WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 6 · 2 years ago

#18 Robert Bear Invention Stories Podcast

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Host of the Invention Stories Podcast Contact Info:

Robert’s Profile

linkedin.com/in/robert-bear-302b429a

Websites

Buythefuture.com (Company Website) InventionStories.com (Company Website)

Email

inventionstories@yahoo.com

Twitter @InventStoriePod

Follow Robert in his adventure:

"If you are an inventor and would like to share your story...you've come to the right place. In 2007, I invented glasses with removable arms. I built my prototype and gave it to a local company to improve on, which they did. I performed a preliminary background check and discovered that there were four other patented products, two of which were better than mine. I wondered why I couldn't find them on the market. I began reading about inventions and learned that the success rate for inventions was 5% or less, and I wondered why so many had failed. I searched the internet for help and found companies that promised to help me without guaranteeing anything. I believe this is wrong and that inventors deserve as much help as possible...for FREE! We created InventionStories.com to share the journey an inventor goes on from having the idea to where they are today. We have shared the stories they have written and some that I have written from interviews with inventors. This gave free exposure to the inventor and gives those read their stories insight into the process. September 1st, 2017...Episode 1 of the Invention Stories Podcast was posted on InventionStories.com. If you are an inventor and would like to be interviewed and have your story shared throughout the world...for FREE...email us at InventionStoriesPodcast@gmail.com" Our goal is to help people invent smarter, and the Invention Stories Podcast and InventionStories.com is the resource you’ve been looking for.

Welcome to why we work, with your host, Brian V as. He speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which would be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going and keep on working. Working's tough, but working is good. Now here's your host to why we work, Brian V. This is Bryan V at why we work, and I have the great pleasure of meeting Robert Bear. Good day find sir. Hello Brian, thank you for inviting me. I mean anyone that's watching this. Maybe if you're listening to this, it may not know, but the beautiful stained glass that he has behind them, you don't see many people with that and it it is a site for not sore eyes but beautiful eyes. It's really nice. Where did you get that? I wanted an auction. In fact, I'll give you the thirty second version of is you don't want me blathering on and on? No, you're all rhead. I had a window the face the street of my house and we always had a coverard. We saw this at an auction place and my wife says, yeah, go ahead and bit up to two hundred and fifty dollars, right. So they start the auction and then the auctioneer talks it up and it's one of the first ones, and I mean before I knew it the bid was over five hundred dollars and before I even put my paddle up at five hundred and fifty, I look at my wife, she looks at me. I couldn't read her void. I mean, and so you, Bundy, said six hundred, I put six fifty, and then we want it. And then I thought I was going to get smacked her here and she was like no, I was going to grab that pound butter. We wanted it and I was like so, yeah, I think we thought it was going to be to fifty. Was seve hundred and fifty. But you know, sometimes you pay more for life for things you want, but they you get what you want. You know, it's a sort of my philosophy. The first half of my life I was like always trying to if there were two options, I'd take the cheaper, less expensive option, and then at some point, you know, I've started buying the more expensive option. You know, why not? You spend a little bit more, but you don't have to wonder what would have happened if I had spent more money. I would like to know about the first half of your life, Robert. What was your first job to where you maybe a little intro, but not so much what you're doing now. Will get into that in a little bit, but a little intro where you're coming from. And what was your first job as a kid? Maybe first paying job? Yeah, I was as a kid. I was as had a paper route. I helped my brother and then I got my own paper Rod paid their tty dollars a month to get up every morning the crack of dawn and I don't know, I look back now and I'm thinking, man, those are some lousy wages. How old were you then? Your first paying job? I think like yeah, I think, well, no, I must have been like maybe eleven or twelve, somewhere around there. Sorry about that. And what did what was your motivation to get that job? I wanted to make money. You know it was but I think it taught me the value of the dollar. You know that it didn't go very far when you had a paper Routt didn't pay much. was there a motivation to get you out of the house like a family member. That okay, Robert, you're spending all of our money. Or you're like no, I want to buy something. I want something and I know if I put some time in, this is how to get it. You know, I think that is a good question and a lot of times when people say that's a good question they're stalling right. But it is a good question and I never really thought about it until you just brought it up. I don't know why I wanted to make money. I guess I...

...just wanted my own money to spend. My parents. Now they didn't get me an allowance. And know its weird because when I was a kid, like a candy bar was a dime, so, you know, money went pretty far. You could buy candy for, you know, to to there's pick candy. That was like to front for a penny the jolly ranchers. So I mean, obviously things have changed, HMM, but I think I just wanted my own money. On. Where did that lead into? So you had that for a little bit, a couple of years. Yeah, I don't think it let anywhere. Just kind of quit it after I got tired of getting up early in the morning and yeah, I didn't work again till I was like sixteen in high school and got my first job. Like many people at McDonald's, did you tough love, three thirty five an hour and they worked you. You know, it's again. You know, it's like wow, and what I found is, like a lot of times, that you go to a higher pan job, you actually don't work as hard, but fast food people learn their money. How would you say the process, and McDonald's would at that time. But did you give you a respect and maybe some discipline and understanding how there's a process to things versus a paper row where you okay, you got this house, that house in the other house and just throw it off and basically you're done. But McDonald's is a lot more structured and giving you a little bit more discipline in your life. Did you find that was a case? It's really that's really smart to ask me. I've never I've never really thought about it, and maybe I should, because you're right, like one I was on my own doing my own thing, and and the other one you're sort of micro managed. But you know, I respected McDonald's what they did and they tried me in different areas and you know, I didn't really. I think they try to match you up with the right position because I was always an imaginative, daydream and kind of person. But I did run the drive through and little bit of the cashier. But my thing was the mcnuggets and I was terrible because I think they charged just for the food. But man, I would eat like twenty mcnugg I don't know what he look and I pulled and I'd be burning my fingers and everything. I was I but now they were good. And I did that till I got a different job at a gas station. I believe it or not, I actually did a full service gas station. I was I checked a well and check the water and the radiator level and pumped up the tires and pump their gas. And well, you haven't seen those things in like forty years here in America. That's I'm from Canada and you don't see them. And I'm living in Korea and a couple of years ago it's becoming more self now right because I think they're realizing they can save some money. But you could get your car checked out, clean your actually you go through a car wash, they'll wipe your car down for no extra charge, like just pure one hundred percent service for just getting gas. That's how it used to be. Now it's starting to wane away from that. But how about at McDonald's? Like for McDonald people that work in McDonald's, and this podcast, as you were asking before, is to encourage people in their work, and McDonald's is off and used, I think, slandered in some sort of way to okay, we can always get a job McDonald's or you know, I had a job, job at McDonald's and it was really good. But it's always the constant right, it's through this hole. For many years McDonald's has been the namestay of younger children getting a job. How do you feel that a job like McDonald's is good for someone to start or even if they're in hard times, to go into that just to get their feet on the ground and maybe get some of that structure? All right, I think it's a great place to start because you work hard and you've you've paid a...

...little so, or at least that's that's how I remember it, and it encouraged me to to to go out and get another job. Now some people stay at a job because they don't really want to go apply for another job because they're insecure or that. I mean that's maybe just it's not their personality to do so. But you know, I was looking at those paychecks and going wow, I mean, and then my buddies were saying, Hey, you can make a lot more money just sit in a you know, sitting in a booth collecting money while people get gas or hey, there's a job there. It was really pretty much next door. So I think I just walked over there one day when I saw that help wanted sign, and I think it is. I think guy, I recognize that. Man, this is some really hard work for some really low pay. And that was at that time. And I wanted to make more, more money. So I went from like three and thirty five an hour to five hundred and seventy five an hour. So I mean it was significant. And then it was just the different world. You know, I didn't mind wearing the outfit, the McDonald's outfit, I taking the orders or anything, but it felt like I was kind of it was an introductionary job. You know, I think you're not supposed to stay in jobs like that. It's like welcome to the world. It's hard, but you know, maybe I shouldn't grind in your game, maybe shouldn't stay here forever and whatever. So that's that's kind of my reaction or my thought on it at the time. And after the gas station, what did you do that bring you up? Graduating from high school, going in know, that was that was in high school. You know, my buddy, he worked at a self service gas station right across the street and for seven dollars an hour I could sit in a booth and work graveyard and I did that. And so I went from, you know, full service making five hundred and seventy five to seven. I'm just moving up my check and get there. You know, it works, getting easier. Well, it doing ESCAP right. Yeah, I they would just, you know, there'd be a big rush right as I got there till about like maybe you have a little rushes before two o'clock, before the bars closed, and then then I'd be like dead after between like two and four o'clock in the morning. And sometimes I would be so tired I turned the lights off and fall asleep and I've waked up turned the lights back on our you know, I it was it was all right as I did that first six months, but I didn't really care for graveyard. You know, it's hard to sleep when people are awake and you know you feel like you're missing life. That's how I felt. But some people love graveyard, or all different people. So you mentioned that your creative. So that must have started to crush your soul right like just to have to sit and put in the aut know, back then I was going to go in to high school and I was working, so I didn't. It didn't really bother me. But yeah, you know, once you once I've graduated college, you know, I worked for nine years for free lay and that was that was it was a great you know, they paid really, really well, I mean for where I was living in the job opportunities and but you worked really, really hard. You did pretty much the same thing and that was, like you said, a little soul crushing and that's one of the reasons that it was inspired me to to to try to invent, and that's how I got down into the world of inventing. You mentioned college. Did you take did you work at free to lay after college? Oh, yeah, like, I mean I'm fifty two. I I did a huge leap from from from working at a gas station to Friedo lay. I'm in the gas station was in the S and Frito lay I didn't start there till two thousand and seven or something. What did you take in college? I was a business major, which I thought made sense and and this is what I believe. I believe it took my course. I used to see these signs follow your bliss and, you know, do something you love and you'll never work a day in your life and things like that. And Man, they are true, because you don't,...

...you know, if you your work and then you're just like, you know, but if, if it's something you love, it's not really work. Yeah, I could. I could do ten hours of my podcast and editing in this and that, and it's feels like it's twenty minutes. I don't even mind. It could be ninety degrees or a hundred degrees and I've just said they're sweat and listening and whatever it's doesn't bother me because that's it's my passions, what I love. But if I'm doing something I don't like, it's, you know, it's like it's like I'm picking strawberries or something. You know, it's like, you know, after like ten minutes you're like this isn't any fun, and you know life is short, so you shouldn't do jobs that you hate. I'm the host of the invention stories podcast and we share the story. The inventor goes on since. So how did your idea? How did you before? You say that, both the podcast of how did you after freedom lay? How did you start to veer towards inventions and what you got, I mean with creativity. Being a creative man yourself, obviously there was something all along the way, but where did you get steered into that direction? Well, what I always hate it. It's sorry. Potato chips are not that creative. I remember meeting a guy said, if you ever work, are free to lay. You'll never want to eat a potato chip or cheesy, particularly like those cheese balls. Again. Okay, you know, I don't have a problem with the products. I still eat him and I use, Oh yeah, time. So I kind of disagree with them, but they were very good to me and my family. They do and and I actually get a pensions. It's not huge because I didn't only work there for nine years, but I I was just really bored because the job is mindless. You could use just go from one stop to the next and you load the chips up. And I mean I actually embrace the time there are an actual problem, because then you'd be like, I get to find a solution for that. Let me see if I can get some extra space ors, you know, out of this. And so that's the only time I'd wake up is when there was a problem. I mean, some people freak out and there's a problem. Me I was like, Oh wow, really, that's cool, but it did it durant. It was its drained me. I work, you know, I was gone sixty sixty five hours a week between the travel time and the job, and but when I was home I you know, I want to do something different. I'd always imagined I had an idea for an invention for your for your glasses. I didn't know why they had to have the frames the way they are and why couldn't you, you know, switch out the frames and everything, and so, you know, everything in my life I just never did it, but I always had the idea ever since I was a kid, and so I started to do that. I created a prototype and then I had an engineering firm even make it better. But when I did the background check, I found like there was four other some ideas very similar to mine, right, and I'm like wondering why they weren't on the on the market. And and then I started reading this book called the invention, Inventor's Bible, and like on one of the pages it said less than two percent of all inventions, you know, make money. So I started thinking, well, that's a real problem and I was wondering why that was. And so I saw, you know, why don't? I I think the best idea are the best way to learn about inventing is to learn the stories of inventors who have gone and see what they've done that they endorse and what's see what they think is a waste of their time. And they didn't really have that on the web. So with your story, what did you learn from your story so that you could bring that personally into your podcast, that journey of your invention? You're finding it elsewhere and you felt probably disappointing because you put a lot of effort into it. What was what was the capstone? What was your your new slogan of life in regards to invention that you brought into the...

...podcast that you do know. I think that it was the or the light bulb moment or the lightning strike was that there's if less than two percent of people are actually successful, they're in eventions, then the entire invention process is broken. So instead of trying to be somebody who invents, why don't I try to fix the invention process? And if you pull it back a little bit, and this may sound grandiosis or whatever, but everything in life that you look around is seems to be a problem. And you know, you can be one of those people who just winds and complains about a problem, but you know, the inventors or scientists or the entrepreneurs, they look at the problem and they say they see the opportunity, you know, and when somebody invents something, it's because they're trying to solve a problem that they think is better than what exists. And you know they're kind of crazy because you have less than two percent chance of being success, but they believe, every one of them believes they're one of those two percent. I don't know if it's two percent success rate, but it's very low, very and that was back then. So I know there's a lot of things to help you now to change things, but did you my goal, come up with things to help. Go ahead. No, my goal was to help, to help the inventor and my and I thought if I could do that and make money, then somebody else could see that, wow, I could make money by helping the inventor too, and and that's what we should try strive to do. That's what I believe, because many people have a crappy job, a job that they hate, you know, and that's got a you know, that's kind of like we're on their psyche. They got to bring it home, they got to take it out on their dog or their kids or their wives. You know. I mean, I would hate to have my you know, I just would hate to have a dad who hated his job. My Dad liked his job, you know, he's so he worked for himself. So, but I do, I think that everybody, everybody has got a crappy job, probably has an idea for an invention. And what are they going to do? Are they got to do anything about it, or is it going to be one of those things that Hans and while they're laying there on their deathbed, you know, why didn't I do this? Or later on, see in the market place, you see somebody else is sitting there I thought of that. You know, truly I was. I was somebody who believed that in cell phones as a kid. I do, but I thought that would it would connect to your home phone. I thought I'd work like a Walky talky. I never dreamed it would be this amazing computer. You know everything all you know if I didn't go that far. But yeah, did you invent anything else that or come up? I mean, you probably did, but some other ideas besides your glasses? I'm working on one right now and you know what I've what I've learned from interviewing, you know, probably almost five hundred, around five hundred inventors of my life, is that I really don't like the patent process. I don't believe in patenting. I just don't. You know, I'm either if I'M gonna I'm gonna do it, either I'm going to bring it to the market or I'm going to try to license it. And if I try to license it, what I'm going to end up doing is getting a provisional pattern, which cost about seventy five and then just approaching you know, myself sheet. I have a lot of connections now and go to the men and all the people who would potentially be license wars, or am I the license ory? Have a license and zy and see if they would? You know, they lit they like to do it. Otherwise, I think that I would just try to use a first to market strategy because I've learned. I've heard too many stories of people who have patents and then somebody infringes on it. What are you going to do? You got to sue him. Yeah, you got that much money to sue them with? I mean, it's reality. Did you have a patent? Doesn't mean somebody, some big corporation or something. I think of a show like like shark tank. Do you find that's beneficial for people who are inventing things, or you think that''s they're kind of going the wrong...

...road trying to get money? And I think it's a great I think it has a lot of great I think everything about well, not everything about it is is very beneficial and very helpful and so many different ways. But mostly they're always harping on the numbers. You know, what are your numbers? What's the cost of goods to purchase this? What he's selling it for? What's the margins? You know, how's your acquisition cost of customers. And if you don't know these things, since they ask that in just about every episode, maybe it's something you should think about. You know what I can I do it? Can I create him sell this product and actually make money? And how am I going to grow the busy business? And you know, I think it inspires people. I think it it's fires people to try talk to. A number of people have been on the show and you know, but it's not the end all, end all. But I think there's a lot of great programs out there. I like the profit. There's always that was in the back of my mind. is going to mention it, but I didn't know. I like that even more. I get tired of the shark tank got people. They're kind of obnoxious, you know they do is the little too in love with themselves. But you know, more power to them. Theyre successful, they can do it. It's remember when Bill Gates got accused of unfair business practices because he was the richest, most powerful person in the world. But I mean how can you blame somebody who's the richest, morest powerful guy in the world and you know from from doing it, you know, and I don't know. It's I like the show. I think it has its limitations, but it's it's good entertainment. It's a little silly, but but there's good, valuable information to be found. So are you working full time on your podcast? Well, depends on what you mean by working. I've been offered, I get offered money or I've been offered money several times to partner with people and businesses to have them sponsor us, and I could have sponsorship anytime that I want because of the downloads that we get, but I don't. I don't really need the money and I don't want to. My mom died like three months ago. Okay, I'm just saying putting this out there, and my mom did too, three months and it blows, you know, at but and well, one of the things I like is this kind of little this kind of little world of what I do and and talking to inventors. It's this beautiful spot because these people take their idea and they're trying to turn it into reality. They're sharing with you that their dreams and and a lot of them are, you know, have some success near like yeah, that's so wonderful because when you look on your phone or you look on the news, it's all garbage. And I know it's not that, but that's what they feature because that's what cells I think the most of the time there's not a whole lot going on, but you know, if it bleeds, it leads right. And so when did you start your podcast? To September of two thousand and seventeen. Would your mom think you podcast? She enjoyed it. She liked me to be happy. And so yeah, so actually, you know what, my mom died. I was just kind of my mom was awesome. I loved her, you know, and so it's pretty shattering and I was just kind of like just like a shell, just sitting there for like the longest time. And and so talking to inventors kind of it's like my happy place I go, you know. And so like yeah, I want to protect it and and I think they want to. I think there are forces out there that I don't know. They want to ruin it, they want to turn it into radio, you know, they want to put in they want to put an ad before and in the middle and at the end, and and I'm like, you know what, I don't I think. I think what inventors do are is like the most wonderful thing. We put statues to musicians and entertainers and what do they do? They distract from the problems of society. Inventors trying to solve the problems of society and they should be have the ones that...

...have the statues made to them. And I mean I love the the toilet. Isn't the toilet awesome? Hell, without the toilet, without indoor plumbing, life would suck, you know. I mean, have you ever been to Asia? I haven't. In Korea they have a lot of places still do. The toilet is just hole in the ground with now they put porcelain with a little front. I don't know what the purpose of but it's not a toilet. So yes, toilet. I think it's a great stevention of mankind. Yeah, you know, and then I know it's like from the Roman time or something, but you know, I just those are the kinds of things that we need to to have, eat, to have the people, the young people, look up to it, admire and want to become you know, but they want they want to be the athletes because they getting paid twenty million dollars a year to go play a game. You know, who cares who wins? And lose. I'm not knocking it out with me. I'm not going it, but I know it's not. It's not I it's not. I just feel like the inventor and there walcked. They're just taking advantage of there's so many scam companies. We all know who they are, and they prey on these people and these people are trying to solve problems in the short run. You know, they're not only they they searching there, trying to make their dream come true, which which is wonderful to be engaged in anything, but they're they're contributing to the economy, they're buying local products, you know, before they mass manufacture and have them come from Asia or Mexico or whenever. But I think the effect of being engaged, just doing something that you love has such a profound effect because everybody who interacts with them thinks, you know, why is that guy so why is he so happy? Why is Brian v doing? You know why is he seems so happy? Well, you know what, he's following his passion, he's doing what he loves. He's interviewing people, and that's that's great because, you know, we we think of people who don't make success in a monetary way by their invention is failures, and we shouldn't because maybe that father or that mother is is doing that with and his son or daughter's watching, or maybe they're doing it together and that's the best time in their lives. You know, I mean it's all about hope and optimism when you're when you're trying to turn your dream into reality. I mean reality kind of slaps you in the face sometimes why you're doing and it cost money, but you know, it's hard to put a price on like like being in love with what you're doing. The you're talking rate at me because, as I said, three months ago or four months ago, my mom died and she was a very hard worker and this idea is in the back of my mind of starting. So I started it on the precipice, on the point that my mom was a hard worker, and I want, like not to toot my own horn, but you want to elevate inventors and I want to elevate workers, because workers are the backbone of our society, no matter the job, no matter what culture you come from. You know, and it was based on and I love this little my little rectangle here, this little time. I mean if you look an inch below, there's tape holding this background up it. But if it's my little my little world. I don't have a stained glass windows, but I have a ten dollar background and it is the idea of following something that you like. I push back a little bit. I think some people have to work a job that may not be the most pleasurable, but they can find some pleasure outside in a hobby or something else. But find some some sort of balance. Is what I find, which is working for most people. But if someone could, like you, find something that you're absolutely passionate about. I'm finding this passionate passion in this is, then that's great. So it's I see that in my life what you're doing. So I appreciate what you're you're you're touting, what your encouraging people and how to...

...live, because there's life is short. Yeah, and for me, you know, I'm fifty two and you know I've been an underachieving slack or my whole life. I've I've you know, I don't have anything that just you know, say I'll look at this. I had some success and and this is the first time in my life. You know, the podcast is and I think part of it is I've got we've got a great name. It's called invention stories. I own the website invention storiescom. So happen? Is that work in so someone stories pod guests? Well, you if you're scrolling through it, let's say you're looking at for a new podcast to look for, to listen to, and you come across invention stories, you know exactly what it's about. Oh Man, invention stories, now that sounds really cool. I'm going to check it out, you know. So I get a lot of people who check it out and then, you know, the guests. If I don't dominate, like I'm trying to dominate, I this the conversation. No, no, that. So if I let them once on your show, what type of people? What are they doing? What do they want to get out of being on your show with their invention story? All, they just want to share it. You know, most of them want would like free publicity for their products they've made. Or right now I've just started season two and we're actually it's about licensing and I'm working with the event right and students and people love event right and maybe you don't know what they're about, but their licensing and and I really like licensing. I wanted to learn more about it. I'm taking the time now to learn about licensing. You just you get an idea, you get yourself a provisional patent and then you have a year to try to get somebody to, you know, buy into it and want to like manufacture and take it from them and see if you can work a deal with them. And I'm fascinated by it. I think it's a smarter way to go than just meant, you know, manufacturing your idea, because you manufact your ideas cost a lot of money and you know, it doesn't really seem to cost a whole lot of money to to go this route from what I've been learning so far, and it's you're using people who already do it, who are already got distribution, who already know where to manufacture it, and it seems smart. I mean, it's sad that it's in a way that that that is so popular now, because it's tells you that there's something wrong with the batten process. That's what I think. What was one of the greatest successes that you've heard of through your invention stories program I guess that you you mean the inventors that I've that I've interviewed, and it depends on you how you define success. Well, how do you define it? And what was? What was that? You know, I always my favorite episode is my favorite episode was the first and and it was with Forbes Riley. She's a spokesperson and and I think it's what I really loved about her. She wasn't an inventor, but what she does is she actually really, you know, is big infommercial, successful persons, brought over two billion dollars to the market and whatever. And so I was able to start with her and she's like, you know, all the inventors need to think about this. This is when you sell it, where you're going to sell how you going to sell it to and whatever, and and they don't. And you know, everybody has an idea and think they can turn it into an idea. It's like it's like me going into a mechanic shop and looking at a car and sent I can be a mechanic because I've seen cars and whatever. But there's a lot to it and and I think she was great because while she was so prepared and she just there were just like so many lightbulb moments. But I think my one of my favorites actual inventors that's had a lot of success is rusty Koy Jones, and she's battling and it's but because it's both a personal thing and and business thing, she battles with both Parkinson's disease and cancer. And she invented this rely alight and what it is is it's a light that kind of it has a battery in it so that when the power goes off you still have light and it's for...

Nice lights inside and you can plug in your phone and whatever. And she she was taking care of her dad. But I think what really and she's had huge success has it's, you know, sold in a lot of places and I believe now she's licensed it out and she's Er makes her story wonderful and so many different ways, is that if I had cancer died Parkinson's disease, I'd one of the two. I probably be crawled up in a ball in the corner cursing God or maybe sucking up to God, so, you know, thinking I'm gonna die or something. But I don't know if I'd sit there still like, you know, trying to make the most out of the world. You know what I mean, but she does, and I mean it's such an inspiration. Like, let's say you and I listen to are somebody's got an idea and listen to it. They're always using an excuse as well. I don't have any time, or this or that. Don't wow, this woman who's Got Parkinson's disease and cancer can do it, but you can't. I mean, what's yourself is? I find these, the few that I've done, is that's, you know, with the idea of work is these people have their own motivations for doing so and it encourages me to keep working. Right. So you hear something like that that you're interviewing, like yeah, yeah, and that's what your listeners are probably getting from that as well. And it's weird because, like, I've talked to a lot of sea over the years. I've talked to a lot of CEOS and presidents. I'm not trying to like put myself up, but there are a lot of times they're like texting me or emailing me and it's like ten o'clock on a Saturday night and I'm thinking you're worth like twenty to thirty million dollars. Why are you texting me right now? And it's weird. And then and then you know, just sort of dons and you it's because they love it. They can't even turn it off. You know, and I mean you see, these guys were worth all this money, like you know the guy, that Amazon guy. I mean he couldn't even spend his money if he tried, and that he still wants to keep going. And they just love what they do and that falling in love with what you do is is just the money's just I don't know, maybe for some people at score card, but I think it's so secondary to love and having passion for what you do. It's, you know, like I said, I won't for me, I don't mind putting in the hours, Robert. What's the most difficult thing about even though you love it, you don't mind putting in the hours. What's the most difficult aspect of your you know, your work, your job, but the thing that you do, you know, it's this is really like something like somebody sits there and I and in an interview and they say hey, you know, what do you say? Is You know, you want to get this job, and then you say, well, what is you? What is it's at you don't like to do or whatever. What's the hardest part for you? And I always say I used to say something like you know, I'm a little bit too meticulous. You know, I would just really like a backwards compliment and that's what I'm going to give you here. I gets, we've get so many requests from inventors. I don't know I'm on some sort of list as well, because I get a lot of them, administrative assistants and PR people in their contacting me and saying that they want me to interview their president, and I'm like with you, he didn't even invent anything. And they try to make what they try to because any entrepreneur can make a case for inventing, because, you know, we started this business on this is all from scratching. Whatever did I have so many people waiting to be invented. You know, actual inventors wait, and I and you know, and it's just it's hard for somebody too. It's hard for me to say no to somebody. I mean I last I check, we had over eight people. I think it's over a hundred that want to be interviewed and we have we have things that we want to do in the next two years and then I'm like it's hard to tell somebody, Hey, can you wait three years? I mean, I don't you know. I like I said before, the reason I'm talking to you is because I know what it's like to reach out and I also have told people. You know, when my mom passed, I got it. Somebody asked me to be interviewed and I was like, you know, I just don't really I gave him a lot of excuses and he seemed like you got mad and I would look, I don't want to say this, but my mom dad,...

I just don't feel like talking and so you know it's but since then, you know, I felt really bad about that. And so any time anybody, whether they're new podcast role podcaster, and it's because I think you're going to help me with my our numbers or whatever, but it's because I've been there. I was that guy. You know. I would send it. Before I started doing the podcast, I used to actually write. I would interview people, I would let me take a step back. I started by collecting all the stories and I put them on from the about us that I could possibly find on our website and I ran out of those. Then I would find like twenty inventors and I would email and I'm asking them to write their story and they send them to my out of twenty, maybe two or three would say yes and maybe one would actually do it. And then finally I said, you know, I'm just going to what I'm going to do is I'm going to contact these people and I'm going to ask him if I can interview them over the phone and I would record them and then I would type it out. And I don't like to tip. That's like homework. Right. It's like, you know, wouky talky telephone idea. It was good. It did. I would spend hours like this. I mean I have over a hundred recordings from like two thousand and fourteen, fifteen and sixteen, you know, and and but but, yeah, I never forget that kind of where where we started or you know, and and it's just kind of blown up. And Yeah, I think to answer your question, the hardest part is to tell people like hey, know, I even know the other people who do something similar to our podcast, and I'll actually say hey, look, they're looking for people. I'd be happy to introduce you to them. And even then I've had a few people flip out on me. You know, I don't like people flipping out I'm for any reason. You know, I don't think anybody does when US, some people do. I always wonder about the guy who works in lost luggage. Man, you know what you're mad. You mean you're you're not happy. We Australach. I'm an a hole. Huh? Nobody ever call it that. Little they learn many languages. They're so even even though I mean and I appreciate your time right like hope I'll not forget the end to thank you again, but hearing more about you, understanding how much of a time restraint you're on. I appreciate you doing doing that. I hope it's not out of guilt, but out of a as you said, understanding where people come from and try not to say no. But how do you? How do you say no? How do you how do you pick? Is it just first come, first serve? You got a picking process, you got a filtering thing as how do you gently say, listen, if you're willing to wait for years then see you, then yeah, yeah, I know, I II, yeah, I I. I'm saying, you know, we're doing a we're doing these miniseries right now and and I'll put you on the list. I don't tell what number they're on the list, but it's not going to be for a while, you know. And that's pretty much it. But generally I try to say hey, you know, I know all these other podcasts and see if they're okay with that and that. That's kind of my process. But as far as actually what I do from the point of, you know, interviewing people and and editing and and some people hate editing in the podcasting worldly on you have somebody that I hate. You know I'm burning out. If you're burning out, you know you need to do something else. I actually think that everything from from interviewing to editing, to putting together the post to sharing it on social media, every part of that I love doing. There's nothing I don't in fact that yeah, when it's like I'm now,...

...this is going to sound really obnoxious, Brian, but I feel like I feel like I'm I feel like I'm creating a piece of art, and I mean, I don't know if this will last while I'm gone, but I mean these I'm sharing somebody's dream and I'm just I want to be as beautiful as possible. I wanted to inspire people. I want to sound to be excellent. I don't want to hear it. All right, gasp, ruch, all right, you know, I take out the you knows, how many times do you hear you know, to tell you the truth, you know, you really edit it down. A I'm I'm a good question. I added me a lot too, because less of me is better, more of them is you know. Well, I don't listen this cloud near this clown talking this. That's me. I'm talking about my saying, God, I'm blathering like an idiot. I got to rerun, you know whatever. But when it's all done, done and I put it out there, yeah, and it's like closure and it's like okay, now let's get out of the next one, it's has some more fun. Yeah, it's just the blast. That's why I know that it's what kind of what I'm supposed to do, because I love it so much. What is it you love the most about it? What is the what? I think it's the connection with the people. You know, I'd just like the actual act of talking to somebody, getting them to know them. They they talk to me in like talking to you right now. It's like, yeah, you know, Brian, would never talk to you in real life, only not. I mean I don't meet guys and definitely not become friends. And you know and you know, but but if this were my podcast, you be telling me how you turn your dream into reality. And that's they're so excited. I mean the passion just comes through the room, you know, it just comes through the speakers. There's there's not a bad episode. There's you know, I read stuff on these, you know, new podcast podcast and there saying that just put something out there, don't whatever, you'll get better over time. I said, no, make your first one awesome and try to make everyone better after that. You know you will get better over time. And I am old school. I'm like, I feel like I'm quoting my dad, you know, going down the pike or something, you know. And then I'm like it takes time. Quality takes time and I don't want it again. I'm I don't want to sound obnoxious, but everything that's quantifiable is how this world works, unfortunately. Yeah, it doesn't do anything for me. I've been in the FRITO business for nine years. It burned me out. Hey, I'm I'm hitting plan. Okay, how much you going to be planned by? I'm gonna do, like, can't you do more? What are you gonna do next week? I mean there was like no like spiking the footballs, never enough, and I didn't grow up with parents who push me like that. There was never enough. So sales or numbers or downloads, they don't mean anything to me and you can think he's full of it. They don't. They just don't. You know. So, yeah, I just want to create these beautiful things because we live in a world that, I don't know, the problems that need solutions and inventors or they need help becoming more successful. They have now and there's a lot of great things that have popped up right now. You know crowdfunding, obviously you know, but I think one of the great things is fiver. You familiar fiber? I am not. Okay, essentially it's an online market place where people can create logos or you know, you can have a variety of things and it's really taken off. I don't know how things are there, but everything's kind of shut down here in the United States right now and a lot of people aren't work and and you know, you can actually make money doing it. Online. It's called FIVER and I use it for my logo. I just change my logo and but anytime I neat help with my website. I'm not that great with the website I use. You know, I do my own web stuff, but something doesn't work right. Also that I got to...

...contact somebody and I can pick who I want. I can pick a country that you know, I know that struggling. You know, that's the end, and I can and I think that's wonderful, like I'll find something like, I don't want to knock Packistan, but I know that they could use help, or Afghanistan, and I'll find something from Afghanistan or pack stands. Hey, this is the problem I have. And they're like they give me a price and I have them do it. I think that's better, you know, because I've had people that I've given money to who needed help. You know, it's like family members and yeah, you give somebody money and it's it just really backfires every time. It's like they feel like you're looking down or resenting them or something. But I suppose if I said Hey, can you do something for me and as a job, then they would feel much better about receiving that money, and so like, I think something like that is it's really great. It's like you can hopefully it'll expand every area where there's you know, there's places in Africa we have people. You know that that fiber has it, and I do. I liked I like, Hey, you know, I mean, first of all I'm getting a great deal and then, you know, you never know the effect that that has, and so I liked it. Another thing is you can use a little avatar and so you can be whoever you want with whatever name. And you know, maybe in real life people would judge you if you go in based on their prejudices or whatever. You know, he's a religion or what you look like or whatever, but when you do it virtually or whatever it's, it could be anybody you don't even know. And and so in a lot of ways I think it's I just think it's really great. I I don't know. I do know. I don't know why people say. I don't know, because that's another thing that people say that I edit out. I don't know. Right, I won't edit it out. You're being honest, Robert. How do you rest? What do you do in rest? What is your rest? How do you take a break? I can take a break anytime I want. And you know, what is it break look like for you? I think I'll watch TV. I I'm a TV watcher. I I don't know. Do you have youtube out there? I Love Youtube. I want to sound like a cloud. I'm a regular guy. Yes, Brian, I got a brother. I got a brother WHO's mentally gifted, minor, right, and we'll just gifted in talent. He and Iq of a hundred thirty or more. Right, that allegedly right. He smart. And so they took me out of class and they did a test on me and, you know, after the test was done, I don't know how long, it seemed like forever, and whatever they said, I wasn't smart enough to be in that group as like wow, man, don't want a drag, you know. It's like and that could crush something. I don't know, could respond differently, but like, you can't. You didn't really measure my creative tivity or my drive or whatever. So I don't know, I just think that's like an acid. I'm just a regular guy, you know, I'm not. I'm somewhere in smart, a little bit extra smart, but I'm not like some g you know, everybody thinks they are like really, really smart. They're not. I mean somebody's got to be. And then like the people were the dumbest of the ones that were telling you how smart they are. Look you, if you're telling me I'll smart job. I'm staying away from you because they're not smart. It's like somebody else says you're smart, okay, and you don't have to tell me you're smart. I can tell you're smart. I know you're smart, Brian, I can tell. Hmm, you got good educational background to and it's it's good. I mean you're saying regular guy, but it's good for people to know like, okay, this guy is busy, extremely busy, but he likes to just to sit down and watch the TV or watch some youtube and that's rest for you. Yeah, I work on my house, I walk my dog, I do I watch Netflix, I watch yeah, Eah,...

Bo came with my phone, and now this is the golden age of TV. Everything's great now and I grew up in there was six channels and three of them didn't come in very well and a lot of mad like twenty four episodes shows. In fact, one of that was one of the reasons I've inspired me to do a short eight to ten episode mini series is because I noticed that's the trend today. They're not even, you know, half hour episodes on Youtube. You can make them one however, however long you want, and so I recognize the intention spans pretty short. So I try to keep my episodes between twenty and twenty five minutes. I need I needed learned from your wisdom and if I do do something that's forty minutes or fifty minutes, I do it in two parts. How his work brought you through life? How can you look back and see what you're doing to gas station, McDonald's? How is work been a constant in your life and helped you develop? Always, I think I've always been out of a step. If I think I did everything wrong, I did. I did the wrong thing. I did the thing that I thought was smart at the time or, you know, I felt comfortable with. I mean I should have like I was a business major in college. Scotty, I don't know what was your degree in Ryan? First Computer Science and ninety six, but then I switched to business. All right, business was boring. It is. You know what the college and these guys are political science majors and liberal arts majors. They are having a great time. You know, we didn't class it it. Yeah, I did math, you know, but I thought it was practical. Don't do anything practical. That's why I said, when somebody starts a podcast, don't do something that's practical or sound smart. I'm going to interview and me, you know podcasters, you know that way that podcasters can tell everybody out. Said, you know, then I'll get the numbers up and stuff, and I'm like Nah, man, do it, do what you love, because I'll get you through every day. And I never did that and so I never was really successful. Always been the work did you but how your achiever? The did the work help you through life? Do you find that? Because some people have an attitude. You know, you're in the states, I'm from Canada. Is I don't need to work, especially younger people. Right. I think as you get older you realize some responsibilities that you have in life, that you have to do some things, but younger people some tend to think that it's not it's not so important. I don't need work. It's not. I don't need it to live. I don't need money. I can just get it from mom and dad. Wow, do you got a different mom and dad than I had? No, I've been working since a sixteen. Actual, I'm I moved out on my own when I was sixteen. So right now, my own way. Now people that's the government. Mom is mom and dad is the government. Okay. Well, you know, I actually for me and I actually say does a finance major, and I tried to say twenty cents out of every dollar. A lot of people say saved ten cents out of every dollar. To try to save twenty cents. I used to put a lot into my fore k because I made so much more than I needed. I live within my means and you know, now I'm fifty two. I don't need to work right now. I'm not saying I'm ready to retire, I just don't have to work. And this with the coronavirus, I mean, just keeps me safe. I don't want to get sick. I don't like being sick. You ever notice when you're sick, all you want to do is not be sick. I don't care that it doesn't kill you. I just don't want to get sick. I like to feel good and breathe and I'm a fan, you know, like like, like a little bit spoiled. I was had a pool when I was a kid and you know, if you have two older brothers, you know one of them is going to at least at some point hold you under water. Coming up right. So not being able to breathe, that's a messed up thing. And like like last year, I was I was weed eating and I was kicking up a lot of dust...

...and and for whatever reason I didn't wear a mask. Is I'm, you know, trying to be macho or whatever, and and I kept coughing and coughing and coughing, and so finally, I mean I was trying to watch a movie in a movie theater with it with throat thing, you know, lonsages and and Soda, and I still couldn't stop and I said take me to that, you know him, the medical place, and they gave me a couple of shots and it kind of went away. But I always sort of wonder. That was only last year. Are Lungs have they been? You know, I don't know what the effects are of that, and so I've I just I'm going to act like like like I'm high risk and I don't want to get say I don't want to I don't want to have what people have, you know, and I don't want to spread it. I go shopping when people aren't there and I try to stay away from people. You know, a lot of these idiots out here and just want to stick their head in the sand. And I always said that, you know, what are you gonna do when you die and you go to heaven and maybe St Peter's or gods at the gate and says, well, you know, I sent you down at once in a hundred your year. You know, epidemic or pandemic. And how did you behave took my head in the sand. You know, you can't tell me what to do. I get right, I say God or whoever. I hope. They say, you know what, we got place for you down there. It's a little hot, but to you know later, I gave you like common sense. I mean it doesn't. Doesn't the word epidemic or pandemic scare you? I mean it scares me, not rationally, but you know, well, here in Korea it's masks were a thing before there was covid so it's much easier for you know, the pride of people to be vanquished because they know it's a real problem. So, Oh, here's my mask. That was in my pocket anyway, so I'm just going to wear it even more. So it's calm. There is a lot of common sense that people they I see what you're saying, especially in more so in America. From my perspective, being Canadians, like my right, but I have friends in Canada that would probably have the same idea as like these are my rights. I don't have to, I know, I understand, but there's common sense to cover your mouth when you're coughing, sneezing and when you're in a big crowd. It's probably a good idea to have. I just want to say this. My mother, she taught me a few things, like she was really big on manners. Please and thank you some and in really the real life, somebody says please to me or whatever, I try to do it. Somebody tells me to do something, I don't say please, I give them the middle finger in my mind. You know the metaphorical but you know, what I think you wanted me do is be clean. You know, you used the other right, you know, and wash your hands. I'll wash my hands after I use the bathroom everywhere and it's it's like not even a plot, not to man, if you're listening out there, I don't know, women, most guys don't. They just don't wash their hands out here. It's free water, you know, so bad. It's everywhere. It's everywhere. There's a you know, of the toilet or yarn all there's there's dirt. Is a lot of guys and it's it's not always the guys you think. You know, the ones that I don't wear the masks and, you know, look like they, you know, don't wash their hands. They probably don't, but that's also guys dressed up in suits. You know, from what I hear, doctors and things. Don't even there's just a lot of guys. I don't know what's wrong with them. Wash your hands. What do you Cros Man? You have put your hand on that handles. I leave. I'm a little bit of a I'm not a total GERMAPHODE, but I don't want to touch that door handle after you just been using the bathroom and didn't wash her the guys that like on the cell phones while there on the toilet. It's like you're so gross. I don't know, it's a strange world we live. I know that for certain now, Hubert, what advice would you have for it's not for inventors in particular, but just people in work and your life experience of your work ethic? What advice would you have for...

...people who are discourage and not even they have a job, I just don't want to go to work today, like, why do I have to work? Why should I work? What is your advice to people who are behind the eight ball in life and feel like the world's against them, but they realizing a little bit that they need to work? What advice do you have for them? You know, I would try to I would encourage them to try to find a job that makes them happy, even if they don't get paid very much, because I think that's, like we mentioned earlier, that's that's going to make all the difference. If you enjoy if you look up and I can't wait to go to work, they don't matter. What I now was, I think I mentioned before on Fiver and and I want to mention that actually own some stock and fiver. Okay, so just to put it out there, that's how much I believe in it. But you can actually start your own little business on it. Is this, sorry, is this fiver? Like to drop a fiver like a five dollar bill? Is that the idea? If I ve ARRCOM and, like I said, I've used it for years and years and love it. But like, let's say, you can't find a job or you're behind the eight ball and you hate your job. Well, what you can do is you can say, well, you know what I'd really like to do? I'd really like to read, you know, tell give people advice on their websites or whatever. Okay, you can start that. You could you get your own little place and it's free and you can say, look, I will rate your websites or your podcast or whatever, and five dollars for this and and you can try it out and see if people are really into it. It's a way of testing something without like starting an actual business. And then if you start to say, Hey, I really like this and I'm starting to get some reviews and it's starting to work, maybe I can turn this into a full time business. But I think the the idea or the goal should always to be to do what you love for a living. I mean, and if you're not, then you know, listen to the invention stories, podcasting, O. There's a j and the you know, be inspired by others, because a lot of people have been in your shoes. They hate their job. I think most people don't even like their jobs, but they see bills and you know, I had a fortunate I didn't think so at the time, but when I was sixteen I was living on my own. All right, I didn't have any money for food. Once I didn't Ramen, top ramen. I don't know if they solved there, but this is the end. This is where Roman come from. Romie, it was ten cents. I didn't have ten cents. I literally didn't have any money and I was hungry because I didn't understand it, and that was really like the wake up moment that, you know what, I need to get a credit card or something, you know, and I need to have a backup plan and a plan and plan being. That's why, the first half of my life, when there was two options, I'd always choose the cheap option. You know, I need to save, I need to you know, I'm afraid right now money, of being hungry, free being and homeless. You know, I want to get ahead of my bills and if you can get in a position where you can save money. Yeah, save twenty cents of each dollar and, you know, invest in stock or if you get a one K for a business, make sure you max it out and do what you can. Robert, I like what you're doing in your second more I like what you did in your whole life, but the second part of your life seems like you're you're living what you want to do and you're enjoying what you want to do and I'm very glad for you. Is there a way that people can reach you? Can contact you if they so are in climbs. So you can reach me at invention stories podcast at gmailcom. You can go on invention storiescom and, you know, you can read the stories. But there's a there's a guess book that I had somebody to create on fiver and and you can tell you know a little bit about who you are and what you are. But I mean it's for inventors. But yeah, I'm always I'm always answering emails. I like emails when people are genuine, not that they're just...

...trying to stall you something, but hey, you know, I I heard young whatever and I like, you know what, I like it when they they compliment me, and that's Nice, not but you know what I really like is when they dog me out, you know, talk a little smack, little trash, like you know, I listen, you're you're showing it suck here. You know what that's when you know, really know, you made it, you know, and people are like yeah, and I'm like, all right, I get that. Yeah, I because you know, it's your buddies and you can find each other and stuff. But yeah, somebody spent the time to Goo farm you or tell me I suck right on, Robert. Is there anything else that you would like to add, whether work related or just something that's on your mind about work? Can't think of anything, Brian. I think we exhausted everything and they closing to me know and closing. Why do you work, Robert? Why do you work? I work. I work so I don't have to worry about my re what I you know, running out of money before I die. I work. Well, I love what I do, so I don't think that I don't want don't really work. I guess it's a mindset. You know, you don't want to work, you just want to do what you love. It's like, I think it's like. I think that's the goal and that's where you should all try to be. As is at that place where you're earning a living but you're not really working. It's like playing guitar. They say, Hey, you know, you practice guitar. You know what, I never practice guitar. I hate practicing. I like playing. I played my guitar. I don't I never practice, I just play it, you know, and it's the same thing. You know, it's like practice. It's like going to work. You know, working man, you're just you're just learning money doing something I love. That's the goal. Got To get there. Are Living. I'm not selling you anything. You know. Also it's but it's something that's people have always told me my light my whole life. I remember growing up in there are s and they'd say follow your bliss. I didn't even know what you're talking about. whish I'd ask somebody and figure out who you are, what you love. What is it? You Love? Trying to make money doing that? You Love Watching football, you love watching the Dallas cowboys. Fine, see if you can find a job doing something around that. You know, whatever you love, just, you know, follow it and believe in it, even if it doesn't pay off in the beginning, it'll maybe you'll need a second job doing something. I hate say that. You can continue doing something you love, but never, never stop trying to reach the goal of do what you love perfect. Robert, sir, Robert Bear, I appreciate you and your invention stories and maybe one day will talk again. I appreciate your time. I know you are busy and I truly appreciate what you've done here. Thank you, Brian. Thank you for listening to this episode of why we work with Brian v be sure to subscribe, follow and share with others so they too can be encouraged in their work. I hope that you have yourself a productive, be a joyful day in your work.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (123)