WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 78 · 1 year ago

#78 Brody Smith - Multimedia Producer & Host - BrianVee WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Brody Smith is a multimedia producer and host. Brody helps individuals and companies build brands through podcasts and other forms of media.

Contact Info

Brody’s Profile
linkedin.com/in/brodyradio

Website
brodyradio.com (Personal Website)

Email
brodyradio76@gmail.com

Twitter
https://twitter.com/brodyradio

Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/streamingyourstories/

Instagram
https://www.instagram.com/brodyradio/

Youtube
https://www.youtube.com/user/BrodyRadioShow

About

"I’m a multimedia host, producer and LIVE streaming audio/video production professional but my WHY has changed over the years to make a bigger impact. I met a 69 year-old man from India staying with me as my Airbnb guest that helped affirm my life decision to leave my job in my 15 plus year career in the same company to put some focus toward my personal life. However, it was my mom's battle with cancer that really inspired me to make sure I'm not neglecting my personal life, while evolving professionally. It would take me deciding to return to the east coast after 17 years with the same media broadcast company to be closer to my loved ones, inspiring me to empower others on a deeper level. After years in radio broadcasting, I made the decision to start my own podcast and interactive LIVE streaming show on Facebook and Youtube speaking with people who have made a positive impact in theirs and others’ lives. My integrity and passion for innovation and customer service brought me to where I’m interested in helping others with their podcasts or video storytelling projects.

My expertise with growing brands, from a/v production to social media integration, has been consistently demonstrated throughout my work history. I’m an extremely skilled presenter and public speaker, with a background in hosting events in the local community, as well.

I enjoy building relationships with and exceeding the expectations of customers through consistent communication, ensuring proper brand messaging and retention by creating results. In an effort to achieve loyalty over customer satisfaction my mantra is relationships before revenue because when you focus on your customer and continue innovating the revenue will follow.

Some of my areas of emphasis include:

■ Audio/Video Podcasting
■ LIVE Event Production/Streaming
■ Video Production
■ Radio broadcasting On-air & brand management
■ Website Development & maintenance
■ Social Media Integration
■ Promotional Event Planning
■ Marketing & Sales Strategies
■ Client Experience / Engagement " (LinkedIn, 2020)

...welcome to why we work with your host, Brian V. As he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which will be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going on and keep on working. Working is tough, but working is good. Now here is your host to why we work. Brian V. I'm Brian V, and this is why we work today at the Great Pleasure speaking with Brodie Smith. Brody is a multimedia host and producer e wanna find out from him because I know his journey was not always straight. He went from one job to another job, but then he really found his passion. So I want to find out how we to no matter what type of worker in can find our passion. Find out what we're good at and do that in our career. So join me in my conversation today with Brodie Smith. I'm Brian V, and this is why we work today. Have the great pleasure speaking with Brodie Smith. Good morning, young man. Good morning. How you doing? I am doing wonderfully Well, thank you again, as I just said to you a moment ago for coming on here, giving me your Monday morning. What a guy. Well, recently, I've heard a guy said his name is Gary V. I'm a huge fan of this guy and I got That's how I got the Brian V. T be full disclosure. That's where I've been Brian V. My whole life. Just the V. And this guy throws the ease on there. The too easy. I was like, That's ingenious. I'm in. Well, he recently said that people complain about Monday mornings and how difficult it is and everybody makes these jokes going. It's Monday morning, he goes. I'm excited about Monday mornings. It's my favorite time of the week and I'm like, Okay, I think that's a stretch. But I understand what it is that though. Yeah, I'm saying same idea to with when he says, like, if you're living for the weekend, you got it all. You got it all backwards. But I do appreciate your being here. Nonetheless, however you value your Monday Yeah, no, I do. And you know, I'm learning to value especially now during a pandemic how to value your time in a different way is still a little bit of a challenge because there's a lot of things I want to dio. And, you know, we all have to kind of restrict everything we want to dio with everything we can safely do now. So it's funny you say that I'm thinking that man, those were great answers. And then I just told you I spent like, two or three hours on the sofa with my dear wife watching Netflix the crown today. So we were not as productive as we would like to have been. I probably should have exercised drinks more watered on the all right. Well, that's That's this life, I guess. Brody, can you give us an idea who you are and what you're doing nowadays? And then I'd like to bring you back. Yeah, so I am a multimedia producer and host. I have spent a majority of my life being a multimedia producer. I grew up wanting to be a filmmaker working behind the scenes, and that turned into a career in TV broadcasting that turned into a career in radio broadcasting, which went over 15 years and now with podcasting becoming mawr relevant and popular and live streaming. And I'm finding that my flow is kind of changing a little bit again. And so I still work in radio broadcasting. But now I also work with small companies, individuals on multimedia projects, you know, ranging anywhere from, you know, video brochures to podcasting. And, you know, I thought for a while that I'm like, man, maybe I missed the boat on podcasting in terms of not in terms of doing my own but in terms of working with other people. And I'm just finding that the people who are in the industry, you know, or like Okay, here we are, but in the world, it's still something that's just kind of catching wind with businesses and such. So I find myself again kind of starting to I don't know if it's that much of a major change in career, but, you know, through all my years of experience now I've got more I could do. You know, I can help people more and and honestly, you know, a career in radio broadcasting is a little self indulgent because you're talking on the radio and...

...you know you're entertaining people. You're you know, And you know, you're kind of like the person in front of a microphone which, you know, I'm not a person who loves connecting with people, but I've always been more of like a techie kind of guy. I can use that terminology. You're finding a lot of people wet behind the ears, I guess which gives you an opportunity for the businesses that you're in now. Well, it's interesting. A lot of people I'm like some of the stuff isn't difficult to learn right when it comes to video and audio. But it takes time, and it takes, I guess, a passionate and interest. And some people just have no interest in it, and they don't have the time or so you can't create more time. So, you know, I can see you know, them them needing to lean on somebody and such. And you know, the other thing I've been learning about. You know, we were talking a little bit this morning about life balance and like, man, I've just been watching Netflix. But one of my biggest influencers is my mom, who's a 20 plus year cancer survivor. In one of the things that I learned from her is balance and that while we all try to have the perfect diet and work out every day and you know, look, I love watching people who work out every day. I'm like a person is motivated. That person's eating healthy. That's awesome. But there has to be a balance, right? And for me in my head, I have my sister now telling me who just moved here to North Carolina, saying, You're a really healthy eater. I'm like I am. And I find, you know, things in the in the universe kind of telling me you know what you're doing better than you think you're doing. I'm like, Well, you know, I eat peanuts, you know, as a snack. And, you know, I eat chicken and rice. I try to be healthy, But hey, don't get this twisted, you know, for Christmas for like, two days around the holiday, we ate pretty unhealthy. So no, no, it's a balance. Moms like you know, you have to enjoy your life because you don't know how long you have. And she's a fighter. And so you know, I've learned to kind of invest Maurin, my personal life. I would have always been very career driven and following my career around the map and moving, and and then one day I just woke up and I said, I've been ignoring my personal life, really, And I need to focus more on that and and remember that life's just not not working, even though we love what we do. Hopefully, no, I wholeheartedly agree broadly. Speaking of family and and careers and changes, I do want to bring you back. And what would have been your very first job ever in it could have been volunteer. It could have been selling lemonade or hockey cards. Just I don't know if you do that for you in North, and you don't have a North Carolina accent, so I don't I don't know where you first started, but what would have been your first job? Well, I grew up in Jersey and you don't have a Jersey accent, and I said, You know that show the Jersey Shore really ruined it for anybody who grew up in New Jersey because it's a big state. So North Korea out like South. Using the Jersey shore is a different. It's a different animal altogether. But my very first job Waas working as a bagger at a grocery store and then I worked the cash register. Why did how old were you? And why did you get that job? I don't know. I mean, maybe 15, 16. My race, My long term memory and short term memory, for that matter is very selective. But it was, you know, go, go get a job. ShopRite hiring. And And it's funny because back then, you think man going to this job, all right? And now I look back, going now as an adult. It's funny because I like grocery shopping yesterday and I enjoy bagging my groceries, and at the time I'm sitting there bagging groceries and it's a job right? And you're getting paid minimum wage. But now I'm like, You know what? I would enjoy doing that kind of job. Now, I would appreciate more now as an adult, because I like interacting with people. I like talking to peep books, and so, like I'm sitting there going, I wanna back my groceries in the person of the registers, bagging the groceries, and I'm just kind of like, and then I'm a big kid. So there's a little kind of switch right about where my knee is, and then if you nudge it, then this turntable will turn. So it'll kind of bring your groceries ground. So I'm sitting there doing that going at these people probably think I'm an idiot, but that's who I am, you know, just, like, kind of horsing around. And so, you know, I think that really helped me appreciate, you know, having a job and what it was like to make you know, You know, I don't want to say a living, you know, But just make some money at...

...the time. It's funny. I went to the commissary. I was invited to the comedy Militant American Military Commissary in Texas, I believe, and they have baggers there and it's I've never experienced. But I've experienced people who bag is a job, and I think I might have done it. But they beg for tips, and I was in this dilemma, like I enjoy this. I can do this. I'm I'm okay and I never experienced. So I had this dilemma. Like, Do I let someone bag just for the sake of them doing it? Or so It was a dilemma I had and I was standing like I don't I'm okay. Actually, we only had, like, a container of juice or something, but that it was their job, so I kind of I kind of felt bad for doing it. But you're right, it's It's a position you get. And I asked this question because I know when you know who I'm interviewing. A few a couple of teenagers so far, but more us that Aaron twenties and thirties and forties and we look back. We don't know why we had the job, but we can look back and appreciate it better. And at least it could be assigned to people who are in their teens of the importance of getting a job for us. We want some candy. We want, you know, a game. We want some shoes. We wanna hang out with our friends for whatever the reasons were. Maybe our parents pushed us out the door, but there is lessons in it, especially when we look back into it. Where did how long did you have that job? And where did it lead to next? I mean, just a few years, so it was long enough while I still lived in town. I think it was until I was getting ready to graduate high school and then move on to college in another state. But looking back, I realized, you know, you build a lot of skills in these jobs that could be basic. I just heard somebody the other day going. Everybody should be a server at a restaurant at some point in their life. And closest I got to the at was being a bus boy for about maybe three or four months. And then the restaurant closed, and I give a lot of credit to people who are servers. But then, you know, I you know, I think there's a difference between the way people approach a job. You know, I see a lot of teenagers now doing whatever it is they're doing, you know, if they're working at a cash register and you know they're having a conversation with the person next over or they're looking at their phone while there taking care of a customer, and I'm like, really? And then yesterday again, I went to the grocery store and this girl's engaging and she's like, Oh, my God, you got the chicken. This is the greatest chicken. And I realized, you know, when I was doing what I was doing, you know, you're practicing your social skills with customers and, you know, it's about like, even if you're only going to develop a report for just a few minutes. My mom, who worked a variety of jobs when she was working the last job she ever worked, was being a She was a bank teller and everybody would wait in her line. There was like three bank tellers, right open there. Everybody would get in her line. They're like, Hey, we're open And they're like, No, we would like to see Helen and my mom who? I guess she didn't have the greatest relationship with her boss who was not a very good human. But these customers loved my mom. They just love my mom because she would say, Hey, how are your kids and should get to know them on a personal level and and I love that so, But, you know, when you're a kid working at the grocery store, you don't necessarily think that way unless you were raised like that. And I think I was friendly enough, but I don't think I really appreciated. I'm not sure I really got to know any customers per se, but I did that and that, You know, that was just enough to kind of get me the responsibility of holding down a job and making some money. And you mentioned you mentioned Bus Boy and I recall now my bus boy position and I could. It was in a nice restaurant. I'm from Canada and it was Esquire Restaurant, Bedford, Nova Scotia. And there's more middle middle upper class people, and they go there. It's not like fine dining, but they go for a roast beef or turkey on Tuesday, like a full blown meal or something. It was just a nicer restaurants stuck on the highway. And I remember the customers are a little bit classier and I'm not or I wasn't And I'm still not. And they're just so kind. And, you know, you know, how are you doing? What are you going to do for school? And they're teaching you in their own way of how thio, you know, serve people. And in that position in particular, I Rick call and you kind of get some good experience through that, and I don't think we really sit down and think about it too much. But those jobs help, and then it makes me think here in Korea, where culturally Children generally do not work until after college. So the very first job is their career, usually, and it's it's they're missing out on a lot. And and that's part of the podcast, right is to...

...encourage people to work as young as you're able to legally. And I mean, you can start your own lemonade stand and do something. But there's great benefits and a lot of the people that you probably speak with on your podcast and the ones I obviously speak to with work. A lot of them started young entrepreneurs and, you know, people who were just, you know, in tough situations. I was speaking to one guy. His mom was single, and he had to get out and work and help the family. So all of that I find is based around work. Brody. What about you? And you're saying you worked and then you were going in with this particular job in through high school and into college What were you thinking for college and in your life and your career from high school? Well, I I feel like I relate to most people who change their mind two or three times to what they want to do for a job or for living. Not like those people. Who? How? I knew I 12. I wanted to do this like, Thank you. Wow, that's pretty cool. I changed my life. Uh, so, you know, I'm going into college thinking I'm gonna be I wanna be a filmmaker. And is that is that what you took at school? You filmmaking or production or I'm not art. What? Yeah, well, my major was cinema and TV production, but I didn't necessarily go to the school that necessarily specializes in that they had courses in that. But that is not like going to N Y. U that has a really film school, right? So I ended up I went to the University of Hartford in Connecticut, and again it was TV and film production, But what I ended up doing, I mean, it all worked out because I ended up getting into TV production because they had a campus TV station and I said, Look, you know, I've been working with video for years, making movies as a kid. You know, I think that's the one common denominators. I've always been a creator, You know, whether you're doing audio or video, you know, it all falls under content creation. So I was like, Okay, well, this isn't a stretch. Let's get into this. And behind the scenes, I had had no interest in being on camera, so e kind of just flowed into that. And I ended up being, um, videographer in the campus TV station. And for me, I was having so much fun because we all got along. We all loved what we did and granted, we didn't get paid. We did for free, but we all enjoyed what we were doing. Meanwhile, you're taking all your courses and was taking radio production and and TV and film production courses with the film productions like, there's a lot of study of film which, you know, is really interesting when you're in those courses to and and it's like, I just wanna make the movies. I don't wanna find out, like, you know, what is the undertones here of this film And I'm like, you know, I felt like everything had an undertone of, you know, this, that or the other. And I I just wanna make I just want to make the sausage. I don't want to know, like the essence of the sausage. I just wanna make it, you know, eso Brody, What was what was your first content that you're making? You're saying when you were younger as a teenager, Was there some things that you were creating then, Yeah, you know, I just made like as I called the movies, we had this home camp, and it's funny because I just got this camcorder that I had growing up and my parents are getting ready to make a move and they said, Hey, we're gonna unload some stuff. You've got some matchbox cars from when you were a kid. They're probably worth money. Do you want them? Absolutely. And there's the camera that you were the one who predominantly used. I mean, it was the family's camera to take on vacation in film, but I used it and still have the same tripod still have the same camera. And so I would be making these movies when I was a kid, which were predominantly, some of them were kind of like tutorials, like on how to do this. And I mean, it was it was kind of silly stuff, but, um, I would make movies, and I like classic eighties horror movies. So I would make some of those and then my mom would freak out because I had the kitchen knife upstairs. He's like, Oh, no, what are you doing? I'm like, No, no, no, no, no. I'm making a movie. I'm not like trying to keep like, um, no, I was I was generally, you know, when I was at home, I was a happy kid. Um, so I'm like, it's okay, but I would make movies. Um, and I would be the one who I somehow talked my parents into getting me. And like some kind of mixer, it was it did color. But it also did audio so you could hook up like an auxiliary. You know, let's say boombox in those days, and so I would shoot all the video, and then I would put in, like, sound...

...effects or music later on. But it was like VCR to VCR. You're hitting the pause, doing this kind of thing. And looking back, it was It was such a pain in the ass if I don't know if I could say that but it was It was a major pain doing it like that now, nothing that we could do all this stuff online so easy. But back then you had to connect your VHS players, your VCRs or whatever, but doing it at such a young age and having to go through that pain staking task. It just shows that you you had a hurt, you had a desire to do it, and then you're you're keeping it through all the way till today. Well, it's funny because it's just in this moment where I realized that everything I was doing back then, even though I'm not doing the exact same thing, it's there's elements of everything. Like again, I never cared to be on camera, and I mean, I count this being on camera because you're visually on. But but for me now, it's more with the intent of getting stories out of people, you know, kind of like what you're doing. So but yeah, it's interesting how everything from back then. Kind of brought me to where I am today, and that's probably going to continue to evolve because I don't know where I'm gonna be. You know, when people ask that question, where you gonna be five years from now? Where do you see yourself being five years from now? Hopefully living under a roof, hopefully having money to pay bills and hopefully not in a miserable relationship. That's where I see myself in five years. I swear to God, if I ever interview for another job, that's what I'm going to say. That's what that is like. The worst question e don't have that question for you. So take me through until today. But I know that you met What was it? A 69 year old Indian, our man from India. And that kind of changed your perspective in view on what you had been doing after university. Well, you know, he was kind of more of a what I would call a sign from the universe, which I find myself talking a lot differently now than I did 10 years ago. You know, I used the word universe a lot, you know, universe God. Ah, lot in kind of my everyday speak, which 10 years ago, like I'm a lot more of a conscious person. And when I say conscious, I mean and this could get into a really deep conversation. I don't want to totally take it down in the rabbit rabbit hole. You can go wherever you want with it. You said stories and this is what I'd like to take out of people because it's a beautiful picture of how people do and why people do the things they do. So this guy and I don't know why his name escapes me right now, but he was one of those things. He wasn't necessarily kind of the moment where and I said, All right, and I need to go He was mawr off. He was kind of like affirming what I was wanting to dio. And, you know, the universe kind of has things happen in your life, and I feel like they put people in your life for a reason. You know how they say people come into your life for a reason season or e figure what the other words. But, um and he came into my life for a reason and it was interesting because he ended up being an Airbnb guest of mine. I was living in Las Vegas, I had a roommate that didn't work out, and I couldn't find anybody to move in with me, which, you know, the concept of looking for a roommate online, to me is just asinine because I looked for and I would have people trying to talk me down and negotiate. Well, here's what I'll pay for you. And I'm like, you know, in terms of splitting the rent, I'm like, No, this is not a negotiation. This is what you're paying. And I get you're trying to negotiate like life's a negotiation, But But no, you're not negotiating it down the half of what I'm asking you. Or so I felt like the universe, you know, which to me, it was just so silly. I'm like, I'm going to trust somebody that I'm meeting online. So then, you know, and I love traveling, So I've had experience being a travel through Airbnb in terms of saving money. But, you know, you also end up making relationships out of some of the people you stay with. They make a bigger impact in your life if you allow that to be the case. So this guy ended up being a guest. You know, that's how I decided. I'm going to help pay the rent is by having Airbnb guests hosting them. Because I'm like, Well, I I kind of know a little bit about this. I enjoy connecting with people. I'm organized. Um um, not a clean freak, but I'm a neat freak. So, you know, I have no problem sharing a space. I had a second bedroom, and so and I went through, like, the guidelines in my apartment complex and said that you can't sublet...

...an apartment I'm like, Okay, well, I live here, right, And I think that's in a lot of cities. That's the Airbnb rule is you just can't run out your house. But as long as you're living on property and it's your property, you can rent out a space. So I'm like, OK, well, that's what I'm doing. I'm not subletting the apartment. I'm just subletting a room which you would do anyway if you had a roommate except with Airbnb thes air people who are trusted and, you know, it's kind of like the honor system. But everybody reviews everybody. So, you know, like this is a much better system than finding a roommate online, who you're gonna frost like so And it was bringing in money, and it was a great experience, and I wasn't. I actually wasn't looking forward to him. He was coming in for a convention. And the only reason I wasn't you know, I was kind of weary about him coming is because you wanted to cook in my kitchen because I had a gas stove, which was, you know, one of the highlights of this apartment. And he's like, Hey, I'm gonna cook Curry and this and that. And up until now, I only had bad experiences with Curry. And the reason I'm saying these details is because it ends up being such a different experience when this guy comes to visit. But, you know, in the beginning of my oh, my God, my kitchen is gonna smell so bad, you know, with whatever he ends up making, you know, And I mean, I was ignorant. I didn't You know, I only had one experience with Indian food. So and he comes in and this guy ends up being such a friendly and warm guy. And then he says, Hey, I'm gonna cook some chicken curry. You know? Would you like to have some? And I said, Look, my my only experience with Indian food has been not a good one. It was I'm not good with super spicy food on. That was my first introduction Thio Indian food. So I'm I I'm just not good with spicy because that's okay. Um, I won't make it spicy. So the curry was outstanding. This guys company was fun. He was just a fun guy to talk to. And one night we're sitting around and and you know, by this, at this moment, I was in the middle of a two year contract of working in the company of worked in 17, like 17 years in radio broadcasting, and I waas at a fork in the road. I know it's really cliche, but I was at a fork in the road where I could either continue building on my career in radio broadcasting and look at other opportunities within the industry. Or I could make a decision two for the first time, really kind of put that aside and focus on my personal life and my loved ones, you know, in getting back to the East Coast to be. And so I'm having dinner with this guy one night and somehow we get on the topic. You know, I'm telling him about my current situation. I'm like I'm in a pretty big fork in the road. This is probably a massive decision because I've always been career oriented, and when you work in radio, you have to move every few years where the work is. That means you're constantly moving around the country. And basically the conversation led Thio him, saying something along the lines of Well, in India, we have basically the train of thought. There is whatever you do in your life. Just be happy. Whatever decision you have, be happy. And it's funny, because when I when I tell this story, I realized it's such a simple concept, like be happy, whatever did you do? But for me at the time, it was just like So um you know, I knew in that moment I'm like, I'm supposed to be hearing this like, this guy is here. And while he's an Airbnb guest and I'm making money off him like this is a This is always going to go down in my life is one of those moments where this is like the universe going your Yeah, but Brody, you say that it's, you know, it's obvious, but if just say in your case and I don't know the whole case completely. But if you're not happy, but you're working, you're trying to maintain, you know, you have to pay the bills and you're getting all caught up in that You lose the sight of that, right? The the pleasure, the joy in the work that you're doing. And then suddenly, Brody, you got to be happy I'm not and boom, right? That's where from what I'm seeing and what I experience is, that's where it's gonna come from because you get so caught in the race that you're losing perspective on what really matters. And you realize, uh, this is draining on me. I think it was a combination of not focusing on my personal life because at the time, you know, I really missed the important people in my life, but at the same time, I was like, This is how I know this is what I know to do for a living. This is how it can make money. And if I'm not working in radio, what am I going to do? E I I have, you know, how can I take skills of talking on the radio? What other industry? We're scheduling music in the software we use. How am I gonna implement this in another job? So there's definitely and I feel like everybody who works in our industry or the record industry. A lot of people say if I don't do this, I have no clue...

...what I'm doing next. And I was in that fear. I had that fear going. Well, I have to do this. This is what I know to do. And I would have people going Well, you know, you can work in public relations and you could work in marketing, and you can do that. And I'm like, Yeah, but I don't You know, all I've ever known for, you know, over 15 years is working in this industry, and you end up a lot of people end up going. I have no idea what I'm gonna dio if this implodes. And so there was definitely the insecurity. So how is that process between you and him and that conversation? And then the decision to go in the actual physical leaving how was that? Was their ebbs and flow. I'm gonna go. I'm not gonna go. I wanna go. I'm gonna check out some things. How did that go for you? There was one more thing. It was because that was in January of 2019, and a month later, just a few weeks later, there was an opportunity to work in the industry. It was back on the East Coast, but it was down in Florida toe work with one of my best friends who had worked with for years. And I said, if I ever had the chance toe work with her again, I will. Because she's the best manager I've ever had on so many levels. And I wanna work with her wherever she goes. I wanna work with her because that's when working was like a dream. Like you would show up and you were with your family. You were like second family, which I mean, that's like the unicorn, right? When you have, when you're doing what you want to do for a living, and then you're working with a manager who is just amazing who pours into their employees. And they don't even, like, see themselves as your boss there, like we're just the team. So that opportunity came up and I explored it. And it was within a few days I went for an interview, had a conversation, you know, felt like it was a great situation. And then a few days later, I'm visiting like the people in my life that are important to me and close to me, and and I just make the decision to say I'm going to focus on my personal life. This is, you know, this could go one way or another, and I hope this isn't I don't think this is gonna be a mistake, but, you know, I need to focus on my personal life. And I had ah scenario years ago where I chose my career over again my personal life and thank God things ended up, um, in my personal life being okay, that I didn't regret it, but I always said to myself, I'm never gonna make that decision, and I'm never gonna allow somebody to put me in that position to make that sort of decision. So I decided my personal life and it was funny because after I made that decision that I'm gonna move back and I go, I don't know what I'm gonna do for a living. But if the universe intense for me to stay in this industry and kind of make whatever impact on making and radio, which at the time I was like, I don't know what kind of impact on making, if anything, maybe people see me as a companion when they turned on their radio. Or maybe they I've had some people tell me they think I'm funny. I think that's funny, because I don't think I'm funny. So, um, you know, it's always very. But, you know, you also don't wanna buy into every compliment you ever hear because then you end up buying into every insult. So, you know, another Gary V is, um you know, like take compliments with a grain of salt because you also don't want to be engrossed by you know, people who, like, you know, criticized insult, whatever the case may be. So before we get into what what you do now And what takes up maybe a week of your time. You had mentioned that your mom and I read this about you and you mentioned it. My mom passed away this year from cancer in February, and I started listening to Gary V afterwards. And then I'm like, I got to start a podcast. So my motivation came from the hard work of my mom. And like she was a single mom. Three jobs most of the time at one time, and eso that's where it came from. But you mentioned your mom had cancer. And how has your mom's life and influence affected you, along with the advice that you got from another person as well in the work that you're doing well in two ways? Because my mom's battle with cancer basically show me how strong she waas and you know, being a fighter, you know, having strength, getting through situations that you think you can't get through. And every time you know if it would be a relationship that went sideways or, you know, a job interview that didn't pan out or, you know, whatever it may be, and then you get down on yourself and I'm like, you know, I would think of Mom going. You know what she's looking. Everything she's been through, like, you know, I can get through a bad relationship and...

...so or or a failed relationship, brother. So my mom strength really kind of, you know, any time I would need some inspiration, I just thought of my mom and I talk about my mom a lot because, you know, especially with people who are going through health issues, because, I mean, at the end of the day, health is the most important thing. And so I talk about my mom a lot to give people inspiration to go. My mom has been doing this 20 plus years like she's tough as nails. But the other thing that my mom did and this kind of came into play for me more recently in the last year or two, literally, is that my mom had a lot of different jobs when she was growing up, and my mom grew up in Hungary, and so her experiences were very much You have to save every penny, Um, and and not not to like a fault. You know, it's not like you're living you know, you're you're living extremely meager means because you're doing that. But her point was, you know, I came from very, um I came from a very poor, uh, time and eso what she taught me. She had a lot of different jobs throughout the years, and it was being a travel agent. It was working as a bank teller. It was working as a real estate agent. Then she could do hair. She was a hairstylist. She did that for years, as a matter of fact, out of the basement of her house. Which again, you know, I'm having these moments. Even in this conversation where, you know, I just realized I mean, technically, I guess she was a freelancer. She had her own business, which I would have never pictured myself doing. I'm like, I don't wanna be a Gary. I love Gary V. But when I hear him talk about like, Well, you know, being an entrepreneur isn't like flying on jets and having champagne and having this life with, you know, all these fancy things. It's being lonely. It's working till really late at night. And I'm like, You know what? I love Gary V but I don't want Gary V's life. I don't want that life like how does he have? How does he make time for his family's? And And that goes down a completely other conversation, all right, getting sidetracked. But my point is like I realized my mom had her own business and one of the things when I moved back, I didn't have a job. And so I took that timeto learn. I learned about, you know, advertising on Facebook and Instagram. And but mind you, did you go back home? So now I have been you have had a place to go to at least. Yeah, I had been living with my girlfriend at the time, and I didn't have a job, So I took it upon myself to kind of learn other businesses, like, what was it like to have your own business to run your own business and that that I was ever really interested in doing that? I'm like, you know, I'm a person. Who who I don't wanna be the boss. I like toe work for people. That's what I like to dio Hyman execute er and, uh, I'm a creator as well, but I'm in execute er, so I'm learning about advertising on social media and then what it's like to run your own business like online. I dabbled in that a little bit. I wasn't super successful, but but it was a great education, was great to learn. And then all of a sudden, you know, I started doing my podcast because some excuse me, somebody said, You should tell your story And, you know, for me part of my story was making the decision to focus on my personal life over, like being career oriented and how, you know, I have a few moments in my life that are mic drop moments where I go. Wow, I said that to that person. That was a cool moment and kind of how I told them, because I think they made me feel a little guilty when I was leaving and going Well, we didn't know you were going to do this and make this decision. I was trying to transfer within the company and because there was an opportunity and they wouldn't let it happen, or they just didn't, you know, want me for the position, and I put in my notice anyway. still in the middle of a contract, and they're like, What is this about? Then I said, Look, you knew when I was trying to transfer Why? So don't act like this is a surprise. And if this ruins my reputation after 17 years of hard work, I'll be able to sleep at night. That's what I said. And you know, sometimes you look back and you're like who I'm like. It's one of the proudest moments of my life where, you know, I was like, I'm I'm setting boundaries for myself and I'm doing what I need to dio and and, you know, cut too. Me deciding to start a podcast to talk to people I'm like, I don't want to talk about myself. I'm like, I don't you know, whatever. I rather talk to people who have made really big moves in their life, big decisions, who just kind of one day woke up. That's the terminology I like to use. Like they woke up and I go, I'm I'm done with this crappy relationship or or you know what? I'm not doing this job, and some people were forced into that moment by a health situation. Mm and...

...and then that turned into You know what? I wonder if businesses air starting to have their own podcasts? Because, you know, when you're again, when you're in the industry, then you're like, Okay, well, you know, this is going to start happening, and then it's not happening. And then you're like, Okay. And But then I said to myself, I go, Honestly, I don't know. Like, what am I going to charge people if I'm gonna help with podcasting, and how am I gonna help them and eso these kind of questions? Start. If you've never been an entrepreneur, you know, all these questions come in. And then, like, um, I'm gonna pay tax on that. And how does that work and all these questions if you've never been an entrepreneur, you don't. I mean, why would you know that? Yeah, but my mom was a really big influence, you know, in terms of what? You know, when she was doing all these jobs and I said my mom literally You know, when they have that that phrase, you can do anything you put your mind to. That was my mom, and you know so So she was influential both from a strength standpoint, but also from a hey, you can do anything you want to do as long as you wanna, you know, make money and be ableto, you know, feed yourself and your family and have a roof over your head. You can do anything you want, and that kind of inspired me to go. You know what? Let me see if I could figure this out. Meanwhile, I'm gonna continue working in radio and I'm gonna try to help people and companies who are interested in in storytelling whether that's through video or whether that's just doing an audio podcast or a live stream. And, you know, that's what I would like to do because I like to work with people and I want to make an impact on people who want to tell their story whether it's just, you know, from a service standpoint or whether it's from like a personal standpoint. And that kind of came out of the podcasting thing. And, you know, throughout 2020 you know, I feel like 2020 is one of those years where everybody looks at I go screw 2020 I headed, but I feel like we got a lot of blessings out of this year. I like to look at the silver lining out of everything to the point where I got I think I got a flat tire. I was like going out to goto work and my tire was flat. And I'm like, Are you kidding? May I gotta drive, like, 30 minutes. So, So pissed. And I said to myself, I stopped and I said, You know, I'm lucky to be able to get a flat tire. A lot of people don't have the opportunity to get a flat tire, so, you know, I try to look at the silver lining and the silver lining is, um uh, totally, Just like the inspiration. Well, no, it was funny. I interviewed a guy maybe two episodes ago, and he's like, Yeah, most things haven't and it's nothing. Knock on him because I kind of challenged him. Then he was most things. There's a silver lining. I go, I know I challenge you. I think everything has a silver lining, no matter what. Even you know, the blessing of having a car, right, the ability to drive the ability to walk down the road to get your car fixed or whatever toe. Have some money in your pocket to be able to do these sorts of things toe. Have a story later on to remind yourself being thankful for these things that happen and to encourage others. I think those were all wonderful things. Brody. What do you think about what do you're doing? What you're doing now in terms of your work? I mean, this year's you mentioned is a blessing, but it could be different than what you would normally be doing in 2019 versus what you might be doing in 2021 when things air kind of back to normal. What would be a typical week for you in your work? Well, I work full time at a country radio station. It's a family owned station in Clayton, North Carolina, which is just outside of Raleigh, and it's definitely different from the corporate world. But that's my full time job. I worked there Monday through Friday. What do you do? What do you do in that position? So I am an afternoon drive on air personality host The afternoon show, which is music intensive, and I also am the digital person of the building. So I update the website. I actually rebuilt the website on a new platform because the old platform, it just wasn't working. The customer Do you have to love country to do country? You know what? That's a great question. Um, I actually really enjoy country. I am or of a I enjoy music, but, um, it's funny, because on our radio station, we play older country in newer country, and most of the people hate the new country like that's not country. And, you know, we've been jar I binge the other day on the Garth Brooks special on Netflix or something, and I knew very little about Garth Brooks, and it was pretty good. I didn't realize he stepped away for 14 years like, that's how little I really know. But like even with him, it was That's not country. What? What is it? You know? When is a country Well, I mean, I know I'm gonna get you for this. I so well, someone's...

...gonna watch this and go. You're such a tool. There's a song by by Luke. Luke Bryan called. Whatever makes you country, I'm gonna get picked on for that. But I think about that because I'm not country. I don't lead the country lifestyle. But I love a lot of country music, and I will admit that I I like new country. I dio the really The reality is, though I think true people who, if you grow a passion for things and this is what I like about work. I love everyone's job. I could say someone who's a gangster. I understand that people find that morally incomprehensible. I mean, but there's some. It's his job. He has to go home and cook, get, you know, pay the bills, and I don't want people to do those things. But if you're a lover of music, you're going to love all genres or at least you know, hats off to what they dio. So you know, countries, it's no different than wrapped to me, right. I enjoy rap, and I can enjoy a good country song. I mean, I've worked in a lot of different genres, except for I haven't worked at a rap station because there's some Drake songs I like and some that I can't stand and like metal, I can't do that but with country, I kind of got in the country through, um, through a person I had been dating at the time. And, you know, I love Garth Brooks. And but for me, um or like, I do like some of the new country. But, you know, most people who grew up country and love country music, you know, they gravitate towards the older country. So my full time job is at the country station. I do digital. I I, you know, do video production. I do the website updates and that kind of thing. And when we occasionally do live streaming, um, segment on Facebook, I can't. I kind of handle all that, um, on the side. I work with companies to help them with them. Right now I'm working on. I don't want to say what company idiots for, because I'm on wine spread. But it's a very big brand that most people have heard of their starting a podcast. I'm working with a local client who is starting kind of Excuse me, a community based, um, concept of a show. It's It's a detective who's basically friends with, um, a young African American adult, and they're doing a show together, and it's It's like a multi camera recorded show in a very what's a very small studio. So I help them build their studio and they're doing a show about their relationship, their friendship, how they bonded and trying toe, you know, basically just tell their story. That's one project. And then I'm working on another video brochure about North Carolina. And what what is the what is the draw? The living in the state, which you know. There's a lot of answers to that, So I'm working on multiple projects. But for me, my passion in terms of helping people is probably more with podcasting, you know, helping people who have never hosted a podcast, maybe never stood in front of a group of people to give a speech or never been on camera. How to be a better presenter. How would you Brody, How would you pitch the idea to a company or even a community? I mean, because that's what I think of podcast does. It brings a community together, whether you're talking about a physical community to say in a small town in North Carolina or somewhere across the world or a business Thio. How would you pitch? The idea of the importance of having some sort of podcast as part of their advertising is part of their marketing. Well, it's first of all, it's an opportunity to have more time because, you know, in traditional advertising, like most of the commercials we have on our radio station or 30 seconds, you know, So you only get so much time to tell the story about what you're trying to promote. So having having time, also having the ability to tell your story on your own terms. Thio you know, a podcast that has very little, you know, rules. You know, technically, you can podcast as long as you want, and you can, you know, if you accidentally cussed, then it's, you know, you're not gonna. The FCC is not gonna come down on you, so there's a lot less restrictions in terms of time, in terms of the kind of content that you can share and and how you tell your story. There's not a lot of boundaries. And once you kind of learn how to do it...

...because you know, equipment, it's not expensive. Uh, you know, most people now, can you know, just jump on Amazon and get equipment. That's, you know not you don't have to have the most expensive microphones like this microphone cost me like $19 and this is what I use and have a windscreen on it. And But I see friends, and I don't know what kind of like you have, but I see friends that spent hundreds of dollars on like these microphones because of this, that and the other. And, you know, while I know the basics of equipment, I don't know it on a deep level like an engineer. So when people talk about certain kind of microphones, I'm like, I have no idea what that is. I've heard of that, but I have no idea. Like, how is that better than this Microphone and e was 100 bucks, and I gotta know it's probably 70 bucks used, but it came with the arm and the pop filter and that sort of thing. But when you were building your studio, you probably didn't think, Oh man, I got to spend a lot of money and I need to get the best. My dear wife would not let me spend. E was like begging just to get this at this e. But, you know, that's what I would say. It's like you get to tell your own story on your terms. You know, with the the only confines and boundaries are the ones that you set, and you don't need to spend a ton of money doing it. You know, you can build your own studio. And I'm just here somebody who can help you tell you what kind of what you need, because you don't need a lot of money again. I'm an example of you know, I mean, you do need some money and it depends what you're doing exactly, but you don't nowadays, it's consumer pricing for equipment that can help you, you know, be an influencer or be a podcaster. And then once you learn how to do it, you could do it yourself. Or, you know, a lot of people now, just they don't have the time. You can't make more time in your day, so it's like, Look, I'd love to learn this. I'm either not interested. Let's just I'm just not interested in learning the lights or learning the kind of microphone or how to hit record or edit. I don't care or I don't have the time, which is, I think, most people's issue. You can't make more time. People don't have time. And at a time where I think Cos. Thank God are focusing MAWR on their own employees work life balance which you know, I feel like working all the time and through the weekend and super late is a badge of honor. I think that's a joke. I don't think that's a badge of honor, and that's why I like I love Gary V. But I'm like, Man, if you're working all hours of the day, you know, I feel like he's giving a speech where he says, You know what? Being an entrepreneur comes at a cost. Um, that's why I don't really want to be an entrepreneur on that level because from a work life balance is so important. I mean, obviously, you know, you know that you have a family like I don't have kids. I don't have a significant other right now at this moment. So you know, if you have a family and you're trying toe do all this stuff, you know, I mean people, people who have kids and a significant significant other. They know balance, you know, better than I ever can. So, um, I think that's yeah. You begin to sacrifice. If if you follow the whims or the advice of some people on entrepreneurs, you will have to sacrifice some of the things that mean the most to you. If you truly follow that. And then I mean, I do that even I happen stance or by accident, and I don't always intentionally do it. I don't mean to do it by sacrificing family time or or health in those things will definitely go off on the wayside on the weight side, Um, if you follow those mhm those tidbits of advice by people like Gary V and I have nothing, but you certainly will lose a lot of your time, and you will look back and regret and say, Well, what do I have? I built an empire, and I lost. You know, I lost my my family. Yeah, I don't have an exact look. You know, again, I'm not gonna talk like somebody who's got kids, and you know, I don't I don't know what that's like, but, um, but You're right. You know, if you enjoy what you do, you can accidentally start going. Oh, my gosh, I'm cutting into my family time or whatever it is that I'm doing. So I think the one thing that's happening, you know, 2020 has forced us to slow the hell down and really like people, you know, some people could look at. It is I got to spend more time with my kids, and other people are like, Oh my God, it was maddening. The kids were running around while I was on the zoom call in the background. They were climbing the shelves and I had to yell at them to get down and guess what? You know, that's really life. And I think maybe it's taught managers companies to realize you know what? You have to be more forgiving with your employees because, you know, I think 2020 has, really, you know, again, the silver lining is it's forced us all to slow down, and maybe it's forced us to spend...

...more time with our family. It's forced us to not be as you know, hopefully, um, hopefully it's forced more of a balance. I don't know and is there a true balance? I don't know, and it's, I think it also, and for me anyway, it's allowed me to realize how selfish I could be. I mean, generally, marriage does that having Children does that being with significant others, family members just taking an assessment of your life. It shows you how much you think of yourself. But I think 2020 does, too, especially for people who are home more often than nod. Or, you know, maybe some stresses that air popping up health problems with other people. And just realizing for me is wow, You know, I could really be selfish because I have I my income or the amount of time I had to work. My hours have decreased, so it's given me more time. And what am I doing with that time? Well, finding I'm still spending it on me and not totally willing to give it up, so it just it reveals it myself. Cem Cem kinks in my armor that I need to work out well, one of the things that I learned this year and to finish like you know, when you say, How do you pitch a client for me, the biggest thing that frustrates me is if you're working with somebody and you just want to make money and that's all that motivates you. Yeah. We all have bills to pay. Yeah, we all wanna make money, Sure, but is delivering, you know, rial customer service. Meaning you care about your client and you care about the outcome. I mean, I'm still sending Chris, I sent, uh, Christmas cards to a bunch of my clients. And that's because, you know I still care about them. I check up and I want to know how they're doing. But I also care about making an impact for them. I don't wanna be the guy that just made money off somebody and what I did for them made no impact. I want to know that I'm making an impact. And I find so many people in customer service, even in the radio industry, that especially now with co vid Well, we just need to make money. We need to make money. We need to stay afloat. If you look at it is in your providing value and you care about the results of your client, then you're going to make the money and that's gonna come through. That's probably the biggest thing in your question about, you know, approaching somebody or pitching. I don't really pitch people like I tell them what I do and then it becomes a conversation that turns in. Hey, I can use that or what do you charge or what do you do? But it's like for me. It's like I just want to help. I wanna help you. You know? I don't want to just, you know, edit your podcast just because I need to make money. I want Thio, and I think that helps you be more selective. If that's your mindset, you're going to reject some clients and go Look, you know, I'm looking to make an impact, and you know, I'm not gonna do this project because, you know, it's not gonna really help make an impact on the level that you know. It's not gonna help you the way I want to help or it's not something that you need. But, um, in terms of being, you know, you were just talking about being selfish. And this year I've learned you have to you have to be selfish to some degree. You have to take care of yourself before you take care of other people. And that's been something that I've been learning more this year. I've been doing more self work this year than I ever have, And that really kind of came out of, um, leaving a really bad relationship and realizing that, you know, I was putting the effort of being in this relationship ahead of my own needs. And I wasn't really looking out for myself as much as I should and learning why and really kind of re recalibrating, you know, for a lack of a better word and that, you know, one of the things I see is that even people who are married especially, you know, we've been in quarantine, but you need your own time. And for instance, I know people that were engaged to somebody and they couldn't do anything without their significant other. They couldn't do a Boys Night or Girls Night, and it's like why? Like what? You have to be up each other? You know, it's so quarantine has forced people hopefully to, and maybe you have to get creative doing this. Spend some time on your own go read a book. You know, be away from your significant other. Um, you know, go to the park, you know, do something that's still safe to do. But you still need your own time. So you need to focus on yourself. You need to take care of yourself. You need to put on your mask before you put on the mask of somebody sitting next to you. You know that that whole analogy when they say, put on your mask, you know? And you know, one more thing somebody had shared with me is like, it's like the MasterCard logo, which somebody told me the other day, Um, I don't know what that analogy...

...meant. So the MasterCard logo is two circles that intersect in the middle, and so that's your relationship. But you're still your own circle. You're still your own individual, and it's still okay to have your own identity. And don't forget, you need to take care of yourself before you take care of somebody else. And that's where bad relationships start forming, where people take advantage of you and you allow that or, you know you don't have boundaries, which is something else. I've been learning about a lot. So in certain terms, I think when you talk about being selfish, I think you talk about it in a different vein. But for me, I've had to learn to be more selfish in the positive way in the way that you need to be as a human. Thio, go. Don't forget you have your own needs, and And don't forget about yourself. Don't put everybody else ahead of yourself because that is not healthy. And that is not okay. And I think 2020 again in a lot of ways has forced us to make sure that we are our own priority. Um, but again, I don't think that means like sitting around like eating Cheetos and watching Netflix all day and and and, you know, not giving your significant other time and all that kind of stuff That's a different kind of selfish. Well, no. We were doing it together. That was it. But you're right to like I find myself just needing to go for a run, needing to go for a hike in the mountains, go for a drive down the road, and we do do that. But I'm also selfish and you mentioned with the the master card. It's like the vin diagram, right? The things overlapping. And I totally get Get that and and certainly putting on your mask first before you're starting to take care of other people switching the gears a little bit broad because I know you're on a timer straight. I don't I don't wanna go over that. You let me know if we're getting close. But I also don't want to miss some questions that I think you would add some valuable insight to. So what about in your position? What is some satisfaction? Um, even some difficulty you have in the work that you dio like frustrations, maybe. Whatever. Whatever just, you know, disrupt your work. Whatever is difficult with a challenge, something that you know. If someone was getting into your line of work, what would they be looking forward to? What would they see as being some sort of challenge to them or what's just a challenge to you? Well, I think for me when you work with a team of people, the biggest frustration for me is is having, you know, your value system being so far off from a company you work or or people around you when your values are completely different in terms of you know what you're trying to accomplish, Like for me? You know, I've seen people in because I'm in the radio industry, so that's what I'm gonna talk about. But people who just want to make the money and I'm like, uh, that's frustrating to me going. You know, I'm working hard to put this this ad for our client together, and this is how it's written. Or, you know, this is who is on the commercial and knowing that some people are only motivated by making money. But to them, it's not really important making an impact or return on an investment. And that bothers may. When you're when you're in a situation like that, are you more apt to say something, Thio? Show your true values or are you willing to just back off and just let the process be that process? Um, well, you know, I think sometimes to my detriment, I'm very honest. And that frustration can come out more times. I think after you realize that you've you've tried to make the impact you can, you've You've shared your thoughts as much as you can, and you realize that this is how it ISS and it's not going to change. And that's I think, you know, at that point I realized I'm going to move on and I'm just gonna do what I'm going to do. And you know, you you know, there's only so much you can try toe influence and help. And you know, if sometimes you're really going up against you years and years of a particular way, some things done, you know, And somebody once told me There's nothing more constant than change. Not everybody adapts to that, though not everybody can do it. Not everybody likes to do it, so that is very frustrating when your value system is different. I mean, you know, in the last few years, you know, I like innovation. When innovation is helpful and it can improve systems, then you know why not? Why wouldn't you do that? You know when you can make your product or service better. But not everybody...

...agrees with that. Some people just like the status quo, and I'm just like, what? About what brings you satisfaction in the work that you do when It's when it's a good day making an impact, knowing that you're helping people. If if you're doing what you're enjoying doing and you know you're making an impact. And sometimes what I learned is you don't know that you're making an impact. You don't know that you just made somebody's day or you just made somebody LA or you just help the business with, Ah, lot of what I do is you know, my full time job is building, um, commercials, you know, online and putting. You know, um, actually making the sausage, so to speak, and putting the music in and and recording. You know, the person who's voicing over the commercial and putting that together and making sure it sounds as good as it can. You know, down to the to figuring out what kind of music to use for the right kind of ad. And you know when when you're making an impact, you know, especially when you don't realize it and then you find out. You know, like I had no idea that I was making that kind of impact. Uh, you know, I've had friends. Tell me, you know, you've impacted me in ways you'll never understand and, you know, it's It's nice to hear that you just don't know, like when you're on the radio and you're doing a show and you might have 10 seconds to say something. And again, I've been told, Man, you're really funny and I'm like God, you can and it's not me beating myself up. I think I think it's important to realize the things that you're good at but also realized the things that you know what this is just not something I excel at, and that's okay. I'm not going to be great at everything. I'm gonna be good at some things and some things I'm not. I am not a comedian. I will never do stand up ever in my life. I am not a funny person. Not on purpose. At least. You know, I make jokes. I inherited my dad's dry humor, but when people go, you were really funny. You know, I still have people tell me from years ago, You know, I really liked your commentary when you were on that morning show, and I'm, like, really like, you know, and not because I don't think I was any good, but you know, you don't just Sometimes you just don't realize the impact you have. I like to know that the things that I do, because it comes from a place of wanting to help and and making an impact and like I care about that, you know, I think people use the term people pleaser which, you know, I think that can get you into situations where you get taken advantage of, you know, And that's been something I've learned to control, you know, setting boundaries and but but at the same time wanting to make an impact and and do something that's you know, a lot of people get into charity work and you know, they want to make an impact. They want to help. You know, I believe in that as well. I'm a big proponent of that. But also like in things that you do, making an impact. So for me, uh, it's if I get to work with a client and now all of a sudden they have a video that they can use as a tool, and they're like, This is great. This is exactly what I was looking for or a podcast going well now I can. You know, I never thought about what it would be like to have a podcast. Now I have a podcast like That's crazy, and and knowing that it's making an impact for them is great. Brody thinking of an impact for people and also people getting into work. So you as a bagger or switching your careers, thinking of people who are getting into work for the first time. And do you have, ah, piece of advice for them or a tip getting into work or switching their careers? Oh, my God. Uh, well, I thinking just as a kid, you know? Okay, I'm going to go do this job. But now, thinking back that job was good or the experience you got from some of the other jobs, but realizing it was a place where it was a dead end for you. It wasn't satisfying to you, but you needed to make that change. Well, I think like when it comes to changing your mind about what you want to do. You know, I've heard more often than not people who are in college. They'll change their mind a few times about what they want to Dio and then that's okay. You know that that is not something that's completely, you know, a strange concept. You know, you condemn pure toe in something, you know, whether it's an internship or get an opportunity somewhere and realize you know what? This isn't for me. I tried it. And it's okay to try something. I know some people who are, like, just afraid, and it's like, What's the worst thing that's gonna happen? You try something. You don't like it, you know, Go somewhere else or, you know, you go to a job and and try it. Take yourself out of your comfort zone. You know, if you want to try something new, you know fear is okay. Um, but try it anyway. Take yourself out of your comfort zone,...

...which I've done more times than I can count. But, you know, it's okay to change your mind about what you want to do for me. Part of the reason that I've gotten into wanting to help clients with podcasting producing podcast, coaching people on presenting we're doing the live stream projects is because the radio industry I don't necessarily feel like it's growing. Um, I think it's become such a business that because it's become such a business, I think it's really hurt the industry. Mhm, Um, unfortunately, e always think of What was it? Private parts by Howard Stern e great at that at that time, like he helped ruin the radio industry in a in a good way that allowed for podcasting in some sense, right? W e one of the greatest I love that movie. It's so funny. God, um, well, look, by the way, not everybody who works in radio is This is in the position of Howard Stern or Ryan Seacrest, where they're financially doing really, really well. And they're in positions where, you know, you know, people say, Well, people are replaceable, everybody's replaceable. But you know, look at those guys, you know they're not going anywhere and they're making ridiculous amounts of money. But for me, part of the reason I'm getting into podcasting is because I'm like, Look, this is where the future is going. People. A lot of people listen to podcasts and and more people and companies are starting their own podcasts, and I want to ensure future for myself, and I need to kinda. It's not even a security. Next. I enjoy doing that, its content creation, and I'm making an impact on a 1 to 1 level and you don't know. I see that impact in radio or feel that impact. But you can if you're working with a client and working with somebody one on one. But I also want to make sure that the future is like, for me, it's part survival. You know, I wanna have a job years to come, because if I if I only put all my eggs right now on the radio broadcasting basket and that's all I do and one day, you know the industry just completely implodes on itself even more than it already has been doing then Then what am I going to do? Like I'll be in my fifties and I'm like, Now you know, I still have years toe work. So you know, part of it is ensuring that I have work and that I'm going in the direction of where the future is going live streaming people doing their own shows and podcasting and being a part of that and you know, So for me, it's think about those things you know think about. You know, I still have friends that are like, I have to get a radio job and a lot of people really recently have gotten, you know, during the year of co vid have gotten let go they've gotten furloughed and they've been without jobs. I have a few friends that have been without jobs for going on a year, two years, And I'm like, Look, you have the skills to do other things. And this has been a big, uh, education for me as well, because, you know, for me where two years ago, it's like I don't know what I'm gonna do If I'm not in radio like, you know, how can I implement these skills and other things? And I would have people go, well, just work in marketing and I'm like I could, but doing this, you know, working in production and having you know, setting up lights and having a teleprompter and having you know a microphone like this is my real passion. I love doing this and I wanna help other people. That's really so I tell my friends I go, you have the talent. You have the skills to do things other than radio, start thinking about that and how you could do that. Because, you know, if if you're just on Lee going, this is all I'm going to dio like, how long do you need to be out of work before you finally realize you need to go, you know? And then and then I've seen people who have pivoted, you know, and gone. All right. I'm I had a friend get into podcasting this year, but he does it like they do a show on the video and they have a multi camera show. And I'm like, you know, a year ago, you weren't doing this. I'm proud of you. That's huge. Start, start thinking more like that because, you know, you have to make sure you know it's your own survival, but also go with the times and, you know, unfortunately, our businesses, you know, gotten, you know, times change people who used to work in the newspaper industry, you know, they had to pivot. The newspaper industry had to pivot. Now they're online as well. And, you know, maybe some of those people are doing different things now for careers. I know people who have left radio broadcasting to go be fitness coaches or to go start their own, um, to go start their own business. So I've seen that happening a lot lately, so, you know, you have to be...

...multifaceted, but you also have to look outside off. You know, what have I been doing So long. Start thinking how you can do other things. And, you know, um, make sure that you're not in a position where if you lose your job, that you're like, Well, I can't do anything else, you know, Speaking of that being multifaceted, is there a skill that you had to develop now that you know, looking to people who are listening in something that they might wanna build upon, maybe as their younger getting into this industry Is there a certain skill that you have or are building that is necessary in this line of work? Um, or even a talent that it's helpful. Well, I I think I think it's just a matter of always wanting to learn. You never stop learning. There's constantly things toe learn and educate yourself on. I mean, to be honest, I am still learning. You know, yesterday I was looking into what are the best kind of cameras that are affordable for streaming because technology constantly changes. So I'm like, Well, now, what are the best kind of cameras to use and, uh, you know, always learning and then finding out where to go toe learn because, you know, it is a little overwhelming. There are so many avenues in terms of like, there's so many conventions. There's so many online courses and that could get overwhelming to and go Well, you know what makes this better than that? Like I was on linked in and and doing linked in courses on basic things the other day that, you know, it's funny, like the skills that most people have. You know, I was updating my resume to include what I'm currently doing on there now on the product side projects that I'm doing, you know, for client goes well, you know what some of the work you've done And then I've got my resume to say, Hey, here. I've worked with and I'm not the greatest resume person like i e constantly learn. And you think you get it right. And then your sister, you know who is successful looks at it and says, Oh, eso when you say what kind of you know skills? I think for any human, never stop learning. And even when you think you have it, you don't have it 100%. There's always something that you can learn. You know, there's always things that I'm learning about video production and that, you know, you can use a microphone like this. You can use a shotgun microphone. You can use a Laval ear microphone, I mean, and then what kinds and then for what situations? And there's constantly things. But then technology changes to, you know, um, where you can learn constantly changes to lynda dot com linked in and then you're like, Well, I haven't really had a lot of experience with lynda dot com and then just trying it. And so, um, in interest. What is linda dot com? I've never even heard of that before. Um, probably not the person to ask for that, But you know, linda dot com is a place you could go. It's e think you could take courses, and I think it's I think you have to pay. Um, you know, for me, I do that stuff on linked in because you can take courses there. And so I've learned a lot on like I didn't even know you could do. Of course, is on linked in. I mean, I think you have toe. It's a suspicious of the premier. The premium subscription. Yeah, and I mean for me, I did the 30 day like the free trial and a lot. And so for me, uh, you know, it's funny because while I have the skill set to do technical things, that not everybody, not everybody knows to do what you and I could do with lights and cameras and microphones. But then, you know, my shortcomings are not being great. A cover letters and resumes, and so it's constantly learning and knowing even the things that you are good at doing. You don't know everything. It's funny, the resumes. I'm learning this, especially through Lincoln, and I found it's a valuable resource, and I'm going to say that I found you and I asked you to come on here. So it wasn't that you were trying toe get out there. And I think I asked you a few times and it took us a little while to set up. But I asked you, but going on toe linked in I find it amazing, like to defy actually interviewed someone else before, And that's what his forte is finding people skills and talents in defining them. For years, I thought you just put the job. You know, my job, my job title. That's enough. They're gonna be impressed by my resume. But the more you realize the purpose of the resume and to define those skills, that's what people are looking for. If you don't have someone you know in the industry already, well, the other thing, too, is for me. One of the biggest kind of questions that I have had in the last like year is what is my title? What, what is my title? And because then you also have to think if you come up with...

...a fancy title like executive janitorial, you know, like whatever it is. But excuse me, if you think of a fancy title, is the average person who is not in your industry going to know what that means? What does that like? Uh, a lot of times I'm a big film and TV fan and and I heard the term showrunner where actors air talking about Well, the showrunner was Matt Miller. And I'm like, What a showrunner mean And I'm a huge like I'm a I'm a TV film fan and I'm like, I don't know what a showrunner is. I've been interested in and filmmaking since I was a kid. I have no idea what the term showrunner is. What the hell does that mean? Executive Producer is another word for showrunner. But then you see, like an executive producers in the credits come up on your like favorite show and then you're like, Does it take 10 executive producers to executive produce this show? And what does it mean? The difference between executive producer and producer? So I finally settled on multimedia producer on I mean multimedia, and most people probably have a general idea of what multimedia's and producer means, like you have your hands and in what you're doing. So I kind of just settled on multimedia producer and then I'll throw in there sometimes host, because I have the ability to host or, you know, but now kind of to be able to help people who have never sat in front of either even a zoom meeting toe lead. A zoom meeting, like you know what? A lot of newbies this year. Yeah. Yeah, well, you know, again, 2020. Hopefully, it's helped people in their skill set, like even from a presenting standpoint, like how to present on camera in your own living room when you're not in a board room. E happened to take a teaching certificate starting in October of last year, and we used Zoom throughout. So I was I was prepped and ready for it was the first time we used it, and I was kind of learning a little bit more about enabled to teach the teacher, you know, you know, this is how we go into breakout rooms and all this sort of stuff, and this is the best way to send audio. And I was learning it. And then it came to this and then starting. So it takes a lot of initiative to learn. Especially if you're wanting to get into your own job or changing your job, not waiting, right. And that's what I find 2020 we mentioned a few times. Now is the advantage. The blessing in 2020 is. What did you do with it? Did you learn or did you just sit back and say, you know all Wow, the world's gonna end or, you know, did you take the bull by the horns and and learn something and find yourself being in a productive position rather than and pity party sort of position. Did you take advantage of the opportunity? Yeah. Yeah, that's actually a great That's a great question. You know, while so many people were bitching that 2026 you know, peace 2025 Felisha. It's like, What did you learn? What did you learn from from this year? A year that in in some ways, like no other years been like it? So what? It was like a Mulligan. If you have the ability to learn, you get a free Mulligan. You get a it's. It's a free year for you toe. Have an excuse not to be as responsible that you need to be, but to take time for yourself. As we talked about self care and learning all about in upgrading yourself like it was just, Ah, it was like a computer upgrade for your system. if you if you really needed it, this was the year to do it. You know the other ones, right? Right. Well, And one of the things I think you know that I had learned is you expect sometimes people in these positions that use, let's say something like zoom like often and you're like, Okay, well, people know what they're doing and then you get on there. And then I realized I'm like, Oh my God, my biggest pet peeve of Zoom, please. Especially when you have, you know, it's like it's different if it's you and I and we're having a conversation. But if you have a ah whole group of people on there and the way Zoom works is if your microphone is live, it's open. And let's say something happens in the background and the sound of whatever it may be. It could be somebody opening the door, and then the camera switches to them, right, and then all of a sudden, and then you hear it. Or if somebody coughs. But it's so loud if you're wearing earbuds and you're like shot you. I was in a few of the groups for a class and I could see the mics on. And I'm just looking at the e Don't want to say I just see it by looking at it. Will it turn off and you're waiting for something toe happen Like like someone is going to scream the noises that just noisy and you know exactly where it's coming from. I know you're pressed for time. I'm going to jump through my questions. But you mentioned your sister a couple of times and she seems to be a solid rock for you. What do you think about Carrick? And you...

...mentioned integrity and the value system. How important is it to bring your up most, um, character in your career, Um, and maybe even how you've developed in your thinking of this from being a teenager. Up until now, I was just I was just distracted by, like, my video shocks. I don't know. Is it too bright? Nope. It's good. Sometimes I have this sun coming up here, but I'm nighttime. Yeah, I'd like to have everything on manual because, you know, and I have, like, the windows open, so I'm like, because if it's on auto, then everything gets funky, and so You're good, right? Um, for me, Aaron. Career area. Yeah, it's it's it's super important. And, you know, for me, you know, somebody says, Well, what is it about you that you know what? It's something that would describe you. And while it's not a super sexy word integrity, you know, I I'm a very integral person. I'm very honest sometimes to a fault. Yeah, um, passion comes through and, you know, people are like but integrity, um, find I find as I'm getting older, that I'm able to learn, I'm able to see faults that I have and try to with the best of my ability and whatever else. I haven't my disposal to chisel those away right now, but to acknowledge that I have them had them. They're part of me. I can understand other people how you know, the worst of the worst. I can understand how they would do those things and those those situations eso not being so judgmental, but just working on myself and trying to chisel away all these things that are not necessary in one's life. Yeah, well, I mean, you know, as you get older, hopefully you know the things that really do need What, while you don't necessarily, you know, completely changes a human being, you know, maybe you wanna work. I like, you know, for me, I'm told sometimes, like, hey, you know, maybe you need to work on X, Y and Z and okay, Yeah. You know, uh, I would like to consciously work, but you have to make that effort to consciously go. I wanna be. But I'm gonna do better. I wanna improve in whatever it is. Um, you know, maybe I do this too much. Or maybe I do that too much. And, you know, I I had somebody recently tell me there are moments if I get very frustrated or there are moments where my fuse goes short and I recognized it happens with stupid things. And when people do stupid things, people make mistakes, we all make mistakes. And I think you know the difference between somebody doing something stupid and somebody making a genuine mistake. And for me, I get very frustrated very easily. It's stupid things, and that comes out and, you know, I'm a very honest person. And, you know, I've been in a meeting where I'm sitting there and I'm so frustrated about something. Some things that have been addressed and haven't changed. And it's like, um I the only one in this room that sees X, y and Z and goes, What are we thinking? What are we like? Hello? And I'll, you know, I get I get really foul mouth. You know when when that passion slash frustration comes out. And I I even recently had a co worker say, Hey, there's somebody who, you know, has gotten offended. You know, you dropped the F bomb a few times in there. I'm like, Oh, well, good. Okay. You know s so let me get this right. We're more focused on the fact that you know, I'm using bad language, but we're not focused on the fact that all that we're not, you know, we're not thinking, Hey, am I providing true value for my client? And what kind of results are they getting? But but it's more important to focus on the fact you're offended because I said the F word like a few times I'm like, Do you even wonder why I did that? Did you hear the passion in my voice and the frustration and that maybe I might have a point or you just focused on the fact that, like, oh, offended, it's I heard something about, uh, Merivel marital advice not long ago, and it was talking about a couple who were just arguing, and then maybe the husband was losing or something. And then the wife made a really good point and he said,...

Yeah, but you're slow Ching to meaning no matter what. She said he wasn't going to listen and buy him, pointing out something else. He felt that he had a win or he he won the argument. And I think what you're saying with that is also true. Whatever you're bringing up to point out, something that's not going right in an organization, and someone's gonna point out the, you know, the the curse or whatever it is you said as the problem in the room, they're missing the main point, and I think that happens a lot. E think I generally, you know, I'm pretty presentable in terms of how I talk, But then those moments that happen and that's naturally how I am so then I'll just you know, and then the cusses started kind of flowing out like it's a Florida regular conversation. But that happens. You know, again, that comes from passion, passion and or frustration. You like to see character bubbling up, or at least people who are sound character bubbling up to the surface within the work that you dio. But that doesn't always show in the prettiest way, right? Like you'll see it. And it's not like But what is what is perfect like, What is Ah, you know, like I'll never forget the story of Gary V, who we've referenced a few times but him talking about how he gets these speeches. He, um, he'll be hired to do, ah, talk somewhere and then they want to pay him, like $500,000. Ridiculous. But they say, Hey, you can't You can't cuss because one of Gary V's things if you follow him, you love his energy, and he's one of those people where he just like you know, him. Cussing is just part of his. I feel like it's his energy and his passion, you know, kind of like when I go, yeah, he's right on the edge every time. And so they say to him, You just can't cuss, you know, And he's like, I'm afraid I can't I'm not your person And he's not willing to change who he is because you know they want him toe fit in the square box for an hour for two hours, and you just you just can't cuss. It was like, Okay, well, you know, thanks for the invite, but I just can't be your person. Yeah, it's funny, but it's funny about cursing it. I don't curse myself. It's not that I don't know curse words or I haven't cursed to my life, but I just generally don't And I think I was more sensitive to the subject years ago. But I'm less and I think it's just, you know, it's some people just communicate that way, and I'm not. I think in my my heart or my mind. I was like, Oh, before and I was probably offended. But I'm like, go ahead and I could hear the point. I understand what's being said, and I appreciate people who are willing to to live to their true self, as you're saying about Gary V, and that's who he is, and that's what you're going to get and I was actually listening to him my last evening. Maybe it was your this morning he was doing. Ah, live thing with bar stool, I think, And just like every 2030 words, is a curse word, right? And just, But it's just, like saying and or or or you know, some conjunction somewhere for him. That's just what it is. He's not trying to offend. He's not telling someone off. Well, it's like you can watch Simon cynic who's another favorite of mine love, Simon, cynic and completely different delivery, but again, great content. But it's and I've seen studies where one study says people who cuss a lot, uh, you know, are extremely intelligent and have a high I Q. Whatever. The study may have been a very intelligent people and are very productive or, you know, whatever whatever it waas and then another one that said, Well, you know, cussing just shows on intelligence, you know, kind of thing. And and so you see the both and it's like, you know, you know, I don't know. I think you also generally no, you know not. Not first to get unlike a huge you know, topic about cussing but like the difference between somebody who cusses but is generally an intelligent person, and somebody who cost this is just not very intelligent. It's just one of their five vocabulary words, right? Yeah, that's right. That's right. So, yeah, I know it's It's something I see, especially with, say, Gary V and, for instance, for for example, it's he has a company he had, and he doesn't act that way all the time, too. And some of it is is part of his branding of himself that that is what has gotten him where he is. Not that he said, I'm going to cuss. This is going to get me followers or this is going to make me. But this is just who he's comfortable with being, and that's and it is just how his mind flows. And I mean, he has a lot going on in his...

...mind. So it zit shows intelligence is, well, well between his energy. You know, I think it's just kind of like you get the energy of who he is, but you know, it's the everything else you get out of it. If that's excuse me, something that bothers you, but it's like, But what kind of you know are you being in spite? He inspired me so much when I was out of work earlier this year. Uh, you know, I was sleeping on a friend's couch and I didn't have a job, and this was before it started, like my side businesses. Well, and you know, I was I was kind of in a rut, and I started watching him, and it was so infectious. And I love him with you. It was it, you know. And it's funny because you work in radio. It's like, Who's the most famous and coolest person you've met? And like the days where you're like, I want to meet Lady Gaga And now I'm like, You know what? I wanna meet. I want Gary friggin V. I wanna meet Simon. Cynic. I wanna meet these people who are so influential, um, for me, how and I love their energy and I won't even know I wouldn't even know what to ask. I would want to be like, Hey, could we sit down for an hour? And you know, that's not possible because the guys kind of No, he's not a He's lucky to get 15 minutes if that there was somebody. Do you have? Ah, Gold. Brody, What is something that you know on art? Overarching? Um, mission that you're on or goal that you have. I got about five minutes left. Um, yeah. I only have questions for you. I think, um ah, goal is just, you know, I want to continue to work with people and make an impact with with what I enjoy doing, because when you love what you do, you know you're going to do your best work, and it's not even, You know, you don't even feel like you're working and and you're making an impact. You're leaving a mark. Um, in the universe, you know, you're contributing, and that's what I enjoy doing. You know, I think for so many years I was kind of very selfish and like, Oh, I love what I do And working in radio and blah, blah, blah, blah. But now I love helping people in with the skill set that I've developed, you know, and and really leaving a mark. And but at the same time, you know, growing as an individual and figuring out what well, I professionally have a lot of things figured out personally. You know, my therapist tells me you still have some growth to dio, you know, and there's a reason that you are where you are personally and so you know, just to continue growing and making an impact in helping people. Brody. Maybe you can think of this two ways. One for the listeners of what they're going through but have And you mentioned the therapist you mentioned sleeping on your friend's couch and being in a funk. I was in a funk the last couple weeks and and things seemed really tough losing my mom, my mother, my grandmother in law, my sister in law. I lost my job and then got it back somehow. And there's people like this. So have you faced some adversity in your life that you either look to to motivate you or it's it's Maybe it's hindering you, but it's something that's you're bringing with you in your drive and your work. Yes, I you know, you know, I thought a lot about why I have kind of gotten caught up in some of the poor relationships. Not that I've had a string of poor relationships like Maybe you know, the one or two relationships that were really unhealthy and why I stayed in it so long and you know, you you know, you're if you're going to some form of therapy, it forces you to be more conscious of the decisions you make and why you make the decisions you make. And, you know, when I grew up, I said earlier that, you know, I was a happy kid at home, but, you know, I was bullied, Um, and to be honestly, I don't know why I had a conversation with my sister recently where she was like, Well, maybe it's just that you showed some kind of weakness and, you know, you know, kids are, you know, kids or kids. They're cruel sometimes. And and I think you know when you try to think back to like how you grew up and how that impacted you as an adult. And I think about that. So like when I was growing up, I had a lot of that and I think my outlet waas doing the filmmaking and, you know, doing what I enjoy doing at home on going to school and putting up with that kind of crap. And, you know, now, as an adult, maybe that's why I am the way as an adult And why I'm so out spoken and honest, because I, you know, wasn't that kid. You know, you have some advice for people who might be in the same sort of situation in terms of motivating them, encouraging them in their work to kind of keep going...

Well, you know, for me, it would be never stop learning. You know, there's always something to learn, but also, it's if you're enjoying what you're doing, that says a lot. And, uh, you know, your support system is super important. You know, the people who know you best know you inside and out. And, you know, they should be your cheerleaders effortlessly. You know, the people who are closest to you should you know. I mean, it doesn't make an effort thio to wanna root on, you know, you know, family or friends, right? And say no. You know what you're doing. You're good at this or, you know, and and meet people network. Talk to people. Talk to people in what you want to do, and people say you're the some of like the the five people in your life, you know, which. You know, I think that is personally and professionally, you are the some of the closest people to you. So if you want to do something as as a career or a job network with those kind of people and pick the brain and or, you know, see if you can learn from somebody or, you know, ask somebody if they want to mentor you maybe somebody you look up to. But, um, I think as long as you're enjoying what you're doing and, you know, looking at something as as money not being like the prime motivator um, you know, I think if you're giving true value in whatever it is you want to do, the money will come. I'm I'm a big believer in that. So, um, speaking of money, Brody, how can people reach you? Rohde radio dot com eyes the website, and I'm on multiple multiple social media channels. They're all the same at Brody Radio. B R o D Y Radio. Brodie Smith. I have one final question for you. Why do you work? That's the hardest question, and yet it should be the easiest. Well, Thio create value to give value to make an impact is really why I wanna work. And I do what I enjoy doing because it doesn't feel like work. You know, I I really feel for people who go toe a job and they're like, This sucks, and I would love to find out what their story is. And do you have something you enjoy doing? Why didn't you pursue that? Because if if, and and everything to some degree eventually feels like a job, there's always a time. Even if you enjoy doing what you're doing, there's gonna be days where you feel like it's a job. But if you do what you love and you provide value through whatever your skill set is what you're good at than you know, and you're not chasing the money than and you're truly providing value, I think you'll get value back, you know, and even exchange hopefully. And if it's not even then, you know, try aligning yourself with places where you know you're making an impact. You're bringing value and that they value because you know your own value, your true value. So, you know, try to align yourself where you're going to get that kind of exchange. But, you know, I just love being a part of a bigger kind of cause and making an impact and and adding value. Brodie Smith. I believe I believe you're true to that. With teamwork, adding value with integrity. Multimedia producer and host Brodie Smith Thank you for your time. And I appreciate the work that you dio. Thank you, Brian. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian V. Be sure to subscribe, Follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. E I hope that you have yourself a productive yet joyful day in your work.

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