting them to get us much stuff a Z can from us. So that's kind of been my focus of the last two or three years Is really working that well, also, you know, developing relationships with the counter that we have or on the phone or not so much of the road lately. But yeah, what is what is some difficult do you have in your position? And what are some satisfaction is that you get difficult, like I'm the point of contact for a lot of for a lot of people. So, um, you know, there's a lot. There's just, like, get anything. There's a whole lot of when mistakes are made on the first call that that people that people want to talk to them on the first call that that they want to make And, you know, there's that could be difficult times. Um, you know, because I gotta gotta eat crow quite a bit. Um, you know, that's that is what it is. That's one of the difficulties. Another difficulty, obviously. Ah, whole new position. Like, I've like I currently like I sell, you know, like plumbing fixtures and heating appliances. And I knew nothing about that. So there's been a steep learning curve with that, um but but, you know, like, I remember when I first started, I would go home at night. Pretty Children, of course. But I would I would come home and I would get on YouTube trying to figure out Okay, what am I selling? I don't know what I'm selling right now, as you probably know more about this product. And so that was one of the bigger learning curves for me. Um is learning the product and learning the mechanical side of the whole industry because I'm not super mechanically inclined. Eso how these things work. It was was a mystery to me, and and that's that's never gonna be that's never going to stop because, you know, that's that's constantly changing in this industry as Well, um, but that was definitely one of the bigger difficulties. Just knowing the product and learning the product. How has your appreciation? And I know one, maybe not having a job, But you've had people work around you and, you know, some different industries. But how is your appreciation grown for different aspects of different industries? Because I know with this podcast, the more I talk to people doing things that I have no idea about, but just thinking of whether it's an apartment building, our house and all that goes into it all the people that come into the process. How is your appreciation of of your industry grown over the last few years? Uh, exponentially, you know, like you, didn't you? There's things that you don't really pay too much attention to, but I remember, actually, it's, uh, when I moved into my old play like my wife and I bought our first house, um, I tried to do some home plumbing. Um, and water started spraying everywhere. So, like okay, like, I'm out of my element already. Like, this is crazy. So you know, between that and then, you know, like when a new houses built you didn't really pay too much attention to it. Like, you see, would you see plaster, You know, drywall, that stuff. But there's so many different components to it. Um, you know that from the plumbing to the heating to the ventilation to the, you know, the h of X systems and and all the different aspects to go into it. And each one of those is a specific trade. Um, that that has years of training on that one system, you know? So you know, you definitely getting appreciation for these, for for for the folks that you work with and for the individuals that around you that you didn't really have before. You know, like, there's a lot of misconceptions out there about about plumbers. And now all I would do is fix toilets. Okay? No, there's a ridiculous amount of skill. Um, that it takes thio be a plumber and and to know how these components work and how they work together in Esso. You know, every day it feels like your appreciation for what these individuals are capable of, what they could do, grows. And I asked him questions all the time, like I want to know more stuff and they love to talk about it, you know? Looks like anybody you know, if if someone's great...

...or something, I know a lot about something. They want to share that knowledge with you. Absolutely. You know, so all ask questions, and I just wanna hear these guys talk sometimes because they have such a depth of knowledge of their trade and and you know of their what what they're doing, It's It's It's pretty phenomenal. How do you stay productive? You mentioned this in that you have resilience, especially coming from sports but sales. Now you have an account, so it's kind of a little bit different. But when you weren't in this particular position, how did you stay productive when you know you're getting nine out of 10 knows rather than Yes. But how are you getting back on the horse and getting in there? What's keeping you going? You mean you stay active? I mean, that's so when I first started, what I did was essentially I developed a list of all the people that I wanted to call that we have not done any business with. Then it was, I think, 100 75 different names and numbers I come up with. And so you just goes to you start going down the list and a lot of these individuals they don't even know They didn't know me. They definitely didn't know me. On dso you get a lot of folks who they know they don't really have any interest. But 175 calls I made Brian have probably set 25 meetings of those 25 meetings. I probably got 12 people to come in to actually buy stuff from us. So it took 175 phone calls to get 12 accounts. Um, but it also did that over, like, a two day period, you know? So, um, it's not at some point, actually, I wish that the Valley had more opportunity for those kind of cold calls and often like unknown entities. But around here, really, there's only so many people that are doing this stuff. I was able to go through it in, like, two or three days. I you know, I remember I had a job after I decided to go back to California, went back to California from, like, 2008. Um at the end of 2008 and beginning to to us nine on. I got a job with the company in Los Angeles County, but I eventually became the A business development manager for, um, Los Angeles and Orange counties. And so that's like there's, like, 30 million people in those two counties. And so I I couldn't fill up my funnel fast enough with these different leads and stuff that it was, you know, I could couldn't wait to go make phone calls. And here is a little is a little bit different. Um, here it's it's a lot about who you know who you are and whether someone trust you, and whether you're that person that they know that you're not full crap, essentially relationship to. And then if they don't get you now, you can come around, circle back and maybe meet them again sometime. That's right. Eyes. They're a some sort of tool that you use. It is essential for you. I mean, it could be your phone or a program, but something that helps you stay efficient. Yes, I definitely use Siri on my phone, um, in the you know, in the course of a day you have. You have people asking to do things all day long and then So if I'm in the middle of the task and I I always tell my employers that I'm great at multitasking, that is not true. I am not a great multitasker. I'm not like it's, uh I have I keep on telling wife is because I have supreme focus so that when I'm doing something that has all my attention, she doesn't buy a Supreme E try. She doesn't buy it. So, um, like, I have to leave notes myself, reminders myself. Um, I use my phone as my assistant for that for that purpose. So if a t end of the day, um, I think about all the stuff I did that day and okay, what did I forget to do today? And generally speaking, I try to leave reminder in the moment because if I forget to do something in the moment, oftentimes it's gone, because I always have so many different things running through my head. Um, you know, most of them are just customer needs and what they need, and okay, give me this stuff. So I use my phone um it is incredibly important. I usually have a running list of reminders, you know, up to 10. 12 at a time. And then, um what? Every time I have a moment throughout the day,...

I'll risk reference my phone. Okay, What I forget to do, um, and that, you know, when I was working in California, it was definitely, like my outlook calendar. And, you know, we had, like, a account management, uh, the customer management system. I don't really have that here, so I use my phone, and it was It's extremely important for sure. Is there something now? Especially that you were later in starting work? Is there something you wish you would have known when you were younger? That it would have done you well now? Yeah. Money management. That's what I wish I had known I was younger, you know, it's, um, the value of a dollar, you know, like I was again, like going back to my mother. God love her. She, uh she knew that when I was coaching football to Katya, Um, I wasn't making any money, but I was chasing that dream. Um, but I probably chase a little bit too long. Honestly? Honestly. And then, you know, I let my let my finances kind of get away from me quite a bit with regard to student loans and stuff. And it took my wife, um, to kind of get me back on track to figure out okay, at the end of the day, you got to get this going because you're we have a family. And so she got me back on track. And then, you know, we're now doing much better, but money management, onda and understanding, you know, mortgages. And I didn't know any of that stuff. And I'm learning on the go like were we now? So we have Obviously, we live in this house here, but we now have two rental properties, and we'll feel that we own on dso I'm learning on the fly with those trying to to make those of his lucrative from productive as possible. Um, you know, thinking about this even now, like a business degree, is probably something that I probably shouldn't got into. But, you know, hindsight's 2020 Like had I known that this is what I'm doing. Obviously, business would have been a better fit. Um, but you know, like I'm still constantly trying to learn that side and then, you know, as an account manager, and you know, I'm like my my my boss will tell you essentially, he's growing me to take over for him. And so um co. It is a great corporation because it allows each one of the locations to operate as their own businesses. It's like a franchise, but not a franchise. Eso we decide how everything goes. So we're running our company the way we see fit, which is great. And so I'm able to see kind of the underbelly of that message behind the curtain. How the how the business is run and then, you know, you see return on investment and gross profit margins. And so it za great to see that side, that side. But if I had I had earlier start with that side of stuff, I think I would have been had a leg up for sure. I don't know if it's the mission statement, but it's it's a vision of M code Thio for you to be working in teamwork and have trust, fairness and for everyone to care. No, I thought knowing you that this would be a good fit. It is. And there, there, there, there There's the core values, essentially that that you're describing when it comes. Thio Tomko. And that's very much what it is. It's, um they they like to create that they're on the teamwork that that family they are. They're always seeking to find what they call their dream team at each location. Um, and it's essentially just finding like minded individuals who have the same goal. Um, you know, which is honestly, is to be as profitable as possible while also developing relationship deep relationships and partnerships. You know, that's that's what income is really all about with our customer base is developing partnerships, Um, and knowing that you know you're gonna be loyal to us, and we're gonna do as much as we can for you to make sure that your you know the best contractor or company or whatever that you could be. We want you to get that, and our job is to help you get there. Eso it is. It's a very cool company. Loyalty and, um, the idea of character. What character trait have you found to be essential in your business,...

...uh, honesty, you know, And it's I think it's honestly whether or not it Z you know, it's some what someone wants to hear not you know, I think just being honest with someone is the is the best best. And maybe that's the hard truth that there that you're gonna be telling this person. But it's better to be able to deal with it in the moment. And then, Okay, now what's what's Plan B A supposed to, you know, like not telling them. Like, in fact, one of the other core values of M Co is straight talk, and that's kind of what that is's. Uh, you know, you're gonna tell us person how it is, and you're gonna help me figure out something out if it's not what they wanna hear. Um, but I definitely think that honesty side of it and integrity, you know, Ah, lot of I've you know, I've always thought of myself the honest and high integrity person and this thing's company. Really, it has been suiting that those two character traits for sure, for me, where is now coming out of education into a career, where do you or how much do you value education, say, for the listener, Whether it's formal or informal, you mentioned maybe in hindsight, you would have taken something differently. So thinking of where you rate education in the need for it as people consider their careers but also exercise, whereas exercise in your life nowadays well, exercises. Usually throwing my kids in here is as far as high as they can go. That's that's about the only exercise I get exercise I get these days. That and shoveling snow. Um, you know it Z as as as much of an athlete as I was, and and and I've never been super motivated. Unfortunately, for better or worse, to go out there and and go for a run, You know that being said, though, when I'm home, I'm up, I'm active. I'm doing stuff. I'm always looking for something to do around the house, so I'm not really a couch potato, even though I don't go out there and and exercise a ton, Um, I need to doom Or and I know that as's faras, the education goes, I think you know, I think education is for at least I guess it really depends in my opinion. Um, I think education is critical on bond. Thio What? Extended toe. You know what path you go down? Education wise, the mawr information and the more knowledge you could seek out from people via text book or, you know, whatever that might be, um, is this gonna help you grow as a person? And it's gonna challenge your beliefs. You know, that's that's what I think university taught me the most remember, um, and Dodge was my was my kinesiology professor my first year to Katya, and she called me on my crap all the time, and it was great, you know, like, E would come up with something, or I need you to come up with something. But I would ask for something and say you're not special. Why am I gonna give that to you? You're not going to get to get any more treatment or any different treatment than anyone else in this class. So get your shit done in Santa and hand it on time. Pardon my language. I'm sorry. Um, but she on that in the moment. Like I was like, what is the woman's problems? She is now, like when I references I love her because she just she didn't put up with crap, and she gave it to me straight and really, I think helped o mold me. Um, and to understanding that. Yeah, I'm that special. I shouldn't get any preferential treatment. Ondas. It's those kind of like, you know, for me. Anyway, my experience was that and that happened to me at the university. So finding whoever that person is in your life to be to educate you, Um, I think it's gonna be important whether that's in a secondary, you know, you know, university or whether it's, ah, you know, you're taking your plumbing courses or you're you're in, you're in the trades, or someone should be there, toe help toe educate you in the way of life and the way life works. But also in your craft. As you mentioned, you had your wife to help you get things on track. Do you now have a goal now, looking further ahead for yourself, you mentioned you...

...have some real estate properties you might take over an account or the area there in M co. Do you have an overarching goal? I do, um, and now my, my goal is, uh is the selfish one is to retire early. I want to retire at 55 and so I don't have a lot of time left to do that. But in addition to that, because I know that if if I'm in a position financially and and my wife allows me to refer to retire at 55 that means that financially, we're doing OK. That means that my Children are gonna be okay. You know, that means that they're gonna have their education paid for. Um, that means that we're going to try to get them up, that opportunity to be successful in life as well. And obviously I would never retire sacrificing that ability for my Children to to do that. That's But if I know that, okay, I retire early. That means that I did things right and it took me a little late start in life to get there. That means I'm doing things correctly, and then we're taking the correct steps financially to be where we need to be, um, to allow for that opportunity because I'd love to be able to golf every day. That's what I wanna dio every day with with cove It I've been home with my dear wife Ah, lot since 2019 in December because I have, ah, lot of vacation time, but now, because we get to teach online So I retired early, I think we would, um, kill one another e Well, I think you know, that's that's unfortunate side effect of the pandemic, because I believe that the divorce rate spiked because you're spending a lot more time with your loved ones. So it's hopefully you like the person you're living with so that the idea of my wife will probably not let me retire at 55 even if we could Yeah, you just gotta have her take up a sport with you If you're into that or whatever you're in to help to get involved with that deep sea diving or something on. There you go. Is there anything that you people do not understand about you, Chris or your industry that you would like them to understand so they could have a better appreciation of the work that you're doing? I think I just tell my touched on earlier just how many things that were involved in, you know, Um it zits, residential, new buildings, residential renovations, ITT's. You know, essentially anyone who's ever had Plummer or heat or come into their house are Are heating. Uh, technician come into their house? Um, they all they know. I think it's funny because everyone always expects everyone that, you know, like if you need something to fix something, your house, you should have that in stock. Like, Why don't you have that thing there? They always come to us for that stuff. And so their supply chain, I think it's something a lot of folks don't quite understand. Um, and the the reality of the world. Right now, this supply chain is about to have some serious problems. There's some slowing that's happening. And, you know, there's we're about to see. We're going to see some really big lead times on getting product thio to us or the supply. Um, so I think things are gonna turn a little bit in that. Is there a particular reason why that's going on? Is it just covitz slowing things down there? Is that political co co? It's a big part of it. Um, the cost of raw materials is also skyrocketing, like stealing wood, and it's just going insane on part of that's like Is NAFTA and Trump trying to get involved and do some stuff and you everyone retaliating? And But I think we're It's almost like a delayed Coben reaction for because almost everything is manufactured in China these days. That's just the way it is. And so everything is being slowed down, and we didn't really see it first. But now it's start. We're starting to see a backlog, and things were starting to get to the point where you know something that we used to have to wait for two or three weeks to get. We now have to wait 23 months and where you keep hearing word that that's going to become more and more of an issue moving forward, hopefully not in the distant future, but definitely for the near future. And not that has any importance. And a lot of folks, um, but...

...it will have impact for many folks like anyone who has anything plumbing and hopefully nothing breaks down plumbing, heating or ventilation related. That's gonna be tough to find because its's going to start to slow down a little bit. Well, that's where appreciation of these different industries comes to light, where some people have no idea how world events are affecting people. But as you're learning that Oh, you know you can't get plastic or you can't get would you can't get this material and your understanding these things better. And that's for younger people or, you know, people in their twenties and thirties. Thio understand this. How the world is really connected and how these different industries and the work people do are really essential. Right? And like e, I think it's, um, you know, for for I guess the word would just be ignorance is because it's not something that folks ever think about, you know, like to you especially, I think, the younger generation where they're so used to instant gratification, you know, like they want something, they got it, You know, like that now five g s or you want some on your phone, you're gonna have it instantaneously. ITT's you. Everyone's used to getting what they want when they want, whether getting out. But with regard to that side of stuff, it's there's not gonna be like that, at least not for a little while. I just hope it doesn't have too big of an impact. You Noah's far, you know, hopefully doesn't impact jobs. And But there was, You know, that being said Brian, like, a couple of years ago, there was there was talk that there was gonna be a lack of the long haul freight truck drivers, and that was gonna lead to really big issues for the supply chain, because there's gonna be no truck drivers, and that never came to fruition, you know, s so it could just be all hearsay. And but we I'm I'm seeing it. It is actually happening. I just I hope that it's not going to get worse, as some people are predicting, because that's not good. That's gonna have a big impact. A lot of people in terms of impact. Is there some adversity, Chris, that you have faced where it positively or negatively affect your work? But you can use that adversity to encourage others in their work. Uh, yeah, yes. I mean, it's, uh I don't know, um, that's kind of a tougher one to Brian, but, like, I just feel like there's always adversity. Um, you know, daily, there's stuff that especially something that's out of your hands like that. That's what I don't like. How sometimes things were completely I have your hands, but you have to deal with on the front lines anyway. And part of it is to supply chain that we just talked about, um, for sure. Um, more personally, adversity for people who are facing adversity in their own lives and how you could encourage them in their journey with work. Yeah, well, you know, just just there's always something, right. So it was like for me, for instance. Um, the adversity with me is like, I'm constantly tired, like, that's why I've used that. That's my adversity, because, you know, I have kids and they don't sleep very well or whatever, but I also know that the ability for me toe to get up and do what I'm supposed to is gonna set a great example for my kids. You know, on dso just my ability Thio drink a lot of coffee. Um, keep going, keep plugging and not allow that to stop me. You're getting away and, you know, it's, um there's always something that's gonna be pulling at you there. There's no doubt about that there's whether it's obstacle or something behind you trying to pull your backwards or, you know, whether it's so much saying that, you know, Actually, I I guess I The work did line of work that I'm in now, Um, and being an American, which which has had a bit of an impact, Um, you know, like people are right in your face and I've had I've had some people say some not so nice things to me. And luckily, luckily I've been yelled at by more coaching these guys could never even imagine. I've been called worse things by my coaches in my life, and I can't even say it out loud because it's...

...not really something you should be saying. So it's water off a duck's back for me. But I know some folks out there they're really impacted by what people saying thinking, You know, I don't think you can't let that stuff getting away. And usually we even see that nowadays with like this, like the online bullying like it's so horrific. What's happening with some folks? But they're just it's some words could be very hurtful, and I I've fortunately but have the ability to let it run right off me and not even sticking. I don't worry about it. Chris. How can people get in touch with you? Maybe even m CO itself if they're looking for a job? Because it seems like a very good place to work with opportunities. Eso write em coz is across Kennedy. Actually send the states in the in the United States is called Fujioka H A J O. C. A. Candidates called him CO. We have, like 300 locations across Canada. There's much of different names that it's under, but, um, www dot m co I think m co dot com dot c a. Your honestly, I forget, um, the company's email address. But it might be emiko lt d dot com. Um, if you But if you want to get in touch with me, uh, feel free, might I'll give you my email address for Franco. It's C J u d d. So see judge at m co l t d dot com. Um, yeah. If anyone does want to reach out, let me know. We have jobs popping up all over the country. We get messages all the time about different job openings and opportunities. We have a great it's called the Strategic Development program for young graduates to get into, um, that essentially, well, well, teach individuals the business. Um, you know, from the from from the depths all the way to the top of the business. And it's a great opportunity for someone had to learn learn the business. Um, you know, from the warehouse position to the inside. Sales outside sales to management trainee. Um, there are there every every imco is always looking for these recent grad strategic development individuals that because they that that's what it thinks is gonna be what sets us apart from other suppliers in our in our competitors, um, is getting individuals who have this this level of education because of the experiences that you do get when you when you go, go to university. And like we talked about earlier, just the different things that you're you know, that that you see and that you experience and, you know, I mean for Yeah, well, like for final for me. Um, it was like all of our group presentations that we did our presentation, that we did it to Katya. Where, um I mean like when I was working in California. Um, I worked, and I was able to set up a meeting of Siemens. Siemens is a ginormous Fortune 500 company. I set up a new organization in a meeting of 25 of the biggest decision makers for Seamen's on the West Coast of the United States. All in one room. Um and, uh, and I was out of my depth. I don't know what I was talking about, but we had our CEO in the room with me, and I was able to stand up in front of these people and give a presentation. Andi asked like, Where is that comfort like, How do you have? Like, what? What did you learn that taught you how to do that was like, honestly, it was being at a Katya and being in this small class sizes and these group presentations, and you always have to stand in front of people and present. Um And so I told that remember those Can't your specifically remember I said this yesterday? The other day on my podcast? My first one was about with Kathleen Martin James in group of about 40 people communications 101 Alexander Keats. Those who like it like it a lot. That was my first one. I was shaking my second, my second one e did. I played Bob merrily in the background and said, Legalize it, don't criticize it. And I handed of zigs, eggs toe all the students. But now I'm a teachers. But I remember specifically...

...those instances at a Katya of just standing up. And that's what you're saying of bringing that into the workplace. Yeah, there's all topics, but no, it's just greatly. It's ah, and you know, there's a number of small universities out there. They're gonna offer that same thing. But I'm sure in larger universities you're gonna get a different skill set that you would have developed, right? So it's But yeah, I think no matter where you go or what, you decided to do it. There's gonna be things that you could bring to the table that you're gonna be ableto learn. Andi. That's that's what it's all about. One final question, Chris. Why do you work? I work. Um, I work to provide a better life for my family. That's why I work. Um, you know, before my previous life I worked. Um, I worked football. I I did what I did because I was passionate about it because I was something that I wanted to reach the top echelon, the top level. And now all I've done now is I have a family, and so I'm making less self decisions. I'm doing the same thing. Um, in my industry now, I want to be able to provide the best for my family. I know to do that, I need to master my craft. I need to be the best at what I do. You know, even though there's talks about me being the next line, that my position here now, here, locally, I want to be my boss's boss, you know? So that's why I work. Because I want to be able to provide those things for my family and challenge myself and to be the best. I want to get the maximum bill maximum out of myself that I can and because I know if I do that, um, we're gonna be OK as a family. Chris Judd, count manager at M co corporations. I have appreciated your time, and I appreciate the work that you dio appreciate that. Brian. Thanks for having buddy. Any time. It was great. I appreciate it. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe, Follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. E, I hope that you have yourself a productive yet joyful day in your work.

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