WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 3 · 1 year ago

#3 Cameron the Educator BrianVee@WhyWeWork

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Cameron Snow (cameron.snow0272@gmail.com) talks about his 20 years of experience in education as he helps high school kids find work and purpose to their lives.

Welcome to why we work, with your host, Brian V as. He speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly miss steps, hopes, warnings and advice, which would be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going and keep on working. Workings Top, but working is good. Now here's your host to why we work, Brian v today this is Brian V at why we work, and we are with Mr Cameron snow. Good Day, sir. How are you doing today? Good Buddy, one thousand and thirty at night with my time. So we're coming in for late night podcast, early morning podcast. And Corey, I guess I appreciate it. We you and I were kind of messaging yesterday and thinking about I think I was too tired, and then I put you on the flip side and put you at the nighttime rather than me on the nighttime. But I do appreciate you doing this and your willingness to do this, as you and I were just speaking a moment ago and you had you and I were talking over Messenger a couple weeks ago. Now. You are a pretty interesting character and you and I know one another from a different capacity, but just the what seems to be steep learning curve and change into the career path you have chosen. Can you tell us a little bit about maybe yourself younger days and bringing up to but not including what you're presently doing in too much detail? Will get into that in a little bit later. Yeah, so I mean I in terms of workwise, Brian, I grew up central new flan always work from the time most for being until today, you know, from working in a lumber yard, pumping gas. You know, when I was, I feel like when I was seventeen years old, I have more money in my bank account then when I was twenty five just getting at the university, you know what I mean. And I always had a couple granted a bank, pumping gas and whatever. But so, you know, we went to university, went to Kadia, then I left there, went to memorial the education degree in high school education and went and worked for a little while and then went back to the masters and administration probably ten years ago. And, like you know, I said you before, I said like opportunity. We're talking in terms of career development and working or whatever, just being someone who says yes the different things. That opens the worst and that's why I'm in the work that I am now and and gained someone good experience. I had and Bo Camera, and you did mention that about saying yes it. was there a light bulb moment for you, something that you experienced? That said, you know I've been saying no for so long. Or is it? Where did that come from? Just realizing, because a lot of people miss those opportunities in our fear fund crazy, I think. I think that, like I never grew up what, I never had any money growing up. That in that sense, you know what I mean, and grew up with a single parent family or whatever, and I think it just started early, like if I wanted to have like I wanted to stown bill, I want to have a motorcycle on to have my own car, and you know I couldn't. That wasn't handed over to me. So it started early. I think, just want to have some money. That's what fueled at all, you know, you know, to go and get these things for yourself. What was you I think you mentioned one of them, but I'm not sure which one it was. What was your first job and how old were you when you when you got it. First job was summer from Grade Eight to grade non, pumping gas at a goose restaurant Gander, and my friends grandfather owned it...

...at the time and so he called me to fill in a guy got sick and I was nervous to sell. I remember getting dropped off down there some Jeez I like, you know what I mean. I'm nervous about this and but anyways, that ended up work there that whole summer. Basically, you know all its like. From what I remember, I feel like I work every day, but it was probably an old twenty thirty hours a week. And then after that my guy who was hold for summer season, then a guy that my dad knew. He delivered the Newfoundland Herald, which was like a TV God, and it was like the worst job on the planet because you didn't have like subscribers. I don't go knock on doors until they sold every freedom one, and so I said Yes to that again, fueled by money, and when that sort of drive it up, he this guy he also owned a gas station which was a real busy place in our town, and he asked me if I come to work for him and I worked there from summer grade nine until my first university the whole time. So you mentioned the motivation of money. So when you started working in the gas station with what did you want? I know they asked You, but why did you decide to say yes, like, did you want a new bike at that time year? Yeah, yeah, dying for Snowville, you know what I mean. Done, have my own motorcycle. Had A girlfriend. You can't have a girlfriend with his funny the whole you know, I want to have a few dollars in my pocket and where a life, like for or anything. So, you know, I think that was a that was the motivator there, you know. And Plus, like I'm not one for I mean people, some people are just super easy going. They don't want to do anything, they just want to weaf about, you know. And and that's not me. You know, I'm not one for stay at home. I got right now. I got a meeting every note in my life after work, you know what I mean, because I'm involved with different committees and volunteer organizations and stuff like that. So as you were growing up, you said a single family home. was there someone in your life that you recognized as a very hard worker? Is someone that. Thinking back. Well, my mom, obviously, I mean you know, we're mom's boys. Yeah, my mom, she works, she had two kids. You know, you get older, you look back at that, you're like Geez, man, I said, how they do it? Yeah, how old were you then? And she's like, well, Geez, I was only like twenty eight. You know what I mean? If I see something that's twenty eight now I'm like me, you're just a kid right. So my mom, I guess you know, she was. She was a hard worker and she never took any BS from anybody. Also, include it, you know what I mean. I heard you the other day talking about your kids buying buiks and one of the one of your little girl getting upset because she didn't get a new book. Well, my mom took a hard line and that stuff. She didn't care like you or mean. It was like stone cold face, but that was her. I think you know me. And if she said I was grounded for two weeks, by the way, it was two weeks. She did. See Now you're challenging me, because I was gonna let off because they apologize, but no, I might stay to it. Yeah, my mom was tough too, very tough, but apparently it worked. We're doing all right. Yeah, so you're you're into your profession. How did you decide to get into education per se? I did a political science and history degree and as soon as I was finished that I started working with employment insurance in Gander at home, and I remember at the time saying, you know, if I can make forty grand a year and Living Gander, I am going to be that's it. I'm set for life, you know what I mean. And I got down on this claims processing unit where was basically data entry and that kind of stuff, and I fizzled, you know what I mean. That is not me. I did want to be sitting in a cubical pumping in numbers all day on the phone. So, in...

...the midst of a perfectly good, good job, my friend Sandy Collins and I we and he was he had a political science degree to he was selling the cell phone cases at them all, we left and we went to Korea. In two thousand and one. I think they can make as good they can make a good movie a like. What do you what are you doing? Exactly the way they insurance in this cell phones and off of the yeah, backpack on. Yeah, so it was. You know, it was a it was a big move, but I knew that I was still young, I had lots of time to settle in and I always had faith in myself that I would land on my feet in terms of finding good work, you know what I mean. So was it an experience to go into education or just get at a dodge? It was a lot of different things. Brow was something I talked about as a kid because this Guy Jeff Green from Gander, he had went away into Korea and I always thought that was pretty cool. I don't know if he was in Korea. I thought it was very back then and you know, so it was just something that I said, well, this is it is now or never, because as I get a new truck and buy house and stuff, that's it UN locked in, you know. So we went. Then just after September eleven happened, which was a little odd time in Korea. Tensions were high or whatever. Ludding wasn't good experience and I did like to work, you know what I mean. I did like being around like students. I like the schedule. I knew back home we'd have summers off. I thought that was pretty good at the time. Didn't realize how good it really would be until you become an adult, and that's sort of I feed it's so when we're in Korea, we applied to do education at more university and if land and both of US got in. So we came back and went to university in September. How long is that program I looked a little bit into that a few years ago a memorial. It's a three semesters, Bang, Bang, Bang, right in a row. So it's after your bachelor's degree. Yes, yeah, yeah, it's you do six courses, then you do internship or whatever for a full semester, come back into summer and do six more horses. Even also get a technology certificate if you started the summer before that, which is actually it was a pretty good thing at the time. And you know, two thousand and one technology seratifically open some doors, right. What were you specializing in? What was your what was your aim? What we were hoping to teach? Well, like in order to be a teacher, you know in new flange of teaching license, you have to have to teachable subjects. So my more political science and history. Those are teachables. If you had like sociology, and psychology. They wouldn't be considered teachable areas. So this was high school? Is this? Yeah, high school. Yeah, sorry, yeah, yeah, I knew I was going to go to the high school. I didn't have much interest in junior high. You know, way too many hormones going on in junior high and it's pretty tough place. If you can survive as a great non teacher, you can do anything, I can tell you that. and teaching, teaching, and Korea, you realize? Not Elementary. Yeah, elementary. That was a you know what I mean? No, I don't know. Brain. I don't have to soft talk for that. I don't think you know what I mean. But the high school is where I ended up then. And Yeah, that's that's where I ended up. How long were you teaching in a classroom? Well, I taught in like I ended up my first job back in new foland was in an island off of new fomland. So there was like twenty eight kids in school from Kate to twelve. That was a guest moment to Brian because I was like okay, I can take a permanent job on island where evidently you can't buy green pepper. You know, if you want milk, you got to order. It comes in what your initials on it. In order to get off there, you got to take a ferry then go drive another whatever to get to my home. Hit's my hometown, but it was a permanent job and yeah, just said yes, let's go. So I worked out there two years, kindergarten, a grade twelve, and when I remember in the interview the Guy said, do you know anything about technology? Now,...

I mean I thought I was okay. We went to a Katie, we all had a laptop. I thought that was like, you know, and I was like Oh, yeah, no problem, no problem. What about biology? Oh yeah, no problem. You ever do a biology horse? Oh Yeah, I did a couple. I never you know what I mean? Yes, I guess there. Yeah. And so anyway, my first year out there I top physit Kate to twelve and I in my kindergarten a great three physic class. I could take them all for a ride in my car. There's horrible, you know what I mean. So, like you do things like picking blueberries and come back right, stuff like that, like you couldn't even it wasn't enough to have a game of anything else. And top technology and great twelve biology course for the right a standard was exam at the end. So there was a bit of pressure. The area there's only three people and like one guy was sick all the time and this other girls, she was like pretty clever, so she would be gone away to another thing. So lots us, just me and one other guy, it seems. Philip. I was like, okay, class we're going to and it was just one guy sitting there, you know. But it was good experience, good chance to get your feet wet, definitely, and after that I said Ye, okay, I'm going to stick with this. So I ended up in a bigger school than six hundred people the next year looking after a coop education program, which was a work experience program through school. Right. How did you find with with that program, the attitudes of this is high school, high school kids, and their outlook a long work. They love the these guys like, I don't know, look brought the different places the world, different things, you know, but most of the people were in this co op program they were there because they didn't really love school to begin with. Yeah, so the fact that they were working three days a week, they thought they were in her all their glory you know what I mean. And these were young fellaws that were cotton wood on a weekends and selling the and moling grass and girls were baby said when like they all had a fever for it. anyways, you know what I mean, and it's funny because I see a lot of these guys now. I mean that was fifteen years ago now, and I see these students around and some of them are like working in the field that they went into the call off program I see one girl. I see one girl the other days. You got three kids and small kids, probably all under six years old. And she went to do her coop placement at a daycare center and, like you, before you do your coop placement, you had to all these personal interest surveys and all these things that would like what your interest right, and she was helping down going to do to a daycare and after like two days there, she came in my office crying. Right, she's like, I hate kids, I don't want to be in a daycare, I want to go do it, I want to be a putician. I've never going into day care again. So I seen her at the mall and like, Jesus, you're doing pretty good for someone who didn't like kids in your co ops? Know exactly right, like kids, but you gotta have you got half a minivanful. Yeah, funny. So how long, because I don't you're not in teaching now. So how long in total were you teaching? So I'm still considered a teacher, like I'm still in her teacher's contract. I still have a office in the building, in a school building. So it's been this will be nineteen years now. But my primary job now is dealing with, say, students who are dropped out or failed out or have babies, are in drop rehab or have like, you know, really different family scenarios where they got no support. So that's my like job now. It's like it's called a pass teacher or past program and the objective is to get people at the POMA. Excuse me, but in my time in the classroom and between then and now is when I got into like curriculum development and this kind of thing. Right. So I still work in school, but I do these other...

...this other work on side and through school boards, stuff that you mentioned. Depending on where you go, people have different perspectives and you are what we would say from Canada on the Rock, right. Would you say in your life experience of, you know, traveling and being from kindergarten too, grade twelve and now students who are having a little bit of more difficulty, that there's a different perspective on the rock about work. Where do you find that everyone's facing the same problems and difficulties? How would you how would you define that? Like, okay, so historic history defines people. You know what I mean? If land was a hard place to live and the fifty s depression hit hard, what? People around here are resourceful, you know. People say you can so ass and a cat. Well, that's like a new fland way. You know. They make things work and I'll throw things out. They they survived the depression, you know. So, like you know, like I think, the biggest shift and change and that kind of stuff has been social media and this, this Hereab, the cell phone in your hand. That is what has changed things, you know, and I think that's Globile, doesn't matter where you are. Sorry for your students. Go ahead. I mean, like Brian, I say like twenty years ago when I started, like you know, or fifteen years ago, and hair grand falls, that students were working. They were two guys are wrote Cup would make them money. They were they did whatever they could to make a dollar, you know what I mean. Tearing Down Fences, whatever. Somebody want them down, they would do it. But now you like am my class in school. If I put it too calle say, listen, my neighbor, he wants someone to put down patio stones. That's a hard days work. It's not there. You know what I mean. It's like tumble. We'd blown across. People are like, like you got the plague. They're getting away from you as quick as they can when they hear that. So that there has been a shift, I think. Would that be what? Maybe I can't define it that well, but that opposed. I mean Korea has this in it's all over the world. I think it generally speaking, like Korea had the war up until s and so people in the S and s and s remembered that. Sure, people in the S, s thousands, they don't remember it. They're just told about it. And now there's a little shift towards people are more victims and they have less of a desire to work in a need to be his. Koreans are resourceful people too, like they will. Yeah, I'll give you a probam example. Okay, and this goes back to a Katia, and it was a statement made during all this could a crisis spot of the student union president, probably like a month ago, and they were the Nova Scotia farmers were concerned that they wouldn't have enough seasonal laborers coming to no the Scotia to pick apples and harvest whatever when the time came and they say, well, be good opportunity for university students. The government is going to pay them x number of dollars to work or volunteer in summer anyways. And the student union president of a Kadia said that, no, no, you know, we got future doctors, lawyers, blah, Blah Blah on our hands. And I think that basically what he said was this kind of labor work is beneath Benie, someone here, beneath someone here's at university. And I think that's the exact opposite, because, you know, you work hard, you do these crappy jobs and stuff and when you get to that point where you got a nice job and your work situation was fond, you can always look back in that you never forget those things. You know, men, I did everything from whatever, whatever you want me to do, you know, and I don't forget how lived that I have it now, right. I don't forget my hours or worker good. I don't forget that. I don't come home, like, you know, physically beat up every day, mentally some days. Sure, you know that my summers are off and these kind of things, like they're different perks for all kinds of different kinds of jobs. People get to see...

...the world, whatever. So you got to do these crappy things. I think the put it in perspective, it was the best thing that could happen to people in university. I think that that's very unfortunate. He got criticized widely for that. Like there was a lot of backlash over that. And can you imagine saying that, saying that your kid, like hey, no, no, that's been eath you know you. Yeah, essentially that's what they say. Yeah, and like I got lots of people from our like old days on facebook this kind of stuff. So like a lot of in comment to the comments and to the university and sell phom. We're like, man, this guy needs write a letter apology and he needs to whatever. But I don't know what happened of it after but that was his initial statement. It was like in a chronicle herald or something. Well, I think, like what job you're doing, it takes other people to to kind of balance the Keel, like parents and mentors and people, and not to just listen to the president of a Katie University and take it are queues from him, because obviously that that can't be true, even if people are doing it not for the money but just doing it for the experience, just to learn. I mean in Korea, you know, many Koreans do not have jobs until they're finish university and the first job that they receive that's their career. Yeah, yeah, different, you know, in the whole university structure and the grades and the pressure coming at a high school for Korean kids is a different scenario than here. You know, and I you know, it's stressful. Right. What are you doing now? So what are you doing now? So what do you mean? Like work wise? Work Wise, like this is what is your day look like now? So you've heard it from a hog Ian and academy and the other side of the world. You started teaching yourself into administrative role and now, as you mentioned me earlier, you have a lot of kettles in the fire. Yeah, so basically I'm I am coauthor and career development course. That's going to be mandatory for students in the province this year. This is what we're up to and there's a team of four of us, plus someone from the department education. So that's going to be released in pilot now in September and then release everybody in Newfoundland and Labrador the next year. Just signed a contract with textbook company, going to do some curriculum writing for them. Basically, you know, what better person to hire on? And someone who just wrote to God, you know what I mean? Someone just wrote to God. Now we're going to do activities in a textbook. We're going to try to sell it to the province. You know what I mean. Is this independent or that is some of your job? It is it is independent. Yeah, and the year before, a couple years before that, I did when I was teaching the classroom, I tot occupational health and safety and students would have a first ay certificate and occupation health, is say, safety certificate, a witness card, and I'd get them to do like the brush cutting course, chaintock course, flagsman course, like I'd make arrangement so they could just go and do it, you know what I mean, and the school would pay for lots of it. The school paid for a first aid and womeness and as a reasult of that, then I did. They wrote a new curriculum guide for that and I did all those like a column for spread kind of deal for a teacher guide. So I did all the suggested learning activities for the entire God and then we just co outh or another course called Employment Labor Relations, which is a half of your course, focus mainly on like a union structure and the evolution of work safe standards and this kind of thing. What our Cameron? What are your what is your biggest joy you get from your job? Biggest joy is when student, you know, I follow some of these people from grade seven right to grade twelve or maybe a year or later when we walk across and get that diploma. Period. Half on the cry Brian, you know...

...what I mean, like you invest your heart and soul into these guys, lots of them, and her family and or ants and all those like. I'm like half like dog to bounty hunter, you know what I mean. I'm down to people's yards, like passing the worksheet. Thank you. You don't finish this frigging worksheet, you're not going to you're not going to graduate high school. And and that's what I'm up to. So, you know, you put heart and soul into a lot of these kids and that's that's the end of the day. That's where you get happy. You know, I invest where and it's people are difficult situations, people have medical issues. Mental health is bigger and bigger every day in schools. You know, like, I'm not saying there wasn't mental health issues when we were in school and the S, but I do know that it has become more prevalent and more severe and and you don't need to be an expert in your other so, like the all these different things. You know what, what is your biggest difficulty, your biggest challenge? Attendance. I can't help you if you're not in school. It's horrible, you know what I mean? Like, I've been to people's House is Braun. Excuse me, we're just frigging loose. Rabbits run around Hous so like parent, a has rabbits run around a house, peece moving all over the house and their primary concern is not getting her kids school. The single's not number one. No. So, like you know, and like I got a good working relationship with some of like chop, protective services, social work, like when things like this happen in school, a lot of times I'm to go to a person for like other agencies to contact basically see what's going on right in extreme cases. So, I mean these people, they work hard, they put her heart and soul into it as well, but at the end of the day, I can't go grab you by the shirt and drag you down the road in the school. Right. Someone's got to be in your corner advocate for you to get there, or you got to want to do it yourself. Cameron, if people wanted to find you, how could they find you? What would be a good way to find you if they especially, I mean many things, but career development, writing, curriculum time. I think you probably have a wealth of knowledge about how to guide and lead students and, as you and I spoke before saying what we came up from, I think I think kids get that, rather than being, you know, say, the president of a Katia coming to such, talk to some kids a hey, now you you go this path and will say well, this and I know how difficult it is. I know some of these difficulties. What would you how can people find you, because I think you have even more than just your job. Asked you could you can probably post my email in the in the link if you put it on Youtube. Okay, right, and they'll be my personal one. You just you just sent to me. So it's cameron dot snows row undred and seven to a GMAILCOM so if someone wants to send me an email, sure, problem reaching out. What would you have for advice on both sides of the coin of say, the workers, and specially in education or just generally, people who find even right now, difficulty keeping a job, having a job, doing what they do, enjoying what they do, and the other side, even from a student perspective, looking towards entering the workforce. What would be your vice? Well, doctor or of work has changed in most places, you know, like you know in one thousand nine hundred and sixty eighty men went into factories and they came out forty years later. You know what cancer and F again in a retirement check and a watch. You know that those days are over. So like if you're a student going into the world of work, like face people head on. Don't be shy, even if you are like put yourself out there. Don't be afraid...

...to shake hands. You know, you might look at yourself as a kid, but if you don't act like one, people won't look at you like a kid, if that makes sense. Like yeah, you're at Grade Eleven, great twelve student who is really eager to work, but your kind of sheepish, like it's going to take every draft of life edit to go do it. But go shake the guy's hand. Don't be fraid to pick up a phone and like make personal contact. And you can never be too eager to get work pride. So like first entering the job market, just like if you got a step out, a few toes, or do whatever. If you want to work, just do whatever is necessary, you know. But email and like email and your buddy and tick tocking and facetime and all this stuff that's fun and Dany for your own generation. But most typically people are going to be our age or older. They want to see a facetoface. So you come up, you knock on the door, you say you're looking for a job. You don't care what it is, you just want to get some experience, and that's the important you know what I mean. That's how I got my present job. I walked up to the door and had my resume in hand, and this is two thousand and eighteen. When they excuse me, exactly right? What like I'm after doing five thousand cover letter, Brian, okay, and keep as a Creti volteacher. Right, yeah, so old first paragraph is a prayer, as a paragraph of where you found we're what you're applying for. So please consider this an application for employment with a job at Boson University, as seen advertised in the Korean Herald. Paragraph number two. As a new student entering the role of work, I'm eager to enhance my skills through part time employment period. You know what I mean. It's like cooky color across the board, but that's what you're doing. You want to enhance your skills. You don't have Netsa you don't have any. And if you're having trouble fund a job, volunteer, and I can't stress that enough, because I spend hours and hours and hours volunteery, you know what I mean, and that volunteer work has also led in some nice opportunities for myself to you know, and volunteer is work experience period. Volunteering is work experience period, sometimes more valuable because you're not doing it for a paycheck and people recognize that. You know. Yeah, and pick some apples. Pick some apples, don't put all the bad ones out the bottom and your good ones on power and take your dy and have some integrity. Exactly. I think. Think what your Mama would like and I'll probably like like you asked, like someone our a WHO hates the work, you're not content, leave. Why would you suffer it out? Why would you put yourself through that? And I said that to people a thousand times, Hims. Don't be intimidated by the job market. Don't be. Don't think for five seconds that your stock in a dead end job or job that you hate, because if you want it, you can get it. That's the bottom line. If you like, you know, you said your mom you want to go work in the university. Will guess spot. That's what you did right. If I want to leave teaching to day and I want to go work on the oil rigs as a human resources consultant, I can do it. I know I can't. I just you know what I mean. Just got to go after it and whatever that, whatever that is. If you're on a dead end job now or you just hate your life because of your work, don't say there it's not worth of it. There's another element camera, I think, and it's good to say a people dislike their job, but also, you know, you may not like your job, but that's okay. You may not get complete satisfaction from your job, but fine, I mean, I see you on facebook. You live the most liveliest life. You have all the toys, you you enjoy yourself when you have your free time. Sure, so, there's an another aspect to it. So even though you might be in a factory, you know, stacking cups or making gets your someth I'm not saying your job got to be like some dynamic thing, but if you don't like it, doesn't matter why. It is like when I talked about working at that Employment George Place, data entry. The girls are worked around me. They loved their DA job. Great,...

...they loved it. They if and if I had to say to them, listen, can you go up and speak to this group of people and tell them what our her or have a face meeting? They didn't want that. Like that was not their compete. Yeah, you said that from that you said that right from the beginning. It wasn't for you, right, that's that's all you said. It wasn't for you. Yeah, you're right. Look my my better half, she works in the hospital. She's a dialysis nurse. Like anything to do with medical the smell at a hospital, you can peel me off the floor, you know what I mean? And there's lots of people to love that work. I'm not saying that. Yeah, like you know, I'd love to be a snowplow operator, Broun, I would say in my students are like, what's your dream job? I'm like, I look at me, snowball operator. What I'm work, but I'm a pair of jeans and drive around town time snow smoking cigarettes. You know what dream spoken darts. I got a buddy in Hellifax, grew up in sack for he's a snowplow operator. I remember the old commercials is is ain't no feather duster right, get out of you guys way. No, it's. What would you say to people who are a little discouraged in their job? Don't speak, but their work calling like discourage and looking for a job either or they're just working and that they lost the drive, the initiative. They feel like there's spinning or you're kind of forgetting the bearings. If you're discourage and looking for work, ask for help. First of all, like there's all kinds of employment centers everywhere and People Think, oh, man, like I don't need to go there, but you never know, like someone just a dog, stop on your resume and just stop on your cover letter. Even something simple as practicing, like if you, if you called me today and said, listen, camera, I'mplaning for work, I'm applying for work, where as a at the college for Curriculum Development, then I'm like being you just hit the right person. So me and you were going to talk for an hour about curriculum development and what's the process, and I'm going to ask you questions what engage what you know about it? Like that there, that's what gets you a job, is these kind of conversations, because you prepped, you know what I mean, going to the place. I would say, I would say to young people, if you're if you got an interview somewhere, like you go to Trotal, like in new flight, with all big deal. You can like drive there on your quad, like you know me. But if you go to your in Toronto somewhere, you got a job interviewed next day, like the day before, go down there and seeing where it is, like go into building, because comfortable, you can get in panic mode quick to right. You show up at that interview, you like sweating because you like miss the boss and you didn't over you're going so like prep work makes a big difference. And if you're in your job now and you'd like seriously hate it, are you getting discourage with it and you feel like it's like going nowhere? You know, reevaluate. What does it you want? Right, have a real chat. Have a chat we were partner, have a chat with your parents, have a chat with whoever, and talk about it. Say, like this is not what I want to be doing and recognize that first of all, and then make a decision, yes or no. I'm like going to do something about it, right. And if you say no, I'm nothing to nothing about it, then stop being discruntled. Stop exactly know what I mean. Just just work and I think, but don't don't complain about it. And if you say yeah, I'm going to try, then I would never say to like to an adult, especially with family responsibilities, whatever. Listen, put that job and get out of it, but you start dipping your toes in and looking around to see what set there and you know you never leave, never leave one without something, and you know in your back pocket that. I like, I'm a firm believer in that, you know, and don't keep yourself going. Thrown a no names. Yeah, like Jerry McGuire, who's come with me. Like no, you know what I mean. Get on. Indeed, get on monster. Started looking around to see what's out there for you that is of interest. And like as a funny, because I had an interesting conversation with my friend the other day. He's got a physics major and a math minor. He was a teacher. It didn't work out...

...for home, like the people side of things, you know what I mean. He just wasn't his cup of tea and I started talking about things that you could do and the other day I sent him a job. The our CMP was as a police force and Canada. We're looking for basically an electronics text and the technician for bugging places. That's what it is. They don't say that, but it is for like bulging homes. Yeah, and I sent it to him and he's electronic wizz right and, like he said, man, just the first time I got excited about a job of forever. So he threw his hat and a ring and he's going to apply and, you know, and go through a process. But like thinking, so the box. Don't think, because and I just worked here for twenty years. If that's all you got, you know, to be surprised at the things that you're good at, and that's why volunteering comes into as an important factor two, because you can grow your resume and Tim's then what you're working experience. Will you know, Cameron, I appreciate this immensely. You've been I wish we I mean, I don't even know the last time you saw one another. must been around two thousand one thousand nine, hundred and ninety nine. Nineteen and ninety nine. Maybe that's some sagon right. Something can you tell me in your final plea for the worker, encouragement for the worker? Why do you work camera? Why do I work? Well, obviously for financial reasons. Like anybody who think that's you kind have money to survived. So that's my number one problem, my number one do you know, the funny thing is I'm going to find sort of interrupt. I'm going to find it. Everyone says this and I'm gonna and my temptation was to pass over it. But I think there's a lot of people that don't realize you need it to survive. Yes, like it'sally simple. People don't guess. Do like other government will pay for me or my parents or yeah, I don't need to work. Well, you can like you know, and if you can have the life all you want and that way. Well, fair enough. With my parents from millionaires, I don't think I'd still be sitting on a couch. I'll be working. You know what I mean? That's just in me. But you know, and like I get a lot of Sidis faction out of my work, Brian, and you know, like sitting on a computer all day writing curriculum, and now that's not really satisfaction. But you know that kid you put her and soul into from grade seven to now. You know the single mom, the kid who had cancer, kid who had a heartfelt transplant, the kid who came out of Drug Rehab. On the other side of it, you know, like there's no money you can pay for that and like the beautiful part is okay, this is being in a small town. You see the you see them result of that. Ten fifteen years later, like you know, like that girl I seen in the mall with her kids, right, so she's thirty one or thirty two now and she's working and she success, she's doing fine, she's got a nice husband, whatever. Right, she's happy and, like you know, they don't ever forget that. You don't ever forget people in your corner. And Brian New, look back great ten grade, eight, grade nine, whatever, when you were like, you know, being a nuisance to society, the people that stood in your corner and stood off for you. You never forget those guys and that's important. I want to be that guy. Right. So that's that's the reason why. Ever, it's funny too, because I think, as you said, pouring your heart and soul into these people. And I remember a middle school, you mentioned, junior high school in every best principal, what Mr Clattenberg, one of the greatest guys you could ever meet. In one day, like many years later, I walked up to it. He didn't remember me in particular, but I was always in trouble. So I thought that if he was going to remember me, it was going to be because of that's double. And the thing is I just remembered him. He was such a kind person, always willing to help get you out of the trouble adjust as he could, and I think we may not even realize how if we're being, as you're saying, an example for some of these people, to encourage them to work, we may not remember...

...them specifically, but they certainly will remember us. And if we do something on the opposite end, something to harm them, then they're going to exactly. Yeah, you don't realize the damage you can do with words, especially for young people, you know what I mean. And it's hard to be cognizant of that all the time when you know you got five hundred students coming and go on, but you really got to be aware of that. And you know, you remember too good. You remember, like we just had to give farewell speeches to the graduation class and you know mine was, like my vice was don't be afraid to give someone a second chance. Right, people deserve second chances. It's a good one, A and I've never heard that before. Yeah, and you know, I was like, don't be afraid to give second chances. You never know, you might find the best employee, the best friend or maybe the best relationship you ever had and end up sixty five years married. I the NTV lowle news, like you know. That was my works the wisdom and don't take the easy room. That was my second thing. Right, like you know, there's lots of off coming your way. Just don't take the easy Roob like I did. Don't be don't be afraid to give second chances and don't take the easy root and always and always say yes, and I always say yes. Cameron snow, I appreciate you immensely. You Take Care and keep working here and I will know what you're doing. I appreciate it and I thank you for your advice and things that you've been saying too. And Messenger. I will take those two heart and adjust beautiful talk like yes, sir, ex back to that. Thanks a lot. And this is Brian V at why we work. We do appreciate anyone that liked to be interviewed and we I do appreciate Cameron today. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian v be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others. So they too can be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive, be a joyful day in your work.

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