WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 11 · 1 year ago

#10 Chelsea The Strong ELL Teacher on BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Chelsea Pyper talks about her journey through life from her tweens as a papergirl to today where she is a ELL teacher in Washington. She shares great insight of the influence of family and how she is able to balance work and life as a single mom.    

Chelsea Pyper (@chelsea.tke) - https://www.instagram.com/chelsea.tke/

Welcome to why we work, with your host, Brian V as. He speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which would be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going and keep on working. Workings tough, but working is good. Now here's your host to why we work, Brian V and here we are with Brian V at why we work, and I have the great pleasure of speaking with Chelsea Piper. Chelsea, how are you doing this fine evening for you? I'm done, really good. I'm in a good spot. Kids are occupied. It was, you know, for us in the Pacific, northwestern about an hour from Seattle, in the state of Washington and the good old USA, it's overcast and for me that's that's that means I'm productive, driven. Today it's two sunshine. I'm out. Is that home? Is that original home? Is that Washington? That's correct. Yeah, borne race here, can you tell us an even me? I mean we are acquaintances. We've known each other for I don't know what it was. It two thousand and sixty two thousand and six, two thousand and seven, maybe something like that. So it was a couple, couple, but it was a while ago. It was. Yeah, we know a little bit of one another and about one another, but in terms of work, can you tell us a little bit about yourself and growing up in Seattle? And Yeah, yeah, yeah, I was just, I think about the other day, just wondering, you know, what the concept of work and where that came from, and I was kind of doing a kind of an internal parallel when I was looking at the your last interview with Marie and and, you know, like him, I had a paper out. That was my first kind of like hey, welcome to the world of work, and that was awesome. I really enjoyed that experience. I think I was ten or eleven, but for me, like the role model for work was my Stepdad. He was such a hard worker and you really kind of encapsulated what I what I kind of deemed like, you know, the middle class work ethic, because you know, that's where we come from. And and he was always, you know, Gosh, you know, by day he was he had a federal job and by evening he was a real estate agent. So he was he was always working and you know, weekends for family time. So I think you know my idea of we're started pretty young and I had a great time with that paper all. That was for sure. Just you know, I don't I think I was only making thirty bucks a month and this is back in the gosh late not a late S, early s. So yeah, that was that was pretty fun. Is Fun experience learning about where I had and maybe you heard it when I said it. I think I mentioned to Marie, but I also had a paper route of which I got fired from. But no, did you have like an influence to get that first job in the paper? Because I remember, if I can remember the guys, I know jody upshy, I think there was a couple of guys that in my neighborhood and they were like rocks star paper route boys or people right, and they just did his point and they had these big bags and just people in the neighborhood knew like these guys did this job well and I as the boy. Look, you're mentioning paper route. I thought about it and Marie mentioned it and a lot of people kids have had paper roads and like I think I was one, you know, wanting some money, meaning to do something with my times, but there were just some kids around that were doing it well and I was like I wanted because then I think they had a nice bike, you know, because they were able to deliver the paper with their bike, and my route was walking, like the main drag of my hometown. So I maybe I could have had a bike, I guess, but I think I had a lot of papers, which is the reason why I go fired because I threw them all away. It was there. Did you know someone in in the paper industry of delivering papers that you just said maybe this would be interesting. Well, it's funny you mentioned that because that was like my second job, because my first job I got hired to work as a at a church, helping with Sunday school, like watching the kids, and I was actually fired from that job and I remember the day and it...

...was something like a few bucks an hour, but still that Gosh, when you're ten or eleven, that's a lot of money. And and honestly, like I remember just doing something stupid, just being a kid, and they're like well, you can't act like this, you gotta Watch the kids and and I'm sure I probably wasn't doing my best and that's when that I think it might have been the it might have been the minister's wife that came in and she goes, why don't you just get a paper out job instead, and I was like Huh, yes, she's and I was like Oh, I really well, I guess. So I did. And and it wasn't like an everyday thing, like like a huge paper, but it was like a Wednesday delivery. So, you know, for me it was like the day before I would get like they drop off the newspapers and have to roll them up and Oh gosh, it's such a tedious process. But you know, it was just like a weekly deal and childhood labor. I think about it. It wasn't. Not Very pleasant. I remember as well. It wasn't really the manager sitting me down at my mum's kitchen table and they're like we're sorry, but you and over the daily news was a red bag with like, you know those running stripes that people put on their clothes are used to. It would be down like the strap of it and like we need your bag back. I don't even know. I knew it was. I should have thrown that in the river too. But well, was it just a onetime thing for you. Was this girl this day throng? No, no, yeah, I know. I when it was really heavy. I don't know which days were, like Wednesdays were horribly heavy, or like there's a lot of news or they put like extra stuff in it, but I was just a little lad some mercy for me, like these were. This was huge, like these guys don't read the paper, it's going to McDonald's. They don't know who's reading the baby, but apparently a lot of people they really cared. So after your newspaper experience, yeah, actually want to ask you about your dad and you saying, and I find this interesting, because being a parent now and working and trying to pay bills and all of that, were you able, because you said he had two jobs, but you were able to play and hang out on the weekends? was was he able to do that well, but while at the same time as trying to do his best to support the family? And I think you and I probably have that same experience where like like I got to do this, honey, I got to get this done. This is work. But you know, I want to make as you and I were talked about, I want to make mud pies with you. I just Huck yeah, right now, I really got to get this done. Do you remember that being or did he? Do you manage that well? So I actually kind of group with to DADS. So and it's it's funny because, you know, I just in a nutshell, my parents were divorced was really young. So, you know, I I'd go to my biological dad's house like every other weekend, like clockwork. So he and I were tight and then about the age of ten, my mom remarried and it's funny because my my dad remarried the same year. They were like eleven months apart. They both got married, remarried, but my Stim Dad, you know, it's like he he taught me different skills and my the my Real Dad, my biological dad, did, and I would say when I compare the two, I end up being much closer to my Stepdad, probably because I was living with my mom and you know it'd see my stepdad every single day, but you know, whereas when we go back to you know, like my my dad, I'd see every the weekend. You know, it's a different kind of skill set that they taught me and I would say that for both, you know, in the time, in the era that that we were living in, S S, it was very much like you work hard, you play hard. So I feel like even till this day I'm still striving if I can get if I can still be like a fraction of of how they were at my age, I would be I would be blessed. I still feel like I'm running towards that goal of still being able to judgle everything. And I'm a single parent, so I think, you know, that adds more to the spice. But my parents are nearby and so they offer a lot of support. But I would say, yeah, I think that I never felt like I got hey and I don't have time, I got to work. It was always so eloquent the way that they illustrated how they always wanted to include me, they always wanted me to be a part of the process, versus Hey, I got to work on this, to give me some time, whereas it's funny when I compare my father's to my mom. My mom was always like more selfish with her time, I guess, and so I've always strive to be more like my dad's like hey, well, I got to do work. What you come along with me? So that really opened my eyes to say, okay, and I have kids later on, I want to include them...

...in the process. I want them to know that they need to have those skills to work hard as well, but also to moder each other their time so that they can, you know, play, play hard as well. How did you what was the next job you did or how how long did you go as a paper delivery person? So I don't think it was very long. I think I kind of got bored. You know, it's just that, Um, you know, it was funally during the summer months, but when it was during school time, I just was really I suffered from procrastination so long. It took me probably until college to kind of nip that in the bud. But I think probably I only had it for a couple of months and I it's sad. It seems like it. I was thinking this as you're mentioning it, because, say it's someone else mentioned. Marie said it's like actually talking about a paper route, because I hope someone's going to listen and it could be, you know, you said at ten, eleven, twelve year old, or someone who's like, I don't have a job, you know, doing a job like that is a good way to start or to get back going. Or because I see, you know, you and I both work in Korea. They have like van services that they just pile up the newspapers, they go to apartment apartment, they grab a stack and they drop it off. So it's like a flyer delivery service. It's just there's a job available somewhere that you can start and even though it's we're just talking about delivering papers, I think there's a work ethic that people can glean out of that that is is valuable. So I, oh, still stuck on a sure being ten years old and my first job. Well, no, that's why I want to get into why we work, because I think at all stages they are whether there's steps or their processes that help all of us out. So after delivering papers, where did where did you venture off to next in your work life? For sure. Yeah, I think there was a big gap of time. I mean I was always super busy with my family and we do I really took advantage of those long Lazy Summers. I think up until probably, I mean my first real job was not until I was a senior in high school. I mean I was really lucky. I didn't. Were you really? Well, you were an athlete. I was another. You're not an author now, you know, you hear people like I was an athlete, but I I'm an athlete to like that. That's funny, I know well, and then forty years old hits and you're still like our ride is. But no, I remember I start swimming when I was young. Well, I guess ten was not young, but I swam with the Adrians. Heasann Adrian is, Islympic goal Middle Back swimmer, of backstroke swimmer, and his sister and I we grew up Taylor. We're best friends. So they were kind of the influence for me. I mean I did grow up with a tiger mom like they did, and you know my parents and bust me out to two hours of a way to do hardcore swimming. But yeah, I had kind of the early bite of the competitive, you know, the competitive sports world, and so I did swimming for quite a umber of years and you know, continue that through colleges. So that was your sport. Is Tri on train. That's what you pursue. Yeah, so you went to college as a swimmer as well? No, because it was so cut throat. I and I was also kind of the the older, the olders swimmer athlete and at the time I kind of fast forward. But I took a gap year off and studied abroad and finally pursued by bea and I was done by the time I was twenty four. But I was considered old and I was just more of a you know, kind of a coach's assistant. I did more of that role than I did, you know, actual competitive swimming, but I did definitely, you know, participating triathlons and you know, I had a bunch of fun time over there. I was actually done a Louisiana state so big party school and Baton Rouge. What was your job as a senior in high school? So going back, so in high school, you know, I did committed a swimming and and yeah, I was a I was the oh my goodness, I forgot my words. This is when you get me, just when you spend so many years abroad, some of the language, you know, you were gracious enough to interview now and it's you're like eight, nine on a Friday. People are winding down. Yeah, I'm not not being interviewed, so good. Yeah, but yeah, going back to high school, I was. I was captain of the home team and and I loved it, but for the work. I didn't actually get a job until, you know, senior in high school, and you know, I'd always do like odd job. I mean that I think that's kind of come with a territory. I up in small town and I'd Molans and I would, you know, I did a lot of cleaning. I feel like I did a lot of...

...cleaning kind of people's houses, but, you know, just our jobs to kind of eat, make some money here and there. But when I was in high school I became kind of like what we call a mall rat. So I started working in the local mall and I just went from like one side of the mall to the other and kind of got my taste for when what is its commerce and you know, getting a page was, you say, one that's at the time one side to the other. You just found a job in this place and I'm done with that and you went to different places like that. Well, I mean I think it was very picky about where I worked, but you know, I started at like a jewelry shop for girls and I learned how to eatr piers and then I became kind of like close to the what they call a key closer, and I knew that, you know, working in I don't know, retail still was not going to be my forever thing, but it did help, you know, you know, get some money and pay for my car insurance and get around up with some gas. So but yeah, it's funny because it wasn't like in on purpose, it was just happened to be. Like I end up working from one end to the mall within two years to the other end and said, okay, I'm done being a mall Ras. So you said there was a lot of flexibility in your family. So can you comment on I remember, I don't know who it was, but it doesn't matter. Many years ago I saw a lady and she looked at her child and I don't know if the child asked for something. She said, you can get it when you get a job. And the girl was, I don't know, let's say nine or ten. So and I find I have that temptation, you know, my kids, if they're not very happy with what they have or, you know, all they're getting more than me or any other things. Well, when you get your own place and you get your own job. You can do that. Can you comment on what seemingly was your freedom, because this is like saying North American culture versus a Korean culture where Korean Kreen do not need to get a job, like it's not necessary after university. And so we come from a culture where, okay, you can get a job at Nin hundred and ten and but then you had the freedom, as you said, to enjoy your long summers and so would get some things that you want it without having to work. Can you comment on how that helped you or maybe even hurt you? And I'm not sure, of having that freedom to not be pressured by your parents to go get a job, because some some parents throw that on and you know, it may be encourage like you, but you don't need to, versus saying get at a house and go get a job. Sure, no, I get it, and I think you know. I have to say that I think I was really blessed. I think if my mom had not met my Stepdad, maybe my life would have taken a different turn and I would have had be required to get a job and help support her in us, in our family. But what I really appreciate, especially now that my dad myself dad is in his s is is that he really wanted me to to enjoy my childhood and I carry that to this day, still wanting my kids to not grow up too fast and to still be kids. But I feel like, you know, we were in a very because of his hard work, because that he you know, like he my gosh, I don't know how he did it because I think about like how crazy busy my life gets to be and how he was so well adjusted during that time. But I mean, you know, he was always such a presence and, you know, I felt like I had you know, no matter what, he always kept his temperament and he was such a good role model. But I feel like because of his hard work, I was able to enjoy my summers and just spend time learning about life, I mean like life skills, and you know, I was able to change my oil in my car and change, you know, do all the basic work on a slug bug that I had for my very first car. I got to learn to do fun things a lot of kids my age probably didn't. You know, I got to skiing, I traveled around. We went to Jamaica when I was younger. So I mean like we went honestly, from like, you know, close to welfare with my single mom to suddenly, you know, looking from BAC and cheese two lobsters a few times a month, you know, eating lobster in Sushi and fish. It was such a huge difference for me. It really opened my eyes to, you know, the kind of life in the world that I wanted to ride for my kids eventually. But I I have so much respect for both my dad's because they worked so hard that that they allowed me to really take my time to kind of grow and learn about the world and just kind of spend time me becoming myself. I yeah, I have a I had an interviewed the other day and just the general which I adore, but it was hard, or is hard, to for him to see how hard is parents worked versus things that didn't actually go his way. So it's and it's taking him while. I think he's starting to and I hope that that he does see it.

But sometimes we we don't see our parents and they were like, oh, we're neglected. Well, no, you know what, maybe our parents really hate being away so much and, you know, breaks their heart they they have to do this for a period of time or whatever I mean. In there's sometimes their parents just sacrifice their family to their work. It's that hard balance to try to meet and into college. Did you were working as well, or actually, why did you? What did you take in college? You were swimming or teaching? And what made you go abroad? What was your intention in going to college? Yeah, so, you know, Um, I think because my parents have provided really so much for me that I wanted to I wanted to do it different, I want to do it on my own. And so when I graduate high school and I end up staying around for a year two at my local college because some scholarships, learned how to be an adult. Look like my own. Had A roommate, but it was probably when I was when I first moved, had taken a vacation outside the country, went to Jamaica, and I really I would believe I was probably a love and or twelve meeting thirteen, but if such an eye owning experience to be in a different culture. That's really where I can say that I hit the travel bug and I knew that I had to see this world that was in front of me. I had to see these cultures and languages and meet people and so that was probably my first fight. But also in high school I did in exchange to Belgium and I love the French language. I knew that that was kind of like my skills set. Even though I had taken all these biology classes with a plan to work in a lab, I just knew I was going to be bored to death. So languages become kind of like you're taking sciences stuck in a lab. I would have been okay for two thousand and twenty, but any other time not so much. Right. So, I mean I follow my passion. I had a kind of a knack for languages and started teaching myself friend and just loved it, and I think that was probably like the the precursor to eventually becoming a DS LL teacher when I lived in Korea. But yeah, that was probably, you know, going to Belgium and going to Jamaica. They had hit me hard it. So I knew that I had to have some kind of a travel a plan on my my resume, you know, sometime or another. And then when I went to I ended up going down. Actually, it's really interesting when I think about it's been a while since I really thought, but when I graduate. About a year after I finished high school, I was about one class away from getting my social's degree and I was like, I'm done, I need a break, and I just like woke up and said, you know, I have this idea that I need to go to some place abroad in Europe, and so I had nerved it down between Switzerland and the seashelly islands on the coast of Africa. And I got this idea for my aunt to when she finished college. There was some family situation. She end up being an opair and I thought, you know, I don't I look into it. You know, it's I've already practiced being an adult. I was at the time. I was living with a boyfriend. You know, we're practicing home life and it just I didn't have the kind of fulfillment that I wanted. I wanted to experience the thirst of being somewhere else geographically and experiencing languages and cultures. So I didn't finding a family and I went to Switzerland for a year and I think that's what really you know, I say now that when I lived in work there, I feel like I saw the world through rose colored glasses and and even now I feel like you know, that's where I have left part of me because I learned so much. I took care of two young girls who I'm still friends with today after all these years, and I really enjoyed my experience there. So that kind of helped to frame my path, like having this adoration for languages the culture, I knew that that that was the direction I needed to go, and so when I went to college, I knew, Hey, I'm going to be majoring in French. I just love the culture and I'm accumulating as as I travel and I learn new skills and me new people. I just become kind of more of a walking history of the cultures and languages that I learn in the people that I meet. And it's kind of interesting to say that, but I ended up going down to Louisiana State University and my biological dad and Stepmom, they had moved down there a few years prior in fact, when I finished high school. They're like, you're going to stay here with us, or are you gonna travel down to Louisian? I said Nope, I'm going to stay here, but yeah, so I, you know, got a vehicle and pack all my stuff and took a road trip and thus began my college life at twenty one and had some great experiences. But that's where I ended, studying French and international study. Who did you with the intention to besides before, prior to going to Belgium? Sure,...

...yeah, I was. You know, one of the language requirements is, you know, you can German, Japanese and in French, and I chose French. So that's where I kind of what you know, ked. What grady did you start studying French? I guess ninth grade, officially ninth grade, but I started teaching myself at at the local library earlier. Yeah, and what was your your what was your hope in in studying French, or were you planning on being a teacher or what was your end goal? Sure, I did not even have an idea of being a teacher on my radar, but I had a plan to be a linguist, possibly work for the UN, being an interpreter or translator, do editing, and I love the idea of baby being like a tour tour guide of some sort. So that was kind of whatever old how old are you at that time? Wow, let's see, so I finished gontring college in two thousand and four. You added timly had. It makes me twenty for adding the year. I just wondering. I think about it, but yeah, I'm absolutely crazy. Anyone who listens who's twenty four and under, you can listen to you. How know, yeah, that you didn't know what you were doing for sure. Oh Yeah, twenty three, twenty four. I still was like you know, I had worked for the partner state for a bit. I did in translating. I loved it. I traveled, but I still wasn't set on what my purpose was, what my what my calling was, essentially my why. I did not know then, but I had a little better idea than then. I think I did. Before you gradud what point did you during universe or college, did you say okay, I'm going to was create your next step? Or was there something that was happened chance? My Friend, Korea was never on my map. It was interesting. There's the story behind I'll try to give you the brief version, but usually say hey, we need a couple of beers and a couple of hours of talk about that. But it's interesting because I after college I moved back to Washington state. So from Louisiana State, moved back to Washington state and I was only here for a couple of months. I knew that it was just going to be a transition stage. Be With my family, hanging with friends, and I was working at the Y MCA and I ran into an old, gosh middle school friend who had done a year in South Korea and the ended up doing a midnight flight and I was like, well, what is this midnight flight? Tell me about it. How is he experience? I never thought to go to Asia. And he goes, yeah, you know, he gave me the rundown and how it went, but that it turned kind of stars with the end, so we had to leave and the thought, Gosh, what's it midnight? So excited I had I don't even know minut Oh. Well, you know, even back in the early two when you were working at the Hoguan's, you know, the the academies, and right night, a lot of you know, first the minute. It's okay, that's like okay, okay, yeah, yeah, yeah, I thought there's like this romantic it's like to Korea at midnight and it takes you in and settling down and give you a humbolks and stuff. But both you mean the the the exile of expats who say exactly, Yep, yes, yeah, for whatever reason that. But a lot stay. So I don't don't get that wrong. I mean just it's not for everyone. Yeah, yeah, yeah, that's right. Yeah. So in for my friend at the time, it wasn't for him. He wasn't wasn't meant to stay very, very long. But I had given myself a month. I'm like, Hey, you know, I think I want to try Asia. You know, I'm fresh with my BEA. I did translation interpretation, but moving to Washington man, I need to have credentials to do that and I thought I just finished school and I didn't want to work on that. So it's like time for to travel again. Let's do it. She'lls. And so I was watching this this news channel, and it was when where you can watch Chinese, Japanese and Korean, and I just remember this, watching the Korean news channel and and this lady, this Ad Juma, had said the word Chincha, Ro Chincha, and I was like, what is this word? Chinchcha? It sounds really great. I don't know what it is, but maybe I'll try Korea. And within a month I was on an air plant. Was it is that like to dio, like really, since, say, Oh, yeah, Sinceha, like really seen XAC, really, really, you tells you went to Korea. Really, I know, really, so it's funny. My parents were like, are you ever gonna stay put somewhere? Yeah, so, and yeah, you can catch me for very long, since I was up again moving. But Yeah, within a month I was on the arplane Ling Jsse and yes, a, Oh and heally, some SAG and then and then rest the sister. How long did you stay here and how how did that define I mean, because I couldn't say for certain, but I'm pretty sure you're still in the same field. Yeah, how did you find...

...that? Helped coming here, helped you as a person? Yeah, helped define your your present role. Yeah, you know, I would have to say that first, that that I've always been kind of interested in the educational fields and helping in some way, shape or form, people, kind of presenting my best self and helping others along the way. You know, when I went to career, I really didn't have much experience in teaching and I remember them, my hogue, saying here's your books, Dam Monday, and I know what to do. But I had to learn to get myself, you know, together and get some pobble on being and happy, ready to go. You Ready? Good Academy, a high one. Yeah, it's like here's your book, start on this page, for there the midnight guy just left your art once see, like exactly, that's that's kind of how it felt. It was just such a such a different world. And just as a side note, I remember I live in this really small suburb of Daegu and it took me a month to leave my little area and I remember going across this bridge and seeing this other white skinned girl and and I had not seen nobody but but Korean faces everywhere in the first month and I was just like how am I going to do this? And I remember going we were looking at each other and we're so excited or like, Oh my God, there's another foreigner here who and so we didn't even know each other from the neighbors friends, and we're like where are you from exactly? Oh, just those times, I tell you can write a book, but you know, it's just those little things that just kind of kind of drove my thirst and I think it was such a trait to only learned like really about the teaching field because that's kind of where I got my passion for teaching and knew that that is what is, that I meant for, that's my calling in life, and I think, you know, I'm always going to look at Korea, you know, professionally, in a kind of a bitter sweet sense because, you know, I was blessed in so many ways and never had any really negative experiences when it came to teaching or my work over there. Personal is a different situation, but for professionally, I really really loved the culture, the system, the teaching opportunities that I had, and I think that that experience helped to define really kind of how I view teaching and I always, you know, I think, probably with my experiences in traveling abroad, excuse me, and my languages. I think I always try to intertwine that in, you know, my classes, in the students that I meet in what did you what is that thing that you you gained the most knowledge about to make it applicable to to where you are now? What is is it? Are you saying that you made it like almost a sound board from which too to present and plan all of your lessons that you do now? Is that? In what way what did you realize? I mean because, as you're saying it, I'm thinking maybe you realize there's a lot of teachers that don't really plan that well and they don't teach that well and but they're doing this job. And okay, so I know that you can do that bare minimum and still be a teacher, but that's not the way I want to I don't want that to be my job. I don't want that to be my work is. Is that what you're saying? And how you took this as a starting point from which to leap off into your career? In what way did you do? Absolutely, okay. So, you know, honestly, I think having still kind of limited its view about the teaching field in America, you know, it wasn't unto being in Korea that I was able to really kind of scaled down the purpose of me teaching in Korea. And I think probably most importantly, what I've gained is probably the lot, how do I just say? I've become a jack of all trades. Right, so, you know, I've gained such a lot of information. So I kind of know a lot, a little bit about everything. Right. So, you know, I think in my course of being in Korea, which was I had a bit. I mean I was there from two thousand and five until two thousand and ten, came back to the states for a year and a half and then from about two thousand and twelve, all two thousand and twelve to two thousand and fourteen I was in Korea. So I guess that's what about seven years seven a half over the span of ten years, and so I think that, you know, part of my mission per se is like, is I'm a storyteller and so you know, there's always something I can draw from my experiences. I did have some some pretty aggy experiences in Korea, but you know, the more positive ones they overshadow those ones, those negative ones, but there's always something that can be said for...

...those experiences rather teachable through their lessons that I try to bring to my students and to my work on the daily basis. And they kind of reinforced that, even though some of the things I've experienced my life were not ideal, that I am where I am because of the choices I've made in my experiences in teaching and traveling. So so, from the time that you first left Korea, was that okay I'm going never coming back, or I'm going to go do something for a little while and then then return, or you're like, well, this home, wherever you went, was not as ye packed up to be. What was your career path moves during those later the first time, leaving, coming back and then returning to where you are for sure. So you know this. This will kind of maybe a edge a little bit more into the personal side, but it was. But it was the person that I was with was making life pretty difficult. I realized that there was, you know, raising kids and Korea was wonderful. I loved it, but it wasn't what I expected it to be in my certain in my situation, and I realized that I wasn't living my authentic self. It's interesting to say that and I don't know if you can agree, but you know, being a different culture for a very long time, you get to the point where, no matter how much you have accumulated in terms of, you know, cultural knowledge, language INS and outs, in being fluent and free and living in that society, you never truly become them. Like I was never like I will never ever become Korean, even though I felt more Korean at times than American. But you know, I realized that I wasn't doing myself a favor or my kids a favor kind of where I was trying to juggle my personal life and my teaching life, and it just I kind of needed a reset and so for me, coming back to the states was kind of what I needed. At the time, my youngest son was, oh, two and a half and my daughter was only a few months, and so we had been a chance me back in my folks and it's hard in itself. Oh believe me, I know this. Oh my gosh. I mean to think how hard it was when I was a single yell and then having kids, and so it was such a different story. It was like, you know, fighter flying. And again, remember when you race. I can remember when your first came to Korea. You get off the airplane, maybe get a taxi, you had your backpack that you had since the college, Maybe High School, and your trustee bag, and then now you're leaving with a couple of kids. I know, oh my gosh it was. It was crazy. It was crazy, it was, you know, and you just learned so much, not only just about yourself but about kind of maneuver because you know, at the time we were we were a third culture family, you know, it's like we were Pakistani American. My then husband is pack Sanny so Paccini, American, but raising her kids in the Korean culture. So it was like mindboggling to be like, you know, three languages on the daily and people are like at home going how do you function? But you just learn and you went back. Did you decide, okay, I'm gonna take teaching more seriously? Did you have to get a teaching degree? And when you thinking a professional development, what was most on your mind? Yeah, so when I came back I just knew that teaching was for me and a sort my master's agree then, but you know, my kids were young and it was such it was hard to balance like late nights when not your masters to agree with the kids. Yes, it's harden to be yeah, it was start as the same month. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, and so, but even back that, I think sometimes it was easier than than it is now. I've got I've got tweens that are like going one thousand six hundred and eighteen. You know I'm saying. So sometimes those earlier days rooper than go to your crib now it's like you can't talk to me, but do you be? Oh Lord. So, yeah, I mean, I think you know, the second time around I really felt like I really wanted to get to know. It wasn't just, you know, learning on the fly. I really wanted to know the academic part of teaching, and so for me it was like I'd Gotten my oh goodness, a couple of certifications as well, and I just felt like I was able to get to be. We have a visitor, we have someone coming in or visit. Hey, sweetie MOMS online. Okay, when it comes to him, real quick, hi, real quick. This is Brian. Come say him quick. Hello, say hi. What's your mean? I'm Brian. Nice to meet you. I have five and a half. Its Prank. You're a big boy, he is. Yep, and...

...he's interviewing me. So can you first? You definitely have more muscle than I have. That's that's reality. Never bring this. Do you want to see how much muscle I have? That's awesome. That only works in our adult world. Now you know. There's my business card. Here's my muscle. Oh, you have toys. I Love Toys. Well, let me see how much her Mo that we said. I thought you were going to show me. I it's really if I turn around backwards and push it up like this, it looks a lot bigger. I'd be big. Huh. Yeah, you know, my son does the same. You got some. My son is five and a half, six and he does. Papa, let me see your muscles. YEA, and I'm forty something. I don't have any. Forty forty something, forty, forty three. It's young. Listen, I know it seems very old. Five young, but forty outside my mind, is it? I know we are. Body doesn't agree. I feel you on that one. Okay, take take him outside, Baby. Thank you. Love you. You're a lot more patient. I'd be. I'd be given, I'd be given dirty. I that was gonna happen least once the cancer. I'll be that newscaster. Oh, I know who's online air and the the baby comes in with the MOM. Who's Dragon. Ever, look at that guy's with a straight face. He I don't know if he kept his job or not, but not, how can you look at him like you're the guy? That hilarious. I'm like, I feel you, man. I don't think what his life trying so hard to do with the Save the moment is made it, I know. So you said You doube being a few courses and certificates, and did you know where you wanted to go, what you want to do exactly? I mean that's a whole process for people. I just today, actually, I received a Hawaiian provisional license because I'm trying to get one out of Oh see, so I just got it today. I was shocked really. So it's a process, right, like those are processes that people really need to put some time and effort into. So did you in yourself, I mean to people who are going to college, to thinking about getting a teacher, there's some things that you might want to think about, because those things take time and it's not that they're overly difficult. Would you say? It's just a little tedious. You got to be organized and you know, right, idea of in life, of anything, I think is good advice, of looking at the goal of where you want to be and say, if it's a teacher, well, figure out all those little things. So nothing surprised you along the way. So how did you go through the weeds of that thing after you are yeah, for sure. I mean you know and and I had gone through. I think I was. I didn't go to a cell to rout, but I mean I did get, you know, my certification and and I was able to kind of look at, you know, when you got your certification for teaching, yes, you kind of looked at a little bit more, you know, professionally, and so that kind of gave me a leg up to you know, working at young Jen and then going to, you know, young book later on, which is actually on my return back is I went back to young Jen college and and was like a resource kind of teacher because I you know, that experience and I think that kind of open up the door for me in a lot of ways. And my last place of work was young book and I loved it there. I loved just the time and, you know, the the professional the hours that we worked as quite a bit different over there than it is over here. I feel like sometimes we're we're in a rat race here in North America, whereas I feel like, you know, like you mentioned, you know you've got you've got time and space your breathe and you know you're not scrambling to make it all work. When you've got a little bit more peace and less chaos you know, going on Kevin Berry. Sorry, but Kevin Barry. I once mentioned to him. I was yeah, I'm gonna, I was thinking about going that Brian Korea is one ten of the work in time of what you experience and I got a real job. He is that. He didn't mean in a bad way, but it just says it is so competitive, right, like and you ye, certificates, you need this and that and papers and you need to stay on that. I mean, yeah, right, you have to stay at the top of your game because there's people out there trying to take your job or you can't get emotion and all of that. So it's no. Teachers, I think, are getting a little bit more respect this year for the amount of work they do because parents are realizing, Hey, my kids are home all the time and this isn't is fun and Oh,...

I need to know some of these things. And I don't know if that's going to be an improvement. I think I saw in England that they gave nurses a big raise or something, a biggest rays ever. So maybe teachers will share all fall in line and for that as well, I hope. So. Yeah, what was what was your goal in in teaching that you would be you would just pursue the esl route. Is that? Is that where you were hoping in a particular school, particular district? What were you're hoping? Sure, well, it's funny because I went back to the states, I realized that I really lacked a lot of knowledge about, you know, the regular teaching fields. You know, I taught from kindergarten forward up to the you know, teaching college and in South Korea and I really wanted to. I loved it and I felt like that was where I was meant to be. Going back the states. I really liked a lot of content knowledge and just in general, like, you know, when how does this school system really work? I really wanted to kind of dig in deep and I worked as a substitute teacher, so that gave me a chance to kind of get an idea of how the classroom is run, but open my eyes to the difficulties that a lot of teachers have to deal with, not just administration but like behavioral challenges. And let me say, wow, it was such a huge difference to be in the Korean classroom whereas you know, you're you're not dealing with beheral issues. Yeah, granted for the younger kids. You know, you're doing more TPR and you're doing fun activities. But you know, in the American classroom, at least in this neck of the woods, and I have to say it's probably almost everywhere, but there's a lot of bevinal challenges that are linked to, you know, kids socio economic backgrounds and a lack of parents at home and in a lot of free time and it kind of you know, kind of drifts into the classroom scene. And there were some days, you know, working as even as a substitute, where I just had to resort two games because we had so many behavioral issues. And you know, the classrooms are so varied, not just with with age level and not each little but but abilities and kids now coming with so many other issues. You know, adhd five or four plans. All these things have to take an account. It does take a lot to juggle everything, you know. So, but so that's what I did as I was a substitute teacher for quite a while and I was still raising my young kids and and so, but I knew that I wanted to really become like a real teacher, because it's funny, you know, as a substitute, you always get the question. No, are you really a teacher? Are you just practicing? And so, you know, it's kind of like you're not really considered a teacher until you got your certification. Right. Well, even so, I did end up going to read. We're yeah, Gif you've worked in a school with other creedis nothing against them. English teachers are not really highly thought of either, right, if you're not, yeah, yeah, teacher, and maybe it's true for most people, but we're trying. No, and we're learning and yes, I think so. Yeah. So when you, yeah, I think, pursued your so at that point you were certified and you were just waiting for a job or looking for an opening. Is. Well, so what I did was the alternative route to certification. I was a like it will be call an emergency certificated teacher, and so you had to go through like a slue background and and get kind of like what they call support or reinforcement from from other teachers and you know, your background, all that good stuff. But anyway, so it's I think in Canada they call it like a supply teacher. Yes, listen, Victoria, okay, so here, yeah, we're subside teacher. Teachers up here. But anyway, so it allowing it to do basically take over the teacher of record, you know, when they were gone. And so, you know, I did end up going through the star talk program so I went with City University. So it basically gave you like a year and a half and I could, you know, it was streamlines. I can take all my experience as a teacher working abroad and kind of, you know, use my on the fly experiences to get through my course work. And so there's a program in Seattle called Star Talk and it's funded by the government, and so I was learning how to actually teach the Korean language to ethnically Korean kids or kids that wanted to learn Korean's pretty interesting, is that first summer. It's pretty awesome actually, and was great. Oh yeah, I loved it. I really enjoyed my time over there. And then, you know, the my level of Korean was not where it would be to translate. So I was like, HMM, maybe I'll just go ahead and do elementary at because, you know, I love found out that I love fourth and fifth grade kids. So that's what I focused on. And we have this big teacher project called the the ATPA and and I did mine in math. So I taught fifth grade for a while and just love that program and got certified through or. I will be soon. Still waiting for the second part of the program, which is sort of to get my teaching endorsement in El...

...and I figured, since I took so long teaching, you know, El or Esl in South Korea, that it does. It makes sense because we're kind of need of El Teachers. So this is kind of the second year of my program. I'm technically done, but I'm still waiting for my kind of like my class internship for my l portion. And since covid hit, it kind of like put everything on pause. So we're kind of waiting to see, you know, so even I can get my own as and I'm not trying to, I won't think back to reveal age, but that your age, our ages. You got my age. You're not done. Yeah, you're not. You're not fully survived, you're not, you know, but you're on your path. Yep. So when people think, yeah, Oh, you know, I'm twenty something, I can't take it course, yeah, are you know? You've been said I was twenty four and I was old right. No, they don't know nothing. I'm pretty something. I gotta take a course or I can't learn. You know, I people you can, yeah, teach dog old doctor Trickson, but you can and you can learn. Yeah, I like you have that drive and then motivations, ablutely so, and you're not seeming stopping. Can you just it's, yeah, a small point, but could you say for like, not a warning but some advice for people who are considering going overseas to teach and then they might have the inkorn to go back to their home country and teach? What is? What is? You kind of touched on it, but what they might want to consider the major difference because for me, eating experience I've had, which I would like to know your response to, is the difficulty teaching ESL and you said not really fitting in that that, I think that, yes, makes the capsule even more encapsulating and restricting. Now you're where you are and you can go visit your mom or dad or whomever and you can kind of escape that. But but you also just mentioned now you're dealing with behavior issues, socio, I can armical issues and things that you wouldn't deal with here. So you're not going to find a perfect place to work. But we're if a teacher, someone you know, recent Grads, like I'm going to grab my backpack and a ticket and I'm going to go. And then what share I do? What should I be weary of when I decide to go back to be a teacher? Can you kind of go with boter gooes? Absolutely, okay. So, first of all, I am such an advocate for students to take like a gap yere, to take time to kind of get to know themselves else and what their skills are. And I think right now, I think there's still a lack of kids really knowing what they want to do and a lot of times are kind of like, you know, a steered by their parents or maybe their backgrounds or their their idea of what they think might lead them to success. and honestly, if I could go back and Redo it, I think before kids I would have got my master's degree. You know, it's still I still have that to finish up yet, right, but I think that we kind of get stuck on well, this is my age and this when I should have accomplished by now, and so there's still some reality checks that I have to do on myself to say, okay, this is where I'm at and I'm okay with it because this is where I know I'm going and this is my plan. So I think for kids that, you know, want to say, Hey, I want to explore the world, I want to go travel, I want to meet people, I want to do different things, and I think that is totally okay and I think we need to we need more people to do that. Honestly, is I think, or know they to make the encourage staff, for sure, but I also, you know, I'm very practical and this is reality. You know, it's you know, you have to find a way to make it work and that means you got to make the money right. And so, you know, I think there's kind of like a dichotomy in a way between, you know, what we want to do, which is our passion, and things that, you know, we kind of have to do. And you know, as we become parents, we realize how the those are vital to like survival, and that system personal pressure different by not. Yeah, you can't separate them. Yeah, exactly. So I think it's important that you know the the student would have. They would say, okay, this is what I want to do and they go for it. You know, satiate that that that passion that you you know, that experience that you want to to have, but but know that this is your end date and this is what we're going to go next. You know, there's always going to be, you know, curves and bumps in the road, and I think it's really all about how you how you get back up again. You know, it's like the process, not only the end result, but but I think you kind of have to have that Juada Viva, which is like joy of life and the passion that goes with it. But you also have to have one foot in the ground and be a Li little more practical and think about which is the most realistic way to...

...get there with the students. Who's teaching any you know, could be any country. Could be trying to could be Japan, it could be South America. Right with looking at transitioning back, do you have any insight into you should and what I you were just saying? I was thinking, because some teachers will go away for a year, two and I say it to everyone that I've ever met, like yeah, if you go over two years, you're putting yourself behind the eight ball. Like unless you have, and it's not impossible, obviously, to do something, but unless you have an inheritance or family business to go to, you fell behind in the country that you were in to the people you graduate it with, and now they're off. So you're going to have to start lower, which is if you're fine with it, then that's perfectly acceptable. But I see a lot of teachers who also who come here in particular and waste their time and not do a little bit of course here and there, and it could have been done so easily. So how would you suggest that someone makes best use of their time while also considering the transition to their home? Absolutely I think that's very important. I think that I have to congratulate you for for saying that, because I think so many expats that come back to their you know, their their natal country experience not just reverse the culture shock, which I did for still kind of many years, but but realizing that day it I am. I'm behind where my colleagues are, you know, because they've been here, they've been teachers for many years and year I'm still like, you know, I've got twenty years of teaching experience, but I'm still considered kind of like you know, new be teacher for year teacher, you know, and so I think that that can kind of take up tool. I think I've gone your ego and so having, you know, started over quite a few times. You know, I just had to realize that I needed to be okay with we're sad, good in another country for a decade. They're like no, you're you know, doesn't. Doesn't? That means something and you know, honestly, it is. It is hard, it is and I know a lot of friends that are still on the path less wandered, traveling abroad still, but you kind of have to look at the picture of the future and it took me, probably having kids and moving back home to realize not so much that I wasted time, but that I feel like I wish I would have done things a bit differently. I wish I would have been more like, you know, right on that path to get my teacher and my certification so that by now I'd be like, you know, eight years in with certification and making, you know, decent money. Now it's you know, sometimes it's hard and it's in it's a struggle, but I would say that it's the transition back. There's going to take some time. You can take some time when having spent so, so long abroad, which I which I did, but I think that you just have to be happy where where you are and set your goals and, you know, reach the any of the courses you took online? Did you do anything correspondence by your away, and did you find that valuable in whether defining, or was that just part of the thing that you've already accepted as doing? So did you I'm going to take a course here just to get my toe in the water, or was that just part of the program you've already decided to do? Well, let's see. Any time out like when I was in yeah, I wanted to. When you're when you're in Koreate, did you take any online courses to kind of I did. Actually, yeah, sure, in fact, when I was in fact that when I came back to free the second time, I had that length of time that I worked at my master's degree and I started, you know, I continued that in Kore of it realized that at the time I had right wasn't where I wanted it to be. I want to experience more culture and hands on that. I wanted to study academically. So it wasn't until I came back to the stage that I took it more seriously, studying online and and, you know, did hybrid models. And it's as said, because I think especially nowadays, but there is become the gap between in class learning versus online learning. I think is is catching up to one another. There's sure a parallel or and I think there's a lot of value and people who do not know what they want to do, but if they just yeah, little course, you know, they could be, you know, the secret little person in the in their little internet world, taking something just to get a taste of it rather than diving right into it and saying, why, I can't afford this whole thing. And there's course. I mean you can do some research. Absolutely the value, yeah, further education, you know, lifelong learning, and then if you find something that has gained your attention, then then by all means give it a try. Yeah, I totally agree with that. In fact, you know, when...

I think about it, I had laid by master's degree down, but I was taking, you know, mock courses through Corse Earra and an edemy and I think, as I said, yeah, I took it to that at one point. Yeah, and there's you know, there's Lindacom, there's really it's almost like there's no excuse to not better yourself and I think being in the create the time, I had obviously more time and more space to be able to to take that time and do that. But I think in today's world, we we kind of it would be who of ourselves to enrich ourselves, not just to help us further our goal, you know, whether it be for a career, but also our skills, you know, and I think that you know, we tend to focus on those macro skills, especially when it comes to like, you know, getting lenny the next job or having the skills to be, you know, one off or to be better than the next you know, candidate. But I think those microskills, you know, when it comes like soft skills, those things are you know, I learned a lot of different skills being in Korea that I find that you're that a lot of you know, the people who are in my Tonetown, they don't have those because they didn't have they didn't they didn't travel abroad, they didn't learn another language, they didn't, you know, they weren't necessarily had forced to learn to live and thrive in a different culture. So and I think that's what sets me apart and that's why I'm still kind of I'm on. You know, being a teacher, you always you never stopped learning, right. So I think it's just it's all about, you know, what can I bring the table and what can I share from my experience? So see what is? What is the biggest difficulty you have found, whether as a paper girl or as a teacher or in between? What is the the biggest difficulty or challenge you came across in working that maybe you a overcome or something that it just sits back and you remember that so that maybe motivate you to keep on going. What it was the biggest challenge that you came across? I think it you know, I feel like my time in Korea was so blissful and like life was almost easy in a lot of ways. You know, coming back the states, it was like, and my mom and told you that she know, she'd come to Korea once or twice a year when we were living there and saying this isn't real life, this is not real, it's like, but it is for you know, where we are at right now. This is real life. I'm working twenty hours a week and it's full time, you know, and I've got, you know, privates on the side. But it really was awakened call coming back home and I think, I don't know, I think that I finally realized that moment. Well, my training thought, but overcoming probably I'll just say I wasn't a type of personality. In fact, I was like more of a an introvert in a lot of ways, and I think that I became more of an extrovert being in Korea, but I still kind of dealt with that being courageous and brave and having the confidence in myself. I think teaching brought that out of me. I feel like, you know, it's kind of like a sink or swim. You know, in Korea I feel like we were just allowed to float and, you know, we were quite teachers, but we were having fun and learning about the world. But in but back home, I feel like you gotta make it or you don't, and so I feel like I for my teaching experiences that I've become much more forthright and also, I think, probably because of my age, I'm real Adjuba now. I mean like you know, I'm not just right. We're not. So as your swimmer, as a swimmer, you were here going this is not swimming, and now now you're backs outside and you're like, Oh, I tell you for real, it was and and I don't know if you know, but did you? Did you ever go to this is a side note, but did you ever go to the gymnasium's in Korea, like the workout centers, the pools, and go have yourself a swim? Having had did you ever experience in in some in the end? Yeah, I've been in some pools. Not, not like a gym membership type of thing, but I've been in okay, son ass a moment ago, of worse. I've been to the gym. Yeah, it's from muscles, your muscles. A couple. I've been to a couple. Okay, maybe accident. Okay. So so you know, part of being in Koree. I mean I stayed pretty fit throughout my pregnancies in Korea, but you know, I went back to swimming and it was a big wake up call because you can't just go to a pool and swim. You guys set up for a class and so your kind of paired with other people with similar, you know, kind of skills as you. But it was hilarious to be like stand in line with other Koreans and like swim the lane and then wait in line, and then swim the lane and then wait in line. That was like what it was like. The same thing with the elevator. You know, we could probably talk for hours about this elevator theory. Who Goes Out, who goes in? WHO's first, whose second? It's not, it's no, there's no debate. Let the people out of the elevator first in the elevator,...

...out of it. And I didn't think it was just it was my mind. I think we all dealt with that. Like you know, foreigners, you'll let the people out first before you go in. But but swell, like guys out of the pool and moved to the side. Wait, yet this is not what are you guys doing? Is it not swimming? Oh, Rotan, no, no, well, at least I can get into the pool when I want and take my own lane and swim as I please. So so what is yours? What is your biggest joy? You've you've you've encapsulated in work experience. What are you able to wow, that's great. How, you know, I think, whether well even either. That is so many I wrote this out today. How is work? Yeah, I is work helped bring you through life, because I think in that you're going to find the joy. Right, like, how has your work and all the experience in all of our difficulties, are heartaches inside and outside of work, personal and Professional. How is work right brought been the consistent through your life to be okay? Like, no, I do have this even though right. Sometimes it's an outlet, sometimes it's you know, people do it too much. But how has working help you? Well, you know, when you work and you make money and things are flowing, well, then life seems to be a bit better. But but I would say that, long story short, that those experiences have made me who I am today and I feel that, you know, I'm still in a mission to kind of tell my story and to the greatest joy for me is is finding those students that didn't have confidence in themselves to know that they they have the skills. They may not have it at that moment, but they're building those skills and I think for me, seeing a student successful in their learning, in their academics, for me that brings a lot of joy, also with my kids, you know. You know as a parent, I think we can all kind of agree that as hard as teaching our own kids, you know, we've learned this over the past four months during covid nineteen. But but I think that greatest joy is seeing in the progress that they've made, in the conference that they've built in themselves and they can do what they didn't think they can. It's, I think you would agree as well, like the patients that we we often have to remind ourself to to grasp as we see our children, students, ourselves, people that we know, because the process is not always seen right. It's a daily that. Okay, are you getting what I'm saying? I've said it ten times yesterday and you're got me saying it again today. And but that process just it teaches us about patients, right, and people have been patients. That's us. So we would do well to be patient with others. So where can people reach you if they want to reach you? Is there anywhere? Or you just don't want to be reached? If someone was looking to learn more about teaching and getting into even your state or any yeah, absolutely sure. That my email address. If you look under. Chelsea tkae had a blog in South Korea, the Korean experience, and that's still on the web. I also have an Instagram, but I'm sure people just write Chelsea tick the film in fiacebook and I can connect with them and help give them some resources they need or they'd like for teaching and some perfect Chelsee in inclosing, do you what advice do you have for, and I say this each time, and I think it's, you know, the young kids, as you know, the the ten year old Chelsea with her paper route, the High School Student Who's think, you know, thinking, Oh, I better make a decision because there's a lot of pressure coming on me from somewhere. The college student who has to pick a major or all, I'm graduating in a couple weeks. What am I going to do? The one who sure stuck in another country, doesn't, you know, a little fearful coming back and maybe being a failure or not knowing what to do, or someone in situation, they lost their job. What sort of encouragement? Or, you know, like us, oh I got to go to work today and I just don't want to. What sort of encouragement would you offer to us? And in closing, should you say why you work? Okay, so, you know, I would say that remember that, you know, whether you're a parent, whether you're a student, whether you're in between jobs, whether you feel, you know, excited for life or what's happening for you, or you're down and out, remember that what you're experiencing right now is temporary, okay, and you know, at as a as a parent and teacher, sometimes you have to live within those moments, so stolen moments where you can stop, process, breathe...

...and then just say, okay, today's wasn't a good day. I'm going to make to borrow a better day. I would say that, you know, take that time that you need to to experience what you're going through, but also realize that you can become better. There's no limit for yourself, right and I just think that, you know, everyone has their own route in their own mission and their own purpose. Sometimes it takes longer to get there. You know, I didn't realize that I was meant to be a teacher until I went to Korea and I traveled the world and, of course, having kids, being being a mother also has taught me that. You know, it has even solidified by mission to be a teacher and the storyteller and an advocate for women's rights and, you know, for poetry and prose and all those good, wonderful creative things that help me to become who I am today. So I think why I work is to spread happiness and to continue my storytelling adventures. Will Chelsea, I truly appreciate you and, from a young boy who is raised by a single mum who tried her best to provide for me and the many children out there who who experience that, we appreciate your efforts and I think you're doing a great job and I hope to hear from you soon. Thank you kindly. Awesome. Thank you so much. Thank you, Jo you. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work, with Brian being be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive a joyful day in your work. The the the...

...the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the...

...the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the, the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the...

...the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the...

...the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the...

...the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the, the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the...

...the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the...

...the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the, the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the...

...the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the...

...the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the, the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the...

...the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the...

...the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the, the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the...

...the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the, the the, the the the, the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the, the the the, the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the...

...the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the the.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (123)