WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 25 · 2 years ago

#24 Brian T Shirley Comedian BrianVee Whywework

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Brian T. Shirley talks about the struggle to be a comedian and the path he has taken in his journey of work. Brian T’S Profile linkedin.com/in/briantshirley Websites briantshirley.webs.com (Personal Website) briantshirley.blogspot.com/ (Blog)

Welcome to why we work, with your host, Brian V as. He speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which will be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going and keep on working. Working's tough, but working is good. Now here's your host to why we work, Brian being this is Brian B with why we work, and I have the tremendous pleasure of speaking to Brian Shirley. Good day, find sir. How you do, Brian? You spell the same way I do. We do it, isn't it odd? Well, you're good, sorry, my air conditions. No, you're good. Well, yeah, on that. Isn't it funny to say? I mean probably everyone has his experience, but we're Brian's so, you know, hy Brian, hy Brian, right, and we always I also, whoever spells it right way, we always have to with an eye or a why? Yeah, you know. Yeah, I saw something today bouts talking about their air conditioning on when they're recording, and it's like they were sweating profusely, and that says I can't wait for this to be over so I can turn my air conditioning on. Yeah, yeah, Efree A. I'm in Korea now and I think it's probably close to thirty thirty five now. Probably your ninety or something already, and it's only eight o'clock in the morning. Wow, now we're at yeah, we're around ninety two or so right now. When you can hear the CICADAS at five o'clock in the morning, you know it's going to be a hot day. HMM, Yep, that's right. Yep, I don't do you know what's sick? Hadas are, though. Me, me, me, me, really loud sounding bugs, and there they're huge, like small mice. They're going to start they're going to start up pretty soon here start getting dark like this all of a sudden, you know, but we can handle it. It's fine. Sir. Will you give us a little background about you and how you started work, maybe your first job, and how old you were and maybe where you were? I was fifteen and I was doing for some reason I've always been around the pizza industry. My first job was Marion's pizza was the name of it, and I was a bus boy, and I'm not sure what the laws are there and, to be honest, I'm not sure what they are here as far as that I age range goes. But back then I think you could work maybe fifteen to twenty hours and you couldn't work past like seven or eight o'clock at night, something like that. And I was, like I said, a bus boy and and it was a very slow restaurant. I remember that. I don't think I was there too long. And then when I was sixteen I started again, busboy, dishwasher at a place called Howards, and this is all in Georgia, by the way. It's where I grew up. And that was probably about it. Maybe I was there a year or so. Trying to remember. It's been obviously a long time. But what was your what was your motivation to get you your first job at Maryon's at fifty fifteen? Well, we we were kind of poor a little bit. We weren't destitute or anything, but you know, we did. We never had too much money and just not only that, but the fact that I guess it was ingrained in me from my grandparents and my mom. My Dad had left at an early age, and I think what it was was back then you were taught, you know, work, you were taught a good work ethic. You know, I think one of the things my grandfather said, it's kind of stuck with me try to is you're going to do something, do it right the first time. That was one of the things always remember him saying. And I think work is something to not just take up your time and not just to make money, but it if after a while, if you if you have some sort of background with people that believe in hard work, you will come to the point where you're going to you're going to be appreciative of a good, hard day's work. You know, at the...

...end of the day you can look back and go accomplish this, accomplish that you know, and I think that's one of the things it's took me a long time to taking me a long time to learn, but I appreciate yeah, I think that's something that's lost sometimes on people when you get older and then you start work. You work with people that are in their twenties, because I'm still in the food industry when I'm not doing stand up or act. As we know, the pandemics killed entertainment. So that is funny to look at these kids now you know that are coming up and think to myself, I wonder if somebody in my age, if I was working with them when I was twenty or eighteen and order what they were thinking of me. You know where they going. Wow, he's lazy, you know, he doesn't have a good work, work ethic, you know, because even though you're taught these things, sometimes it takes a while for them to kind of get into your brain, you know, so almost on a hammer a man, but I think that's what could be lacking sometimes, the good work ethic, and especially in younger people. So when you're raised in an environment, and I'll admit it, I was at the best worker when I was younger. I think that's one thing that has learned. Either you learn it quick or over the course of your life, like I have, you finally get it in your head that, hey, you know. I got to tell you, though, as bad as I am on myself, I do have a good reputation, but with a lot of people work, so I guess I'm my own worst critic. When you were fifteen, now you mentioned your dad was not there, nor was mine, and I interviewed a gentleman not long ago and like to contrast the two of you. He sort of went through route, admittedly so, of taking full advantage of his mom's hard work and not in not being motivated to do his own work. And you're kind of hinting that. Well, you know from your grandfather's perspective and you know your mom being singled. Do you recall, like recognize, using some hard work ethic with your mom and being a little motivated? Like for me in the middle I saw my mom, I worked, but I didn't really fully appreciate the difficulty of being like a single mom raising a punk like me. And did you recognize any of that at that age? Like you said, you were just you were kind of getting it but not fully engaged with it. No, and that's a good point. I didn't realize the struggle that my mom had to raise two kids by herself and work during the day and then work at night to sometimes, sometimes she helped to jobs, and I think now I'm really appreciating that a lot. Even though I'm single by myself. I have to do like four or five different jobs just to keep things going because of what I do, product what I've chosen to do. But when I started working and I got into construction when I was around right before I went the air force. I'm also a military better, but before that I was doing construction. That's when it hits home because that was hard labor and I actually was paying my mom a little bit to live there too and sleep on the fold out bed because my brother had his own bedroom at that point. Because you know how it is when you get to be eighteen. It's in our my experience it was you know you're going to you're going to contribute. Are you going to go somewhere else? So I learned to contribute and that's when you really start appreciating what work is, because you learned that you got to pay your way and you how do you do that? Well, you gotta work. So those are the beginnings of learning those lessons about respond my melody. My Mom always left a sofa for me, but she got rid of the bed. It's not it's not going to be long term for you. Right as I got I like, okay, you got to spread your wings here now. So was the construction rate out of high school pretty much? Yeah, because I yeah, I think it was. I think it was pretty much after I got out of high school and I was kind of banging around, getting into trouble a little bit. I was a little bit of a party animal, I would say. Yeah, and lot lack of direction. My Dad came back into my life. He's I'm living...

...where my dad lives now, which is very contentious, and my family. I moved over here in Stout, I'm in South Carolina, and he we connected and he tried to send me to college and I was a drinking scholarship. So I didn't last too and I had that scholarship. Is Yeah, it's not a give those debt down and stays. I thought of the LE in Canada. Canada's got the major one. I was on a mine or what the one in Canada's a lot colder to but yeah, I got into some trouble and they said look, we got to do something with this kid. So I would and join the air force and which now you're going from work as a when you say work, I look at the word work as a daily experience. When you say the word work, I think of a job. You go today after day, and I might punch in punch. I was right. You may not necessarily enjoy of Aur. You might be kind of like tolerating it, or maybe you do enjoy it, but it's it's not a life thing, you know what I mean? It's like you could take it or leave it, you know, if something happening, that's that. To me, is the job, the job, and work. That's what I e quite work to me. But now that I once I was in the air force and then after I got out and started a vocation of trying to be an entertainer, I learned and that there's a difference between work and a career or work and a lifelong vocation. Big Different, because with work, usually it ends when you clock out. That's it. You know, you don't really think about it when you go home. Are you are? You shouldn't to me, because that's where stress comes in. But a vocation or something, a career, is never ending. I'm twenty four hours a day, whatever you want to call me right now, but I have to have survival job and that's where work comes in. And did that start with the Air Force? Is that how you start to realize that full I think it did without me even realizing it, to be honest, because when you're in the service it's twenty four hours a day. You know, we had to do. You know, you have your hours where you go to the shop, but then there were times where we had exercises, with exercises and you know your you could be there twenty four hours in the shop. You could be there twelve, a sixteen, you know. So you're always on Bay. We lived on base. Now there were people when they got married, they get a house or they lived in a house. It is but it's always a part of your you know, got to keep your hair trimp you know, you you're it's a full twenty four hours job, if you want to call that. So, when you were in high school, sorry, when you were in high school, were you thinking? What? Were you getting into trouble and not being a good student? I assumed. Yea, that is where you're alluding to. It me too, as the French saying want. We'll see, but did you have in the back of your head something that you really wanted to do? was there something that even to today, where it's clicking, and you said even you had an interview as well, but is there? was there something then that you found that brought you some some solace or some peace? I was leaning towards and not really seriously pursued it, but I was wanting to be a rider in so many ways, you know, like I was, you know, the whole thing about being a kid, and get in a band. You know, I had a couple of friend we had, we played with that. So I wrote Song. But then, I mean I actually wrote for the school newspaper, cut up with a character and had a column for a little bit in the school newspaper and started writing all this the short stories or skits, sketches, whatever you want to calm comedy sketches and stuff, and not I'd already done that when I was a kid, like thirteen, fourteen two. So that, even though it's not it wasn't it during periods of my life. It kind of went away. But that's been a consistent thing, even if it's been cut up a little bit in my life, because I could still consider myself that now, because when I'm writing a short story, I mean a short film or character, I do now CRP news. It's a parody on news. That's writing. That's where everything starts, you know, even and even in acting, even when you get that script and you're doing a character, to degree you're kind of writing and creating because you're sometimes...

...you need to come up with a backstory for this person that you're you're being, and that involves a certain amount of writing there. So I think writing's been something very consistent in my life and I've actually I write a column monthly for a publication called what's the story? So that the seeds that began when as a kid and then in high school. How did you make the transition from the military? What was your thinking? Thank you for your service, by the way. Oh, and I said this too. I'm interviewed to soldier the other day and if it wasn't for America it Kennidan would be in trouble. It's so it's not just to say it. Don't we really do. Thank you. What was the transition from the military? What was your next thing opposed to what you're doing? was there something else in between military? And that's and I actually those were the seeds of stand up, because I would like if they had a squadron function or something, because I was so goofy and always doing weird stuff and writing all the stupid stuff, they would have me involved. Somehow I didn't see it or I knew both. I right the skits for it and then back then are you know. Then I got out and immediately went downhill again. I'm when and try to be a manager, who we go back to work right, not career. I went back to that job thing we were discussed a little bit ago, where I was trying to manage a booth at six flags over Georgia. It's a amusement park and we take pictures of people. As I came over the hill of the roller coaster and seldom fell shocked. So I blew that. I went right back to party and when I got so I blew that went and well, let's be honest, partying is fun. So it's not like you went to you know, doing damage to yourself, like intentionally. Just partying is fun. Yeah, and when you learn a lot of hard lessons to then I went in and went to this Cologne what I call a Cologne cult I know it sounds weird, but I don't know if you've ever had this happened, like if you're walking through a parking lot and also sudden somebody comes up. I got a bunch of bottles of Cologne and they're like hey, what kind of colone do you like to wear? You know, we've got this for it is usually one thousand nine hundred and ninety five or whatever, and they spread you down and smell it and but you can get it right now for ten dollars or whatever. Well, the reason I call it a cult is because they would, they would get you what they called juice in the morning. You'd go for your meetings, you got your Cologne. The main guy would be you know, and he said here, your goal is to sell this many bottles, because if you keep selling this many bottles, you'll get your own deal and like he had, and that's when you make money. Is then you got other people selling Cologne and you know you're getting a piece of it. You know, it's all a kind of a pyramid, cult SNIM thing going. Okay, and I lost my car, I lost the apartment I was living in. I mean I was living on people's couches, you know, and and this is I haven't even put that this out that much into public eye, which I don't mind. It's just, you know, it's one of those stories. Come Up. It's good. Let's like one of these. I'm going to put in a book because it's so much try to do on stage. If I try to do it. I'm giving you the condensed version, but that got out of hand really bad. This was when I went back to what's the reason for the losses? Well, be Mawnies, did you? You get sucked into selling these bottles right, so you're buying more product? Well, yeah, you will, I know. We you don't buy him the they give you a certain amount in the morning and you come back and either you paid for the ones they gave you and then keep whatever difference, or you can you know, you got to pay for the bottle. So what you try to do is you start trying to sell as man bottles, and sometimes you would sell under to where you were either making only two dollars instead of seven dollars. You know, is just so you can get your numbers up, you know, and so if you're selling, you know, three or four bottles a day, that's only twenty eight dollars. You know, even when you do it good, you know, even if you have full Christ but your you know, they you're there in the morning, there, you used your you know, so you are, you are a hundred percent sold. Yes, that's how that you were like telling your whole family. You guys got to buy and these people. That's one. Here's how a cult works. One thing they...

...taught, they'll tell you, is stay away from negative people. WHO's negative people? Usually your friends and family, going, what the hell you doing, because my my uncle actually ran into me in a parking lot selling this stuff. It was an accident, and he goes, what are you doing? You know, and you're just negative. You don't understand here. I don't, though, people like you. Right, I've already been in the air force and then got out and here I was on the streets, you know, doing all this stuff. And Yeah, so you I lost everything. They act the car that I bought in Texas when I was in the Air Force. They came all the way from Texas and read and Reimburst, I mean read what you call it, repoted, repot the car. I don't know how they found me because I wouldn't live it anywhere. But yeah, it's your today, at least by a bottle of Cologne from you, if Ibaly of a didy. Let me get everything guy this then let me get out of everything out of the car. Okay, so how long did you last with that before? You said that was several months, and then I escaped. This girl that I had met while I was in the little cult. I grabbed her and she shoot while I lost my car, so she drove me it over here to South Carolina and that's how I got back the South Carolina and from there I had to dtox for a little bit, not drugwise, just I had to stop wanting to self Cologne to people. Every time we pulled into the gas station. My Dad would freak out because I was, you know, wanting to get out and start pitching people. And I'm serious. It's just one of those things that you get program you get in there groove. Yeah, so you have the D program out of that. And I was doing this and that little I was walking around trying to get a grocery store job or whatever, and I think I did start. You do and produce, but I was still kind of I didn't have any direction in life. And that's a big thing for me that I've learned as I've gotten older and is that if you don't have a direction, I get depressed, to be honest, if I don't have a goal or a purpose or whatever you want to call it. So my dad introduced me to this lady and said once you hang out with her and she's going to take you a few places to kind of get you acclimated a little bit better. So she took me to comedy club here in Charleston, which this was year, about twenty five years ago, where it was booming. It was big and I saw all kinds of big comedy guys, are and girl and I was hooked. The first time I went I was like wow, I've never seen live stand up. I'd seen it on TV, but to me, being in the the audience and being, you know, part of it is just amazing. And then I joined a workshop and I think it was a couple of months later was my first time on stage and at that point it was the best feeling I had in my life. I mean it blew everything else away, you know, and he gave me a focus and so I joined the workshop and I haven't looked back. It's been tough, you know, some year last year was the best year, though, I've ever had in my life. As far as what is the workshop consist of? So what are they doing in that for you? Oh, what's with this? At this particular club, you did not get on stage until you've been in that workshop. For at least thirty days. You had to excuse me, I got to get an what. Yeah, and you had to come up with your five minute stand up routine, you know, write it, I'm talking, ride it out. Then you do do that routine in front of the class, not on stage, in front of an audience, in front of the other comedians and the guy that was the teacher. Then you could get on stage, but he had to see your set. You know, everybody critiqued to you, told you, okay, this is good, cut this, you know whatever, and helped you edit it and everything. And then you finally got to do your five minutes in front of a live audience on probably an amateur night. I don't remember how that work because it's been a while, but they sometimes they would have. You got to get up on a pro night, but I think it would use a amateur night. And then you work yourself. You work your way to be an MC, you know, and that's where you get paid and plush. You're on an amateur I mean you're on a professional show. So that's when you know you're starting to move it up the ladder. But I stayed in that workshop for two or three, four year I don't know. I even when I started kind of Vincory now to other clubs and starting to get some work on the...

...road as an MC, which you could back then. Now it's stuff. Then I really started learning when you go on the road and you come back to the workshop. I did a tour Canada, as matter of fact, on West Side. I did Alberta and British Columbia three weeks, sixteen cities in three weeks in February and I drove from Charleston to Canton. I'm going to say with what ugs, letters something, but I know you drove it. We'll want it, Carol. How hard was it? Do you recall your first time getting up there doing jokes, because you said you did some m seeing in the military and you're up on stage, but was that one? Was that the first time you wrote a joke? What did you write some jokes in the military to that you use that I work you. No, I think I've been writing jokes for a while. But you know, you don't realize it till you get that workshop and you're like wow, I've been doing this all my life. I mean you know when you're at writing jokes, but I'm I wrote just such weird, silly stuff that was no way for me to do it on stage because it was just so out there. So I had to learn this. That's what this workshop taught me. Kind of normalized me a little bit enough to where I could be palatable to the regular people, because I just have that sense humor, that it's real bizarre, and so I guess writing has always been a part, but getting in the workshop and getting direct you find your craft that fine tuned. Would I'd already been doing. Really is what it was. It took my talent and focused it and cut off the meat. I mean cut off. Do you recall? You recall how how you felt? He said it was a great experience, but getting up there on stage, it's and looking out into the crowd and this is your big five minute opportunity to show you recall that? Yeah, it's frightening. It's you know, you're nervous. You're almost up to the point and I still get nervous. You're almost up to the point where you're thinking, why the hell am I doing this? I'm an idiot, and then you get up there and you get that first giggle, that first smile, that first murmur of positiveness and it's like a bolt of lightning. You just two things. It's amazing that, it exhilarating, and the other thing was it fit like a glove. It was so natural, you know, and of course I had a long way to go, and still do, you know, but when it's that, you know in your head when you go this is is what I should do, and not just because of the reaction, you know, just because of you know, wow, I made people laugh, but because of the way the stage felt, you know, the way that being in front of people and performing felt, not just the last I was getting, but just and it and the acting now has taken down another, to another level for me, because I had, you know, you don't just pop on a movie set and start doing lines and your goal. You know that process. I started gradually. To you, and people don't know this unless they do it, but a lot of this stuff takes years. Even if you have the raw talent, you know, it's got to be refined and it's in you have to. Hell, I was in an Improv group. We practiced Improv. Does that sound goofy? Yeah, but that's the way it works. You know, you have these games you play and you got to get with a group of people and learn each other, and I still do dinner theater. That has a certain amount of problem with it too. So I don't think these things that I'm talking about, you feel them. You just know. You Get up there and there's something that comes over you and you know this is something I meant to do. And but I'm not talking like a glow right, I'm not talking on this grandeur of I was meant to be a star, you know, because I do know people all throughout the years and I've been work and that. You know, they just don't have a good sense of themselves. You know, they don't have a sense of well, you know, you didn't really do that good and you don't know what how to tell these people. You know, no, I think you should be a dentist, you know, or something else. But you gotta know you you have to be realistic with your talents and if you're really set for something, if you really meant to do something, you got it, because to me, I...

...don't think I would do it if there were doubts, you know, like you know, I'm not I'm not really that funny, which we always do have those doubts. But, but, but, when you have so much proof that that's just you kind of kicking yourself a little bit. You got to go with with what's real. You know, did I really make these people laugh? And then you look at the comments or, you know, remember what people told you after shows and you go now, I mean, I can't argue with that. But you mentioned how covid is kind of taking a kicker on entertainment. What was your typical day like, or your week like prior to Covid? Prior to Covid, I was delivering pizza two days a week Max, working about maybe nine ten hours a week. That was when I was in town. Then I would have a variety of entertainment things that I would do to fill in the arrest you know, either I'd be doing a comedy show somewhere I'd be doing short film or Web series or something. Now sometimes you do not getting paid for the film's I did student films just to build up my resume, you know, and stuff like that. So that's why I always kept what they call survival job, just to keep some money coming in and between gigs. Then I was an am a brand ambassador for company out of New York, where I would do wine tastings at grocery stores and that was cool because it kept me, kept the money coming in and I was still in the public, you know, dealing with public, with people, and I enjoyed that and I had journk wine, so it was like that was a cool thing right there. Dj Sometimes helping for special events or weddings, and then posting trivia, which I did last night. That's starting to come back a little bit, not much, but I got a GIG. So I when you're an entertainer, unless your big name are, you've got, you know, good representation. You know you're you're scrambling for different things. You know, today I was working on audiobook and we'll see how that goes. That's kind of a new foray for me, but that's what this covid's done. It's made people have to, you know, stop, pause and improvise, kind of like a marine. You had to figure out, okay, I can't make money doing this, this is this, I got find something else, you know, and the pizza delivery picked up. You know that once covid hit and you know, Brian, this stuff went like that. That's what really stuck about one week you've got all these gigs lined up and then two days later they're all gone. Everything start falling the two days up. We're not doing any more wine tastes, no more dinner detective. This GIG guy canceled that gate. We can't film anymore. I was filming a pilot. I was playing a chief of staff. For got run the president that we had to stop doing that. He put out a sixteen minute proof of concept because we couldn't film the rest of the pilot. And what are we going to do? Just leave it sit there? So this guy said no, we'll just put it out. And have you ever been able to adjust in this situation to see, because you and I met through linked in. Yeah, so how is it that you're adjusting and morphing to keep yourself out there, because you know in the hopes that this all goes away right and the covid goes away and things go back to normal. How are you able to ebb and flow with the times during this uncertain time so that you're ready, willing enable when that time comes? Part of it is climbing out of the chair or bed, you know. Yeah, you're right, because I got real depressed and still do. But I mean especially at the beginning and then when the protests, it was like you're depressed. Okay, things are kind of coming back. Oh Wow, I've picked up more pizza stuff that I could error. Okay, well, the money's coming, so that's good. Then I'll sudden these protests are in your life, Gosh, you know, and get pressed. You know, then you get scared and you know, are they going to come and breaking my house? You know, then you get over that and you're like, you know, so you persistence. You know, I guess that's but it's...

...tough. You gotta you have to have people to like. I got friends and family, thank God, but you know, if I start getting really bad, I can call them and go this is you know, so I you know, I try to spend time with my parents when during a week and that helps, you know, sit out and have a powow on the porch. But you have to keep moving mentally and physically, and it's tough. I mean it is tough sometimes. And if you don't have a good job, like in food or something there, or you're a nurse or whatever, I've feeled for you right now because you know, that's how are you guys over there? How are Y'all doing there? Korea is does things rather well. I mean we we were impacted with it in January, so we were kind of ahead of it for North America. Say Right, and they tend to wear masks and stuff anyway, almost as fashion here, so it's no big deal and they're kind of a society that, I think, I was talking to someone yesterday, conforms well to the suggestions of government. So I'm not as easily conforming, but I do conform because I'm in their country, so it's to my best interest to so. I think because they conform so easily, things kind of tamper off and the medical here in Korea. I don't know why more countries don't follow the way medical runs and in the way things are done here. So you yeah, very well, but we still have, you know, we need to wear masks outside. We you know, there's I don't see many, I don't hear of many protests or anything like that going on. It's things are run well here there. They're run very well. been people live kind of normally. They just wear masks and schools and stuff. You know, they'll look into September to see if they're going to continue, but they took all the precautions that were necessary, I think, in light of not knowing much about what we're really going through. HMM, I've been over that way. I did a tour of Japan. I did some shows for the marine basis on Fuji and open now, and it was beautiful country and really appreciated that trip. It was exhausting and because you travel for twenty four hours and then you have to perform almost immediately. I think we got there six in the morning and I had to show that night. I don't remember. I just know as a as a comedian, what is the hardest thing about your job? What is the from the writing process to getting off stage or that night of the day after? What is the most difficult about what is most difficult about being a comedian? I think the most difficult part is when you don't have the show that you thought you should have or you have a bad show. I mean sometimes you have a show that's not somebody else wouldn't say, oh, that's bad show. They go are you did fine, but inside you're like, crap, man, I messed this joke up. This guy over here was looking at me the whole night didn't crack a smile. You had a you got two hundred people laughing, but one guy that just sits there with his arms crossed will bug you until the next show or next week if you don't have a show. So I saw something the other day with Joe Rogan and he's a comedian and he was saying, you know, the bombing, when you bomb, everyone bombs, I mean is a bomb, but you know, have a bad show, but when you bomb, that gives you the encouragement to drive to do better next time. So you kind of need the bombing to to improve. Yeah, Oh, yeah, I would agree with that. I mean you you have a bad show, your you want to get back. You know, if I'm going to have a bad show, I'd rather have it where there's two shows of one to night. The bad shows the first show, so I have another show immediately get back on the horse. Yeah, but I mean to be it. I guess second though. Bombings would be first, but second would be. The most difficult part is continuing to come up with material. I mean there's people that are you know, they ride all the time and you know I try to write, but it's for me get doing different stuff helps with my stand up, like writing for this new segment I'm doing. I know it sounds weird. I'm not doing a joke for my stage, but continuing to write and keep in the writing process helps help. You know, you got to work those muscles. So I think that's the second most difficult thing, is continueing to create a process, especially when you know I've been doing it twenty five years. So you have...

...to you don't want to do the same jokes, although you have jokes that you keep in the act, but you don't want to do the whole you know, report are all the time. You know you want to add some new stuff in there. You know, and hopefully you do, and I think a lot of life experience help ups that too. You know. And this is what is it? What is something that you you enjoy most out of it? You mentioned it at the beginning. It's, you know, it's not just the laughs, it just the performance. I mean even like last night when I was doing trivia, I joke around. You know, I don't do any of my I might slip in a joke here there, but even then I was having fun and it's just to me it's a living it's a feel, like a hundred percent of life. When I'm on stage. It's like this is how it should be all the time. I wish you know, it's it's the essence of my life. Any performers like that? Being on the stay? Is there a full essence? That's where you get there. NTIRE being is on fire with life, you know, because that's what they look yearned to do, and that's that's the thing that continues to drive our lives. Is this thing called entertainment, this thing called stage, and you do all these other things just to keep that thing going, you know, delivering pizza or, you know, stacking cans at a grocery store or whatever, just so I keep the food coming in and the lights on and the rent thing, you know, because if you I mean, you can get a full time job, you know, fortune five hundred or whatever, but there's going to be a time when, if you continue down the entertainment road, that somebody's going to offer you something and you're going to look at your boss to go look, I got to go out of town for three weeks. That's the end of that job, unless you've built up the vacation. You know, I've been fort. What advice, what advice do you have for people that want to get into entertainment or even you have lots of work experience. Some some advice for people who don't have a job. You know we've all experienced not having a job when wanting a job. Or you mentioned having an interview in between jobs or looking for a job. What advice do you have? And even if they were going and to entertainment, to different answers. One, if they're going into entertainment, make sure you have a flexible job. You can't stop working. And then I know a comedian who, and this is back when we were in the workshop, he got booked for a week or two down in Florida at this club down there and as soon as he got booked he said, and he was he had a full time job at as a produce clerk a grocery store. Soon as he got book he said, well, that's it, I'm quitting my job. So for two weeks on the road he quits his job because I guess he thought it was just going to snowball after that. It's not the way it happens, but especially if you have been doing it for five years. So I would say, if you're going to get in your entertainment either you got to be independently wealthy or you got to have a good work at it, because you're going to want a flexible job and you're going to want the people, your boss and Co workers, to like you. For those times whenever you go, Oh crap, I got a Gig tomorrow, somebody covers your shift or your boss says don't worry about because I can tell you that happened to me a lot. I would I worked at this place here for six to seven years. That are just quit. Long Story, and my boss who left, who now I followed over to the job he left it for. Yeah, if I said Look, man, I got something, you go, don't worry about it. We got we got you don't worrying, but that could. That's me coming in on time, that's me covering shifts that I wouldn't scheduled for, that's me staying late, you know, if they're busy. You know. So good work ethic, especially if you're going to if you want to do entertainment, because it's not glamor at at a level. You work hard when you do entertainment. So if you're not used to working hard in a regular job, don't even think about being an entertainer. You know, because I was on the set of obx our banks for fourteen hours. Now. That ain't work but out of you. But it's somebody who's lazy, even though you're sitting there, because I thought...

...was there with a hundred other people, then didn't. After eight, nine, ten hours, these people start bitching. It's like, don't come to a movie set and, because you're there twelve, fourteen hours, complain because that's the quickest way for them to go not using that person next time. So that's just just a word of warning. If you want to be an entertainer, if you don't have a job, and you know we're talking in regular jobs, yeah, you go get one. I mean the worst thing that people do is, and I've seen this a lot of times, is complain about not having a job, go looking for jobs, but the jobs that they're finding aren't what they want, so they either don't get a job or they kind of half ascid and put in a application and show up with pants down to their knees, or you know what I mean, they don't don't you know. It's like, why would they hire you. So either they're not trying, are they just don't have any sense, you know. So if you don't have a job, go get a job, any job, and work it till you can find something better. You know, if you don't like that job, get something better. When I left this job I was at now, of course I've got other things I do, I immediately had three job opportunities, you know, and I'm too. I'm doing two of them. I said I'm going to do I'm not going to get full time. I'm going a couple of part time jobs because, a, I'm going to see which one works out better and be I you know, if I have to quit one or I get fired, you know I've got the other one, and I wouldn't get fired because it's something stupid. I'd get fired because somebody offered me a role and I said, hope, I'm going to go do this movie. So you, Brian, how can go ahead? Go ahead? Oh, no, just you gotta think, you know, got to think ahead. Always think ahead, three steps ahead if you can. Yeah, that's why I like Linkedin, because you can build your brand there and you can show and keep looking and just kind of even if you have a job that you're satisfied with. Just have that off to the side and make the connections that may be necessary for you down the road. MMM, how can people reach you, Brian? If they whether in acting or you know, follow you see where you are. Well, I'm all over social media, Brian t Shirley, no matter what you do. If you go to Google and say Brian t Shirley, everything will pop up, at least the first two or three pages are you go to Brian t shirleycom, as we discussed, be our I a in t and then, just like the girl Shirley as hi, or at least right, and facebook, twitter, as you know, Linkedin, flirting with Tick Tock a little bit here and there, and then instagram. So I'm all I'm on those. But then the website and or my email, Brian Teach Shirley at ALCOM. My Dad, my dad has taught me under the Work Ethic to He's entrepreneur of salt of swords, because he's been an inshirts for health insurance for forty something years, which, when you're an agent you're doing it's like your own, your own business, you know. And then he was a city councilman, for twenty years. The couple years ago with our health insurance here, you know, things got kind of weird with the Obama care or, you know, the Care Act. So he started be invested in a vacation company, Dream vacations. So He's a travel agent to and this is he's seventy two years old, you know. So just goes to tell you. You know, people get older, but you still have to keep your options open. And here's here's what's funny about it prime. It's travel, you know. And so the name of his company is surely a good timecom. So if if you want to look it up, it's surely sat our way. But I tell people don't Google. That's good because you don't know what's going to pop up if you google. And what you're saying to is if you're lacking motivation, encouragement is look around right, take an index of the people in your lives, and you know you don't have to look much further than your dad. You're right to show people that are working hard and have a good work ethic. And and when we're younger, we kind of don't want to look to that. We kind of looked to our own things, but surely we can no pun intended to find people that are within our reach...

...to give us that little bit of kicker to to keep working. HMM, and Ryan, work is live and in closing, why do you work? I think because it gives me satisfaction. When you when you boil it all down, it gives me satisfaction. Let's think about this, because we call it work, but what really is? Well, it's a way for us to pay for our food, pay for the place that we live, clothes, get a car, etc. Etc. If you go just with the basic needs and then from there comes goes to want. So with this thing we call work, what was that Tenzero, years ago, twenty? Yeah, you know what was it? It was these our ancestors, gathering berries, you know, killing a rabbit, building a you know, wig Wam or whatever, or cave, you know. So think about it like that. Think about it like that. It gives you a little bit of a different perspective. What we call work was survival way back when. Yeah, so we get it's we get the added benefit of what we do. Is just not for survival. If we do it a certain way, we can get satisfaction out of it, to which I'm sure they did, but I think we've got that advantage and we keep getting was. Society continues to grow and and electronics and all this other stuff makes like easier. You know, we get to say not only we survived and but we're thriving. You know, that to me is the essence of work satisfaction. It's really good. It's really good and in that essence it's it's like building community is, you know, with the added advantages or benefits, the fruits of our labor. Brian, I appreciate you and I hope people will find you. Brian T SHIRLEYCOM and thank you for coming on, thanks for having me. You've been a scholar and gentlemen. Thank you, sir. Thanks and a good one. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian Ving. Be Sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive, be a joyful day in your work.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (123)