WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 25 · 1 year ago

#24 Brian T Shirley Comedian BrianVee Whywework

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Brian T. Shirley talks about the struggle to be a comedian and the path he has taken in his journey of work. Brian T’S Profile linkedin.com/in/briantshirley Websites briantshirley.webs.com (Personal Website) briantshirley.blogspot.com/ (Blog)

Welcome to why we work with your hostand Brian ve as he speaks to people like you from all over the world, as wetogether dive deeper into our motivations struggles, joys, seeminglymissteps warnings and advicing, which will be anencouragement to us all and to get u get going and keep onworkingworkingoworkingongood. Now here's your host to why we were NDriningthis is brime B, W th. Why we work- and I have the tremendouspleasure of speaking to Brian Shirley, good Ay, find sir. Ah, how you doingBrian you spell it the same way. I do cu, we do e, isn't it odd? No you're,good, sorry, my airorconditioners, no you're good twell yeah on that!Isn't it funny to say I mean probably everyone has this experience, but we'reBrians, so you know hi Brian Ibrian rigt and we always Ayus. Whoever spellsit right way. We always ha with an eye or a Whi. You know a I saw someth today, but talking abouttheir air conditioning on when they're recording and it's like, they weresweating profusely, and it says I can't wait for this to be over. So I can turnmy air conditioning on Eyeah Everah. I I'm in Korea now- and I think it'sprobably close to thirty thirty five, now, probably you're ninety orsomething already, and it's only eight o'clock in the morning. Wow No werewe're at yeah we're around ninety two or so right now an you can hear the Sacetas at fiveo'clock in the morning. You know it's going to be a hot day: MHM YEP! That'sright! Do you know what Sacatas are Nemene mereally loud? Sounding bugs and they're they're huge, like small mice, yeahthey're, going to start me they're, going to start up pretty soon here theystart getting dark like this. All of a sudden you know, but we can handle it pine. Sir, willyou give us a little background about you and how you start at work, maybeyour first job and how old you were, and maybe where you were, I was fifteen and I was doing um for some reason. I've always beenaround the pizza industry. My first job was H. Marian's pizza was the name of it and Iwas a bussboy and I'm not sure what the laws are there and to Beyon as I' much sure whatthey are here. As far as that age grange goes, but back, then I think youcould work, maybe fifteen to twenty hours and youcouldn't work past like seven or eight o'clock at night, something like thatMHM and Um. I was like K, I said a bus boy and itwas a very slow restaurant. I remember that I don't think I was there too long and then, when I was sixteen,I started again. Bus Boy Dishwasher at a place called Howards and t. This isall in Georgia by the way, so I grew up and h that was Um, probably about maybe I was there hat ayear or so I'm trying to remember it's been obviously a long time. But whatwas your? What was your motivation to get your your first job at Marian ThaFif Fifteen? Well, we UH. We were kind of poor a little bit andwe weren't destitute or anything. But you know we. We never had too muchmoney and h just not only that, but the fact that I guess it was ingrained and me from mygrandparents and H my mom, my dad had left at an early age ANDM. I think what it was was back. Then you were taught you know work. You were taught a good work ethic.You know, I think one of the things my grandfather said it's Kindof, stuckwith me tried to. Is You got to do something? Do it right in the firsttime that was one of the things. I always remember him saying and H. I think work is something to not just take up your time and not justto make money, but it it if, after a while, if you, if you have some sort of background with people that believe inhard work, you will come to the point where you're you're gonna you're Gong,to be appreciative of a good, hard date work. You know at the end of the day,you can look back and go...

...accomplish this. I accomplished thatyou know, and I think that's Um one of the things it took to me a long timetoo taking me a long time to learn ern but appreciate yeah. I think that'ssomething that's lost sometimes on people m. When you get older and thenyou start work, you work with people that are in their twenties 'cause, I'mstill in the food industry. When I'm not H, doing stand up ORAC. As we know,the pandemic is killed, entertainment. So that is funny to look at these kids nowyou know that are coming up and think to myself. I wonder if somebody in my age, if Iwas working with them, when I was twenty or eighteen wonder what they were thinkingof me. You know where they're going wow he's lazy. You know he doesn't have a good workwork ethic. You know, because even though you're tauht these things,sometimes it takes a while for them to Kinda, get into your brain. You know italmost want to hammer em in Um, but I I think that's what can be lacking,sometimes the good work ethic, and especially in younger people. So whenyou're raised in an environment can ill admit it, I I wasn't the best workerwhen I was younger Um. I think that's one thing that h that has learned Um either you learn it quick or over the courseof your life. Like I have you, you finally get it in your head. That heyyou know I I I gotta tell you, though Um as badas I am o myself. I do have a good reputation t with a lot of people Iwork with, so I guess I' my own worst critic. When you were fifteen now Um, youmentioned your dad was not there. Nor was mine, and I interviewed a gentlemannot long ago and like to contrast the two of you. Hesort of went the rout, admittedly so m, of taking full advantage of his mom'shard work and not in not being motivated to do his own work and you'reKinda, hinting that, while you know from your grandfather's perspective-and you know your mom being single, do yourecall like recognizing some hard work ethic with your mom and being a littlemotivated like for me in the Middle? I saw my mom I worked, but I didn'treally fully appreciate the the difficulty of being like a single mom,raising a punk like me, and did you recognize any of that atthat age? Like you said it were just you were kind to get nip, but not fullyengaged with it. No and that's a good point, I didn't realize the strugglethat my mom had to raise two kids by herself and work during the day andthen work at night too. Sometimes sometimes she help toting jobs and H. Ithink now I'm really appreciating that a lot, even though I'm single by myselfUm, I have to do like four or five different jobs just to keep the thingsgoing because of what I'd do, Fo, what I've chosen toto Um, but when I started working and and Igot into construction when I was around right before I went in the Air Force-I'm also military veterar. But before that I was doing construction, that'swhen it hits home 'cause. That was hard labor and I actually was paying my mom a littlebit to live there too, and sleep on the fold out. Bed 'cause, my brother hadhis own bedroom at that point. 'cause. You know how it is when you get to beeighteen, it's an in my experience. It was you know: Yyou're, gonna, you're, gonna, contribute or you'regointo go somewhere else, so I I learned to contribute and that's when you really startappreciating what what the work is, because Yo you learned that you get a paintyour way and how do you do that? Well, you got ta work, so those are thebeginnings of of learning. Um those lessons about respond, my miility, my mum, always left a sofa for me, butshe got rid of the bed, its nuit's not going to be long termfor you right as I got I like. Okay, you got to spread your wings here now.So was the construction rate out of high school Um Pretty Much Yeah 'cause? I think it was. I think itwas pretty much after I got out of high school and I was kind of banging aroundUm getting into tribl a little bit. I wasa little bit of a party animal. I would say and M lit lack of direction. My Dad came backinto my life he's I'm living where my...

...dad lives now, which is very contingensin my family Um. I moved over here in Stou, I'm in South Carolina and he um we we connected and he tried to send meto college and I was on a drinking scholarship, so it didn'tlastto and H. I had that scholarship yeah. They give those that down instates. I thought I only in Canada Canada's got the the major Hene I wason a minor. What the one in Canadais a lot colder toobut yeah, I uh got Ini some trouble and they said look we got to do something with this kid I we and join the airforce and which now you're going from work as a whenyou say to work. I look at the word work as a dailyexperience when you say the word work, I think, ofa job you go to Um after day tonight, hunch in punch out right. You may notnecessarily Um bu joy or you might be kindo liketolerating it or maybe do enjoy it. But it's it's not a life thing. You know what Imean it's like, you could take it or leave it. You knowif something Happeng that that to me is the D, The job in work. That's what Iequate work to, but now that I once I was in the air forceand then after I got out and started a vocation trying to be an entertainer. Ilearned that there's a difference between work and a career or work andAlife long vocation, big difference because with work, usually it ends.When you clock out, that's it, you know, you don't really think about it. Whenyou go home, are y? U Or you should to me 'cause, that's where stress comes in,but a vocation or something a career is never ending. I'm twenty four hours aday, whatever you wan to call me right now, but I have to have a survival joband that's where o work comes in and did that start with the Air Force? Isthat how you start to realize that full Mi tiner did without me even realizingit? To be honest, because when you're in the service it's twenty four hoursAttech, you know we had to do you know you have your hours where you go to theshop, but then there were times where we had exercises ith exercises and youknow you're you're. You could be theretwenty four hours in t e shop. You could be there twelve to sixteen in old,so you're always on Bay. You K O we lived on base. Now there were peoplewhen they got married, they' get a house or they lived in a house I mean,but it's always a part of you're. You know, got Ta, keep your hair trimped.You know you you're, it's a full H, twenty four hours, uh job. If you wantto call that so when you were in high school sorry when you were in highschool, were you thinking what were y y know getting into trouble and not beinga good student? I assumed that's what you're alluding to me too. Was the French Dame wa Wel seeUm, but did you have in the back of your head, something that you reallywanted to do? was there something that even to today, where it's clicking- andyou said even you had interview it as well, but is there was there somethingthen that you found that brought you some some salice or some piece Um? I was leaning towards and notreally seriously pursued it, but I was wanting to be a writer a and so many ways you know like. I was youknow the whole thing about being a kid and getting a band. You know I had acouple of friend wea we played with that, so I wrote song, but then I Imean I actually wrote for the school newspaper cute up with a character andhad a column for a little bit in the school newspaper and started writing all th. These shortstories or skits sketches whateveryu want to call hem comedy sketches andstuff, and I I'd already d an that when I was a kid like thirteen fourteen twoso that even though it's not it wasn't Uminduring periods of my life, it Kindof went away, but that's been a consistent thing. Even ifit's been cut up a little bit in my life 'cause. I can still considermyself that now, because when I'm writing a short story, I mean a shortfilm or or a character. I do now CRP news. It's paredy on news, AT'SRITING! That's where everything starts. You know even N, even in acting, evenwhen you get that scrip and you're doing a character to degree, you're,Kindo, writing and creating 'cause. You...

...sometimes you need to come up with abackstory for this person that you're your being and Um. That involves a certain amount ofwriting there. So I think writing's been something very consistent in mylife and actually I write a callumn monthly for a publication called what'sthe story so that the seeds of that began as a kid and N in high school, how did you make the transition fromthe military? What was you thinking? Thank you for your service by the way,Oh, my nar, and I said this too. I'm interviewed asoldier the other day. If it wasn't for America can would be in trouble. So it's not just to say it. No, wereally do. Thank you. What was the transition from themilitary? What was your next thing opposed to?What you're doing was there something else? Inbejen military and that's- and I I actuallythose were the seeds of Sandup because I would um like if they had a squader anfunction or something because I was so goofy and always doing weird stuff andwriting all thi stupid stuff. They would have me involved somehow. I didn't see it or Iknew both I'd write, the Sketts Fort and then packn. You know, then I gotout and immediately went downhill again. I went and tried to be a manager e woul go back towork, writing Um, not career. I went back to that jobthing. We were discussing a little bit ago where I was trying to manage a booth of six flags over Georgia. It'san amusement park and we been take pictures of people as they came overthe hill of the roller coaster and selomfel shocked. So I h blew that I went right back to party in when IGotouto Blue Bat whip wel. Let's be honest, partying is fun, so it's notlike you went to you know doing damage to yourself like Shintentionally S.partying is fun yeah and you learn a lot of hard lessons toom. Then I went an and went to this Cologne. What I call a Cologne cult. I know it sounds weird, but I don't know if you've ever had thishappen, like if you're walking through a parkind lot and all of a suddensomebody comes up and get a bunch of bottles of Cologne and they're like hey.What kind of clone do you like to wear? You know, we've got this for it's,usually nineteen, ninety five or whatever, and they spray you down ensmell it, and but you an get it right now for ten dollars or whatever wellmhm the reason I calle it. A cult isbecause they would they would get you what they called juice in the morning.You'd go for your meetings, you got your clone, the main guy would be yoand he said here. Your goal is to sell this many bottles, because if you keepselling Thas many bottles, you'll get at your own deal n alllike. He had andthat's when you make money is, then you got other people, Sellin, talone nd.You know you're getting Piez, you know it's all kind of a pyramid, cold, Simthing going: Okay and I lost my car. I lost the apartment. I was living in Imean I was living on people's couches. You know, and- and this is I haven't even put- thatthis out- that much into public eye, which I don't mind, it's just you knowit's one of those stories come up. It's good and it's like one of these I'mgoing to put in a book 'cause, it's so much to try to do on stage. If I try todo it, um I'm giving you the condensed version, but that got out of handreally bad. This was when I lokd back. What's the reason for the losses, Weldi menygets, sucked into seliny'sebottles right, so you're buying more product? Well, yeah Y W, you don't buy'em, they they give you a certain amount inthe morning and you come back and either you PAV for the ones they gaveyou and then keep whatever difference or m. You know you gotto pay for theMOTTL, so what you try to do, as you start trying to sell as manky bottles,uh and and sometimes you would sell underto where you were either making only two dollars instead of seven dollarsyouknow was just so. You coul get your numbers up, you know, and so, if you'reselling, you know three or four bottles a day, that's only twenty eight dollars. Youknow, even when you're doing good, you know, even if y o have full crise butyou're. You know theyyou're there in the Mornin D, JS' US Youare, a hundredpercent sold, yes and ats ha that you were like telling your whole family,you guys got Ta Buy and these people that's on here's. How a cult works.

One thing they ta they'll tell Yo isstay away from negative people, who'se negative, usually your friends and family, going. What the hell are you ddoing, 'cause M.my uncle actually ran into me in a parking lot selling this t it was anaccident and he goes. What do you Doig it? You know and you're just negative,you don't understand Er. I don't know people like you,alread, been on the airful horse and then got out, and here I was on thestreets. You know doing all of this stuff and H, yeah, so Yo I lost everything th Y,they act the CLARN that I bought in Texas. When I was in the Air Force,they came all away from Texas, anre reimbursed Timea read what do you callit Rebo Repo, the car? I don't know how they found me 'cause. I wasn't livinganywhere, but Um yeahit's DI. They at least buy a bottle of clonefrom you uh they, probably they let Meget Everythii.This tylet me get out everything out of the car okay. So how long did you last with thatbefore you said that was several months and then I escaped I this girl that Ihad met while I was inthe little tult Um I ground her and she well. I lost mycarves, so she drove me over here to South Carolina and that's how I gotback to South Carolina and h from there. I had to detax for a littlebit, not drug wise. Just I had to stop wanting t selt colon o people. Everytime we pull IUT A gas station and my dad would freak out 'cause I was youknow, wanting to get out and start pitching people um and I'm serious.It's just one of those things that you get preot and you get in the Grove. Soyou have to deprogram out of that, and I was doing this and that little I waswalking around trying to get a grocery sort, job or whatever, and I think I asdid start doing produce, but I was still KINDOF. I didn't have any direction in life andthat's a big thing for me M that I've learned as I've gotten older and isthat if you don't have a direction I mean I get depressed to be honest. If Idon't have a goal or a purpose or whatever you want to callit. So my DD introduced me to this lady andsaid: Wont You Hang Out with her and she's going to Tane you a few places tokind of get. You H acclimated a little bit better. So shetook me to comedy club here in Charleston, which this was yer abouttwenty five years ago, where it was boomy. It was big and I saw all kindsof big comedy, guys, Er and girl, and I was hooked. The first time I went I waslike well I'd, never seen live, stand up, I'd seen it on t V, but to me beingin the the audience of being. You know, partof it is just amazing and then I joined a workshop and I think it was a couple of months later.I was my first time on stage and at that point H it was the best people I had in my life.I mean it blew everything else away. You know, and it gave me a focus, andso I jup joined the workshop and I haven't looked back, it's been tough.You know some years last year was the best year, though ever had my life asfar as what is the workshop consist of so what are they doing and that for youwih this at this particular club, you did not get on stage until you'd beenin that workshop for at least thirty days, you had to excuse me I' Gon toget a reate Yeah Y. Ah, you had to come up with your five minute. Um Stand up routine right, I'm talking ride it out. Thenyou do do that routine in front of the class, not on stage in front of anaudience in front of the other comedians and the guy that was Um, theteacher, then you could get on state, but he hadto see your set. You know everybody critiqued, you told you okay, this is good cut this.You know whatever and Helpe you edit it and everything, and then you finallygot to do your five minutes in front of a live audience. UN? U probably anamateur night! I don't remember how that worked because it's been a while,but they sometimes they would have you. You got O ge up on a pro night, but Ithink it was usually amateur night and then you worked yourself. You work yourway to be in an MC, you know and that's where you get paid and plus you're anHonan amateur. I mean you're on a professional show. So that's when youknow you're starting to move up the ladder, but I stayed in that workshopfrom two or three four year. I don't know I even when I started kind ofventuring out to other clubs and...

...starting to get some work on the roadas an MC which you could back then now and stufp Um. Then I I've really started learning when yougo on the road and you come back to the workshop. I did a tour at Canada. As amatter of fact, on the West side, I did Alberta and Briish Columbia. Three weeks, sixteen cities in threeweeks in February and I drove from Charleston to Canad,going to say with wha dog lat or something, but I know you drove it: Re Wan, a Carl. How hard was it? Do yourecall your first time getting up there doing jokes 'cause, you said you didsome M cing in the military and youwre up on stage, but was that one was that the first timeyou wrote a joke, or did you write some jokes in the military too, that you useall that I wor yet? No, I think I've been writing jokes for a while, but youknow you don't realize it till you get in that workshop and you're like wow.I've been doing this all my life Um, I mean you know when you were at writingjokes, but I wrote just such weird silly stuff. There wasno way for me to do it on stage because it was just so out there. So I had tolearn this. That's what this workshop taught me. KINDOF normalized me alittle bit enough to where I could be palatable to the regular people,because I just have that sense of humor that it's real bizarre and Um. So I I guess- writing has always been apart, butgetting in the workshop and and getting directe fine, your crat at Hind tuned.What Ha already been doing really is what it was it took my talent and andfocused it and cut off the meat. I mean cut off TV call. You recall how how youfelt Yo said it was a great experience, Bu getting up there on stage and looking out into the crowd, andthis is your big five minute opportunity. Hi Show diye recall that yeah it's frightening,it's you know you're you're, nervous, you're, almost up to the pointand, Istill get nervous you're, almost up to the point where you're thinking, why inHel Am Im doing this, I'm an idiot and then you get up there and you get thatfirst Gil that firs smile at first murmer of positiveness and it's like a bolt of lightning you just two things: it's amazing that it'sexhilarating and the other thing was if it like a glove, it was so natural. Youknow and of course I had a long way to go, and still do you know, but when it's that you know in your head when you go, thisis what I should and not just because of the reaction. You know just becauseof you know whall I made people, but because of the way the stage fells youknow the way that being in front of people and performing felt not just thelast was getting, but just an the acting. He now has taken out another toanother level for me because I ha you know you don't just cop on a movie setand start doing lines and you're gold. You know that process. I startedgradually too Um. You and people don't know this unlessthey do it, but a lot of this stuff takes years. Evenif you have the raw talent, you know it's got to be refined and it's it'syou have to hell. I was in an improve group. Wepracticed improm. Does that sound goofy yeah, but that's the way it works. Youknow you have these games you play and you gotta get with a group of peopleand and learn each other and Um. I still do dinner theater. That has acertain amount of having a problem with it too. So I don't think Um these things that I'm talking about you feel 'em. You just know you get upthere and there's something that comes over you, and you know this is something I meantto do and but I'm not talking, I like a glove right and not talking on thisgrandeur of I was meant to be a star. You Know An. I do know people althroughout the years and I've been working that you know they just don't have a good sense ofthemselves. You know they don't have a sense of well. You know you didn't really dothat. Good and Y. You don't know what how to tellthese people. You know. No. I think you should be a dentist.You know or something else, but you gotta know you have to be realisticwith your talents and if you're really set for something. If you really meantto do something you something you...

Gbecause to me, I don't think I would do it f. If therewere doubts, you know like H, you know, I'm not, I'm not really that funny,which we always do. Have those doubts but B, when you have so much proof thatth, that's just you kinda kicking yourself. A little bit you gotta go with with. What's Real,you know, did Ot really make these people laugh, and then you look at the commennsor. You Know Yo, remember what people told you aftershows and you go now. I mean I can't argue with that, but you mentioned how co Covit is Kindo,taking a kicker on entertainment. What was your typical daylihe or your weeklike prior to Coveit Prartacovet? I was delivering pizza two days a week Max working about maybe nine ten hours a week Um that waswhen I was in town. Then I would have a variety ofentertainment things that I would do uh to fill in the rest, either I' be doingas comedy show somewhere I'd be doing a short film or Web series, or somethingUm now sometimes you'r not getting paid for the films. I did student films justto build up my resune, you know and stuff like that. So that's why Ialwayst cut what they calle survival job just to keep some money coming in indbetween Um Gigs, then I was a a brand embassador for company out of New York,where I would do wine tastings at grocery stores, and that was coolbecause it kept me. I kept the money coming in and I was still in the public.You know dealing with public with people and I enjoyed that and I drinkwine. So it was like that was a cool thing right there, D J, sometimeshelping for special events or weddings, then hoasting Trivia, which I did last night-that's starting to come back a little bit, not much, but I got a gig Um. So I, when you're an entertainer unlessyour big name or you've got you know good representation. You know Y, youyou're scrambling for different things. You know today I was working on the Valio Bookand we'll see how that goes. That's kind of a new for aid for me, but that's what this Cov i's done. It'smade. People have to you, know, stop pause and improvise kind of like a marine. Youhad to figure out okay, I can't make money doing this. This T is this. Isthis I gotto find something else you know and the pizza delivery picked up. You knowthat once cove it hit- and you know Brian- this stuff went like that.That's what really sucked about one wee you've got all these gigs lined up andthe two days later, they're all gone. Everything started falling within twodays up would not do any more line. Taste, no more dinner, Totectthem K,this guy cancelled that go. We can't fell hem anymore. I was felling a pilot.I was playing a M Chiefest AFF FOR GT runn, the president, the W we had tostop doing that. He put out a sixteen minute proof of concept. 'cause. Wecouldn't film the rest of the pilot and what are we going to do t just leave itsit there, so this guy said now we'll just split it out and have you been able to adjust in this situation to see because youand I met through Lincoln. So how is it that you're M adjusting andmorphing tokeep yourself out there BEC? You know in the hopes that this all goes awayright, that Kova goes away and things go back to normal. How are you able toebb and flow with the Times um during this uncertain time, so that you'reready willing enable when that time comes part of it is climbing out of the chair or bed? Youknow yeah you're right, because I got real depressed and still do, but I meanespecially at the beginning and then when the protests it was like you'redepressed Oky, things are KINDOF. Coming back, Oh wow, I picked up morepizza stuff than I caneokay. Well, if money's coming so that's good mhm, thenall sudden these protests start d you're like Gosh, you know and get pre.You know, then you get scared and w you know. Are they going to come and Broakin my house. You know Um. Then you get over. That and you're likeyou know, so you...

...persistence, you know I guess, but it it's tough. YOU gotta! You have to have people too, like I gotfriends and family, thank God, but you know, if I start getting really bad, Ican call them and go oh this is you know, so I you know I try to spend timewith my parents when, during the week an that helps you know we sit out andhave a POW ow on the porch, but you have to keep moving mentally andphysically a d. it's tough. I mean it is tough, sometimes, and if you don'thave a good job like in food or something Ror you're a nurse or whatever Ian Meel for you right now, because you knowthat's how are Yo y guys over there? How areyou all doing that Koreas? Does things rather? Well, Imean we, we were impacted with it in January, so we were kind of ahead of itfor North America say rand. They tend to wear, masks and stuff anyway, almostas fashion here. So it's no big deal and they're kind of a society that Um, I think I was talking to someoneyesterday comforms well to the the the suggestions of government. So I I I'mnot as easily conforming, but I do conform because I'm in their country,so it's to my best interest too. So I think because they can form so easilythings kind of tamper off Um and the medical here in Korea. I don'tknow why more countries don't follow the way medical runs and in the waythings are, are done here. So yeah very well, but we still have you knowwe need to wear mask outside w. You know, there's I don't see many. I don'thear of many protests or anything like that. Going on it's things are run well,herethy're they're run very well, an people live Kinda; normally they justwear, masks and schools and stuff. You know they'll, look into September tosee if they're going to continue, but they took all the precautions that werenecessary. I thinkin in light of not knowing much about what we're reallygoing through MM. I've been over. That way. I did a Toure of Japan. I did someshows for the marine bases and Fougi an Oganala, and it was a beautiful country,and I really h appreciated that trip. It was exhausting becauseyou traveled for twenty four hours and then you have to perform almost immediately. I think we gotthere at six in the morning and I had a show that night, I don't rememberidestow as a as a comedian. What is the hardest thing about your job? What isfrom t the writing process to getting offstage or that night or the day after?What is the most difficult about? What is most difficult about? Being acomedian, I think tha, the most difficult part is uh. When you don't have this show that youthought you should or you have a Bandsh, I mean. Sometimes you have a show.That's not if somebody else wouldn't say ell, that's Badsha they'd go wel.You did fin, but inside you're, like crap man. I missed this joke up. Thisguy over here was looking at me. The whole night didn't crack a smile Yo hadyou got two hundred people laughing, but one guy that just its there ith hisarms cross will bug you until the next show or next week. If you don't have ashow, so I saw something the other day with Joe Rogan and he's a comedian, andhe was saying you know the bombing when you bomb everyone bombs mean you justay bomb, but you now have a bad show, but when you bomb that gives you theencouragement to drive to do better next time, so you kind of need thebombing to to improve yeah. Oh Yeah. I would agree with that. I mean Y, U Youhave a bad show. You E you want to get back to you know if I'm goingto have abad show, I'd rather have it where there's two shows of once a night thutthat chose the first show. So I a another show immediately get back onthe horse. H, yeah, but I mean to me. I guess. Second, though, O R bombingswould be first, but second would be. The most difficult part is continuingto come up with material. I mean there's people that are you know theyride all the time, and you know I'd try to write I, but it for me, do indifferent stuff helps with my standup. Like riding for this new segment, I'mdoing I know it sounds weird, I'm not doing the jokes for my stage, butcontinuing to write, ind keeping the writing processed helps help. You knowyou got to work those muscles, so I think that's. The second most difficult thing is continuing tocreate a process, especially when you know I've been doing it twenty fiveyears, so...

...you have to you, don't want to do the same jokes,although you have jokes that you keep in the act, but you don'twantto do thewhole. You know Rekwota all the time. You know you want to add some new stuffin there you know, and hopefully you do- and I I I think, a lot of lifeexperience help us that too, you know- and this is that is what is somethingthat you you enjoy most out of it. You mentione it at the beginning. It's youknow, it's not just the laugh, it just the performance. I mean Um even like last night, when I was doingTribua, I I joke around. You know I don't do any of my. I might slip in a jHor there, but Um. Even then I I was having fun and I it'sjust to me. It's a living. It's I feel like a hundred percent of life when I'm onstage it's like this is how it should be all the time I wish you know it's. It's the essence of my life, anyperformeris like that being on the stage is there a full essence? That'swhere you get there contire being is is on fire with life. You know, becausethat's what they lk yearn to do and that's that's the thing that continuesto drive our livences. This thing calledentertainment. This thing called stage and h. You do all these other things.Just to keep that thing going. You know. Deliveran pizza or you know, stackingcans at a grocery, storeer o whatever just so. I keep the food coming in, andthe lights on and the Rent Pang. You know because, if you I mean you can get a full time job, youknow fortune five hundrd or whatever, but there's going to be a time when, ifyou continue down the entertainment road somebody's going to offer yousomething and you're Y Gonto, look at your boss to go. Look. I gotta go outof town for three weeks, at's the end of that Njo a unlessyou've built up the vacation. You know I've been fortuate advice. What advicedo you have for people that want to get into entertainment, or even you have lots of work experiencesome some advice for people who don't have a job? You know we've allexperienced not having a job when wanting a job or you mentiond, havingan interview like in between jobs or looking for a job. What advice do youhave an even if they were going intoentertainment to on different answers? One? If they're going intoentertainment Su you have a flexible job, you can'tstop working anthin. I know it Crekin who and this as back when we were inthe workshop. He got bote for a week or two down Florida at this club downthere and H as soon as he got booked, he said, and he was he had a full timejob a as a prodoas clerk at a grocery store. Sushe got booked, he said: Well,that's it! I'm quitting my job SOFOR two weeks on the road he quits his jupcause. I guess he thought it was just goingto snow, a ball after that. It'snot the way it happens, especially if you Hain't been doing it for four orfive years Um. So I would say: If you're going to get in terentertainment, either you got to be independently wealthy or you got tohave a good work etith, because you're Goingna want a flexible job and you'regoing to want the people your boss and coworkers to like you on those times wnwhenever you go. Oh crap, I got a gig tomorrow. Somebody covers your shift oryour boss, ays no worabt 'cause. I can tell you I that happened to me a lot. Iwould I worked at this placed here for six or seven years thatI just quit long story and my boss, who left who now I followed, ver to the jobhe left it for Um Yeah. If I said Lookman, I gotsomething you go, don't worry about it. We got wee, got it yo, Don worn, butthat that's me coming in on time. That's becovering shifts that Iwouldn't scheduled for. That's me, staying late. You know if they're busy,you know so good work efespecially if you're Gont, if you want to doentertainment because it's not lamor at an level, you work hard when you doentertainment. So if you're not used to working hard in a regular job, don'teven think about being an entertainer. You know 'cause Y, I was on the set ofobx Outer Banks for fourteen hours. Now that ain't work, but I but t somebodywho's lazy. Even though you're sitting...

...there 'cause I I was there with ahundred other people, then after eight nine ten hours, these people start youknow bitching, it's like don't come to a movie set and because you're there, twelvefourteen hours complaining that's the quickest way, but then Tho go not usingthat person. Next. No, so that's just um just a little word of warning. If youwant to be an entertainer. U, if you don't have a job, and you knowwe're talking on regular jobs, yea, you do get one. I mean the worst thing thatpeople do is and I've seen this a lot of times is h, eplain about not havinga job go looking for jobs, but the jobs that they're finding are what they want.So they either don't get a job or they kinda half asid and put application andshow up with hants down to their knees. Or you know what I mean they don'tdon't you know it's like. Why would they hire you so either they're nottrying or they just don't have any sense. You know. So if, if you don'thave a job, go and get a job any job and work it till you can find somethingbetter. You know if you don't like that job get something better. When I leftthis job I was at now. Of course I've got other things I do Um. I immediatelyhad three job opportunities. You know and I'm too I'm doing two of'em. I said, I'm N, I'm not going to forgetfull time. We had a couple of part time job because am I see which one worksout better and B? I you know if I have to quit one or Iget fired, you know IV forgot the other one and I I I wouldn't get fired,because I did something stupid. I'd get fired, 'cause somebody offered me arolloll and I said hop. I'm going to go, do thiso to Brian. How can go ahead? Go ahead ojust you gotta think you know, gotta think it ahead always think ahead.Three steps ahead. If you can yeah that's why I like Lincoln 'cause, youcan build your brand there and you can show and keep looking Um and just Kinda,even if you have a job that you're satisfied with just have that off tothe side and make the connections that may be necessary for e down the roadmhow. Can People reach you Brian if they, whether in acting or you, know, followyou see where you are well, I'm all over social bediar, Bryan t Chirley, nomatter what you do. If you go to Google and say Ryan t surly everythingill pop up at least the firsttwo or three pages and the alred go to Bryan t Shirley Com as we discuss, B Ur,I an t and then just like the girl shortly as Ay Ghy or ay Har and UH facebu twitter. As you know, Lincon umflirting with Tiktok a little bit here and there and t en instagram, so I'mall among those, but then the website and or my email briant shirly at Aldcom. My my dad has taught me uthe work ethic too, he's a entrepreneur of saltof sorts because been in insurance for health insurance for forty something years which, when you're an agent you'redoing it's like you own, your own business,you know, and then he was a city Counsilan for twenty years the comntliyears go with our healthinsurance. Here you know things got kinda weird with the Obomic ar or youknow the careact m. So he started he invested in a vacation of company of dream vacations.So he's a travel agent h too, and this is he's seventy two years old. You knowso it just goes to tell you know peopleget older, but you still have to keep your options open and here'swho's. What's funny about him,cryme, it's travel, you know, and so the name of his company is surely agood time dotcom. So if you want to look it up, it's surely s rly, but Itell em: don't go hat's good cause, you don't know it's going to pop up. If youdo Andand what you're saying too is ifyour lacking motivation encouragement is look around right. Take a index ofthe people in your lives, and you know you don't have to look much furtherthan your dad to show people that are working hard and have a good work ethicand and when we're younger W, we kindo don't want to look to that. We kindolook or own things, but surely we can noponintendent...

...fine people that are within our reachto to give us that little bit of kicker to to keep working m and right work is Lineg inclosing. Why do you work? I think, because it gives mesatisfaction when, when you boil it all down, it gives me satisfaction Um, let's think about this 'cause. We call it work. But what really is it? Well, it's a way for us to pay for ourfood pay for the place that we live. Give Ou clothes, get a car TCETERAEtcetra. If you go just what the basic needs and then from there cow goes towant so w this thing we be call work. What was that ten to thousand years ago, twenty yea, you know wh? What was it itwas these our ancestors gathering, berries. You know killing a rabbit, building a you know, Wigwam or whatever or cave you know so think about it, like that think about it, like that, it gives youa little bit of a DIFFERENC pespective Wat. We call work was survivale way back when yeah, so we GIT's we get the added benefit of. What we do is just not for survival. Ifwe do it it a certain way, we can get satisfaction out of it too, which I'msure they do, but I think we've got that advantage and we keep getting wit. Um Society continues to grow and and liketriics and all this other stuff makes like it easier. You know W, we get to say not only we survive enbut were thrived. You know that to me is the essence of work.Satisfaction, it's really good. It's really good N, and in that essence,it's it's like building communities. You know with the added and advantages or benefits the fruits of our Labor Brian. Iappreciate you and I hope people will find you Brian T, Shirley dotcom andthank you for coming on Thaks for happening. Yo been o scholar, an agentleman tink, you sothanks nee good one. Thank you for listening to thisepisode. Why we were with Wrinin, be sore to subscribe, follow and sharewith other men, so they to e encouraged. There were. I hope that you haveyourself iproductive, njoyful Dayin, your work.

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