WhyWeWork BrianVee
WhyWeWork BrianVee

Episode 1 · 1 year ago

#1 Bruno The Entrepreneurial Teacher

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Bruno The Entrepreneurial Teacher talks about his work experience growing up and how he deals with the difficulties with work. Why we work, even when it is hard. We need to encourage people to work and work well. 

  

 

Welcome to why we work with your host, Brian V as he speaks to people like you from all over the world, as we together dive deeper into our motivations, struggles, joys, seemingly missteps, hopes, warnings and advice which will be an encouragement to us all to get up, get going and keep on working. Workings tough, but working is good. Now here's your host to why we work, Brian being. Welcome to Brian V's why we work. We are here with an interview and you on facebook are behind the scenes, just to get an idea of how my questions may come at you. And you will not be able to hear my interviewee he you will when you listen to the podcast some time in the near future. So I appreciate your time and patience and yes, sir, just I want to make it as respectful, as interesting and just about you, and obviously it's about me because I'm doing the show. However, I want to know more about you in the idea of work. Will have some have some just some questions. Thirty, forty minutes, however they go, and maybe we follow some tangents, some some rabbit holes, what have you. Whatever is good for you. If, and also if there's some things that are said you wanted them, edit it out. I have no problem with that. Or if a question seems to be just you know, like if I say, do you have any pets, since, Oh, don't talk about pets, my dog died yesterday. I mean then if that's not needed, we just can edit that out. So any of that is fine. This is not a gotcha lesson, this is not trying to trick you. I'm trying to get to the heart of work and, as I said today on Instagram, I want to put the puzzle pieces together of why everyone works. Does that answer your question? Yep, that's good, you're good. Okay, sir. Mr Is it okay to use your name? What would you what would you like to be? Would you like to go by Nice? Mr Brit just called me Mr Bulk if you want to get forrmal, but if no notice, I'm all right with Bruno. Bruno, why don't you even how to properly pronounce your name? Just tell me a little bit about yourself. And again, everything is in the context of work and the name of the podcast. Is Why we so so. I mean I've Been Korea for about eleven years and I've always been working constantly and I was actually I've always been more coholic. I guess good cold, you can sit up and yeah, when I start, when I first came to Korea, that's why I thought I did. I mean I'm working a hug one full time and and yeah, it's just work, work, work. I didn't have anything else going for I didn't have friends, I didn't have any other things to do, because you go home and work. So I kind of working hell has helped me a lot. You helped me get through a lot of hard patches here, start at the beginning. So work is definitely something that gives us meaning and and helps us, you know, get through the day or get through just go through life when you're not when you're kind of for me at that time, I said I was alone. I was kind of ruderless in a way, so I didn't really know what I was going what was going to happen, and that really helped me kind of just, you know, do good job, you know, get good at what you're doing. It's like the Kum...

Kung Fu philosophy. Just perfect your art and that will despite the hardship and difficulties and the mental in mental challenges in the sense that in your minds, going to mess with years, going to say on it's a board or owner, want to do something else. I want to move on, on to give up. So well, sticking to the strong work ethic has helped me a lot and it kept me on the right path. It bases, essentially, and before then, before Korea, I've always worked pretty much since I was I was starting to think about when I started working. Like, I mean, what is work? Right? Work is not just exchanging time for money. It's also, and I was thinking about this it I mean usually people call its stick, changing time for money. Basically, it's a kind of basic we're looking at, but it's also before you when your child. Now that it's not that comment, but my life, my days children, I used to work, I was with my parents, I saw, yeah, uncle, you you're leading right into that, because you're mentioning right now all of the things that you're doing in the last you said nine years or yeah, ten years, and you're mentioning now back into your childhood. And so what was your first job? What was the what was the first thing that got you like, okay, you mentioned a little bit about money and Childhood and different motivations. But what was that first taste of money? Reasoning for doing it? And the reason I started off like that is that I started working at very young age, but I wasn't earning money per se. I mean I was how old, how will do you what is a young age? I was trying to think my okay, my parents. I've been a latch key kid for I was latch key kid. What is that? Latch? Oh, so, so, like you get home and because both your parents work, so you get home and also one there latch key, latch. Yeah, okay, okay, it is a latch. But okay, yeah, I understand that. And Yeah, and then so, but during the so during I was at home, and then but during the summers. So my parents always worked. My Dad had like normal, you know, kind of white color work A. Where's my mom was? She used to run stores, and initially for franchises, and then she had her own stores, like a newsagent coffee shop, and I used to go and work there on the weekends. So what could you do in these? So you're thinking back. So what was what was it you were doing with your mom or in these stores? What was your responsibility? So, I mean, yeah, so on the weekends all we do is so I'll see, I'm trying to think back. That's if I had done anything else before that, because that's the only obvious job. I job. Again, is that a job? But I was conscripted in a sense because basically, I my mom would have to go there and she'd go like six am, seven am, and and she just ever, you want to come? I don't remember what she told me, but she said it. She must have said something I bring to come with me, help me out and I'll give you something. Be a dinner today. Dam Must. They had to be an incentive, because I remember doing so. We started seven and leave at seven or eight or nine or whatever. That's a that's a job. That's like twelve, fourteen hours us working the whole time, though, yeah, I wasn't doing the whole time, and especially. I mean so basically you go there, like the news agent. I went there, and then the summer was like pretty much every day from bytom how old? How old were you to see? I'd say twelve or three. Yeah, and, like I remember,...

...like the news agent, they bring the newspapers. For some reason they wouldn't put them together. They just bring them in like's like ten. There's one newspaper and you got ten different protections, yeah, sections, and you get to put all together. And it was like just very, you know, very repetitive work that my mom obviously don't want to do, and so I did those kinds. It's kind yeah, I'm the right man this job, right boy. And Yeah, and like stacking the shells, checking inventory once in a while, serving customers. But you know, I mean, yeah, I think I did a little bit that some point when she had to go out for like do some air and or with the bank or whatever. And Yeah, I think so. That's basically what I did. And then later on she moved on to a coffee shop, which is more I've been old. I was a bit older than so I was basically a waiter. I waited tables, I've got tips and I was I think it was about fourteen, fifteen, it was. Yeah, before. Yeah, so that was your in the summer. You're totally motivated job, not told to do it, but this is now your yeah, that was I mean it was hard because you had the it. If this was in a there a lot of business people in that area, and so a lot of people come in and out from the morning to two clock, lunch time, and then between two and and then after to was kind of you know, you see people come in for a coffee or you know what, there weren't that many people. And Yeah, so it's basically waiting tables and then maybe I'd make a coffee, make coffees, maybe cut some bread, you know, make some breast sandwich or like simple sandwich. So was this you you choice to get this job? Did you decide this is what I wanted to do at the age of fourteen? Is this? Is this kind of pushed? I was a natural. I don't remember thinking, I don't remember I don't remember feeling bad about it. That's why I can say it did teach me. I believe that. If you yeah, I mean and then yeah, so, but at the same time, like I was working. This was a long time ago, right, but I do truly believe that that gave me a work ethic. Really could work. And of course seeing my parents work was as that was. That was also big part of it, but doing it was. Yeah, it helped me. I mean you wake up early, you got to do it, you know, in your and you mentioned your family. Watching them as you're getting older and seeing them both work, is there something that they specifically instilled in you, or is it just by their actions you saw where? was there a clear message that, say, your mother or your father kind of engraved into your heart about as you're saying it was, for example? It was more about for example, because I don't remember. I remember one thing. They told me once, and this was later on, when I was about sixteen, I met my uncle in the summer and I was at my grandmother's house and he said a, Bruno, want to go to friends. I was like it just the beginning of summer? I was like yeah, it was. It was a kitch now, what do you mean? And basically he wanted to drive his van from London to a small so my family has a kind of small, very old, small house in the countryside in France. It's called like call. It's like West, the western side. How many? How many languages do you speak,...

Bruno? I've learned, okay, I've been exposed to about I mean I've I've studied eight languages, some more than others. If formerly like an, I understand. Let's again. I don't speak all those languages. Yeah, it's some pieces. Now I haven't practiced but I understand some of it. I did guy, I did growing up. For English, I did. I went at a German in my middle school. I the French middles in school, the German, French Portuguese, with the Portuguese. So that's for and then later on in life time I do my major's Chinese and e comics. I the Chinese and I lived there for year, so I got a good explorers that and I did Japanese while I was doing that. Actually, initially I want to Japanese, but then my father this is different. We're going to tend it now, but I went to Japanese. So I be in a Chinese and then I met a really good, really Nice English guy and he was like he was obsessed. Are you still is up? I don't know, know, but he was obsessed with languages. It's any languages, especially Asian, Asian language, and he was fluent. He lived in Japan while he was in England. They have a program where they'll send high school students for a year to live with a family in Japan and he did that. So he was like fluent in the Chinese Japanese and he helped me out. So by the end of my day, my degree, I passed said Japanese and I got a first, which, if you don't know, in England, getting your first in universities, damn is it is very good, hard, quite hard. So I got and so I got. I did Japanese, the Chinese, not I Korean. Obviously I did. Then to semesters in can young. Did you? And then I mean, yeah, I didn't know you did that. How was that taking? That? There the the Korean. So if you have the time, I recommend it and if you really want to learn, that's the best way. And this is from I'm not just because if the system is good, but I mean it's like it was like four hours a day, nine, two, one. and to keep in mind, I was doing that while I was working from a hug one full time. So basically, and that's that's why I asked, because I knew you spoke a few languages just by and knowing you, but that many. It's it shows, especially with the number of jobs you just mentioned you have done over a number of years. It shows the worst work ethic that you're referring to, like for someone to learn even to understand your own. I heard a quote once and a quote a guy. No, he's like, my second language is English, yet to declare my first right. And you're not talking about a first or a second, you're talking eight or ten. Yeah, I mean, yeah, fair enough. It's just I don't like to bring it up too much because I can I can't speak it, I can spell. No, no, I'm not a flow of fluent in them. So I feel a bit bad. Well, you don't use them, they're not around you as well, but you're using at least a few on a regular basis once in a while. Yeah, yeah, and then, I mean I did spin it. Other be in Spain for a bit. My parents moved. My Dad moved there alter Gibraltar living. He had a business and lived in Gibraltar. Or not actually had a business in Gibraltar, which is English, and but then he lived in Spain. So other there for a while, picked up Spanish, and then time's kind of I just Beiu. I didn't never study time, but I just know it's a romantic languages. They're also as you first start moving after the age of fourteen, did you continue to work? Did you start to find a drive and a desire to keep working for whatever reasons. I mean, as you know, in the West we have these long summers and...

...yeah, just as far as I remember, every summer I did something, I did some kind of work and I even worked at my one summer worked at my uncle's restaurant, which was kind of more touristic area, and I got some insight into how, not my uncle, but how they swindle the customer or they skim the customers. But yeah, so in a restaurant where we used to serve baked potatoes fresh out of the microwave, I was like what, and then they put them in Tinfoil wrap. I said we as you yeah, specialty of dous. What do you guys do it? Just put it in the microwave. Look, they'll so I did that in the summers. Again, it's just long. Summer's boring. And and then when I was sixteen I went to France. I did that was completely different again. So I went with my uncle, lived there for a bit and after for a week, I was like boring. I mean we were cycling from like I don't know if you've been too friends, I have not. Actually, it could be similar to Canada. Because in the way the instance that you have like a lot of small towns and in between this small towns like thousand people to hells and and then in between you have like two and twenty case be in between them. So we do cycle with I go. Yeah, that was post so it's kind of in our countryside. It's all I want to go. My great grandfather's from France. My last name is a little town there, the rude, the Vastartis there something along? Okay, yes, yeah, I mean it's although this was a long time ago and it was different times now, I don't I can't do some research before you go there any but it was nice place, very very slow, very easygoing. Yeah, so after a while was okay, I've got it, I want to do something and my uncle knew some of the farmers around which were in the best whether it was all subsidized by they go from, which was interesting. And so so what I do? I I started off by the first thing they they suggested to me was your your young lad come with me to my duck factory. And I was like, you know, I know Faka. Have you had a Faga? I'm not. So it's like a French delicacy's quite expensive. It's like that. It's duck liver, basically. Okay. Well, yes, or Patty, but not that bread. Yes, Falca, it's a French jelaxy. And so as I he come to my duck bar. Okay, duck farm, sounds good, and then he showed me like this, you know, yet different stages of growth, ideas. Ducks it bigger and then eventually they get they go into the factor three, which was and I'd only did it once because it was really shocking. So basically, too, they have fatten them up right. So until that stage when they're big enough to into the factory, there have a great life, you know, they're running around and eating stuff, but then when they going to to this like warehouse and they just put them in cages and HMM, man, I mean nowadays you probably can go and need to and see how that works, but in those days, I mean I knew about five guy. Once I off delicacy prounds. Yeah, I want to have some far guy with my cabby out. It is bad. But when I saw them do it, I was like Holy Canoe. And basically the guy I did one one round. So the whole thing. I went so basically okay, to have an idea of how this works. You know the nozzle that they used to fill up cars? Yes, something stay, something similar to. They grabbed the ducks neck. Yes, stuff it down is side. Yes, I've seen it's really really yeah. So I just saw that for...

...like at once. One I didn't round. Should be once, one round, and I was like, Nope, I'm fine. Next, what's the next job you got? You have but now. So yeah. So then in that area was well known for the PRUNES. PRUNES, right, plums, yes, yes, another delicacy. So basically I started off picking, picking plumps with was it really as well, because they you can only pick them from the ground. Just kind of back breading work, backbreaking work, and you got to be in the Sun. It's like picking up these plums and put him in baskets which are there for a week. And it was okay. But then they sent me to the the place where they provide them, and that's where I spent most of the summer, basically, and I just bait, basically like ten ten hour days, ten eleven, maybe nine, and I just like they would bring the plums, I would put them on these stray big trays with another guy and they put him in the oven and then we put on on big racks, racks, and then put him in the oven and it stood again, again again. And Yeah, I did that. And for a normal, same person you think, well, that's I'm not going to do that for a month. But ten hours that they doing this. What a crazy math, and I just did it. I don't know why. I don't know. I mean at the same time I was living with a actually, at that time my uncle had to leave, so I stay with an English couple and they're really nice. So we went to know, we went for drives and its stuff. So, from the jobs you've started out by by saying sorry, until all of your adventures, what is the most interesting job, despite, besides the one that you're doing now, before we get to talk about that, what is those interesting job in my life? Yeah, looking back, not not the one you have now, if that's part of your list, I I wouldn't say that the the jobs I did before were interesting. I wouldn't call them interesting, but they define who I became or define me, because it mm just they taught me not to give up, even though I want to, and it's boring and I mean there was always at the back. Okay, when I was before sixteen, the jobs I did, I kind of did it for my parents, I guess, out of feel the old pcienting. Its just respect though I want to, I don't remember. I can't remember what I felt, but I thought. I don't know, and I don't remember having negative feelings about it. So, yeah, but then the the the work when I had to. So I mean so and then so they I don't remember exactly why I did it, but at the in the when I was sixteen, the one in France, I got well paid. It was a it was really well paid actually, and I was a bit skeptical about the pay, to be honest. And also did it. Why were you it? Just, I mean I they told me how much I'd get and I think it was like it was above minimum wage and and it was a lot of hours. So it was a lot of money. I mean I mean a lot of money for me. I've sixteen year old. I remember buying a camera or less some some piece of I remembers a lot of money when I got it the end. And for Su for that kind of you know, I think that you were worth that much money. Is that what you were questioning or you just hadn't made that much money to that point? Yeah, basically, I mean, yeah, I think that was my the first time I made that, that much money. He's in decent money and from someone I didn't know by it's is friend of a friend. That happened. Happened to be. So my favorite job. Yeah, and I mean it...

...wasn't. It was. I feel that I liked it because of the money. So I like it. It was my numbing, essentially. But then there was another one of my other motivations was I wanted to learn, not learn, for I wanted to practice my French. So that kind of I got everyone unpus spoke French. So that that I guess that's something that I learned as well. That's kind of a lesson I learned when you do a job, most every time you do something, try to get something else out of it, not just the money, not just the experience, but tried to learn something else that's unrelated and and then that will help you get over those moments when you feel, I this is boring, I don't feel like it, because when you feel that, then you think, but I'm I'm learning French. Now, okay, then learning French. It's boring, but I'm learning French. So having something, some other objective while they're doing the job is very helpful and very it really helps, you know, sticking to it and not keeping up. I was going to ask you're getting into something. I was going to ask in a little bit, but I think it's worth mentioning now because it's something for say in this podcast I'm trying to repeat and encourage people and I think what people sometimes feel is discouraged right and maybe even depressed in their job, and I think you're touching on it by saying, by what you're saying, doing something else, not just what that task is. Can you elaborate on that and maybe even the benefits of people who, besides yourself, knowing it, what other people probably are experiencing the benefits of doing something else besides your job? I think I know a way of looking at it. So a lot of the people I've read, like successful people, they've had jobs were basically repetitive or boring, or people proceeded as boring but later on they realized, Oh, I did this and I acquired these skills. I didn't realize that time. But you know, I I got skilled and I see this again and again a lot of famous people. Recently I read outliers to book by forgot his name. Any people look it up? Outliers in your book, you wish book, and it talks about outliers, people who are the outliers, and it talks about build gates and all this. And they did repetitive things that later on gave them the skills to do something big. To the skills or perspective, you know, I mean if you have a like any anything you do, you're doing something else. Right, if you're in if you're a waiter, you have to learn to deal with people, you have to learn to just, you know, put a smile on your face. You have to learn. Yeah, so there a lot of things you're doing that. If you just think this is a job, I don't like it, but I have to do it for money, then that's you know, your your your what Sup Story. You're missing. You're missing a good opportunity of the real the learning experience. Yeah, there are other things going on. No, and you got to think about that. And sometimes simple jobs are, let's see it, not sometimes, most of the times, simple jobs are stepping stums to but you got to you got it. But then this brings me to a principle. What is the principle? Although, so begin with the end in mind, right. This is one of Seven Habits of highly effective Stephen Coll make sever copy. So have have think about heaven ambition and then figure out like go back...

...like, okay, I want to get through this big goal, but in order to get there I need certain thing and to do certain small steps. So what are those small steps? Where can I get those small steps? And this goes to like a lot of people these days, like graduate people who Study University, they just think they they just they have part time jobs, like in kind of bars and this. And I mean, yeah, you can learn people skills and I guess you could learn some certain things if you have certain responsibilities, like dealing with money or whatever, but scheduling, cash and stuff like that. Yeah, yeah, a lot of skills. You can learn that, but it's kind of limited. But so that it's more effective, to figure out, okay, I want to be an architect, what the famous architects do to teach them the necessary skills to excel later on and then make a plan, like what, where are these, you know jobs, these these stead yeah, so that that's very important and a lot of young people don't think like that and they kind of waste their time in these low paid, again, low paid jobs, but which are essential for them later on. Yes, we need low paying part time jobs and we need that in society because it gives us, gives people a chance to, you know, get some experience, but it's some time. Choose the right one. Don't just go for generic one, which is a bar attending or waidering. Get Dude for a while, learn those skills with okay, fine, but then be more specific, have standards, you know. I think that's something that I learned from to these famous people that I read about, and and and now, okay, I still have an answer your question. I'd say, okay, when I was in when I was in university in London. So as I worked, I was really lucky. I was so lucky I got this part time job in a now infamous confucious institute. The world has changed. Have you heard about that? So you're going to go no, no, no, you you can elaborate if you wish, just current use. So Confucius institutes are basically the CCP's propaganda are essentially one of the ways they propaganda is and I worked in one of those back in the day and basically I was a secretary. I was really lucky to get that job. I got it. So basically, I did my first year in London, I went to China for eleven months, came back because that was part of the degree. Came back. As soon as I got back, I found that job and I was like and they basically all I did was I said at the desk, and one reason I got it is because I was spoke like some few languages so that they can and Chinese and in that the part. It's kind of part of the school, but it's a little bit independent. So they had their own funding and they had their own programs. So they the school itself taught these languages, Korean, so as school, my school of Oriental and African studies. So they taught all these languages in the school, but then people from outside the school could go to the center and they could learn these languages. I kind of private something. Yeah, anyway, so it's a bit separate. So I worked as a secretary. I'd sit for however long I had my had my ships and then and then second of a small room with a lot of media and I help people. You know, these are the show them around, explain how things work, and I eventually I was actually doing workshops through that. I thought how how to learn Chinese, workshop on Aun Chinese and and Asians, Asian languages in general, because it kind of related to characters and it's kind of that time. I said it all my brain nuts. It's fuzzy, but so that that was a great job and it was supposed to be part time...

...but it ended up being full time because I mean in terms of hours, time I spent there, because it was very flexible. I mean, if someone didn't come up, I'd always be opened. I was in London. I was kind of not doing much. So I have friends, but you know, I if I can stay in one place. I had a computer most of time. I just alone. I could study, I could do whatever I want. I had the Internet. So that's all I did. I sit down, studied and then and at the time I'm making money and once in a while they've called me. I really want to do some workshops. You want to once I will went into this middle school. They asked me to go to a middle school to talk about Chinese. Chinese was becoming more popular as a second language. Explain to them where your heart, your journey, how you learned, et ceterator. Own so all these things popped up because I started this job and that was those so I would have to say that was my best job I've had, besides teaching. I know you're I know you're here in Korea, or you're in Korea. What brought you here and what are you doing now, because you'd mentioned what you've been doing while you're here. But what brought you here and what are you doing now? So yeah, so it's a very long story and it's not relevant to the conversation, but basically I wanted to come to Asia and initially I thought I'd go to China, but I had a feeling and my feeling was right, as it turns out. So yeah, so I decided I had if I had three, I have three choices, China, Japan, Korea. China I have a bathroom, and Japan I was I knew was expensive. So but then life one thing, I took another and again stop relevant to the story. So just I just ended up coming here, very random, especially too and after two weeks here, my plan was come to Korea for two months, since sea how to go out went and I had I literally had. So I yes, Oh, okay, I'll okay, let's talk about that. So, yeah, so you asking me why I came here and how do you know what you're will, not so much how it's being, but what are you doing now? Yeah, so, yes, but before I came to Korea, so I graduated, I went to Portugal for a while because I have a lot of a lot, yeah, I mean, yeah, so I got family all over, I mean in many countries, so it's easier. But so I went there for a while because I have to get out of London. At that time it was not a good time, like and you know, you you're in one place for a long time, and that was like, you know, you're studying a lot, you kind of you just want to change every change, the change everything. So I went Portugal, try to find a job there and then never good fortual find job, since fun last, even for the natives, just is and just so you have an idea, I saw I did. I had a few jobs. I thought bit of English, like they do here, after school stuff. I did I made pizzas. I sold door to door for two companies. One was encyclopedias and the other one was the products. It's kind of those are like the to stereotypical products to sell to our day, like that and vacuum cleaners, I think. And Yeah, so it was great, great experience and I did it all like I tried to go find not real jobs, you know, go to the bank. So I just banks, commercial companies, the Chamber of Commerce, because I speak Portuguese, I can speak to speak Chinese, at that time English, and I thought, okay, I don't have other and I have other stool, I guess, but that didn't maybe didn't have the banking steals or math skills, okay, but I mean, you know, so I tried. I did try. That didn't work out. And this was in two thousand and eight,...

...right before the crash, or during the missions, two thousand and seven thousand eight, Ay, so around that time a period. And so I tried this after trying the normal roots and just I get us. And then the pay at that time was like I looked at the pay scale, I was like thousand dollar, thousand euros. I can minimum wage in Portcus five hundred years. HMM. Okay, now five hundred, which is I don't know, this doesn't make sense. So so, yeah, so it was okay and it wasn't. It wasn't that great. And I knew, after living in China, that you can make money teaching English. Okay, so I knew that. I'm I and I kind of guessed Japan would be better, higher standard of living and career be in between. I did those carry was, although I had a lot of current friends. I don't know exactly, but anyway. So, yes, I had these jobs and the last job I got, I had, I made about so I'm that money allowed me to so was. That was so my mother paid for the ticket to come to Korea and I that was the money I had to spend. Right, it was about man, it was about two thousand or two million one, okay, and my plan was too. I hope it would last me two weeks, so a two months. Yes, I just I just come to Korea, travel around a bit and then, yeah, anyway, so I did it for two weeks. You know, that wasn't so. I did a bit of touristy stuff and then after a while I was after I've got to find. Got To find a job. It's and I went to the hug one first when I've met. I saw and I had but then I didn't really think it through because, as you know, you can just go to hug one as a tourist and say, Hey, hire me. Right, you got it. A process. My cren record shake better. And so, yeah, I it took me a while to get a job, proper job, but eventually it worked out and then I came to stable did my first job here. Yeah, so that's how I came to Korea. And so what was the second part of the question? In what are you doing now specifically? Yeah, so, yeah, so, I mean, and then since then I've been teaching. I did all kinds of jobs. I can go into that if you want. I have got a bit of experience now on teaching from home. I have my own business. I work for myself. I'm still trading time for money. Yes, that's so. Yeah, that's that's what I'm familiar that you're doing. You're working from home. So what are the challenges that you have or some of the stresses, the difficulties now, I mean even looking back and bringing them to present day with your job, but not specifically about your job, but what are some hardships that you go through with with your work? I mean, I'm satisfied, to be honest. It's life. Is Hard. Again, I I'm I'm being following the principles, Kobe's principles, and I'm satisfied. I mean, yeah, there are days I feel tired, I feel like you know, I want to have I want to have more free time do other things, but I I'm satisfied. I mean, I know a little bit like you. You, I mean even from your story and knowing a little bit you, I don't know if I know anyone who works. I mean you work a lot. So, like, how many hours are you putting in? Just? Yeah, so even just B three days is a job. These days, not as many as I have. I I I was doing like so when I started the job, this this business, I was doing up to ten hours a day, and not every day, but I'd...

...say between fifty and six hours a week. And I think that I give to give people context that people oh, so what, that's not a lot. I do ten hours, but we're talking teaching hours right. This is ten hours of teaching, not all of the other stuff that goes with teaching parents and homework and preparation, and that was that's Sundays. But still to this day, my Sundays I'm after eight. I got to work, I got to do a report, cards, I got to prepare once in a while, I have to photocopy stuff, I have to think about, I have to decide the books I got to use. I'm got to change a curriculum once in a while. So being hard wars five. Yeah. So being satisfied, the difficulty. How do you deal with just you're satisfied. Those a wonderful thing. So how do you deal with the difficulties, the stresses or the being tired in those things? What? What is the way? You know that? I think the secret is knowing where I'm going. Oh, where? I think I'm pretty having that goal, as you may have a goal getting yeah and yeah, so I'm on the right path. What is your goal, as much as you want to say what is what is your highlight? What is I mean, as you were saying that about having a goal, I was thinking, and I've heard this kind of before, but you're saying is if you want to count climb Mount Everest, you need all the preparation that goes into it beforehand. You need to know what the stuff you need. They even do. I think I saw a documentary once where they go up some elevation and come back down. They go up a little bit just to prepare their bodies to get to where it is they want to be, and that seems like what you're you're promoting here is you have a goal for everyone to have a goal, to do what it is that they want to do, to achieve and find out all along the way what is needed and practice those things and having that goal. So what what is your goal? Okay, two things. One is my character. I like to work and there's no doubt about the idea, but the idea of not working is I live, is scary to me and because I don't, I I feel like I've have to be productive some I needed when I work a lot. I still at the back of my mind, and and I've been thinking about is why do I keep thinking negative things, like you think you're not working enough. Sometimes while you're working, its twelve, fourteen hours, they you're thinking, I gotta put some more hours in. It's all about perspective, it's all about you know. Yeah, so, yeah, I mean I guess that's one thing I can highlight, like putting things in perspective, like you will work as much as okay, I'll how about other position, tours? People will work as much as they think they need to work. HMM, that doesn't make it. It doesn't matter how much you work if you think it's like the people who have like eating disorders. Right, yes, they will not eat because they still see themselves as over overweight, even though no, they're normal, they're no more or they're under waits. And I thought you were going to take it another way and say they only eat as much as they think they need. Fair enough. Okay, that was right. It was better which both were both there. They both work, but they they set their limit and apparently their limits not enough. Yeah, so it's all perspective. Number One. Number two. So my goal, if I tick that out of the picture, would be to become more effective at creating income, basically, and that means either working less but...

...making the same income, or keeping the same changing the type of work to a kind of higher the like. HMM. So instead of working like the grunt work, which is pitching and doing other things which are make more money, and they like a managing or I don't know. I don't know what that is yet. I'm trying to figure that out. But so that would be a goal if I took my character out of the picture. So, yeah, figure out other ways to make money. That so say as much, so more. Maybe someone else would have the same question. By taking your character out of the picture, what do you mean by that? I hope, I think. I hope character is the right word. So the it's who I am. So I need to work. I feel that I have to work, or I feel like just what's the point, like, what am I doing? It's I feel like I'm okay, good metaphor. It's like quicksand. I'm on quicksand if I don't work, if I don't take the sand out, I guess that's not perfect metaph I heard something about pops and today is like the harder you try, the harder you sink. So yeah, so I guess in a way it's like that. That's how I kind of like how I feel. I don't know why. I really don't know why. and Are you I'll tell you what character. You mean your personality. You need to person every personality personal. So you saying that you need to stop doing that or you need to get that character out of your work ethics so that you can work less or and make more. Is your character in the way in this situation? Yes, I then need to work. is in the way a little bit. I guess it's like when you have like miners or people like for example. So it's like a miner who goes, who becomes the manager, right, he's been used on the minor like someone who's been used to doing my go go, Googlou for small, small kinds of jobs, but then suddenly they become a manager for whatever reason, and then they're like, I'm as still want to fix cars, I still want but it's not effective because if you're a manager, you can tell people what to do and you you know how to do it better, so you will be the come to, will be a lot more productive. So that's what I right. So I kind of I guess my mindset. Okay, mindset is the wrong I had the wrong mindset. I guess that that's the word I'm looking for. My Mindset.

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