WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 4 · 2 years ago

#4 Cassidy The Homeschooling Cleaning Lady

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Cassidy speaks of her role as a homeschooling mom of three and her successful part-time work cleaning for military personnel while in South Korea. You can find her on her Facebook page: Waegwan Cleaning Services @waegwancleaning

Welcome to why we work, with your host, Brian V as. He speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which will be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going and keep on working. Workings tough, but working is good. Now here's your host to why we work, Brian V. Today this is Brian V at why we work, and today I have the pleasure to be here with Cassidy Sloan. How are you doing today, cassidy, this evening, I should say this evening. Yes, how are you tonight? I am doing well, as you and I were just talking, we're just trying to get our kids to bed and get things in order before we go on this little adventure of why we work. Would you be able to tell us a little bit about yourself? I know you and I met once. We've chatted a couple of times on Messenger and stuff like that, and some of it work related, and could you tell us a bit about yourself in terms of just growing up in some ideas about work, and we'll go from there? Yes, of course, so again. My name is Cassie Sloan. I am twenty eight years old and I live in wave on, South Korea. I grew up in kind of like a rural South Carolina about half of my childhood and then moved towards Augusta, Georgia, which is about two hours outside of Atlanta, the other half of my childhood. So I guess some of my ideas about work growing up I had the wonderful example of my father who my my mother was a college graduate and my father was not, but his work ethic definitely brushed off on to me. So much of how I work stems from the way that I've seen him work well, whether it was he doing well. I'll give you a brief background. My parents married very, very young and he was he started out as just a cook at wife Saver, and for any of you that don't know what wife saver is, it's a I think it's mostly like down South America, a just a fur restaurant, they know, fried chicken type stuff, and he went from there to working at his uncle was sewing machine shop. From there he's so sorry. You said very young. How Young is young? If you don't mind me asking because then that kind of compared to two thousand and twenty eighteen. So yeah, like, so he has some like with a married at eighteen to they're married at eighteen. They mean they not to disclosed. They have me much younger. So they are a success story solutely how hard work and per surveillance and saving money and doing the best you can really truly works out in the end. Will you look? You look at now, at kids at eighteen, like you're talking, married and with a job like that's incredible. Yeah, my dad is always been a pretty big inspiration for me. But to finish that little subnatsnaps. So he essentially, without a college degree, went from working at wife saver, moved his way up, moving on a working on different vehicles, to getting his CDL, which allowed him to work on eighteen wheelers and never they broke down the side of the road to eventual ry. I'm very ignorant what you say CDL. Yes, I'm not sure myself...

...exactly what it stands for. My husband probably what he's in the background. Maybe if he pops his head around the corner he could mouth it to me very quietly, but I don't sartify some I would have. He was able to fix fix trucks. Yes, mechanic of sorts. Yes, you became a mechanic. And then from there he actually got a contract in Afghanistan working on heavy truck, which usually you cannot do unless you are prior military. It's kind of hard to get into. Yeah, so, and then from there they moved to Korea and my dad moved up there, moved up through the companies here. Yeah, and survived various company turnovers, bless his heart, and and moved up through there and just he's been a really great example. How old? How old were you at that time? Do you remember coming to Korea? Oh, actually, my parents came to Korea not long after I got married. Yeah, yeah, and so I, my husband and I were in the states. Um, I think about seven years before we came to Korea. We've only been here about two and a half years. So I don't know if I got confused. Were you referring to your father working? Yes, as eighteen, and then he became a mechanic and he also came to Korea. Yes, he came to Korea first. So when that was? When you were a child? From that time span was from whenever I was a child to the point where I got married. I got married eighteen as well. So he had been here and then you guys eventually came here also. We eventually came here. We followed about two years later. It just happenstance. That's pretty good. That's pretty good. Do you did you have a job when you were younger? Um, when I was was, I want to say, sixteen years old, I had my first official job, which was working at Duncan donuts. So it was very, very simple. I was homeschooled, dual enrolled in college, which I did not complete, but I had lots of volunteer work and volunteer experience before then. So technically working on and off without pay probably since the time I was twelve years old. It's funny. I interviewed someone the other day, someone I went to school with and her daughter. I was speaking with her and her dream is to, if that's I got it right, Duncan donuts like she and very enjoys or someone else's under just loves Duncan donuts. And when my mom was younger, she she not younger when I was younger. She worked in a don't shop. There's lots of perks involved with donut chops there are you get sick of it eventually, very much. Whenever you you come home, that's all your clothes smell like. IS IS FRY food. So what is it that you do now here in Korea? Well, first and foremost, before my my business that I've created. I'm a homeschool mom, but my business is Waiguan cleaning services, and I created that about a year and a half ago, almost two years ago, originally kind of bipure accident. I kind of stumbled into it, but now it's become a I would say it's pretty part time, but the hours are long. That makes any sense? Yeah, way gone is the area in which you live. If people listening wondering what's that mean, but it just it's a Korean name for the place where you reside at the moment. Yes, did you have any prior experience like so you're what do you do on a daily basis when you have a client? When I have a client, a lot of my day starts the night before. I usually call the the client or message of...

...client, whateor email, whatever their preferred way of contact is. I if they prefer to have a digital end voice I'll send them their end voice about twenty four hours beforehand and firm their clean set out all of my gear, all of my equipment, my uniform and whatnot about a day before, because I have three children I have to set up everything for. So it's a little bit harder than the most people. It's I have to set everything up for the kids the night before. I have to coordinate, you know, their childcare and whatnot, and then the next day in the morning I get up quite early and get all my stuff together, get them situated. And what the time? What time do you get up, though? I mean it gives these little things like homeschooling and getting your kids ready, getting up early doing this job. Those things are motivation for people. Like if I'm like, I'm getting up at nine o'clock, that's not helping anybody. But if you like get us, I get up at four o'clock in the morning. Very nice. Like if someone's well, if she can do it, maybe I can do it too. Right, that's not easy. Well, it's I don't just get to put for for my job. Now there are some mornings I don't get up at four just because I'm so tired, but I generally I get up at four o'clock in the morning to to go to the gym. I work out. We're about an hour or an hour and a half, come home, have breakfast and then pack up kids, get them situated and go. What time are you going to bed? Usually, if you if you get up at for thirty to ten thirty. Okay, that's it's still tough. It's still tough. I usually when I'm done with a client, I come home and I might take a twenty minute now. I need it. What made you want to start cleaning as as a position and in any question I have, you should know I had jobs in the hotel industry as a housekeeper. I was a janitor and a couple of jobs. So I take I have great respect for people who do jobs like this or any of the jobs. Any questions that I have don't think that they're kind of like, hmmm, I'm why did you get into that? It wasn't kind, it was more volunteer. You can ask the question. It's okay, we can pause this or anything. Um, no, could you please wait? I thank you. Sorry, he's about to start a project. He's asking me. He's like it's you know what I can't city. It's you can take your time making coli no problem. I have tea, I can drink tea. You can go and come back. It's I have no problem. It would make him happy, I'm sure. Oh No, he's he just got done helping my father move some some things around, so he's going to sit down and take a break a few minutes plus his heart. Yeah, so well, I'm sorry, it's fine. Thanks. How did you get into cleaning? Yeah, yeah, it was actually an accident at first. I had no intention at all on starting any sort of business while I was over here and I we are work with the military community here. My husband's a contractors. We have sessed to base and whatnot, and we have a facebook form for the spouses here and one day there was a woman who was pregnant and she was getting ready to pc us, which is permanent change of station, and they were moving back to the states, and so she really needed a lot of help. She needed she needed a lot of help getting ready to move. So I volunteered. I said sure, I can come over and help you clean really quick. So I did and I didn't charge anything this initial time and help them out and they moved and then a couple days later, someone masses me and said Hey, I heard you did such a good job with this person's house, because you please do mine. And I was like okay, and I think like fifty or something like Shit, fifty, yeah, in your apartment, and so I did...

...it. Then next day I had two more people message me. You did such a good job with this person's apartment, could you please come do mind? So I was like okay, I think it was my mother who suggested. She's like, why don't you make a facebook page real quick? Just throw together a logo, put something together so that people can contact you, just in case you want to keep doing this. So I was like, I made the logo on the spot and I made the facebook page and then all of a sudden client started rolling in and I'm just like okay. So I had to learn really, really quick the business side of it, which is thankfully pretty easy because I only work with military and military affiliated. It's a business through base, so I have some parameters that I have to work in, but that's how I got started. It was a total accident. Can you speak? My dear wife and I befriended some American soldiers back in two thousand and eight. We probably explain this to you when we met you and your mum there in the coffee shop back in two thousand and eight or two thousand and nine, and we since then in some sense envied the military because, like I know, there's just like this is about work, but there's a lot of difficulty that comes with the military. But what we love the most in it turned my dear wife's attraction towards me joining the military, because we are kind of hesitant, just like, Oh, I don't know if we could do it, is it was the community. It was like, can you speak, because we're outsiders looking in, because we're I'm not in the military, but like what you said is like, okay, this tight knit thing and then you found this and they found that. Can you speak about the the military community? Like that's just seems like so vital that it's there's difficulties in all like a family. Right, there's it's not perfect, but I just find that it's such a wonderful place for you to do as many things as you would like. Yes, and you know, like I said before, we're not a military family. Where a contractor family. So we have access to be but it is such a wonderful community because you can reach out. Especially now a day's having social media, it's so much easier to connect, especially whenever you're in a foreign country, having all these resources available to you. I know people who don't have access to it that I just I feel like I would be lost, you know. So it's nice to have this this community of Oh, I'm leaving, do you need a couch? Oh, I'm leaving soon, let me help you get this situated. You know, it's just everyone helps everyone everyone. You know there are troubles on occasion. Yeah, but Um, but it's just like it's like a big family and I just I appreciate it so much. So would you say whenever you guys leave or however, would you like to keep this job going no matter where you where you continue? I'm not entirely sure. I think if we, if we moved back to the states, it would depend on the kind of support system I had because first and foremost, I am a homeschool mom. If something happened where I had to choose between homeschooling my children and having my business, I would dissolve my business immediately. I don't need to have my business. It's not something that I rely on. It's something I as a service to the community that I get paid for and I enjoy the extra money, and I mean don't we all? That's, my part, the reason why we work right. But I'm not sure. I'm really not sure if I would do that back in the states. Maybe, maybe, maybe not, I don't know. You've mentioned a few times homeschooling, so I think, knowing a little bit of the responsibility of teaching...

...your children at home, you can you speak about homeschooling and what you do, what you'd feel comfortable talking about how you because it's not, you said, through tree children. I yeah, there are eight seeks and for a boy and two girls, but yes, it's there are various different types of ways to homeschool. So the only way I can speak of is the way that I am familiar with. My husband and I actually we're both homeschooled and we're both homeschool and the same program called the Robinson Curriculum, and the way this curriculum is different than most is that it is a self teaching curriculum. You essentially teach your children how to learn and then you give them the path to seek knowledge on their own within certain confines. So you give them you do teach them how to learn, you teach them how to think for themselves and then they go forward through math, reading, writing, and then everything else branches off from there. As a mom who works and homeschools, that gives me a lot more and I we school year round, so we don't don't take a whole lot of breaks. So I actually have, even though I work, I have a lot more opportunities. They usually do like six days a week of school year round. So even though I'm working, I can still get a lot problem more schooling in time wise and day wise the most public schoolers probably all be honest, but that's a kind of how it works for us. We have a flexible schedule, but we also have a kind of nonnegotiable schedule at the same time too. There are certain things that have to happen before anything else happens and I can move it around little bits here and there, but you know, we have a group, we have it works for us. That's that's the Robinson cricket them. I'm aware that's how we met, right because we have our children on that we're kind of a hybrid. We have it. Well, there's no school, so it worked out perfectly because we had there's no school here since December, and so we're like, okay, let's get back into a program, which they were doing anyway, but then it just kept going. So there it's. There is is there's little room for negotiation. You get that done in the day and then you can go and now they're at the point. I mean maybe you can speak of the I mean it's a good promotion for because I think it's a very good program. But the more it's kind of like building a garden of sorts in the beginning, with teaching to read and the phonics part of it. That's kind of the you know, sitting settling down. What is your with three kids? How do you find that has gone in that process? Oh, I've I've loved it, honestly, the whenever you Navi get them young, and especially whenever you take those first part of it falls on your parenting too, because I'm firmly convinced to the homeschool program can't well, never go very well. As if they can't, you, you you have have that balance of discipline versus grace, you know, like Hey, you've got down and you've got to do this and this is what has to happen. And then you also have that you know, understanding what's going on with them, understanding their emotions, understanding, you know, the various circumstances in their day. You know, like are you hungry or thirst year? You Tired? You know things like that that you know sometimes it's a little hard for a public school teacher to really grasp whenever they've got like thirty different children in their classroom. You can't really sit down one on one and be like, okay, let's stop the lesson for a minute because you're feeling a little overwhelmed. But whenever they're young like that and you're sitting down with the you know you're teaching that phonics and you're teaching, you know, root memorization of addition, subtraction, multilication division, which, yeah, it takes a few years to get them to memorize it, but that's the beauty of the...

...curriculum that we follow is that you take those first few years of just the very basics and you get a such a firm, concrete foundation that once they get to be, you know eight, eight to ten, they start to merge into. Okay, now we have a textbook, now we're taking test and they've got it so concretely drilled in their head. This is school times, is when we sit down and it builds into them this wonderful work ethic that translates the rest of their lives and I just think it's beautiful. Like, I don't know your husband that well, but I'm sure between the two of you both being homeschooled, it permeates your whole life, right, like you realized at a young age, like whatever was the best two things. Go ahead. We talked about on our on our first date. Was Our first date, was homeschooling and if we had kids, whether we would homeschool you going to home school? Is probably one of like the the fifth conflict within them. Our Day conversation. You know, it was just so, so important to both of us and he was raised in a more strict household, I was raised a more leanient household, even though we're on the same curriculum. When we've merged that to really have this really I mean we're not perfect and it's gracious what we have this really great cohesive. Our two backgrounds merge together very well. something. So your older child. Are you able to leave? How well, I was a boy or girls. Sorry, he ate. I do have a friend that watches. She's more the kids call her aunt, so basically she's basically family. She watches them during the day. I really only have two or three clients during the week. I try to keep them. I try to keep at least two of them shorter so I can get some of their school done before I leave and some other school done when I get back. Some days it just doesn't happen because MOM is tired. But are they not even like the physical watching? Are they at that point now able to do it on their own without my myself? Is Yeah, my son sometimes he needs a reminder, a top on the shoulder like that, focus and that's about it. He says yes, Ma'am and goes on ahead. Ember is still as my six year old. She she needs a lot of guides because she's still she's learning the phonics. It's still sit down and math. She doesn't she doesn't need any help with that because it's just it's a worksheet. Sure he knows how to do it. She can write math she can do on her own. I just I correct her work and and drill her on her she brings her flash cards to me and like okay, let me, let me drill those with you. Pardon me, but Um, but now she's really right. Now it's only my eight year old that can do everything start to finish, without my help. It's just needs a little tweaking here and there. Can you speak to say, as you just said, being homeschool but just the work ethic necessary to be a student, a studious student, and the benefits of that, as you seen in your husband and now in yourself with a business, how those are important, because I'm kind of not talking to you, but I'm talking to anyone that might listen that might say, you know, school doesn't matter so much. If this is not what I want to do, there's no sense of putting in the effort in and or I'm in this job up been. You know, it doesn't matter what I do. I can just live how I want. It translates over into everyday life, what without a job, pretty fairly well, no matter what you decide to do, because it really translates into focus, whether it be look at the amount of people nowadays that can't hold a conversation without he they can't make eye contact or they jump around from task to task in their home. You know, they they lack...

...this sort of les drive in this focus that is seems to be kind of missing, especially for my generation, and I think the homeschooling really allows that to kind of permiates and everything and life. I see it, my my husband and his job, the way he's a has the ability to focus his work in me. I don't get to see him at work, but I definitely hear about it. Right, honey, any any still gets a paycheck. So you know someone must be happy. Oh, Oh, yes, I know, right, job, right. So what about if someone is lacking in it? What would you suggest for them to start building their focus? Like you mentioned your weightlifting, and you know there's some of that permit into this to write, like if you didn't have the ability to do it, you weren't homeschooled, you're not focused, you don't know what you want to do. How can someone's start? It's actually funny that you mentioned that. I actually have kind of built a three step process for myself for trying to get myself out of focus and it's something that I've actually gone through with a dear friend of mine who's actually a life coach. He walked me through this process where actually created this process, kind of tailor made for myself. But I usually I make a list. Make a list of the things that you want to do save the next day. Don't make it crazy. You know, the do this every day. Make it a practice. Okay, what are three nonnegotiables that if I just get these three things done, my day will be better. And it doesn't have to be clean the entire house, swashing, you know, nothing crazy like that. But wake up, make your bed could be the number one thing. And you're dining. Oh Oh well, Geez, what else can I do? And something else simple, like go for a walk, you know, like okay, say that's thing number two, maybe thing number three. Of them, the little thing that might make your day better. You go go sit down and read, read fifteen pages of out of something and just sit there and if you can make yourself cut all your distractions away, to put your phone in another room, sit down read fifteen pages of something. That's not something I did to do all the time at all. Usually listen to audio books because I'm so busy with the kid and doing it though. Yeah, yeah, yeah, I don't really have a chance to sit down actually re physical books very often. But, Um, you know. So sitting down and making a list would definitely be number one. Number two would be act, because you can make a list all day long and never actually do it. So number one, make your list, number two would be act and then number three would be revised at the end of the day. Okay, did I get everything done on my list? If you didn't, what can I do better day tomorrow? Write that down and repeat the process day in, day out. So it's kind of like whenever you're giving a speech, tell tell them what you're going to tell them, tell them and call them what you told them. Kind of do the same thing. That's an old sermon from the s and tells them what you got to tell you know, I learned that from my my whenever I was in for h whenever I was learning how to give speeches. It's in. The funny thing is in we all, but so many people just let the days go by, even if they have to go to work, right and not doing anything. Yeah, that's what we all we just let the days go by and not accomplish anything that we could have done and we say another week, Humbug, here comes Monday or Sunday or whatever. Well, I think it's funny because I still get caught in this trap on occasion, whenever I'll let days go by to next thing you know, you blink and it's been two weeks later, and what have you done? I got in and out of funks like that. But I think the important thing to realize is that no matter how much you try to focus, you will inevitably fail. That's just the way it is. But it's what...

...you do after that, whether it be Oh Geez, I've messed up, let me go ahead and fix this right now, or you let the days slip by in this two weeks later, the moment you realize, while, Geez, I could have been doing this all along. You know. So it as soon as you flip the switch and figure out what you need to do and start that loop all over again. Then look forward to the next time you fail, because in the next time you fail at you're at focusing or your work or something that you know you're supposed to be doing, you're continuously retraining yourself to get back into it faster, looking ahead, and I mean and boiling down to having a hope right, something set before you right, and some people have bigger hopes and some people have lesser hopes, but not to be down in the Slough of despond or something like that. Exactly. Yeah, to talk. You don't want to get knocked off a path like, Oh wow, is me. Oh No, get back up and get, you know, get on your horse and get your things done for the day or the next day. What would you say, whether it's homeschooling or your cleaning business, what do you think someone should know about how difficult your job is, something that they do not understand, what they may not appreciate so much about what you're accomplishing, and it's good for them to know, because then they can appreciate it or they may even want to vent true into it. I can't start with the the cleaning aspect of I think something that a lot of and I don't experience this a lot, usually have very clients that are, you know, maybe older. You know, they've worked hard themselves. Oh, a lot of people may not realize how much time goes into a cleaning. Sometimes it's you. She's usually about four to five hours. But the you have to be constantly thinking like I need to do this, then this. I can do these two things at the same time. Let me make sure not to backtrack through this room your end, especially this this whole virus thing it's been going on that's been rocking the world. You know, you don't want to go back into a room that you've already clean unless you absolutely have to. You don't want to you know, cross intaminate and and track things through him whatnot. So it takes a lot of time. So whenever someone comes in later, especially if I'm doing a move out clean and you know I've taken these five hours to you know, really hit it hard. It looks ten times better than it does. It passes inspection and you know they will like, oh, there's this tiny little crown in the corner. That's like, are we joking, because there was literally so were all over your wall and you're worried about this tiny crowm and you've already passed inspection. You know it's just just but it's usually I've noticed who it is that nitpicks over the little things. That's honestly, it's people that I can I could almost always pick out that don't have the greatest work ethics. It's the people they are older, that work a little bit harder, that have done more, I guess them more of not so much done more in their lives, but you can kind of you can kind of pick the people out like that. That person's a hard workers, those people that appreciate the hard work a lot more. People that don't really understand what hard work is, that don't appreciate it as much and they're picky. Meanwhile they have a cookie in their hand where maybe they come came from. That exactly he's, you know, picking over little things that the truly don't matter in the long run. And then as far as homeschooling, golly the patients that comes with that, because as much as you love your own children, they are they can be miniatures of you and your spouse. So you're your husband or your wife, and so you see things in your children that are kind of...

...mirrors of maybe personality flaws and yourself, and it's hard being confronted without a couch. That hurts. It's hard, it's nice. So we're confronted with these little mirrors throughout the day and I find that's the reason why we get so frustrated at our kids, as you think got the one, the one that maybe a noise, do the most, might be the one that's it's just like you. Yeah, you sounds like me. Yeah, so it's hard because whenever you know you're in a maybe I'm not. I'm not. I have so many teachers that are public schoolers, that are public school teachers and they are amazing. The work they do is so necessary because not everyone came home school and I have so much respect. Is Is. It's a different playing field whenever it's your own kids. There's a totally different type of annoyance and frustration that comes with it. Not Saying that any is more or less, but it's very unique. It is absolutely what is either one or both? What is your greatest joy you have from doing what you do? Oh goodness, I could do both. So, from the cleaning side of it, be appreciation. Whenever I know this person's contacted me and they they don't have the time, they're overwhelmed, they're trying to get back to America, they're exhausted. Especially now with with covid nineteen, how much harder and the stress it is whenever you got all these people that you don't know coming in, moving your furniture, at everything and just just just the stress that mounts and knowing that at the end of all that, I've been able to help them relieve that stress and the gratitude I get whenever I'm done. Honestly, it it's it's so worth it. I've gotten gifts, tips, wine bottles, cards, you know the people, people are really appreciate and as far as the homeschooling, before you get to homeschooling, just I think this is on my mind. Sweet how about the pleasure of looking at what you've just accomplished from what you what you wanted and walked into and then you're just about to close the door and you're like there's those it's honestly, that's a very unique joy because you walk it's all. It's kind of like art. You Walk in and you're like, okay, this is this is what I've been dealt this is the what I have to work with, and being able to see everything get continually polished and sweat and why it's until it's shining and walk away you go wow, I did that. I was a resident manager and I have to give a shout out to Linda reardon. She and I were partners. We always work together, always clean together. She usually did the kitchen, I did the bathroom. That was whhere the split came and then everything else was fifty and right. We just worked very well together and cleaning and just when you're done you look like it's huge because their university students usually and they're not clean apartments. And when you're done you're just like we did all know and your joy of home schooling. I guess the joy of homeschooling is whenever I so many different things I can pick from, I guess my favorite thing, my thing that brings me the most joy is seeing the application in the real world. Whenever I they they take something, the kids take something that they've learned at home and they use it while we're out. My son reads a big word and uses it in the correct context. It's just like wow, I see the real life application at this and see and whenever we're out, say at a museum or we're out did the park or...

...something, and I see them learning out in the real world and being able to focus and pick things out from the environment and ask questions and we research it on the spot and just to see them get it and use it, not just over at home we're doing a lesson, but we're out and about and I see the wheels turning. That makes me so happy. It's kind of like the one issue I think we all have is like we don't see our children grow like physically, like they just they're always around us. We're not seeing it. But if, like grandma's I didn't see them for a few months, like wow, you got so big in for that, especially homeschooling or teaching your kids are. I hope they're getting it and you don't know, you can't see it every day that that's being ingrained. But when you have those moments like that, you like yeah, it's and you know it's working, but it's sometimes like in that frustration you're like, I told you this yesterday. Yeah, we're told things many days. Right, we need to what about some difficulties? What is your what is your biggest difficulty in your work? My biggest difficulty in my work might be, HMM, trying to think. There's so many there. There are a lot of difficulties, but a lot of them I can medicate pretty well. I know there's a lot of stress that comes with my job. There is that I need everything to be perfect whenever, sometimes starting from the day before when you're scheduling right exactly, making sure that I don't forget something, because, say, if I forget something really, really important that I need for my job, it makes it ten times harder. Like, for I mean the most ridiculous example. The best thing you can use to clean glass showers with is dawn dish soap and a magic eraser. If I don't have those things, if I happen to forget one of those things, oh my goodness, I've had that happened before and it's not you have time and you're thinking about it. This is a and then making sure that it's possible will for the real turn when they come in, because if it's not clean to standard, then I've only had this happened twice to me. And what's I at? Two hundred and fifteen, two hundred and sixteen clients so far within the past year and a half. You've had two hundred sixteen clients this this year and the year and a half. That's correct. That's that's pretty good. It's pretty good. And you're talking you're not talking like me, while iurs was like one bedroom apartments are like you're talking full military grade places right. A lot of them are actually some of the big high rises out in debut. They got a part family apartments, huge, like huge hallways, like think Walmart Aisles, if you remember back the dates, or eighteen hundred square feet like type stop. Shoot, I've done twenty five hundred square feet, two thousand to three thousand score beat apartments. That have just been insane. Some Day people get get some good apartments out here. I've seem crazy. Some of them are just so big and then marble has to be cleaned a certain way. Would has to be cleaned. You don't go in, you don't go insaying wow, what a lovely big place. You like, oh no, I have to clean immediately. Start. I do a walk through all take a mental note of how many rooms there are. I try to figure out where to start, where to work my way back, top down, right, left. It's it's really, really stressful. I come home and I'm just like I'm done. I'm done cleaning your own house. After you have someone to work with. Do you ever take on someone or I have pete at...

...least once every three months I have someone asked if I can hire them and currently I am not at the position where I'm I'm ready to do that. I think it of maybe at some point in the future I may take on a crew. I'd even like a Threezero Square foot place. You're not saying can you give me a hand on this one? Not at all. Nope. Actually, actually I had. My husband came and helped me one time. You Go, that's helpful. Oh, it was the most helpful thing. I asked. I had scheduled a client and I didn't realize just because I rely on generally public transportation to get back and forth. I take a base bus and then I'll take you the train of the subway and within day it's Um, it's everything's pretty accessible. I accidentally sketch one that was too far out for me to get to. It happened to be on a Sunday. My husband was like, okay, I will drive you out there because it was so far out. Is Probably Thirty five minutes outside of Metropolitan Day Gou Yeah, has been drives me out there and you know, he's never really seen me work before, so it was really cool. Honestly, there's probably one of my favorite cleans with week was cleaning with him. It's nice to have him around. He's wonderful. So that the stress involved is your difficulty. Yes, the stress. What would you say? Is there anywhere people could reach you? I mean even if someone from Daegu here's this if they want to connect or something. I guess you have parameters by which to go by, but if anyone want to talk to you about Robinson Curriculum, homeschooling, how could someone if you want for someone to reach you? Yeah, so they want to reach me through my cleaning services. That's facebookcom backlash wig one cleaning, way gone WAEG WAN cleaning, and usually from there, you know, even if they have questions about Robinson Curriculum. Yeah, that's probably the easiest way to reach me, and then I can switch them over to either my my phone number or email or whatnot from from that venue. Thinking back to your dad, is your your inspiration of how hard he worked growing out and getting your first job and doing the work that you're doing now and being a homeschool mom. You have another fifteen years ahead of you right. You're plugged in for the long haul. What advice? What advice? Would you have some for some Non Workers? One maybe getting into work, maybe thinking about working, people who are hesitant about getting into work. And you know those people that are working and they're just a little discouraged and or you know, maybe they're in between jobs because of covid or maybe they're some mental block. For some reason they're just not working. What what words of encourage you have? One of my favorite quotes is that helps me through stuff like this that I could, I guess in part it would be from Dr Jordan Peterson. He wrote a wonderful book called twelve rules for life and I encourage everyone to go read that. It is is absolutely amazing. But he says something along the lines of you have to put your own house in order before you can change the world. So start at home. START WITH GETTING UP, making a red whether your ear you know, you have a job, don't have a job, whatnot. Your your home, your environment, is very much reflection of what's going on in your brain and I find I don't work very well if my house isn't clean. I can usually tell whenever there's something I'm having a hard time up here if I look around my house. My House is messy, I'm usually pretty stressed out, more sad or...

...it's usually a pretty good indicator of kind of my mental status. So, but you can also help get your emotions, brain whatnot in check by okay, let me just turn all that off and make my bed. Let me turn all that off and do some laundry, and then all of a sudden your brain kind of starts to clear up and you can think a little bit better. So for anyone with you're out of work, in work, struggling with work, you're a homeschool mom, you're in between jobs, do a few things at home, make your lists, and that makes everything else go so much easier. It's great advice. Right. I heard something similar in the one is, you know, get up and yeah, make your bed. Start with little, little steps, work through the clutter and there is something for you, whether it is cleaning or whether it is garbage removal, whether it is a lawyer, whatever it is that you do, start with your own home first. Could you exact enclosing, cassidy, could could you tell me why you work? Why do I work? I work. I guess it's a multifaceted thing, but I don't work for a sense of fulfillment. I like having that, not so much a sense of recognition, not in a selfish way, but in a wow it really it makes you feel good when you do something for someone else. Gives you this wonderful serotone and boost, the this feeling of wow, I did it, whenever someone comes to you after a job and goes, thank you so much, we would have had the hardest time moving if it hadn't been for you, and it feels really, really good to be able to do that and it makes me happy. I think, in like ins what we were just talking about. You know, getting up in a bed, making your bed, that that initial your motivation to get up. People, if you're willing to do your first step by doing other things, especially doing things for others, you will have that boost as you're talking about, and it feels wonderful to help other people and that will also, in turn, motivate you to do more for yourself and in turn do more for other people. Exactly the U, I guess. Well, one last nut little quote, but there's a psychologist. I think I have her name right. Think her name is Mel Robins. I might have to fact check that, but her, the way she gets out of bed and the way I learned how to get out of bed, which, honestly, I could have been implementing this past week, because I have not hitting up on time. As she on her alarm, it's off, turns it off and she counts back down from five to one. Five, four, three, two, one. Soon as you're done saying one, you jump up out of bed, walk to where your clothes are that you've set out the night before, hopefully, and put them on by the time you are up, probably within sixty seconds, your dressed and put your shoes on, maybe within a minutes. You can't go back to bed and you've done something. That's I mean, because the advert or the opposite of that, is people who roll at a bed, stay in their pajamas and think about what they're going to do this day, with no plan, no three goals, know nothing, and then there goes a day and then they're wondering why they're not happy right why they have no motivation in the life. Cassidy, I truly appreciate this talk about why you work and why it is important to work. It's been a great time. It's been an hour and it went by very quickly and I appreciate you and I hope you enjoy the rest of your stay here in South Korea and if any military people are looking for a cleaner and Korea, Cassidy Slan as your lady and anything else about homeschooling. She's a good mom and a good teacher. Thank you very much.

I appreciate the offer, Tillman, beyond the podcast. Thank you, Cassidy. Talk to you later. Thank you. Have a good night. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian v be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged into their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive, be a joyful day in your work.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (123)